The Fats and oils situation

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Material Information

Title:
The Fats and oils situation
Physical Description:
301 v. : ill. ; 26-28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economic Research Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics and Statistics Service
United States -- World Food and Agricultural Outlook and Situation Board
Publisher:
The Bureau
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publication Date:
Frequency:
frequency varies

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Oil industries -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Oils and fats, Edible -- Economic aspects -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
FOS-1 (Mar. 1937) - FOS-301 (Oct. 1980).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: Agricultural Marketing Service, 1954-Mar. 1961; Economic Research Service, May 1961-<Oct. 1977>; Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service, <May 1978>-July 1980; Economics and Statistics Service, Oct. 1980.
General Note:
"Approved by the World Food and Agricultural Outlook and Situation Board," Oct. 1977-Oct. 1980.
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Item 21-D.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000502965
oclc - 01588232
notis - ACS2699
lccn - 46039840 //r82
issn - 0014-8865
sobekcm - AA00005305_00014
Classification:
lcc - HD9490.U5 A33
ddc - 380.1/41385/0973
System ID:
AA00005305:00014

Related Items

Succeeded by:
Fats and oils outlook & situation

Full Text
w *


..ureau of Aricuiltural Economics
SWashington









"a In this issuei-
S Coconut oil .:'nd Philippine Independence, .9 *..
S.orld exports of.oconut oil .... .1909-3.
S.''.. T T E-F AT S AND O I L S SITUATION




..I.. t "this isaue -

8, : coconut oil-ond Philippine Independence, .9 {
^"*^ I l Jorld exports of .coconut oil, 1909-38. i
^, *i'


mber 154 1939'


Summary

Prices of most food fats advanced sharply in'early September after

declining in August to the lowest levels in 5 years. The Bureau of Agri-

aultural Economics says the recent advance apparently reflected specula-

tive anticipation of future increases in demand as a result of the out-

break of the European war, .increased -ar-risk insurance on ocean shipments

of fats, oils, and oileeods.and generally improved business conditions.

Domestic demand for fats and oils is expected by the Bureau to

be strengthened somewhat during the next few months, since present con-

diLtions-favor increased industrial activity and improvement in consumer

purchasing power.

Production of fats and ois from domestic materials for the

current calendar year is expected to be the largest on record. Stocks

were unusually large at.tbq beginning of the year. Import requirements

- mostly for soap and drying oils are considerably less than average.

During the war of 1914-1l, the domestic production and exports of

animal fats remained relatively stable, but production of cottonseed and

,flaseed declined. Imports of copra and coconut oil,' soybean oil, peanut


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Table 1.- Price per pound of spg9ified fats and oils, and oil-bearing materials,
August 1937 and 1938, and June-August 1939

Item August a 1939
S1937 s 1938 : June i July I Ang.
i Gents Cents Cents Oenta. Oents
Fats and oils- .
Butter, 92 score, Chicago .................... 32.0 25.5 23.6 23.2 23.5
Oleomargarine, don. veg., Chicago ............1 15.0 16.4 14.5 14.5 14.5
Lard, priue stean, Chicago ................... 11.3 8.1 6.1 5.7 5.6
Lard, refi-ed, Chicago .......................s 13.0 9.0 7.1 6.6 6.4
Lard compound, Chicago ....................... t 12.2 10.6 9.0 8.8 8.8
I
Corn oil, crude, tanks, f.o.b. mills ......... 7.8 7.9 5.6 5.3 5.1
Corn oil, refined, bbls., N. Y. ............... 10.9 10.4 8.8 8.6 7.8
Cottonseed oil, crude, tanks, f.o.b, S.E.mills: 7.0 6.9 5.5 5.0 4.5
Cottonseed oil, p.s.y., N. Y. ................ 8.0 8.1 6.5 6.1 5.5
Oleo oil, extra, Chicago ..................... 12.4 9.4 7.4 7.2 6.9
Oleostearine, bbls., N. Y. .....................: 9.6 8.2 5.9 5.7 5.6
Peanut oil, crude, tanks, f.o.b, mills .......s 7.9 7.7 5.7 5.6 5.1
Peanut oil, don. refined, bbls., N. Y. ....... 11.8 10.6 8.9 8.9 8.6
Soybean oil,crude,tank cars,midwestern mills .t -- 5.7 4.9 4.3. 4.2
Soybean oil, refined, N. Y. ................... 10.4 8.4 7.5 7.2 6.7

Babassu oil, N. Y. ...........................: -- 6.4 6.2 6.0 5.8
Coconut oil,crude,tanks,f.o.b.Pacific Coast 1/s 7.5 6.0 6.0 5.7 5.6
Coconut oil, edible, N. Y. 1/ ................: 10.1 8.2 7.6 7.6 7.6
Olive oil, edible, bbls., N. Y. ................ 32.0 25.1 25.1 25.1 -25.1
Palm-kernel oil,denatured,bbls., N. Y. 1/ ....: 8.3 6.8 6.6 6.5 6.4
Palm oil, crude, casks, N. Y. i/ ............. 8 S.3 6.7 6.8 6.7 6.6
Rape oil, refined, bbls., N. Y. 2/ ............ 17.4 14.8 15.3 15.3 15.4
Sesame oil, refined, drums, N. Y. 3/ ......... 1 11.5 10.5 9.2 9.2 9.2
Teaseed oil, crude, N. Y. .................... 9.4 8.0 9.4 9.5 10.3

Tallow, inedible, Chicago ...................: 7.5 5.1 4.7 4.4 4.0
Grease, A white, Chicago ....................... S.2 5.3 4.8 4.5 4.1
Menhaden oil,crude,tanks,f.o.b. Baltimore ....s 5.3 4,0 3.7 3.5 3.2
Sardine oil,crude,tanks, Pacific Coast ....... 5.3 4.0 4.3 3.6 3.1
Wnale oil,refined,bleached winter,bbls.,N. Y..I 10.3 8.6 8.2 8.0 7.6
Olive oil foots, prime, casks, N. Y. .........; 11.1 7.7 .7.1 6.9 6.8

Linseed oil,raw,tank carlots, Minneapolis ....: 10.6 7.9 8.7 8.4 8.1
Linseed oil,raw,carlots,bbls., N. Y. ......... 11.1 3.4 9.3 9.1 8.7
0-:ticica oil, N. Y ..........................s 12.5 11.2 13.3 15.0 17.4
Prrilla oil, druLs, N. Y. 2 ................ 16.6 15.2 15.0 15.6 16.8
Tung.oil, druus, N. Y. ....................... 14.3 14.0 20.6 21.9 22.0
I
Castor oil, No. 3, bbls., N. Y. ..............t 10.2 9.2 8.2 8.2 8.2
Cod oil,Newfoundland tanked, bbls., N. Y. ....: 6.9 5.1 4/4.3 V/4.3 4/4.4
Oil-bearirn naterials-
Copra, bags, f.o.b. Pacific Coast ............ 2.8 1.9 1.9 1.7 1.6
Cottonseed, U.S.farm price (dol. per ton) ....' 26.6 21.4 22.7 20.7 16.2
Cottonseed, Dallas (dol. per ton) ............ -- 22.9 22.7 18,2 15.7
Flaxseed, No. 1 Minneapolis (per bu.) ........ i196.9 173.1 181.1 157.4 153.5
Soybeans, No. 2 Yellow.Chicago (per bu.) ..... 107.0 90.0 93.0 90.0 --
1/ Includes excise tax of 3 ce:ts beginrm-in; May 10, 1934. 2/ Includes excise tax
of 4.5 cents beginning August 21, 1936. 3/ Includes excise tax of 3 cents, May 10,
1934-August 21, 1936. 4/ Quoted as "untanked."


FOS-31


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0rS-31


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oil, and flsaesed were increased. Prices of fats and oils were now ef-

fected much by the war until 1917, when prices of practically all con-

modities, including fats and oils, increased sharply.

In recent amendments to the Act to provide for Philippine inde-

pendence, duty-free quotas are established for imports of coconut oil

into the United States from the Philippine Islands for the period January

1, .1940 to July 3, 1946. After the latter date, all imports of coconut

oil from the Philippines will be subject to regular duty payments in this

country. The duty-free status of Philippine copra has not been changed.


REVIEW OF RECENT DEVELOPMENTS

Prices decline further in August, but advance sharply in early Septenber

Prices of most food fats declined in August to the lowest level in
5 years, reflecting the large supplies of edible fats and oils available
in this country and abroad. In early September, however, prices advanced
sharply, reflecting speculative anticipation of future increases in de-
mand as a result of the war, increased war-risk insurance for imported
fats, oils, and oilseeds, and generally improved business conditions.

Despite the rather general declines during August, prices of a few
fats and oils advanced. Butter at Chicago was up about 30 cents per 100
pounds, seasonally. Crude teaseed oil at New York advanced about 50 cents,
chiefly because of the shortage in supplies resulting from Japanese mili-
tary operations in China.

Imported drying oils also advanced in August. Oiticica oil, a
substitute for Chinese tung oil, advanced $2.40 per 100 poun's at New York,
while perilla oil rose by half that amount. Linseed oil declined, although
remaining somewhat higher than in August 1938. Linseed oil is not con-
sidered a good substitute for many of the special-purpose uses of tung
oil; present and potential supplies of linseed oil in the United States,
Argentina, and India, moreover, are relatively large.

Price movements, 1914-18

Considerable interest centers on the movement of prices of fats and
oils during the World War of 1914-18. The combined prices of the S princi-
pal domestic fats and oils during that period, including butter, lard,







tallow, grease, oleo oil, cottonseed oil, and linseed oil, remained cani
paratively stable during 1914 and 1915. A moderate advance in prices took
place in 1916. No sharp advance in prices of domestic fats and oils oc-
curred, however, until 1917, when with the large purchases of supplies of
all kinds in this country by the United Kingdom, chiefly on long-term
credits, and the entrance of the United States into the war, prices of
practically all commodities advanced sharply. Prices of domestic fats
and oils reached a peak in 1919 about 140 percent higher than the 1910-
14 average but this was followed by a sharp collapse in 1920 and 1921.

Domestic vegetable oil production reduced during World War, imports increaed

Production of animal fats in this country, except for a slight up-
ward trend, remained fairly stable throughout the World War of 1914-18.
The production of vegetable oils from domestic materials, however, declined
considerably from 1914 to 1920, with reduced output of both cottonseed and
flaxseed. Cotton and cottonseed production was reduced because of the dif-
ficulties in exporting cotton, low prices during the first two years of the
war, relatively high costs of production during the remainder of the war,
and low yields throughout resulting from bool weavil infestation. Flax-
seed production was reduced largely because of the unusually strong demand
for wheat, and, in 1917, because of low yields. The demand for wheat dur-
ing the var of 1914-18 increased relatively more than the demand for flax-
seed, with the result that much land previously planted to flaxseed in the
North Central States was planted to wheat,

To make up the deficiencies in the domestic production of oilseeds,
as well as to provide for the growing demand for fats and oils for food and
soap with increasing human population, imports of coconut oil and copra,
soybean oil (in those years not domestically produced), and peanut oil
were increased sharply from 1914 to 1918. Imports of flaxseed, chiefly
for the paint, varnish, and linoleum industries, also were increased.

Exports of animal fats decreased somewhat during the war years.
Although net exports and shipments of butter increased slightly after 1914,
exports and shipments of lard were considerably smaller from 1915 through
1917 than in the years 1912-14. Lard exports increased fairly sharply,
however, after 1917. Tallow, which previously had been on an export basis,
was imported on balance in 1917 and 1918, apparently as a result of the
increased demand for soap and glycerin in those years.

Supplies of domestically-produced fats largest on record

Production of fats ind oils from domestic materials for the cal-
endar year 1939 is expected to total nearly 8,500 million pounds compared
with a domestic production of 8,000 million pounds in 1938, and a 5-year
(1925-29) average production of 7,753 million pounds. Production from


- 4 -


FOS-31







PCS-31


-5-


domestic materials in the years 1912 and 1914 averaged 6,086 million
pounds annually, while in the period 1916-19 production averaged 6,133
million pounds annually.

Most of the increase in domestic production in 1939 compared with
1938 will be in the production of lard, soybean oil, linseed oil, and
tallow. Production of cottonsbtd oil is axpectr.d to bu somewhat smaller
than in 1938.

In addition to increased production, stocks of fats and oils, and
of oilsit.ds in tc.rms of oil, on January 1, 1939, wt.re the largest on
record, totaling 2,565 million pounds. Stocks on July 1 also wbre unusu-
ally large.

Although animal fats, principally lard, usually are r-xporttd by the
United Stat-s, ct.rtain vegttablu oils and oilse.crds are imported. The most
important items imported include copra and coconut oil, and palm oil for
food and soap and flaxseed and tung oil for the drying oils industries.
Oliv. oil also is an important import item. Exports, including shipments
to non-contiguous territories of th,. United States, of animal fats and
oils, and soybeans and soybean oil, in 1938 totaltad about 275 million
pounds. But imports of othtr vegetable oils and oilseeds, in tEirms of oil,
totaled 1,800 million pounds, so that the ne't import balance. in 1938
amounted to about 1,525 million pounds of oil or oil E;quivalbnt of oilseeds.
Net imports of fats, oils, and oilses.ds during the. first 6 months of 1939,
in tc;rns of oil, were. about 5 percent larger than in the. corresponding
period of 1938.

Because of the large supplies of fats and oils now available in
the United States, import requirrunts for the remainder of 1939 are con-
sidt.rably less than for the corresponding p,.riod of 1938. Inports during
the nE.xt sevt.ral months probably will be affected also by incrt.ased costs
of transportation resulting from high war-risk insurance rates and higher
ocean freight.rates. It does not suem likt.ly, how(;ve.r, that important
imports of fats and oil will be. seriously rt.duc,.d by war activities,
although supplies of whale oil in 1940 nay be. curtailed by reduced whaling
out.rations.






Table 2.- Stocks January 1, production from domestic materials, trade and apparent
disapptiarance of fats and oils in the United Status,
specified periods and yfars Ij

SAvcrage 1912 and 1914 2 .: Average 1916-19
:Produc- :Nt :App.doma :Produc- :Net :App.dom.
Item :tion from:imports : dis- : :tion :imports: dis-
:dom&stic :or not :aDptear-: Stocks:from dom.or net :appear-
:materials:;xports : ance : Jan. 1:materialdexports: ance
: .:(-) -: : '.1 -) 3/:
Mil.lb. Mil.lb. Mil.b.Mil.b. Mil.lb. Mil.lb. Mil.lb.


Butter..............., 1,638 3 1,635 : 47 1.638 24 1,612
Lard...........,..... : 1,567 -510 1.077 : 76 1.727 -548 1,179
OthLr domr.stic food
fats-
Corn oil...........: 82 20 62 : -- 109 5 104
Cottonseid oil.... : 1,613 -277 1.336 : 320 1,388 -137 1,232
Oleo oil.......,,..: 132 90 42 : -- 158 65 93
Oleostoarine stock.: 198 5 203 : -- 224 11 213
Peanut oil.........: 1 7 8 : 66 65 131
Soybean oil I/.....: 9 19 : -- 224 224
Tallow, ediblt......: 24 -- 24 : -- 33 -- 33
Total "other".... : 2,050 -356 1,694 : 320 1.978 71 2,030
Imported edible fats- :
Babassu oil 1/ ....: -- -- -- -
Coconut oil lj ....: -- 90 90 : -- 371 371
Olive oil, edible..: -- 47 47 -- / 43 43
Palm-ktrntl oil 1.: -- 24 24 : -- 4 4
Palm oil...........: -- 51 51 : -- -- 31 31
Rape oil...........: -- 11 11 ; -- 15 15
Sesame oil i/......: -- 1 1 : -- 2 2
Sunflower oil..... -- -- -- -- --
Teaset.d oil........: ---- -
Whale oil..........: 4 7 11 : -- 5 5 10
Total "imported".: 4 231 235 : -- 5 71 76
Total edible fats.....: 5,279 -638 4,641 : 443 5.348 30 5.297
Technical fats-
Castor oil I/ .....: -- 22 22 -- -- 25 25
Fish oils..........: 28 2 26 : -- 21 8 29
Fish-liver oils....: 5J 9 9 : -- 1 12 13
Gruas ..............: 188 -- 188 : -- 234 -- 234
Greast, wool.......: 5 13 18 : -- 7 3 1'
Heimpset.d oil 1/....: -- -- -- -- -- --
Linsoed oil 1i.....: 327 18 485 : -- 232 224 456
N:atsfoot oil...... 5 -- 5 : -- 8 -- 8
Oiticica oil....... -- -- -- -- --
Olive. oil, indible: 6 6 : -- 5 3 3
Olivi. oil foots....: 14 : -- -- 7 7
Perilla oil / .....: -- / / -- -- 2 2
Tallow, in,.diblt...: 254 13 241 -- 282 21 303
Tung oil...........: -- 36 36 : -- 48 4
Veg. tallow ........: ..-- : ---- -- -- --
Total............: 807 243 1.050 : -- 785 353 1,138
Total all fats........: 6,086 -395 5,691 : 443 6,133 323 6,435.
Continued-


- 6-


FOS-31


*







%.Table 2.- Stocks January 1, production from domestic materials, trade, and apparent
disappearance of fats and oils in the. United States,
specified periods and years / Continu,.d


Item


Average 1925-29 : 1937
:Produc-:Net :App. : :Produc-:Nlct :App.
:Stocks :tion :imports :dom. :Stocks :tion :imnorts:dom.
:Jan. 1 :from :or net :dis- :Jan. 1 :from :or net :dis-
:dom.ma-: exports: apptare. :dom. mt-: Uxports:appear-
: :turials:(-) 3/: ance : :t,.ri.l1s:(-) 3/:ance


:Mil.lb. Mil.lb. Mil.lb. M Mib.:Mil.lb. MLl.b.


Mil.lb.Mil. b.


Butter...............:
Lard.................:
Other domestic food
fats-
Corn oil..........:
Cottonset.d oil....:
Ol o0 oil.......... :
Olt.ostearinfe stock:
Peanut oil........:
Soybean oil l/....:
Tallow, edible....:
Total "othtr"...:
Imported edible fats-:
Babassu oil 1i....:
Coconut oil I/....
Olivu oil, edible.:
Palm-kt.rntl oil 1/:
Palm oil..........:
Rape oil..........:
Sesame oil iJ.....:
Sunflower oil.....:
Tease:rd oil.......:
Whale oil.........:
Total "imported":
Total t:dibl,: fats....:
Technical fats-
Castor oil ij.....:
Fish oils.........:
Fish-livt.r oils...:
Grtease............ :
Greasa, wool...... :
Hempos.t d oil V/...:
Linsefd oil 1/.... :
Ne-atsfoot oil.....:
Oiticica oil......:
Olive oil,intdiblt:
Olive oil foots...:
Perilla oil I/....
Tallow, in;.dibl... :
Tung oil..........:
Veg. tallow.......:
Total...........:


Total all fats


49 2,069 2
59 2,285 -767


21 120 1
495 1,625 50
12 135 79
6 79 14
3 13 4
5 5 15
4 48 --
546 2.025 -125


115
5
9
26
4



19
178
832


10
41
8
42
3

304
2

2
6

68
23
1
510


12




6.--
i--


11
12
6. 3ql


83
2
363
7

376
8

51


523


362


1,


7 7c;4


562
85
59
169
18
12


52
957
6h


55
27
31
- 72
11

385
- 1

9
42
5
4
95
7
598
661


2.0b4 :
1,514 :


117
1,532
57
65
17
17:
48 :
1,853 :


534 :
86 :
57:
163
17:
12


62
931:
6,362 : 1

52
101
33:
286 :
18

774 :
7

9
41:
5
519
93
7 :
1.945 :


61 2,132 5 2,155
146 1,441 -162 1.371


26 127 32 167
606 1,626 199 1,745
4 75 6 67
6 46 5/ 47
29 51 53 10o
94 194 5 162
9 78 10 88
774 2.197 293 2,384


2
89
4
13
94
14
12
51

36)
264
24r;


20
161
17
58
2

170
2

2
7
20
244
29

734


I--
--
2






69
71
q. 841


197
2
303
8

147
5

5'1


625


1.287


35
667
48
179
411
6
44
5/
27
55
1,472
1.608


62
- 1
67
- 3
5

517
- 1
4
5
22
44
3
175
8
907


33
516
52
150
350
15
51
5/
27
69
1,263
7.17V"


54
251
67
285
13
2
582
4
4
5
20
40
676
155
8
2.166


8.307 : 1 q79 7.128 2i 15 9.359


Continued-


I ..


. : 1 342


Y


---~-


ri


--- J --


S, ,


I


I


- i -_


, ,


: 1.142


IPOI'e 1iI- I


- 7 -




FOS-31 -
Table 2.- Stocks J:nuary 1, production from domt.stic materials, trade, atnd apparent
dis:.ippt.arflnct of fats and oils in the. Unite-d States,
spycifie.d pc-riods and years 1/ Continued
: 938 : 1939 -
: :Produc-:Net :App. :Produc-:Net :App.
: :tion :imports:dom. : :tion :imports:dom.
Item :Stocks :from :or net :dis- :Stocks :from :or net :dis-
:Jan. 1 :dom.ma-:exports:appear-Jan. 1 :dom.ma-:6xports:appear-
: :terials:(-) 3/: ance : t.eria]s (-) : ance


Butter................
Lard..................
Other domestic food fa
Corn oil...........
Cottonsft.d oil.....
Oleo oil...........
Olostcarino stock.
Peanut oil.........
Soybean oil Ij.....
Tallow, tdible.... .
Total "othi-r"....
Import.-d ediblu fats-
B'bassu oil li.....
Coconut oil 1/....,
Olive oil, edible..
P-lm-kernal oil l_.
Palm oil ..........
Rape oil ...........
S. o lt oil I ......
Sur'lower oil......
Tt-as,, d oil ........
Whale oil.........
Total importedd".
Total tdibl) fats.....
Technical fats-
Castor oil l/......
Fish oils,.........
Fish-liver oils....
Grease...... .......
Grease, wool.......
HT.mose.,d oil l/..,
Linscrd oil 1i.....
NT.atsfoot oil......
Oiticica oil.......:
Olive oil, inedible
Olive oil foots....:
Ptrilla oil l/....,
Tallow, int:dible...:
Tung oil...........
Vf.g. tallow........
Total............
totall all fats........


:Mil.lb. Mil.lb. Mil.lb. Mil.lbMil.lb. Milb. Mil.b. Mil.lb
: 43 2.27 7 2.20!: 12q 2.300


54


ts


18
686
6
5
25
131
9


1.754 -234 1,467: 107 2.100


137
1,678
88
49
78
323
93


22
78
- 5
- 3
16
- 21
5/


S49:
1,659:
83:
46:
91:
223:
94:


28
783
6
5
28
210
8


145
1,350
70
40
85
500
95


880 2,446 87 2.345: 1.068 2,285

: -- 32 31: 5
: 240 -- 680 658: 262 -
: 2 5 71 73: 5 10
: 42 -- 14 50: 6
155 -- 271 262: 164 --
5 -- 6 8: 3 -
: 5 -- 10 15: 5 --
: -- -- 5 5/ : --
S -- -- 12 12: -
: 91 58 22 89; 82 50
: 44 63 1,118 1,198: 527 60
S1,521 6,560 964 7.214: 1,831 6,745

28 47 49: 26
S 106 188 2 146: 146 200
: 19 2 62 52: 31 3
: 73 322 2 3352 58 360
: 2 5 2 6: 3 7
: 5/ 5/ :
252 157 283 506: 186 250
: 2 4 1 4: 1 5
..-- 5 5: -- -
: 2 5] 5 6: 1
S 9 -- 22 19: 12
24 -- 32 42: 14
196 762 1 764: 195 900
49 107 95: 61
-- 5/ 5/ : -- --
762 1,440 561 2,029: 734 1,725
2,2S3 8,000 1,5?5 9,243: 2,565 8.470


Computed from reports of the Burc.au of Agricultur:dl Economics, Bureau of the Census,
and Burtau of Fore ign and Domestic Comm, rce..
i Data on stocks ,nnd tr-di. include. oil c.quivalEnt of oil-b,,aring materials.
j/ Data on stocks not available. Exports include. shipm,.nts to non-contiguous
territories frr butt..r and lard. 4/ Partly estimated. 5/ Less than 0.5 million
pounds .


-- --L-- '~ --- '~--


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FOB-51


- 9-


COCONUT OIL AND PHILIPF'IiE INDEP'TDENCE, 1946


Duty-free quota established for imports of
coconut oil from the Philippines until 1946

Amendments to the Act of March 24, 1934, to provide for the complete
independence of the Philippine Islands, and other purposes, became effective
with President Roosevelt's signature on August 7, 1939. Salient features of
the Act as amended with respect to exports of copra and coconut oil from the
Philippines to the United States are as follows:

1. While export taxes are to be collected in the Philippines on most
articles shipped to the United States from January 1, 1941 through July 3,
1946, copra and coconut oil will not be subject to such taxes.

2. A duty-free quota is established for imports of Philippine coco-
nut oil into the United States amounting to 200,000 long tons (440 million
pounds) in 1940, and diminishing by 5 percent of that amount each year until
1946 when the quota from January 1 until July 3 will amount to one-half the
total quota for 1945. With complete independence for the Philippines begin-
ning July 4, 1946, all imports of coconut oil into the United States from
the Philippines will be subject to the tariff levied on imports from other
countries. This tariff is now 2 cents per pound. Imports from the Philip-
pines from January 1, 1940 to July 3, 1946 in excess of the annual quotas
will be subject to duty payments.

3. The duty-free quota for coconut oil is to be allocated by author-
ities of the Philippine Government among manufacturers whose products were
shipped to the United States in the calendar year 1937, on the basis of pro-
portionate maximum shipments in any calendar year during the period 1933-57.

4. The excise tax of 3 cents per pound on the first domestic pro-
cessing in the United States of coconut oil from Philippine sources will
continue to apply.

5. Proceeds of the excise tax, collected on and after January 1,
1959 and accrued prior to July 4, 1946, will be paid into the Treasury of
the Philippines to be used for the purpose of meeting new or additional ex-
penditures necessary in adjusting Philippine economy to a position independ-
ent of trade preferences in the United States.

6. The provision that no part of the proceeds of the excise tax col-
lections shall be paid directly or indirectly by the Philippine Government
as a subsidy to producers or processors of copra, coconut oil, or allied
products is retained, although a portion of such funds may be used "for fa-
cilities for better curing of copra, or for bona fide production loans to
Philippine copra producers".

At the present time, the excise tax rate on the first domestic pro-
cessing of coconut oil originating in countries other than the Philippines




FOS-31


- 10 -


is 5 cents per pound, while the duty on imports from such countries is 2
cents per pound. With an excise tax rate of only 3 cents per pound on Phil-
ippine coconut oil processed in this country and with no duty on imports of
such oil, Philippine exporters have a tax and duty preference so far as the
United States market is concerned, of 4 cents per pound over those in other
countries. This preference will be retained for all imports of coconut oil
into the United States within the annual quotas until July 4, 1946, when the
2-cent duty preference will be dropped.

From January 1, 1940 until July 3, 1946, the duty-free quotas for im-
ports of coconut oil from the Philippines will be as follows:

1940 200,000 long tons, or 440,000,000 pounds
1941 190,000 418,000,000 "
1942 180,000 396,000,000 "
1943 170,000 374,000,000 "
1944 160,000 352,000,000 "
1945 150,000 330,000,000 "
Jan. 1 -
July 3,
1946 75,000 165,000,000 "

Actual imports of coconut oil from the Philippines totaled about
364,000,000 pounds in 1938, considerably less than the duty-free quota set
for 1940, although somewhat more than the quotas for 1944 and 1945.

There is no duty on imports of copra from any country, although the
extraction of coconut oil from copra comes under the heading of first domes-
tic processing of coconut oil and hence is subject to excise taxes.


Imports of copra may be increased; coconut oil reduced

In 1921, a duty of 20 cents per gallon was levied on imports of coco-
nut oil from countries other then the Philippine Islands. In 1922, the duty
was changed to 2 cents per pound, the present rate. Since the duty on im-
ports from non-Philippine sources went into effect, only negligible quanti-
ties of coconut oil have been imported from countries other than the Philip-
pin(s. Imports of copra from non-Philippine sources, however, continued to
be fairly large until 1934. But with the imposition of excise taxes on the
first domestic processing of coconut oil in that year, which in effect gave
a 2-cent preference to Philippine copra, imports of copra from countries
other than the Philippines als- fell off sharply.

In 1933, about 81 percent of the coconut oil and oil equivalent of
copra imported by thr United States originated in the Philippine Islands.
This percentage was increased to 93 in the following year, and in 1938 ap-
proximately 98 percent of the coconut oil and copra imported came from the
Philippines.







Table 3,- Coconut oil and oil equivalent of copra: Imports into
the United States from the Philippine Islands and other
sources, 1929-38, and January-June 1939
in;1.1 ~ ~ ...... _" ....J l^om other : Total :Percentage
From Philippine Islandser tal :Percentge
Year : :sources: oil-: from :of total
and : Coconut :Oil equiv-: Total :equivalent of : all :from P.I.of
period : oil :alent of : : copra : sources:total from
Sra / l : 1. 1 : 2/ :all sources
: Mil.lb. Mil. lb. Mil. lb. Mil, lb. Mil. lb. Percent

1929 : 412 195 607 164 772 79
1930 : 318 212 30 163 693 76
1931 325 169 494 120 61 so0
1932 : 249 125 374 161 535 70
1933 : 316 279 595 138 732 81
1934 a 315 213 528 39 567 93
1935 : 353 278 631 8 639 99
1936 322 225 5 7 4 551 99
1937 : 337 297 634 42 676 94
1938 364 309 673 14 687 98

Jan.-June:
1939 : 192 132 325 1 326 100

Compiled from reports of the United States Department of Commerce.
1/ 63 percent of actual weight of copra imported.
.2/ totalss of unrounded numbers.
3] Imports of coconut oil from sources other than the Philippines averaged
only 23,000 pounds annually during the period 1929-38.


Under existing law, it is probable that imports of coconut oil
from the Philippines will diminish to some extent after 1942 or 1943 as the
duty-free quota is reduced. Such imports may tend to disappear entirely
after July 3, 1946, because of the duty preference for copra. Imports of
copra from the Philippines probably will tend to be increased after 1942
or 1943.

Assuming that present statutes with respect to coconut oil and copra
are not changed from now until 1946, imports of coconut oil from all non-
United States sources will be subject to a 2-cent duty with the achievement
of complete independence by the Philippine Commonwealth, plus an excise
tax on first domestic processing of 3 cents for coconut oil from the
Philippines and 5 cents from other countries. Imports of copra, on the
other hand, will be subject, indirectly, only to the excise taxes on the
first domestic processing of coconut oil.

With decreased takings of coconut oil by the United States, copra
crushers in the Philippines will be forced to find new outlets for their


FOS-31


- 11 -








products or to reduce their activities. Crushers in the United States, on
the other hand, probably will expand their activities -in order to meet the
demand for coconut oil in this country.

United States the principal market for Philippine copra

Beginning with the war of 1914-l8, the United States has-been 'ti-"
principal market for copra and coconut oil exported from the Philippines.
Prior to 1914, only small quantities of copra and coconut oil were imported
into this country. But with the marked increase in demand for vegetable
oils for food, soap, and glycerin during the war years, imports from the
Philippines increased sharply. The United States took about two-thirds of
the total exports of copra and coconut oil from the Philippines during those
years compared with only 10 percent of the total during the preceding 5
years.

The duty levied on imports of coconut oil from non-Philippine sources
in 1921 gave a virtual guarantee of the expanding United States market for
coconut oil to the Philippines. And the preferential excise taxes on the
first domestic processing of imported coconut oil established in 1934 ex-
tended this guarantee to copra. Largely as a result, exports of copra and
coconut oil from the Philippines to the United States during the past 15
years have averaged about 85 percent of total exports to all countries. Other
countries taking Philippine copra and coconut oil in recent years have in-
cluded the'lktherlands, Germany, France, Italy, Spain, Canada, and Mexico.

Total exports of copra and coconut oil from the Philippines have ox-
panded sharply during the past 40 relars. In the period 1899-1903 the com-
bined exports, in terms of coconut oil, averaged about 71 million pounds
annually. In 1938 such exports totaled a40 million pounds, the largest on
record. Prior to 1914 n'c-rly all of the exports were of copra. During the
war and immediate post-war years, however, a copra-crushing industry of
fairly large proportions was established in the Philippines, and for the
past 20 years approximately half of the ex-orts of copra and coconut oil have
been of coconut oil.


OS-31


- 12 -





- 13 -


Table 4.- Coconut oil and copra: Exports from the Philippine Islands to the
United States.and all countries, specified periods and years

Exports .to.the United : :Total :Pct.of
States : Exports to all countries :exports:total
Period :: :to U.S.:exports
and : Oil : : Oil : :as pct:repre-
year :Coconut : equiva- : : Coconut : equiva : :of totalsonted
: oil : lent of : Total : oil : lent of : Total :to all :by coco-
: copra : : copra : coun- : nut
: I/ .I : : tries : oil
:1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000
: pounds pounds pounds pounds pounds pounds Percent Percent
Average
189-1903: --- 94 94 1 70,596 70,597 2/ 2
190-08 : 1,006 1,798 2,804 1,912 86,396 88,308 3 2
1909-13 : 966 16,531 17,497 2,209 165,745 167,954 lo 1
1914-8 : 87,810 55,052 142,862 89,056 123,878 212,934 67 42
1919-23 : 189,251 76,471 265,722 222,311 161,505 383,816 69 58
1924-28 : 266,441 192,551 458,992 273,412 253,121 526,533 87 52
-1929-33 331,260 189,638 520,898 342,660 268,920 611,580 85 56

1934 : 299,686 213,174 512,860 319,305 475,984 795,289 65 40
1935 : 357,562 289,021 646,583 364,188 351,252 715,440 90 51
1936 332,742 253,506 586,24S 351,904 404,291 756,195 78 46
1937 : 353,483 288,156 641,639 360,005 328,535 688,540 93 52
1938 : 351,938 315,893 667,831 365,133 475,096 840,229 79 43

Computed from Annual Report of the Insula' Collector of Customs, Commonwealth of
the Philippines.
I/ 63 percent of actual weight of exports of copra.
/ Less than 0.5 percent.


EXPORTS OF COCONUT OIL AND COPRA, PALM KEfRELS, AIlD EABASSU NUTS
AN.D OIL FROM PRIMARY PRODUCING COUNTRIES, 1909-38

Exports of coconut oil, copra, palm kernels, and babassu nuts and oil
from primary producing countries are shown in accompanying tables for the
calendar years 1909-38. Total production data for these commodities are not
available.

Coconut oil, palm-kernel oil, and babassu oil are the three so-called
laurie-acid oils which are capable'of imparting quick lathering properties
to soap. When used for soap making purposes, these oils, like other fats
and oils so used, yield glycerin as a byproduct. The three quick-lathering
oils also are used extensively for food purposes.






POS-31


Since the war of 1914-18, the use of the quick-lathering oils in soap
has increased sharply. During the period 1909-18, total exports of coconut
oil and copra in terms of oil from surplus producing countries averaged
about 845 million pounds annually, and showed little year-to-year change,
with expanding exports from the Philippines being about offset by reduced ea-
poets from Netherlands India. But after 1918 the trend in exports from nearly
all producing countries was sharply upward, with exports attaining a record
peak of nearly 2,600 million pounds, in terms of oil, in 1938.

The Philippine Islands and Netherlands India are the two principal
copra producing countries. Most of the increase in world production and ex-
ports of copra during the past 20 years has taken place in those countries.
More moderate increases occurred in Ceylon, British Malaya, Australasia, and
Oceania, as well as in other tropical areas including East Africa and the
British colonies of the West Indies, Honduras, and Guiana. On the other hand,
British India, a large coconut producing country, virtually ceased exporting
coconut oil and copra after 1922, and now imports those products in fairly
large quantities, Mexico also imports coconut oil and copra, although it is
itself a copra-producing country.

Palm-kernel oil, which is similar to coconut oil in many of its
properties, generally is produced from imported palm-kernels in the indus-
trialized countries of Europe and North America. Palm kernels are extracted
from palm nuts (from which palm oil also is obtained) produced mainly in West
Africa, Netherlands India, and British Malaya. Production of palm kernels
for export in the latter two countries is a relatively new enterprise, having
obtained significant volume only in the past 10 years.

Exports of palm kernels, like those of copra and coconut oil, remained
comparatively stable during the years 1909-18, but increased sharply there-
after. Approximately 1,800 million pounds of palm kernels (yielding about 810
million pounds of oil) were exported from the primary producing countries in
1936 compared with an average of about 800 million pounds of kernels (yield-
ing 360 million pounds of oil) for the 10 years 1909-18. Exports declined
somewhat after 1936, which was the peak year. Palm kernels yield about 45
percent of their weight in crude oil.

The babassu nut, a variety of the palm nut having a relatively large
kernel, is produced only in the tropical forests of Brazil. Exports of babassu
nuts from Brazil were almost negligible until 1919, when 24 million pounds were
exported. Considerable fluctuation in exports occurred thereafter. The largest
exports occurred in 1923, 1936, and 1938, when 78, 68, and 67 million pounds
were exported each year respectively. Price apparently is an important factor
affecting exports. It is reported that the potential supply of babassu nuts
in Brazil is very large, but lack of modern transportation facilities from the
interior is a factor which tends to limit the quantity of nuts gathered and
exported. The average oil yield of babassu nuts is about 63 percent.


- 14-





FOS-31


Table 5.- Coconut oil ard. oil equivalent of copra: Exports from coco-
nut exporting- countries and areas, 1909-38 1/

Cal- :Nether .:Phil- :Brit. :. Brit-:Aus- : : :Estimated total,
endar: lands :ippine :is-t :Coylon:: ish :tral-:Oceania:Other: all coconut
year. India. Islands:Malaya:' .:India:asia :: :exporting coun-
: 2/ .: :? 2j/ -. 2/ : /J : 4/ : / :tries 2/
S:Mil.lb. Mil.lb'. Mil .b. )Mil.lb, Mil.1b. Mi.lb. Mil.lb. MI1.1b. Mil. lb.
1909 : 255 151 22 :122 64 67 39 769
10 : 346 *168 52 123 58 b/ o0 46 878
11 : 374 197' W42 115 60 6/ 69 51 936
12 : 348 97 32 g8 50 32 58 45 750
13 : 322 56 6/ 140 62 33 49 42 756
14 : 344 114 -/ 154 61 6/ 6/ 18 896
15 : 260 223 65 141 55 30 71 55 899
16 : 239 135 66 129 56 28 6/ 15 762
17 : 225 228 70 125 39 42 77 17 859
18: 153 330 79 148 67 45 86 18 944
19 : 628 344 105 200 69 48 111 15 1,569
20 : 431 207 133 153 10 49 77 51 1,109
21 : 516 408 115 150 19 49 79 61 1,398
22 : 477 477 118 181 32 67 123 70 1,546
23 : 44g 45 153 126 8 84 118 98 1,521
24 : 494 464 147 187 2 87 119 98 1,597
25 : 509 433 150 230 1 97 125 113 1,658
26 : 558 501 166 235 5 6/ 131 121 1,821
27 : 443 596 145 215 2 / 128 107 1,743
S28 : 685 64o 156 226 1 / 143 162 2,152
29 : 702 661 179 242 1 135 152 152 2,225
30 : 554 567 165 214 /7 142 139 144 1,924
31 : 510 606 165 240o / 133 117 133 1,905
32 703 444 165 179 1/ 126 114 125 1,857
3 : 699 7S1 198 210 7/ 130 129 138 2,284
3 586 795 193 305 / 130 120 132 2,261
35 : 693 716 240 193 1 128 139 14o 2,248
36 719 756 214 150 I/ 146 158 113 2,293
37 : 754 68 197 250 1 166 6/ 118 2,360
38 /: 184 840 208 275 1 154 r/ 106 2,585
Compiled from official sources and the International Institute of Agriculture,
i/ Oil equivalent of copra: Actual weight of copra times 0.63, 2J Includes re-
exports, hence some duplication. 1/ Includes Netherlands New Guinea (data for
fiscal year), British New Guineas, Western Samoa and Japanese Pacific Islands.
4/ Includes British Oceania: Gilbert and Ellice Islands, Fiji Islands, Solomon
Islands, Tonga Islands, and New Hebrides; French Oceania: French Settlements,
and New Caledonia. 5/ Includes British Borneo, Indo-China, Siam, Portuguese
India, Timor, and Cambing in Asia; Mazambique, Tanganyika, Zanzibar, Kenya and
Uganda, Madagascar, Mauritius, Seychelles, French West Africa, French Togo, St.
Thomas and Principe, Gold Coast, and Nigeria in Africa; and Trinidad, Tobago,
British Honduras, Grenada, St. Lucia, St. Vincent, Jamaica, British Guiana and
Parguay in the Western Henisphere. 6/ Not available. I/ Less than 0.5 million
pounds. 8/ Preliminary.


- 15 -






FOS-31


- 16 -


Table 6.- Copra: Exports from coconut exporting countries
and areas, 1909-38
: : : : :British:Estimated
::Phil-:: :West total all
Calen- :Neth-:ip- :Brit- :Cey-:Brit-:Other:Aus- :Oce-:East :West :Indies,:coconut
dar :er- :pine :ish :lon :ish :Asia :tral-:ania:Af:ri-Afri-:Central:exporting
year :lands:Is- :Malaya: :India: :asia : :ca :ca :and So.:countries
:India:lands: : : : : : : : :America:
1 : : : 21: 31:4/ :/ 6/: 7/
Mil. : Mil. il. Mil. Mil. Mil. Mil. Mil M. M Mil. Mil. Mil. Mil.
lb. : lb. l. lb. lb. lb. lb. lb. lb. lb. lb. lb. lb.
1909 :~4 2L, S 7 8s W F TW "T -9 -" T 3 2 1,038
10 547 266 56 85 57 20 8/ 96 47 3 2 1,219
11 : 58 313 40 92 65 21 / 110 55 3 2 1,332
12 546 154 27 69 62 21 50 92 45 2 3 1,071
13 506 71 S/ 125 83 15 53 78 49 2 1 1,037
14 537 193 8/ 158 81 24 8/ / 8/ 1 2 1,239
15 385 307 7 135 49 22 8 112 56 2 5 1,188
16 336 159 73 1 7 59 15 45 8/ 4/ 2 4 989
17 :257 203 84 121 23 11 67 122 8/ 5 10 95
18 151 121 74 142 1 10 72 136 / 1 8 744
19 728 55 128 197 24 11 76 176 8/ 2 3 1,480
20 : 4 57 181 152 3 12 77 122 -6 2 3 1,070
21 687 331 145 153 7 29 77 126 59 2/ 6 1,620
22 : 748 382 155 1S9 34 23 107 196 72 3 12 1,921
23 707 457 210 114 9 50 134 188 77 6 21 1,973
24 758 346 198 19 1 45 138 189 86 6 19 1,984
25 774 323 195 255 2/ 43 154 198 103 6 26 2,077
26 : 831 384 234 271 4 51 8/ 208 104 6 28 2,288
27 673439 194 222 2 35 / 203 95 7 31 2,071
28 972 517 213 221 / 109 8 227 lo4 7 1 2,625
29 :1,007 383 252 229 2/ 86 24 242 104 8 44 2,569
30 : 828 384 229 203 91 73 225 220 114 6 36 2,318
31 : 794 384 225 210 2/ 62 211 186 109 7 32 2,220
32 :1,058 303 218 102 9/ 46 200 181 113 10 27 2,258
33 :1,076 681 247 144 2/ 50 206 204 125 9 31 2,773
34 : 920 756 214 236 2/ 38 207 191 131 12 23 2,728
35 :1,070 558 250 109 2/ 62 203 221 127 16 13 2,629
36 :1,121 642 172 116 / 8 231 250 140 23 13 2,767
37 :1,098 521 169 159 2 263 8/ 147 14 23 2,689
38 i9:1,222 754 154 16 9/ 8/ 244 8/ 158 12 15 .064
onmpiled front official sources and the International Institute of Agriculture.
1/ Net exports. 2/ Includes British Borneo, Indo-China, Siam, Portuguese India,
Timor, and Canbing. 3/ Includes Netherlands New Guinea (data for fiscal year),
British New Guineas, Western Samoa and Japanese Pacific Islands. 4/ Includes
British Oceania: Gilbert and Ellice Islands,Fiji Islands, Solomon Islands, Tonga
Islands and New Hebrides; French Oceania: French Settlements, and New Caledonia.
5/ Includes Mozambique, Tanganyika, Zanzibar, Kenya and Uganda, Madagascar,
Mauritius and Seychelles. 6/ Includes French West Africa, French Togo, St. Thomas
and Principe, Gold Coast and Nigeria. j/ Includes Trinidad and Tobago, British
Honduras, Grenada, St. Lucia, St. Vincent, Jamaica, and British Guiana. 8/ Not
available. 9/ Less than 0.5 million pounds. 10/ Preliminary.






- 17 -


Table 7.- Cooonut oil: Exports from coconut exporting countries., and
exports as percentage of total exports of coconut oil and
oil equivalent of copra, 1909-38

: Exports of coconut oil :Exports of coconut oil as per-
len Thili- I : Esti- :centage of total exports of coco-
..etheu-ine "riStis* Sriti therl mated : nutoil a oil equivalent of copra
Stands9 Indiarl :total al :Phii- 1- : :Total,all
year india,- alaygD e oel coun- conut. ethepine ritigh :coconut
S .lands / tries lands. Is- M alayq Celo
-ars :t : ort- -" a CU.Producing
: : : : : 2/ i.ou-India land :countries
: Mil. Mil. Mil. Mil. ilil. il. Mil. Per- Per- Per- Per- Per-
: lb. b Ib. lb. lb. lb. Ibk cent cent cent cent cent


1
1
2
1
6
5
2
2
1
1
5/
1
2
1
1

5/1
1
2
3
3
3
2
2
2


115
110
97
75
103
115
151
139
255
475
637
435
317
278
347
349
380
438
498
607
464
506
434
537
542
592
550
666
692


1
1 20
2 18
7 13
11 26
28 44
38 77
27 90
41 83
16 49
1 49
1 41
53
S 53
6 52
4 54
11 49
10 64
6 57
2 60
5 57-
3 45
1 40
3 51
2 47
8 52
5 43


100
33
4o
4


35
30
24
41

21
21
17
14
15
1B
11
16
14
11
13
14
17
21
30
34
50
46
53


15-
13
10
10
14
13
17
18
30
50
41
39
27
22
18
22
21
21
25
23
27
24
27
23
24
24
26
24
28
27


Basic data


compiled from official sources and the International Institute of


Agriculture. I/ Includes reexports, hence some duplication. 2/ Includes
Indo-China, Mozambique, Tanganyika, British Guiana, Trinidad, Tobago, and Paraguay.
J/ Tot available. / Less than 0.5 percent. 5/ Less than 6.5 million pounds.
. Preliminary.


70s-31


1909
1910
1911
1912
1913

1915
1916
1917
1919
1919
1920
1922
1922
1923
1925
1926
1927
1929
1929
1930
1931
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936
1937
1938


1
4
4
3
6
17
27
63
58
169
178
83
6
3
21
34
19
73
6s
32
10
36
21
6
19
13
62
44


11
26
30
35
100
254
309
171
199
236
197
246
230
259
319
314
220
325
364
253
352
319
364
352
360
365


22
17
17
15
5'
5/
23
20
17
32
24
19
24
20
21
22
27
19
23
22
20
21
23
28
42
58
82
o106
91
111


67
69
57
45
61
54
56
36
59
76
57
54
62
54
62
69
64
75
87
98
86
108
115
119
156
124
77
150
169


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- 18 -


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UNIVERSITy OF FLORIDA

0os-31 -20 IllIIlIIIllIIMUUIIIIiIIIIIiAIfI o
3 1262 08904 2500

Table 9.- Oleomargarine: Production and materials used in mmanfacture,
United States, July 1937 and 1938, May July 1939


S July


Item


S1937
: 1,000
: pounds


Oleo oil ... ............9:
Oleostearine ............:
Lard neutral ............
Oleo stock ............:
Beef fat ........... ....:


830
286
97
96
---


1939. 1/


1938
1,000
pounds


1,090
315
97
166
---


May
1,000
pounds

1,001
290
77
73
22


*June

1,000
pounded


1,009
260
85
114
15


July
1,000
pounb.

859
246
111
57
12


Total animal ..........:


Cottonseed oil ..........
Soybean oil .............:
Peanut oil .............:
Corn oil ...............:
Cottonseed stearine .....:


1,309


9,281
1,977
171
134
---


Total domestic vegetablejll,563


1,668


8,181
2,979
290
2
---


1,463


6,780
5,568
194
24
1


1,483 1,285


6, 708
5,1470
167
21
---


5.522
5,625
186
s18
18


11,452 12,567 12,366 11.351


Coconut oil .............:
Babat-i. oil ..............:
Pai:n-'1.ernel oil ......... :
Palm oil ................:


Total foreign vegetables/ 8,759

Total fats and oils ....: 21,631


Milk 9 ..... .............:
Salt & oth-r miscellaneous


4,743
1,259


Production of oleomargarine 26,288


7,680


4,296


3,235 2,89?


20,800 18,326 17,084 15,528


4,787
1,143


25,512


4,498
1,053


4,112
989


3,870
906


22,699 21,111 19,262


6,568
1,123
971
97


6,331
1,086
263
---


2,964
1,323
8
1


2,129
1,1o6
---


1,560
1,332
---


Computed from Bureau of Internal Revenue records and Internal Revenue
Bulletin.
SPreliminary. 4
2J Ordinarily domestically produced. 3/ Not domestically produced.


--- ---- --


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7,69