The Fats and oils situation

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Fats and oils situation
Physical Description:
301 v. : ill. ; 26-28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economic Research Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics and Statistics Service
United States -- World Food and Agricultural Outlook and Situation Board
Publisher:
The Bureau
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publication Date:
Frequency:
frequency varies

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Oil industries -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Oils and fats, Edible -- Economic aspects -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
FOS-1 (Mar. 1937) - FOS-301 (Oct. 1980).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: Agricultural Marketing Service, 1954-Mar. 1961; Economic Research Service, May 1961-<Oct. 1977>; Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service, <May 1978>-July 1980; Economics and Statistics Service, Oct. 1980.
General Note:
"Approved by the World Food and Agricultural Outlook and Situation Board," Oct. 1977-Oct. 1980.
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Item 21-D.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000502965
oclc - 01588232
notis - ACS2699
lccn - 46039840 //r82
issn - 0014-8865
sobekcm - AA00005305_00016
Classification:
lcc - HD9490.U5 A33
ddc - 380.1/41385/0973
System ID:
AA00005305:00016

Related Items

Succeeded by:
Fats and oils outlook & situation

Full Text




UNITED STATES DEPARTMITT OF AGRICULTURE
Bureau of Agricultural Economics
Washington

FOS-8 October 14, 1937


.THE FATS AND OTLS SITUATION
-----------------------------------------------


CONSUMPTION OF OILS BY THE DRYING INIDU4TRLESD E~
THE UNITED STATES, 1931 TO DA


THE GENERAL FATS AND OILS SITUATION U-----------
S\ "US DEPOSITORY

Total production of domestic edible vegetable oils during the 1937-

S56 season will be materially larger than last year. The indicated supply

of cottonseed oil for the season 1937-38 is about .one-third larger than

in 1936-37, the largest since 1931-32 and 16 percent larger than the 5-year

average 1928-39 to 1932-33. Stocks on hand at the beginning of the season

1937-38 were larger than a year earlier and larger than the 5-year average.

Soybean oil production will probably be from 15 to 20 percent

larger than the production from the 1936 crop of soybeans, and there may

be a slight increase in the total production of peanut, corn, and other

minor vegetable oils.

The production of lard and other edible animal fats (tallow, oleo

oil, and stearine) will probably be lower in 1937-38 than in the preceding

year. It is believed, however, that the increased production of vegetable

oils will more than balance the reduction in animal oils.
I







FOS-8 2 -

FLAXSBED SITUATION

World supplies of seed on hand now are moderate, and the prospect is

for only a moderate supply next year, but the stock of linseed oil on hand

in the United States is relatively high. Competition of other drying oils

with linseed oil increased up to 193C, but has shoAw a reversed trend during

the past 6 months. The present business recession may weaken the demand

for all drying oils in the next few months.

World supply on August 1, 1937

On the basis of present information concerning stocks of seed in the

four principal producing countries anid estimates of the 1957 crop in the

United States and Canada, it appears that the supply in tiese countries on

August 1 was possibly 6 percent smaller than the small supply a year earlier.

A September 9 report from the Agricultural Attache in Argentina, reports an

exportable surplus on August 1 of 17,613,000 bushels or 23 percent less than

on the same date a year ago. Apparently; the short United States crop of

1936 and the improvement in building activity in consun-ing countries in the

spring of 1937' compared with recent years were the principal factors causing

Argentina to dispose of an unusually large percentage of tlie 1936-37 crop

by August 1.

A 1937 flaxseed crop in the .Tnited States of 7,640,000 bushels is

indicated by September 1 condition. This compares with 5,908,000 bushels

*harvested in 1936 and with the 5-year average (1928-52) of 15,996,000 bush-

els. July 1 commercial stocks are estimated at 3,339,000 bushels, the largest

since 1929. The official first estimate of the 1937 Canadian crop is 741,000

bushels whichlis 59 percent less than the 1936 crop and 76 percent less than

the 1929-32 average. Supplies of Indian scvd available for export on August 1






FOS-8 3 -

are believed to have been about 30 percent larger than on the same date a

year earlier.

The only official information that bears on the size of the next Argen-

tine crop is the first official estimate of the acreage planted. This esti-

mate for 1937-38 is 6,301,000 acres, which is about 15 percent less than the

acreage of the crop now moving to market and less than the 1928-32 average.

World demand

The total volume of building activity in the four principal linseed oil
consuming countries averaged about 3 percent higher in the first 7 months of
1937 than in the same months of 1936.

The volume of building activity in the United States in the 9 months
January August 1937, has averaged 8 percent higher than during the same
months of 1936. On the other hand, building activity to date in 1937 has been
lower than in 1936 in all three of the principal European linseed oil con-
suming countries (Great Britain, Germany, and France).

Table 2.- Percentage consumption of fats and oils in the drying
industries in the United States, 1931-37


Year : Linsed:Tung oil:Perilla :Fish oil:Soyben : Other :Total
oil oil oil
:Percent Percent Percent Percent Percent Percent Percent
Average -
1931-33 73 17 3 4 3 1/ 100
1934-36 64 17 9 6 2 2 100

1931 : 77 15 2 4 2 1/ 100
192 : 75 16 2 4 3 i/ 100
1933 : 69 19 5 4 3 1/ 100
1934 : 69 20 4 4 2 1 100
1935 : 65 18 8 6 2 1 100
1936 : 61 15 13 7 2 1 100

1936- Jan.-June :(59) (16) (15) (5) (2) (3) (100)

1937- Jan.-June : (71) (17) (5) (5) (1) (1) (100)

The drying industries include paint and varnish, linoleum, oilcloth, and print-
ing ink. During the past 6 years paint and varnish has averaged about 86 per-
cent of the total.

l/ Less than 1 percent.





FOS-g


Table 1.- Estimated consomn'.ion of fats an- nils in the drying
industries in the United States, 1931-37


:Linse-d :Tung nil:rerill.. :So'bean : Other
Year il : : l oil I/ Fish il oil : ../ : Total

:Mil. lb. Mil. lb. Mil. lb. Mil. lb. Mil. lb. Mil. lb. Mil. lb.

Average -
1931-33 : 9r 89 16 23 12 4 544
1934-36 : 45n 123 63 e4 16 11 703

1931 : 471 9 11 27 9 3 611
1932 : 354 7h 11 2C 12 4 475
1933 : 376 In2 25 22 14 5 544
1934 : 4r 117 24 25 13 7 595
1335 : 465 129 c 43 1S S 723
1336 : 477 121 i n, ,2 17 1S 790

Jan.-Jane 31: (234) (2) (57) (21) (9) (12) (395)

1937

Jan. -June j/: (333) (78) () ( (24) (7) (4) (469)



The dryina industries include paint and varnish, linnlelum, oilrlnth, and
printing ink. During the past ; years paint and varnish h ave averaged
abnut S9 per-ent of the total.

1] Since dr;.ing rils are usel directly as well as in fa.-tor consumption,
these figures represent total domestic disappearance excluding
small quantities repn.rted by Bureau of the Census as used in soap,
shortening, and miscellaneous products.

2/ In-ludes factor' cr.nsumnptiin of caster and miscellanenus nils, in
193i-33. In lq34, 3,0OOn,QOn pounds each 2astor and sunflower
ilis, and l,i0rc ,000r pounds miscQllanecus rils. In 1935, 4,.OO,C00
pru'ndi castor oil, Z,'-"',O00A0 p-unds citicica oil, and 2,CCO,000
rounds miscellaneous oils. In 1935, 5,ikC,r" r pounds castor oil,
2,'j0, 1.r r pound: oitici-a nil, and 1l,PrCC, 'l', pounds miscellaneous
oils, probably largely hempseed.

3/ These data are rou'h rstimates based largely on the relation of con-
s'.uution in drying industries to tntal disappearance, 1931-36.


- 4 -


















cn
U)








OF




ZI-

0




w(6
W
Iw

mi-h


U)














Dz
O)




Z
O
U
u


III


V) z
O 0 0
-=D 0 0
- 0


I1j
to




LM
0
lk LLJ



LuL

C/)



Cl)



Lj
(0 i





C,,L'J

co-






LUv,
-1





80
- c*)


aid
o s
LU0

i- S

Lu







LLI

CLV
5 ^










LU
-a:
(0 i
>. U
ri



lu J

co^
P:
0









CO TSUlPTION? OF OILS BY THE DR'.IPC- I:!DUSTRIFS IN
T:-i. LU!ITI:D STATES, 1921 TO DATi

The industries generally referred to as "dr:ying industries" include paint
and varnish, linolear, oilcloth, and printing ink. DirinL the past 6 years
paint and varnish have represented an -..verage of about 86 percent of the total
utilization of oils in the drying industries.

Consumption of fats and oils by the drying industries in the United
States amicunted to 475 million pounds in the calendar year lC32 which is the
lowest total since 1918. Since the low point of 19'2 consumption has increased
steadily, reaching a total of "90 million pounds in 1936, and an estimated con-
sumption of 469 million pounds in ti.e first 3 mont.is ,f 1937.

During the 6 years l'3l7-36, linseed oil contributed a steadily declining
percentage to the total drying oils used in t!h United States, dropping from 7?
percent in 1931 to u1 percent in 1936. This percenta._e decline in the use of
linseed oil was balanced by an incrcns, d utilization of perilla and fish oils
with slight additions in minor oils such as :.erm;se;d, oiticica, and castor oils.
Perilla oil contributed 2 percent to the total in 1931 and i:Z percent in 1936,
while fish oil increased from 4 percent in 1.,21 to ? pcr.Lcnt in 1936. Other
oils increased about 2 p.rcen-t.

Rough estimates of utilization of oilc by t:h- dryin ir.dustries during
the first half of 1957 (con:p'ited on relationship of consarrtion in drying, in-
dustries to total dis'a-.pcr:--.,, 1i,..1-1), indic'jte 3 r.v-rse in the trends in
consum-tion of lins.--d and r.irill oils.

The estimated usc of linse:d oil. in the dryine industries January to
June 19l? was about 42 Lcrc-it l r 'r thinl t.iF. ostir.ated us? during the same
mocnths of '19- whi.l. *', us*- of p-ril i oil decr .F i -.Li bby lLrost 60 p'rc fnt.
Prices of linseed oil cdurinr, this pLriod avcr:ged 10.3 c'r.ts per pound compared
with an .vnra-. of 9.t cents during t:he cal:nd.ar :,y',ar 1936, mnd prices of perilla
oil averaged 11.6 crnt2 comrr.prEd ;with o.. cots pTr pound in 19 6.

Linseed oil -roruction in tne United States, from do;riestic and imported
sped, for the season 1936-7 was iar'ger tLanr for an:. ot:hur sr-ason since since
1929-30. Stocks of linseed oil June 3'0, 1i'7, mournted to 142.4 million pounds
compared with 140.7 million -r. pounds on t.e sarne dute in 1936. T.hese stocks com-
pare with an average enld-of'-the-~eason stc.Cks of 10.G.9 million pounds for the
crop seasons 1930-31 to 1'9i4-_35, and 141.2 million pounds average at the end
of the seasons 1i'25-26 to 1929-C10.

Linseed, perilla, andr soybean oils

During the 6 years i1931-..6) when the uercentage consuiTmotion of linseed
oil was steadily decliiilng alnd the ,ercentage consur:ption of perilla oil was in-
creasing rapidly th,; price of linseed oil wad trer.dirn upward, and the average
weihte-d price of p,:.rill a-id snybiean oils conbincd averaged lower during each
of the years under -orsider.tion than the. price of linsced- oil. During the first
half of 1937, when tihe utilization of perillu and lin.eed oils showed sharply
r-versed trends, perilla oil vas :hih:r in price than linseed oil because of the


FOS-8


- 6 -









excise tax of 4-1/2 cents per pound on perilla oil and 2 cents per pound on per-
illa seed, effective August 21, 1936. The full force of this tax was not im-
mediately reflected in the price because a large volume of perilla oil, 118
million pounds, was imported in 1936 prior to the imposition of the tax, and
stocks were accumulated to draw from after the import tax became effective.

Imports of perilla oil were completely stopped for the succeeding 6 months
but were resumed again during the second quarter of 1937. About 24 million pounds
have been imported during the first 7 months of 1937, compared withn99 million
pounds in the same months of 1936 and 49 million, 24 million, and 17 million
pounds in the sale respective months of 1955, 1934, and 1937. During the past 3
months, July to September, perilla oil prices have continued to rise, but soybean
oil prices have declined enough in the same .eriod so that the weighted combined
price is almost on a level with linseed oil prices.

The first official estimate for 1937 perilla seed production in Manchuria
is 273 million pounds compar-d ith 324 million pounds last year. Military
operations in the Far East may not directly affect exports of oil and oilseeds
from Manchuria, except as all exports may be retarded inasmuch as available trans-
portation facilities may be reduced and prices in foreign markets ma: increase
because of higher freight and insurance rates.

Since soybean oil is a seri-drying oil, its use in paints is feasible only
in connection with oils trat dr;i more rapidl.. Extremely hiah prices or short
supplies of tung oil and perilla oil may tend tc discourage the use of soybean
oil in the drying industries, except at lower prices.

Tung oil

During the 6 years 1951-3., tung. oil contributed an average of 17 percent
to the total drying oils used, the two low year- bein,. 15 percent in 1931 and the
same in 1936. Tne larrgst percer.tae consumption was 2 0 percent in 1954 following
heavy imports and low prices in 19-3. Lurinnc the 6 years under discussion the
price of tung oil averaged 7.4 cents in the yeFars 1921-34, and 16.5 cents in 1355
and 1936. The price of tung oil has jumped from 12.9 cents in July 1937 to a
nominal average quoted price of 21.2 cents in Stptirub.-r, because of the Sino-
Japanese situation. Supplies on h.nd. in this country, hor':v.Lvr, are fairly large
at the present time. Imports for the 11 months, Octcber 1936 through August 11 37,
totaled 158 million pounds compared w.ith 135 million pounds a year earlier. Of
this amount, 42 million pounds came in during July and August 1937. Stocks were
reported at 44 million pounds at thie end of Jun? 19.?, Since tun; oil can be
stored for a considLrable time without d,-tcrioration large. stocks can be sccumu-
latrd without fear of loss, but it is probable that supplies now on nand in the
United States are not large enough to meet average requirements for more than
6 to 9 months.

The Chinese tung oil areas are fo." the most part located in the Yangtze
River Basin, which is south of the areas involved in the present disturbance,
but exports of tung oil from China undoubtedly wi1l be affected by the military
operations as loig as hostilities continue. We have no reports on the size of
the new crop which is ripening now and should be crushed beginning in December
or January.


FOS-8


- 7 -




-8-


Fish oil

The 1934 excise tax of 3 cents per pound on fish oil applies only
to imported oil, and appears to discourage imports and encourage domestic
production. Production under the American flag is reported as about 267
million pounds in 1936 with small net exports, compared with production of
64 million pounds in 1931, and net imports of 15 million pounds in the
same year. The 1937 season is not yet far enough advanced to estimate
probable oil production, although reports to date have been somewhat dis-
couraging.

The volume of fish oils used for drying purposes in 1936 was more
than double the amount so used in 1932, and the percentage contributed to
the total use of drying oil jumped from 4 percent to 7 percent in the same
period (see table 2). With the technical advancement in methods of refining,
deodorizing, and otherwise processing fish oils, this trend is likely to
continue even in the face of rising prices for fish oils.

Price relationships

Present price relationships between linseed oil, tung oil, perilla
oil, soybean oil, and fish oils will tend to favor linseed oil as long as
the new price relationships are maintained.

Oiticica oil

For a brief discussion of oiticica oil a comparatively new oil -
see FOS-3, May 1937, p. 19. Imports in 1936 amounted to only about 3
million pounds, and about 2 million pounds have been imported during the
first half of 1937. Since 1935, when prices were first quoted, oiticica
oil has been consistently lower in price than tung oil. As there is no
excise tax on oiticica oil and it is free of duty, its increased use seems
probable.

Hempseed cil

The excise tax of 4-1/2 cents per pound, together with a duty of
1-1/2 cents per pound on hempseed oil, and a tax of 2 cents per pound on
hempceed, appears to be completely effective in barring imports as none
have been reported since August 1936. Stocks of hempseed oil, amounting
to more than 8 million pounds at the end of the first quarter of 1936,
were reduced to 120 thousand pounds by the end of June 1937. Imported
hempseed oil is therefore, for the present time at least, out of the
drying industry picture.

Paints

It seems evident that considerable shifts are and will be taking
place in paint materials* Many countries are making a great effort to
produce synthetic substitutes for linseed oil and to increase the produc-
tion of other drying oils. During the past 10 years the finishing of
automobiles has been revolutionized. The first automobiles were finished
with enamel paint, then Duco, a nitro-cellulose lacquer containing prac-
tically no oil, superseded the enamel paints. In recent years enamels
and lacquers made from synthetic resin have been used to a considerable
extent. In addition to being used on automobiles, these finishes are


FOS-8








used on refrigerators and outdoor metal equipment needing a durable coating.
So-called metallic paints are made with an aluminum paste or powder used
with synthetic resin or nitro-cellulose lacquers and enamels. The percent-
age of oil used in them is far smaller than is used in ordinary oil paints.

There has been a material increase in the volume of manufacture of
casein paints and other water paints in the past few years. These paints
use practically no oil. Up to the present time these finishes made without
oil constitute only a small percentage of the total paint and varnish
finishes, but it is believed that their use is making some inroads on the
consumption of oil finishes.

Table 3.-Price per.pound of specified drying oils, 1931-37

:Linseed.: Tung oil,:Perilla :Menhaden : Soybean :
: oil : drums, : oil :oil, crude,:oil, crude,: Qiticica
Year ; raw, : N. Y. : drums, : f.o.b. : f.o.b. : oil,
: Minn. : 1/ : N.-Y. : Balto. : mills : N.Y.
I Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents


Average-
1931-33
1934-36


1931
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936

J&n.-June

July
Aug.
Sept.


S 7.3
: 9.1


7.8
5.7
8.5
9.0
8.8
9.5

9.2

9.8
10.1
9.9


6.8
14.0


7.4
6.3
6.8
8.9
17.0-
16.1

17.1

18.9
16.5
14.4


6.9
8.7


8.1
4.9
7.8
9.0
8.2
8.8

7.5

9.7
9.8
9.9


2.1
3.6


2.7
1.9
1.8
2.6
4.0
4.3

4.6

3.7n
3.6n
3.6n


4.7
7.2


5.5
3.1
5.4
6.0
8.1
7.5

6.8

7.9
8.0
8.2


216.5
12.6

13.3

14.8
13.2
11.6


1937


Jan.-June

July
Aug.
.Sept, .


: 10.3

10.5
:10.6
:10.4


14.6

12.9
14.3n
21.2n


11.6

11.6
12.1
13.6


5.5

5.3n
5.3n
4. 9n


9.4

7.6
6.5
6.2


11.7

11.0
12.5
16.1


'I Beginning August


22, 1936, quoted as Atlantic Coast. 2/ Average for 8 months


Compiled from the Oil, Paint, and Drug Reporter, except soybean oil for
July to September 1937, which is from the National Provisioner.


POS-8


- 9 -






FOS-8 10-

Table 4.- Price per pound of selected fats and oils, July-September, 1936 and 1937


1936 :


Fat or oil


July


A: .
: Audp. .


Sept.. July


1937


. Au. .Sept.


Donest i pries-
Butter, 92c, II.Y.
Oleonmrgarine, nut, Chicago
Lard, prilm steam,, C14ica-go
Lard refined, Chicago
Lard corn.ounds, Chicago
Coconut oil, edible, Il. Y.
Cottonseed oil, crude, f.o.b.
S. .. mills
Cottonseed oil, p.C.y., N.Y.
Soybean oil, refinrd, :". .
Peanut oil, dom. r'finea, i.Y.
Rape oil, refine, d, 7'. .
Oleo oil, lieo. 1, II..
Oleostrarine, barrels, !'.Y.

Corn oil, refined, Y.
Olive oil, edible, ii.".
S'Lnflrvwer oil, refined, iN.Y.
Tcssr-ed oil, crude, N.Y.

Coconut oil, crude, Fac. Coast
Tallow, inedible, Chirnt o
.,reFase nooe i.Y.
FaLm oil., .rude, ..
Olive oil foots, hirrel-, ;.Y.
Palnm-i-rnel oil, den:rtured, ,.Y.
Babassu oil, tanks, [;.Y. 1.
Sardine oil, tanks, Pac. Coast

Linseed oil, raw-, I.iinn.
Tunf- oil, drums, Atientic Coast
Ferilla oil, drums, I.Y.
Soybean oil, .*rude, f.o.b. mills
M.enihaden oil, crude, f.o.b. Balto
Hi- ,pseed oil, .-rude, N.Y.

Foreign prices- 2/
CottnnL oil, crude, nosed, Full
Cr,,ra, Resec'- 'd F hilir ine s
FP-im-kernel nil, ?r',de, Hull
Whale oil, .rude, ITn.l,Rotterdam.
Tallow, beef, fair-fin London
Lir.s'eed nil, naked, Hull


:Cent s

33.6
11.2
11.0
: 12.1
12.0
6.2

8.7
9.8
S10C.O
: 12.5
: .5
9.4
: 9.0

11.8
: 22.?
9.9
: 3.4

: 4.3
: ;.6
: 5.'7
4.4
: .2
4.2n
: .1
4. On

9.8
n1?.9
: 9
: 7.9

: .. Cn
: 9.6



: 6.0
: .0
4.9
4. 2

6.1


Cents Certs :Cents

35.6 35.0 : 31.6
11.9 12.5 : 1 .5
12.1 11.7 12.2n
12.8 12.5 13.6
12.7 12. : 11.2
6.9 7.9 : 7.6

99.9 .. : On
10.1 10.? : .2
10.2 10.2 : 11.3
12. n 12.bn: 12.2n
P.C 8.9 12.8
10.2 11.1i 1:3.0
10.2 10. : 9.7

12.6 12.3 : 10.9
25.7 29.nn: 32.0n
10.6 11.ln: -
12.5 17..4 : 9.4

4.6 5.5 5.1
6.0 6.7 : 3.2
5.4 6.1 : .0
4.7 .0 : 5.7
9.0G .3 11.2n
4.8n 5.On: 5.5
7.5 *.. : 9.4
4.2n 4.4n: 5.9n

10.1 9.9 10.5
16.5 14.4 12.9
9. 9.9 11.6
8.0 8.2 : 7.6
3.6n 3.Gn: 5. 3n
9.5 9.6 -


6.7 6.5 : 6.2
2.3 2.3 : 2.5
5.2 5.6 : 5.7
4.3 4.2 : 4.
5.4 5.4 5.8
6.0 5. : 6.8


COnts Cents


32.8
12.2
11.3n
13.0
12.2
7.1

7.On
8.0
10.4
11. 8n
12.9
12.9
9.6

10.9
32. 0n

9.4

4.5
7.5
7.6
5.3
11. ln
5.3
8.2
5.3

10.6
14.3n
12.1
6.5
5.3n



6.0
3/2.6
5.5
4.6
5.7
6.8


35.0
11.8
11.0
13.0
11.0
6.6

6.2n

10.0
11.On
12.7
13.0
8.9

10.3
32.On

9.4

4.2r
6.6
6.8
4.8
10.8r
4.8r
7.6
4.8r

10.4
21.2r
13.6r
6.2
4.9r



5.2

5.1
4.3
5.5
6.6.


1. b-ir.nning rebruar:, 1327, j prices are futures. 2
pound at current mront1,ly rates of exchange. Price
liminary. 3/ Preliminary, av-rage for 3 weeks.
For average price, January to June, see FOS-6.


Converted to U.3.cents per
s for September 1937 are pre-


-


O






- 11 -


Table 5.- Oleomargarine: Production and materials used in manufacture,
Unit-d States, July and August, 1936 an.. 1937

: 19i6 1/ 1937 1/
Item : :
July Aug. July Aug.

: 1.0o lb. 1.000 ib. : 1,000 lb. 1,C00 lb.


Oleo oil
Oleostearine
Lard, neutral
Oleo stock
Total animal


i,601 1,583 : Zr 754
254 297 : 286 292
137 152 : 97 112
120 144 : 96 86
2,112 2.176 :L,3j __ 1_2j4


Cottonseed oil
Soybean oil
Peanut oil
Corn oil
Total domestic vegetable

Coconut oil
Babassu nil
Palm-kernel nil
Palm oil
Sename oil
Total foreign vegetable


Total fats and rils


: 7,612
S1,278
: 324
: 2035
: ,417


1,289
S 269
-125
: 4
11.241


7,68&
767
322
179
,_iZL
-t_-sSZJL


: 9,21 10,027
: 1,977 2,742
: 171 137
: l34 23b
: 11,563 13,142


11,749 : 6,568 7,714
1,985 1,123 523
275 : 971 9
62 : 97 13

1,7 : 8_7 __ 9.2 6


25,127 :21,631


23,612


Milk 5,258
Salt and other miscellaneous 1,530


Production of oleomargarine 27,695


5, 87 4,743 5,254
1,614 : 1,259 1,325


3n,351 : 26,2]


.5 28,679


_J Froliminprr.

Compiled and computed from reports of the Cnamissioner of Internal Revenue.


For average, January to June, see FOS-6.


FOS-8




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


3 1262 08904 2600