The Fats and oils situation

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Material Information

Title:
The Fats and oils situation
Physical Description:
301 v. : ill. ; 26-28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economic Research Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics and Statistics Service
United States -- World Food and Agricultural Outlook and Situation Board
Publisher:
The Bureau
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publication Date:
Frequency:
frequency varies

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Oil industries -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Oils and fats, Edible -- Economic aspects -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
FOS-1 (Mar. 1937) - FOS-301 (Oct. 1980).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: Agricultural Marketing Service, 1954-Mar. 1961; Economic Research Service, May 1961-<Oct. 1977>; Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service, <May 1978>-July 1980; Economics and Statistics Service, Oct. 1980.
General Note:
"Approved by the World Food and Agricultural Outlook and Situation Board," Oct. 1977-Oct. 1980.
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Item 21-D.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000502965
oclc - 01588232
notis - ACS2699
lccn - 46039840 //r82
issn - 0014-8865
sobekcm - AA00005305_00013
Classification:
lcc - HD9490.U5 A33
ddc - 380.1/41385/0973
System ID:
AA00005305:00013

Related Items

Succeeded by:
Fats and oils outlook & situation

Full Text




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THE








S DOMESTIC
CALEND.
POUNDS
I:;LLI::: ONS)I______


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3


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UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS
WASHINGTON
MA


e----------------- ------ N,--E- .m
FATS AND O I LS SI ..


----------U.S. DEPOSITORY


C PRODUCTION OF FOOD FATS FROM THE FARM,
{R YEARS. 1929-38. AND INDICATION FOR 1939


1929 1930 1931 1932 1933 1934 1935 1936 1937 1938 1939
*SOYBEAN OIL. CORN OIL. PEANUT OIL. OLEO OIL. OLEO STOCK. OLEOSTEARINE. AND EDIBLE TALLOW
PRELIMINARY


NEG 32817 BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS


RCH 15, 1939


II


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE





o70-25


Table 1.- Price -er pour." -f specified fats pnd oils, January-Februnry, 193&-39

1938 193lq
Fat or oil Jan. :: Feb. Jan. : Feb.

:Cents Cents : Ce:-.ts Cent
Domestic prices -
Butter, 92 score, N. Y. : 33.71 31.1 : 26.29 26.25
Oleomarg-.ri':, .onestic vegetable, Chicago : 15.50 15.00 : 14.50 14.50
Lard, -rine steam, Chicago : .34n 8.56. : 6.60n 6.58
Lard refined, Chicago : 10.06 10.06 7.72 7.54
Lard conpormn., Cr.i.-rgo : 10.25 10.31 :9.25 9.25
Coconut oil, c'ible, N. Y. :6.50 6.12 : 4.25 4.19
Cottonseed oil, cr-,.e, f.o.b. S. E. mills 6.17 6.70 : 6.'~ 5.61
Cottonseed oil, p.s.y., N. Y. 7.40 7.00 : 7.10
Soybean oil, refir.e-, N. Y. : 8.56 9.10 : 7.70 7.50
Peanut oil, domestic, refined, U. Y. lO.n 10.0%n : 9.88 9.25
Rape oil, refined, IT. Y. :12.06 12.06 : 10.82 10.80
Oleo oil, No. 1, IT. Y. q.75 9.50 : 8.25 7.81
Oleostearine, barrels, N. Y. 7.62 7.44 : 6.78 6.34

Corn oil, refined, IT. Y. 9.28 9.74 : 9,31 8.94
Olive oil, edible, I. Y. 31.33 27.86 :25.07 25.07
Teaseed oil, c-rue, I1. Y. :8.4 -.47 ,994n 8.97

Coconut oil, cr-ie, Pacific Cc-st 3.83 3,56 2.68 2.72
Tallow, inedible, C icago 5.31 5.29 : 5.12 4.96
Gre,.e, huae, N. Y. 5.05 4.9 : 4.94 4.77
Palm oil, cru-'e, II. Y. 4.25 4.22 : 3.68 3.68
Oli-e oil f::ts, barrels, IT. Y. 9.34 9.19 7.18 7.09
Pal--kernel oil, denatured, I!. Y. 4.25n 4.18n : 3.4On 3.40n
Babassu oil, tanks, H. Y. 6.S6 6.75n : 6.31n 6.17n
Sardine oil, tanks, Pacific Co.st 5.48 5.97 : 3.88 3.90n

Linseed oil, raw, Minneapolis :0.00 9.78 : .30 8.30
Tung oil, drur.s, N. Y. : 15.56 15.34 : 15.44 14.97
Perilla oil, druns, H. Y. 11.31 11.12 : 9.78 9.64
Soybean oil, cru,'e, f.o.b. nills 5.75 6.12 : 4.97 4.76
Menhaden oil, cruzie, f.o.b. Baltimore 5.00n 5.00n : 4.27n 4.02n

Foreign prices i/
Cotton oil, cru e, naked, Hull 4.35 4.14 : 3.84 2/ 3.77
Copra, Resecada, P. 1.80 1.59 -- -
Palm-kerr.el oil, crule, Hull 4.88 4.44 : 3.60 2/ 3.56
Whale oil, crurl'.e, o. 1, Rotterdam 3.79 3.58 : 2.76 2 3.03
Tallow, beef fair-fine, London .0 4.0 463 4.00 2 3.87
Linseed oil, raked, Hull 6.40 6.22 4.86 2/ 4.96



1/ Converted tr U.S. cents -r -ourr. a.t current monthly rates of exchan-ge.
2/ Prelir.in.r..,.


- 2 -





7OS-25


-3-


T-HE FATS 'AND OILS S I TUAT I O.N


Domestic production of fats and oils from domestic and imported materi-

ala is expected by the Bureau of Agricultural Economicn to be about the sane

:this year as last. .The 1938 production -,f 8.6 billion pounds was the largest

since 1929. The increase last year over the 8 billion pounds produced in 1937

was due almost entirely to increased production from domestic materials, since

imports of raw materials for manufacture were reduced considerably.

The Bureau also expects that the production of food fats and oils from

materials produced on farms in the United States will be about the sane as the

estimate of nearly 6.5 billion .ounds produced in 1938. The substantial in-

crease in prospect for lard production may be more than offset by a decrease

in cottonseed oil production and imports. Some increase also is 'robable in

butter, soybean, corn, and peanut oils.

The estimated 6.5 billion pounds produced from domestic materials of the
principal food fats butter, lard, cottonseed, soybean, corn, and peanut oils,
and the edible beef fats in 1938 exceeded the average of 5.6 billion pounds
produced in 1934-37, but was the same as the 1929-33 average. The 5-year
1929-33 average was equalled in 1938 in spite of the fact that lard production
in 1938 was only 1.7 billion pounds compared with-an average of 2.3 billion
pounds in 1929-33. The decreased lard production was balanced by increased
production of soybean, corn., and peanut oils.

Production of fats and oils in the United States was at a reduced level
from 1934 through -1937-chiefly because of the effects of the drought upon
butter and lard production and the effects of the smaller cotton acreage upon
cottonseed oil production. Production increased in 1938 as a result of the
large cotton crop in 1937 and the increase in hog production in 1938.

Anparent disappearance of all nrin-.ry fats and oils in 1938 totaled
about 9.2 billion pounds, compared with 9.3 billion pounds in 1937 and 9.2
billion pounds in 1936. These are the only 3 years on record in which apparent
disappearance passed the 9 billion pound mark. The average for 1923-33 was
8,5 billion pounds. The decrease of about 100 million pounds in total disap-
pearance of all fats and oils in 1938 compared with 1937 was due to a decrease
in the disappearance of the major drying oils. Disappearance of linseed, tung,
and perilla oils in 1938 was 160 million pounds less than in 1937. The disap-
pearance of fats and oils other than drying oils was larger.






FOS-25


Imports of flaxse-d, in terzs of oil equivalent, and of tung and nerilla
oils in 1938 were 300 million pounds less than in 1937, while imports of fats
and oils other than i'rying oils were about 600 million pounds less in 1938 than
in 1937.

It is noteworthy that while net imports of drying oils represented 67
percent of the total disappearance of drying oils in 1938 and 55 percent of the
average total disap-narance in the 10 years 1923-32, the net innorts of other
fats and oils represented about 13 percent of the total disappearance of other
fats and oils in 1938 and averaged about 6 percent in the 5-years 1929-33.
("Net imports" in this case represents total imports less exports of food fats
and oils, including lard.)

Table 2.- Inports of fats and oils as a percentage of disappearance

DRYING OILS
Description Uit : Average : 193
: : 1923-32 :

Total imports . .. :Mil. lb.: 433 :42
Disannearance .. . : 777 :627
Imports as percentage of dianpnearance : Pet. : 55.7: 67.5


Net imports . . .il. lb.: 428 : 422
Disappearance ............... : 777 : 627
Net imports as percentage of disappearance. : Pet. : 55.1: 67.3
FATS AND OILS OTHER THAN DRYING OILS
Description : Unit : Avrage : 1q3
: : 1929-33 :

Total iirorts . .. :Mil. lb.: 1,374 : l,404
Disappearance . : 7,856 8,615
Imports as percentage of disappearance : Pet. : 17.5: 16.3


Net izm orts . . :Mil. lb.: 483 : 1,105
Disappearance .. ....... : : 7,856 : 8,615
Net imports as percentage of disappearance. : Pet. :6.1: 12.8



Outlook for Fats and Oils

It now apnoers probable th-t the total domestic production of fats and
oils in 1939 will not be greatly different from the nroducti-'n in 1938. A
substantial increase, nerhaps 360 :million -nounds or more, in lard production
is expected. If the 1939 cottn crop should be no larger than 11 million
bales, however, the decrease in -roduction of cottonseed oil would more than
offset the increase in lard production. It is expected that the 1939 produc-
tion of butter, soybean, corn, and peanut oils will be somewhat larger than
that of 1938.


- 4 -






7OS-25 5-

The production of food fats and oils from materials produced on farms
in the United States in 1938 is estimated to be nearly 6.5 billion pounds.
This includes almost all of the domestic -roduction of fats and oils from
materials raised in this country, except flaxseed and linseed )il. It is
expected that the production of food fats and oils in 1939 will be about the
sane as thrt of last year.

Imports of food fats and oils a-d of raw materials for their manufacture
may be about the sane in 1939 as in 1938, with possibly some reduction in cot-
tonseed oil imports and will reflect chiefly the increased production of lard.
It is probable, however, that imports of drying oils and raw materials for such
oils will be larger in 1939 than in 1938, because of the expansion in the
demand for such oils in this country resulting from increased building activity.

Exports of lI.rd from the United States in 1939 are expected to be some-
what larger than in 193g, as lard production will be considerably larger this
year than last. The increase in lard exports, however, will be limited by the
lack of foreign outlets. At the present tine Great Britain and Cuba are the
chief foreign markets for American lard, and little expansion of ex-orts to
our former important foreign markets, such as Germany, appears probable.

From the standpoint of prospective supplies in 1939 and perhaps in
1940 there appears to be little reason for expecting any significant advance
in prices of fats and oils in this country. The domestic production o.f fats
and oils in 1939 probably will be only slightly smaller than in years of
relatively large production, such as 1929, 1932, and 1933.

It is noteworthy, however, that the total production of food fats and
oils in 1939 will be only slightly smaller than in 1929, although lard pro-
duction this year will be about 300 or 400 million pounds smaller than in
1929. Butter -roduction this year will be somewhat larger than in 1929, and
the production of soybean oil, which was 11 million pounds in 1929, nay be
norg than 350 million pounds this year. As a further increase in hog produc-
tion is expected, lard -roduction in 1940 will be larger than in the present
year. Thus, if crop production is about average this year and next, it may
be that the total domestic production of fats and oils in 1940 will be
larger than in 1929 and perhaps the largest on record.

Demand for fats and oils in this country, reflecting chiefly changes
in business activity and rational income, probably will be stronger in 1939
than in 193g, but foreign demand for fats and oils in recent months hns been
decidedly weaker than a year earlier. One of the irnortant factors in the
recent weakness in foreign demand hns been the decline in the exchange value
of the pound sterling and some other foreign currencies.









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Table 4.- Apparent disappearance of fats and oils, 1934-38

Fat or oil 1931 : 1935 1936 1937 1938 I
:Mil, 1lb Mil. lb, Mil ib MI t Mil. lb,


Cottonseed oil
Coconut oil
Soybean oil
Palm oil
Corn oil
Peanut oil
Olive oil, edible
Castor oil
Palm-kernel oil
Babassu oil
Olive foots
Sesame oil
Teaseed oil 2/
Rape oil
Olive oil, inedible
Sunflower oil
Oiticica oil
Vegetable tallow
Kanok oil 2/

Linseed oil
Tung oil
Perilla oil
Hempseed oil

Butter
Lard
Tallow, inedible 3/
Marine animal oils -
Fish oil
Marine mammal oil
Fish-liver oil
Crease
Tallow, edible
Oleo oil
Oleostearine
Wool grease
Neatsfoot oil
Total


1,566
597
31
31g4
132
: 26
62

24

31
10
S 2
: / 10
11
S 25


S 3

417
120
25
(2)

:2,312
: 1,628
717

152
38
37
: y,4
6g
62
S 32
15
4
8,697


1,4h41
330
103
305
131
2 22
70
51
55
10
32
57

19
37


470
133
64
(ON

2,207
1,218
718

232
33
55
254
68
68
47
15
6
8, 73,'


1,340
640
222
315
153
120
64
60
50
36
28
54
8
67
12
26
3

16

485
125
112
(20)

2,135
1,344
726

270
39
61
290
110
90
53
15
5
9,202


1,746
4q3
183
350
167
109
52
63
150
32
21
50
27
15
6
1
4
8
0
o

590
155
4c
(2)

2,158
1,363
676

250
69
67
282
29
67
47
13
4
9,3P9


1,665
605
3c5
262
148
90
72
53
52
31
18

12

6


490
95
42


(2,205)
(1,443)
764

143
90
52
335
95
33
47
6
4
9,242


Preliminary.
Factory consumption.


Imports.
Less than


Computations are based on production from domestic and
net trade in fats and oils, and stocks.


500,000 counts.


im-orted materials,


Figures are rounded to millions without adjustment to totals.






- S -


tlae ".- 2 -Es i-. T:'rs :f -.t ;il -i eam o=ut il: -nocrts into the hited
States, errtrs : -'r= -ri:ziC -r--ctesi- g -o-tries, ani iparts as
Ir-r3.t.age :. er arts, 1931-3d


:i.~'*-~-~ 'r n-r r
SS...c2s


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kil. Mi". Vi:. I.i. -" Vii. M l. Mn.


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Table 6.- Palm oil: Imports into the United States, exports from principal
exporting countries, and imports as percentage of exports, 1931-38

IMPORTS INTO THE UNITED STATES
Country of origin 1931 i 1932 1933 1934 1935 1936 1937 198
:Mil. Mil. Mil. Mil. Mil. Mil. Mil. Mil.
lb. lb. Il. lb. lb. lb. lb. lb.

letherland India 81 110 170 99 188 252 286 228
British Malaya 3 2 7 1 5 4 4 2/

Africa -
British West 119 60 55 20 40 32 62 3/13
Belgian Congo 39 38 44 27 49 42 50 27
French West 4 5 2/ 0 3 2/ 2 1

Other countries 4/ 13 2 11 9 13 9 7 5/ 2
Total 258 217 287 156 298 339 41l 271
EXPORTS FROM PRINCIPAL PRODUCING COUNTRIES


SAsia -
Netherland India
British Malaya

:i: Africa -
SBritish West
Belgian Congo
French West
Other 6/


135
10


268
81
62
15


187 256 267 316 380 435
18 28 36 55 66 96


265
35
51
14


292
116
52
13


257
99
56
11


327
125
90
5


369
132
105
3


338
150
82
9


Total : 571 620 757 726 918 1,055 1.109
IMPORTS INTO THE UNITED STATES AS A PERCENTAGE OF TOTAL EXPORTS
:Pet. pt. P Pt. Pt. Pct. Pet. Pet.

Total 4: 5 35 38 21 32 32 37


1/ Preliminary.
2/ Less than 500,000 pounds.
3 Includes 740,601 pounds from Gold Coast.
4f Includes Belgium, Canada, Germany, Netherlands, Uiited Kingdom, and "Other
countries".
5] Includes 779,485 pounds from Portuguese Africa.
f/ Includes Portuguese West Africa and British East Africa (Tanganyika).
I


7OS-25


- 9 -





Fos-25


- 10 -


Table 7.- Palm-kernel oil and oil equivalent of nalm kernels: Imports into
the United States, exports from -rincipal producing countries, and
imports as percentage cf exports, 1931-38

I__MPCRTS IUTO TH3 INIT2D STATES
Country of origin 1c31 1932 1933 1934 1935 1936 1937 193

Sil.Mi. Mi Mil. Mil. Mil. Mil. Mil.
PALM-KERKEL OIL AIFD : lb. lb lb l lb. lb. lb.
OIL EQUIVALENT OF
PALM K !'RIELS 39 lI 20 17 81 33 179 17

EXPORTS IROM PRINCIPAL FRODUTC!NG COUNTRIES

PALM KTRIELS fDT TERMS OF :
PALM-KER]TEL OIL:
Africa -
British West : 314 3?5 323 362 4o00 4- 428
French West : 10 127 105 133 139 168 170
Belgian Congo 47 57 62 49 64 92 95
Portuguese West : 17 13 1 17 18 16 15
Anglo Egyptian
Sudan 5 3 7 S 9 (8) (8)
Other Africa / : 7 7 4 5 (5) (5)
Total Africa 500 607 528 573 635 773 (721)

Asia -
Netherland India : 12 18 23 25 30 36 41
British Malaya 1 1 2 3 4 5 7

South Anerica -
Brazil : 14 9 1 3/ 10 31 22
Grand total 527 635 554 601 679 945 791

IMPORTS EITO THE LUITED STATES AS PERCENTAGE OF TOTAL EXPORTS
: Pet. Pct. P:t. P7 Prt Pt. P4 3 12 4et
Total 7 2 4 3 12 4 23


I_/ Preliminary.
2/ Includes Senegal, British Caneroon,
British Togo.
3/ Less than 500,000 pounds.


Ganbia, Ruanda-Urundi, Tanganyika, and






M S-25


- 11 -


Table 8.- IMPORTS of fats and oils into the United States by
countries of origin, 1929 and 1938


Commodity and principal :
countries of origin


:Million
poundss

Coconut oil Total : 412

Philippine Islands 412
t
Copra oil equivalent :3

Philippine Islands : 195
Netherland India : 18
British Oceania : 28
British Malaya 53
New Zealand : 2
Australia : 44

Palm oil Total 262

Netherland India 45
Belgian Congo 36
Nigeria : 140
British Malaya 2
Netherlands

Olive oil, edible- Total: 57

Italy : 72
Spain : 17
France 5
Tunisia : /2
Greece : 1

Olive oil, inedible -
Total : 10

Greece : 3
Algeria : 2
,Spain 4

Olive oil foots Total :

Tunisia : /
Italy : 41
Portugal : 1
Greece 2
Algeria : 2


7EG3TABLE FATS AND OILS
Q : 1938 ::Commodity and principal
*3 r-nuntriet nf orirmin


Million::
pounds ::
::Gottonseed
364 :: basis) -


364 :
:30

309 :
/ :


11


oil (crude
Total


Brazil
Japan
United Kingdom
gypt
China


: 1929


S1938


:Million Million
:pounds pounds



56
19
3
2
2


::Palm-kernel oil Total


2 : Germany
--- : Denmark
: Netherlands
2~l :: United Kingdom

228 ::Palm kernels oil
27 :: equivalent
12 ::
--- Nigeria
1 :: Other British
: Africa
1 :: Other French A
:: Netherland IrdJ
40 ::
5 ::Babassu nuts oil
9 : equivalent
9 ::
6 : Brazil

::Corn oil Total
5 ::


3 :
2 :

22::

S ::
5 ::
_ : :
4 :
4


Netherlands
United Kiugdor
Belgium
Germany
France
Japan


1
2


West

frica
ia


Continued -


principal


_


__


,


- a1_~__


,






FOS-25


- 12 -


Table 8.- IMPORTS of fats and oils into the United States by principal
countries of origin, 1'9 and 193g Contd


VEGETABLE FATS AND OILS
Commodity and principal : 9929 : 138
countries of origin :
:Million Million


Castor beans oil
equivalent

Brazil
Kwanturng
British India

Flaxseed oil
equiva-lent

Argentina
Uruguay

Tung oil Total

China 1/

Perilla ,il Total

Japan
Kwan Lung
China


:mounds

24



67
:
:
447

427
0

120

120

6

2
3
0


:: MARI'rE ANIMAL OILS
::Commodity and principal : I129 1938
:: countries of origin_ :
:: :Million Million


nou.nds ::
::Marir.e animal oils -
th :: Total

48 :: Whale -
--- orway
--- Canada
: United Kingdom
: Netherlands
284 ::
:: Fish oils -
265 :: Norway
16 :: United Kingdom
: Iceland
107 :: Japan
: Newfoundland &
107 :Labrador
: Germany
32 ::

15 ::
2 ::
2 ::


:pounds




4
S 2
2
S 0

Vu


ounids


Less than 5:0,000 poun's.
Includes Algeria.
Included with Algeria.
No general imports reported;
countries.
Not reported prior to 1936.
Not reported prior to 1933.
Includes Hong Kong.


imports for consumption not available by


Compiled from Foreign Commerce and Uavigation of the United States.


.





7os-25 13 -

Table 9.- EXPORTS of fats and oils from the United States by principal
countries of destinn.tion, 1929 and 1938


Commodity and principal : 1929
nmnntris nof restin.tionn 1


Lard, including neutral
lard Total

North America -
Canada
Central America:
Costa Rica
Panama
Guatemala
Canal Zone
West Indies:
Cuba
Dominican Rep.
Haiti
Mexico
South America -
Venezuela
Colomb ia
Ecuador
Peru
Iurope -
United Kingdom
Czechoslovakia
Belgium
Germany


Malta, Gomo
Italy
France


Cyprus:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:


:Million


: 47.9


17.8

3.7
2.0
3.3
S .5

80.5
4.9
3.1
62.1

9.4
22.5
4.4
: .1

S245.2

20.7
:219.2


1.3
27.0
11.0


Oleo oil Total


3urope -
United Kingdom
Netherlands
Belgium
Germany
Norway
North America -
Newfoundland
Cuba


15.5
21.1
1.7
17.2
3.0

1.2
1.2


ANIMAL FATS AND OILS
: ::Commodity and principal : 12
1938 countrieses of destination:


Million::

::
2P 6 ::Oleo stock Total


1.1 ::

1.9
1.3 ::
.5
.3 ::


Suronpe -
Sweden
United Kingdom
Denmark
Netherlands
Norway
Germany
Belgium


47.5 ::
1.2 ::Tallow, edible Total
.6
7.2 : Europe -
United Kingdom
3.5 :: North America -
2.3 : West Indies:
.9 : Cuba
-- Dominican Ren.
: Mexico
124.8 :: Cnada
5.3
1.7 ::Fish oils Total
1.5
1.1 : Europe -
/ :: Germany
--- : North Anerica -
: Canada
5.4 : Cuba
: exico-

2.4:
1.7 :
.6 :




--- ::


1938
* _____


V1I-l----l--- --I--------1--- -


Continued -


:Million Million
0or- ds ro dOUs




: o. 1.7
.4 .5
1.5
1.5
: 1.4 ---
l.U4
S .5 ---
S .5




0.1 0.2


: .8 .... /
.3
.3 ---
: .9 ---
: .6 ---

: _1 2.


0 1.3

0.2 0.5
.1 .4
.5 ---


~(







FOS-25 14 -

Tabla 9.- EXPORTS of fats and oils front the United States by principal
countries of destir.vtion, 1929 and 1938 Contd


Connodity and principal : 9
lq
countries o-f destinrnti r:


VEGETABLE FATS AND OILS
S19 33 :Co- -uocity and nrincinal : 1Q29
.nnmntria of -.qatinntion


:Million
:p ounOs


Soybean oil Total

North Anmericn -
Canada
West Indies:
Cuba
Neth:rland West
Indies
Dominic:-. Rep.
South America -
Argentina
Africa -
Union of So. Africa

Cottonseed oil Total 2

North America -
Cuba
Canada
Central Anerica:
Panama
Canal Zor.e
Mexico
South America -
Argentina
Chile
Asia -
Japan
Philippine Islands


2.0


Million:


Snunl S

6.4


S4.
--- ....

4.5 :


::Coconut oil Total 3-


North America -
Cuba
Canada
Mexico


0 .6 :Vegetable soap stock-
1.8 --:: Total

.4 --- : Forth America -
S Corada
.7 .4 Cuba
M exico
26.1 4.5 : South America-
Argentina
: Europo -
1.3 1.3 :: United Kingdom
q1.0 .2

.9 / ::Soybeans oil
-- .7 : equivalent
.7
North Anerica -
.8 --- :: Canada
.5 --- :: Mexico
: Europn -
1.0 .1 : Nethrlands
.2. 2 2 Franc


:Million






5.5
7.0
15.4

!Z



2.1
S 1.0
.9

.2

3.1

1: _.





: l


Less than 500,000 pounds.
In terms of refined, except
Edible and inedible totaled
No exn-orts re-orted.


Canada, which is crude.
without converting.


Compiled from Foroign Commerce and Navig-tion of the United States.


S1938


Million
TnounM

1.1


3.7
1.9
.6


3.8
1.8


19.5
.4

1.0
.2


--ne----- s. .etn i r


'~-I-~-~-----






- 15 -


Table 10.- Oleomargarine: Troducticn and materials used in manufacture,
United States, Deceuber 1937-3S, January 1939-39

S1937 1/ 19q 1/ 1939 1/
Item : Dec. Jan. Dec. : Jan.

: 1.000 Ib 1.000 lb. 1.000 lb. : 1,000 lb

Oleo oil 741 : 794 1,009 1,187
Oleostearine 26 : 28 237 : 232
Lard neutral 191 149 105 : 107
Oleo stock : 60 : 57 117 : 131
Total animal : 1278 ; 1.2 1,468 ; 1,657

Cottonseed oil 20,920 : 19,580 10,577 9,r,4
Soybean oil 2,948 4,217 4,19 : 4,811
Peanut oil 22 : 236 232 219
Corn oil : 213 ; 209 135 : 119
Total domestic vegetable 2/ 24.309 : 24242 15.142 : 15.033

Coconut oil 6,594 4,390 7,204 7,245
Babassu oil 665 : 2,138 615 712
Palm-kernel oil : 516 : 919 99 : 122
Total foreign vegetable 1/ 7.775 7.447 7.919 : ,079
Total fats and oils 33,362 32,973 24,528 24,769

Milk 7,26 : 7,350 5,30 5,556
Salt and other miscellaneous : 1,93 1,990 1,344 : 1,394


Production of oleomargarine : 40,72 40,476 30,373 : 30,319


*/ Preliminary.
a_ Ordinarily domestically -roduced.
3/ Not domestically produced.

Compiled and computed from Bureau of Internal Revenue records and Internal
Revenue Bulletin.




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