The Fats and oils situation

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Material Information

Title:
The Fats and oils situation
Physical Description:
301 v. : ill. ; 26-28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economic Research Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics and Statistics Service
United States -- World Food and Agricultural Outlook and Situation Board
Publisher:
The Bureau
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publication Date:
Frequency:
frequency varies

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Oil industries -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Oils and fats, Edible -- Economic aspects -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
FOS-1 (Mar. 1937) - FOS-301 (Oct. 1980).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: Agricultural Marketing Service, 1954-Mar. 1961; Economic Research Service, May 1961-<Oct. 1977>; Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service, <May 1978>-July 1980; Economics and Statistics Service, Oct. 1980.
General Note:
"Approved by the World Food and Agricultural Outlook and Situation Board," Oct. 1977-Oct. 1980.
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Item 21-D.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000502965
oclc - 01588232
notis - ACS2699
lccn - 46039840 //r82
issn - 0014-8865
sobekcm - AA00005305_00011
Classification:
lcc - HD9490.U5 A33
ddc - 380.1/41385/0973
System ID:
AA00005305:00011

Related Items

Succeeded by:
Fats and oils outlook & situation

Full Text

.Pf 56, 7,7/' i /


UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS
WASHINGTON
JULY 14,


1938


THE FATS AND I LS SI T UA T I ON


PRICES OF COCONUT OIL, TALLOWy
LAUNDRY SOAP, 1920 TO DATE


1920 1924 1928 1932 1936
INCLUDESS. 3 CENTS TAX ON FIRST DOMESTIC PROCESSING. BEGiNNING JUNE 1934


NEG.34441 BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS


FEQi -IT


CENTS
PER
FOUND

12



9


U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE





FOS-17


Table 1.-Price per pound of specified fats and oils, average January-June,
monthly May and June, 1937 and 1938


:Average:
Fat or oil : Jan.-
:June
: Cents C


Domestic prices
Butter, 92 score, N.Y. : 33.4
Oleomargarine, domestic vegetable,
Chicago 16.3
Lard, prime steam, Chicago :12.3
Lard, refined, Chicago 13.2
Lard compounds, Chicago 13.6
Coconut oil, edible, N.Y. :10.3
Cottonseed oil, crude, fob S.E. mills 9.5
Cottonseed oil, p.s.y.,N.Y. 10.8
Soybean oil, refined, N.Y. 12.2
Peanut oil, domestic, refined,N.Y. 13.3
Rape oil, refined, I.Y. 12.0
Oleo oil, No. 1, N.Y. :13.3
Oleostearine, barrels, N.Y. :10.3

Corn oil, refined, N.Y. :12.7
Olive oil, edible, I.Y. : 31.9r
Teaseed oil, crude, II.Y. 12.2

Coconut oil, crude, Pacific Coast 7.6
Tallow, inedible, Chicago : .6
Grease, house, II.Y. 8.5
Palm oil, crude, N.Y. : 6.6
Olive oil foots, barrels, N.Y. 11.6
Palm-kernel oil, denatured, .Y. : 7.0
Babassu oil, tanks, N.Y. :1/10.4
Sardine oil, tanks, Pacific Coast : 6.9

Linseed oil, raw, Minneapolis 10.3
Tung oil, drums, Atlantic Coast 14.6
Porilla oil, drums, N.Y. 11.6
Soybean oil, crude, fob mills 9.4
Menhaden oil, crude, fob Baltimore 5.5

Foreign prices 3/
Cotton oil, crude, naked, Hull 6.5
Copra, Reseccia, Philippines : 3.9
Palm-kernel oil, crude, Hull 6.8
Whale oil, crude, No.l, Rotterdam 5.1
Tallow beef, fair-fine, London : 6.2
Linseed oil, naked, Hull : 6.3


1937 : 1938
S :Average: :


Jan.- : May : June
June :
Cents Cents Cents

29.2 26.4 25.9


May : June

Cents Cents :

32.3 30.9

16.4 15.4
11.9 11.9
12.9 13.2
13.2 13.4
9.2 8.1
8.9 8.2n:
10.5 10.0 :
12.3 11.4 :
13.2n 12.8n:
12.5 12.7 :
12.5 12.8 :
9.6 9.5 :

12.4 12.0
32.5n 32.0n:
10.1 9.6

6.3 5.6 :
8.2 8.2
8.3 8.1
6.0 6.0
11.4n 11.2n:
6.0 5.8 :
2/9.8 2/R.9 :
6.9n 6.9n:

10.9 10.6 :
13.8 13.1 :
11.5 11.3 :
9.0 R.2 :
5.6n 5.8n:


6.6 6.1
3.1 2.8 :
6.0 5.6 :
5.0 4.8 :
6.0 5.8 :
6.6 6.6 :


4.0 3.9
4/1,4
4.3 4.1
3.3 3.3
4.5 4.4
5.8 5.3


15.2
8.4n
9.7
10.3
6.0
6.8

8.8
10.1
11.6
9.1
6.9

9.7
27.0
7.8

3.4
4.9
4.4
4.0
8.7
4.1
6.6n
5.5

9.3
13.2
10.7
5.9
4.7


1/ Average for 5 months. 2/ Futures.
3/ Converted to U.S. cents per pound at currently monthly rates of exchange.
_/ Preliminary.


14.8
8.in
9.2
10.2
6.2
7.0
8.1
8.6
10.1
11,2
8.5
6.0

9.6
25.6
7.1

3.1
4.4
3.9
3.5
8.3
4.2
6.4n
4.9

8.9
11.4
10.3
5.7
4.7n


- 2 -


15.4
8.4n
9.4
10.2
5.6
6.8n

8.5
9.9
10.4
8.5
6.1

9.6
25.3
6.6

2.9
4.6
4.0
4.0
7.9
4.2
6.3n
4.8

8.2
10.9
9.9
5.2
4.in


4/3.8

4/3.9
4/3.1
4/4.3
4/4.9


'1







FATS USED IN SOAP

The reported use of fats and oils in the manufacture of soap in 1937
was about 1,660,000,000 pounds. This was more than for any other year reported
except 1929, when about 1,700,00,0OC pounds were used. There was little change,
compared with 1936, in the relative proportions of the thr-e major groups of
fats and oils used in soap. The most important shifts in individual oils
within the groups were in palm-kernel oil and palm oil. One hundred twelve
million pounds of palm-kernal oil were used in soap in 1937, compared with 26
million pounds in 1936. The quantity of palm oil used was almost double that
in 1936. (See table 2.)

The increased use of palm-kernel oil was practically offset by a de-
crease in the volume of coconut oil used in soap. These are quick-lathering
oils. In the slow-lathering group the increase in palm oil was practically
offset by a decrease in the quantity of inedible tallow used.

Total disappearance, for all purposes, of inedible tallow, coconut,
palm-kernel, and palm oils in the first quarter of 1938 was 15 percent less
than in the corresponding quarter of 1937.

During the first quarter of the calendar yeor 1938, domestic production
from domestic and imported materials of those four major fats used in soap was
about 14 percent larger than in the first quarter of ]937. But stocks as of
March 31 were about 30 percent larger than a year ago and slightly larger than
on March 31, 1936.

Total imports of these four fats were about 14 percent smaller in the
first quarter of 1938 than in the corresponding quarter of 1937.

The Association of American Soc.p and Glycerine Produicers recently re-
ported domestic soap production for the first quarter of 1938 more than ono-
third larger than in the final quarter of 1937 and only 11 percent below the
first quarter of 1937, when peak production for recent years had been reached
by the soap industry.

Soap imports and exports ore relatively unimportant. Imports were slightly
less in 1937 thin in 1936, being less than 4 million pounds in each year. Soap
exports totaled more than 32.5 million pounds in 1937, compared with almost 28
million pounds in 1936, and 27 million pounds in 1935.

Prices

Prices cf tallow and grease were slightly high-r -nd of coconut oil
slightly lovwr in June than in May. Average prices cf the principal soap fats,
however, were about the same in these 2 months. Prices in the first half of
this year were about 40 percent lower than in the corresponding period of 1937,
and only slightly lcwer than in January June 1936. (See table 1.)

Wholesale prices of soap tend to fluctuate less widely than the price of
soap materials. In the first half of 1938 the price of laundry soap r.t Cin-
cinnati averaged about 13 percent lower than a year earlier.


- 3 -


FOS-17





FOS-17


Materials source and availability

BACKGROUrD.- The soap industry is one of the largest industrial
consumers of fats and oils in the United States, usingabout 1-1/2
billion pounds annually. From 70 to 75 percent of the saponifiable
materials used in soap is domestically produced, while 25 to 30
percent, made up largely of quick lathering hcrrd oils, is of
foreign origin.

Major shifts since 1904 in types of soap fats consumed are
(1) a decline Lnd recovery in the use of animal fats; (2) an in-
crease up to 1916 in the consumption of cottonseed oil in soap,
followed by its decline rand practical disappearance from the soap
kettle; (3) an increase in the percentage zontributud by quick-
lathering hard oils from 1912 to 1923; (4) a pronounced expansion
in the consumption of palm oil, followed by sharp decreases in
1935 and 1936 when a large volume of palm oil was used in food
products. 1/

Supplies

Generous supplies of tallow and grease are in prospect and reports from
the Philippines indicate exception-rLlly hcavy arrivals of copra. On the other
hand, reduction of the dorrastic cotton crop will mean a smaller supply of
cotton oil refining foots.

Tallow

From 90 to 95 percent of the supply of inedible tallow is used in soap.
This fat accounts V'or 30 to 40 percent of all saponifiable materials consumed
in scap making.

Apparent production of inedible tallow in the first quarter of 1938 was
27 million pounds larger than a year earlier. It is expected that total
production for the year may exceed the 625 million pounds produced in 1937.
The estimate cf increased production is based on the Bureau's report that the
number of cattle slaughtered during the second half of the year may total about
the same as in the second half of 1937, but the weights of the cattle slaugh-
tered probably will be heavier than a year ago.

Stocks of inedible taller. on M.rch 31 were more than 30 million pounds
larger than on March 31, 1937, but were smaller than on the corresponding
date in any other y-ar since 1933. Imports of tallow are generally negligible,
but due to reduced domestic supplies, imports rose sharply in 1934 and 1935.
Since that time imports have been negligible. The excise tax of 3 cents per
pound in addition to the duty of one-half cent per pound was placed on im-
ported tallow by the Revenue Act of 1936, effective August 21, 1936.


I1 Fcr mere detailed analysis see FOS-6, Aug. 16, 1937.


S4 -





FOS-17


Grease

Production of grease was about the same in the first quarter of the
year as in the corresponding period of 1937. It is probable, however, that
production for the 6 months, April to September, may be somewhat larger than
last year, since the Bureau reports that slaughter supplies of hogs for the
remainder of the 1937-38 marketing year, ending September 30, will be larger
than supplies last summer. Stocks of grease on hand March 31 were larger
than on the corresponding date in any of the 3 preceding years.

Domestic vegetable oils

Production of domestic vegetable oils has been sharply higher in the
1937-38 crushing season than in immediately preceding years, due principally
to the large cottonseed crop and the record supplies of vegetable oil foots.

Crop Board reports indicate that the acreage of cotton under culti-
vation on July 1, was 22 percent less than on the same date in 1937, that the
acreage of soybeans for harvest is 9.8 percent higher than in 1937, and the
acreage of peanuts 10.7 percent higher than on July 1 last year. Production
of flaxseed for the 1938 season was indicated as of July 1 at 7,631,000 bush-
els compared with an estimate of 7,622,000 bushels made on the corresponding
date a year ago for the crop of 1937. The final estimate of the 1937 crop
was reported in December at 6,974,01:0 bushels.

The available supply of these domestic vegetable oils is of importance
to the soap industry only insofar as they release a larger volume of cheaper
fats for use in soap, and as they augment the supplies of refining foots.
Insignificant amounts of soybean, peanut, corn, and linseed oils are used in
soap.

Marine animal oils

Hydrogenated fish and whale oils in addition to tallow, palm oil, and
greases, are sources of hard slow-lathering soap materials. Consumption of
marine animal oils in soap has increased each year since 1934, and in 1937
accounted for 11 percent of the total saponifiable materials used. More whale
oil than fish oil was used in 1931, but less in each year since then. Use of
fish oils in 1937 was slightly less than in 1936, but the use of whale oil in-
creased from 33 million pounds to 65 million pounds.

Available supplies of whale oil on hand were larger than have been
available in recent years. Even though closer supervision over the operation
of whaling expeditions under the American flag has been provided for, it is
probable that again in 1938-39 more whaling will be carried on under the
American flag than in recent years prior to the season of 1937-38. Thus,
there is a probability that if the whaling season proves to be a good one
"domestic production" may be continued on the high level of 1937-38.

Imports of whale oil were large in 1937, amounting to 55 million pounds,
but dropped to only 3 million pounds frcm January through March this year.


- 5 -








Stocks of whale oil amounted to 82 million pounds on March 31, slightly
lower than on March 31, 1937, but larger than in any preceding year since
1931.

Imported oils

About 20 percent of imported materials going into soap is quick
lathering hard oils coconut, palm-kernel and babassu oils. From 5 to 10
percent is contributed by palm oil, a slow-lathering material. Imported
whale oil is also utilized in soap.

Coconut oil and palm-kernel oil

Reports from the Philippines indicate that arrivals of copra have
been exceptionally heavy in Manila and Cebu and that an unusually good crop
is expected for the year unless low prices discourage production.

Conumnption of coconut oil in the United States increased steadily
from 554 million po'mds in 1932 to a peak of 637 million in 1936, which was
only slightly below the high levels of 1929 and 1930. In 1937 there was a
sharp drop to 493 million pounds resulting from increased consumption of
domestic fats and oils. Consumption during the first 3 months of this year
was slightly under the same period in 1937. Stocks of coconut oil on December
31 were over twice as large as a year earlier and were the heaviest on record
since September 30, 1934. While slightly more than half of domestic con-
sumption of coconut oil in 1937 was in soap, compared with only 41 percent in
1936, the percentage of total saponifiable materials used in soap manufacture
contributed by coconut oil dropped from 18 to 14 percent. (See table 2.)
This reduction was balanced by a sharp increase in the use of palm-kernel oil.

In conjunction with smaller disappearance and larger stocks, prices
of coconut oil h-ve declined, the average January-June 1938 being 3.4 cents
per pound plus 3 cents processing tax, compared with 7.6 cents per pound
plus 3 cents processing tax, January-June 1937. (See table 1.)

In 1937, 112 million pounds of palm-kernel oil were used in soap
manufacture, compared with only 26 million pounds in 1936. About 40 million
pounds of total supplies in 1937 were crushed in the United States from
imported kernels. The remainder of the supply was foreign crushed oil.

Babassu oil

Of the 32 million pounds of babassu oil consumed in the United States
in 1937, 34 percent was used in the soap industry, but this accounted for
only 1 percent of 3ll saponifiable materials used in soap manufacture.

Both babassu oil and kernels are bound on the free list under a
3-year trade agreremnt with Brazil, which became effective Jnuunry 1, 1936.
While the potential supply of babassu nuts is understood to be large, actual
commercial development of the industry apparently has not made great progress.


FOS-17


- 6 -










Palm oil

Palm oil has been imported in increasingly large volume since 1934.
This is in spite of an excise tax of 3 cents per pound which has be,:n
effective continuously since May 10, 1934, on the first domestic processing
of palm oil except.when used in the ranufacture of tin and terne plate.
Imports in the first 4 months of 198 were 98 million pounds, only 14
million pounds less than in the same period of-1937. Total imports during
1937 amounted to 411 million pounds.

From 1931 to 1934 an average of about 75 percent of palm .oil sup-
plies was used in soap, but in 1935, 1936, and 1937 a much larger proportion
was used in vegetable cooking fats. In 1937, use in soap exceeded use in
edible products, accounting for 40 percent of total disappearance. This
was 8 percent of total saponifiable materials used in soap.

Foreign soap production

Important developments in foreign soap production have taken place
in Japan, Germany, and Russia.

Japanese soap production is reported to have more than doubled since
1930, the largest increase being in laundry soap. The expansion was
facilitated by rapid development in hardonLd fish oils, 'which now account
for more than half of Japanese consumption of soap fnts. About one-third
of Japanese soap materials, of which bcrof tallow, rosin, and palm oil are
the largest items, are supplied from abroad. JTpanese imports of glycerin
have dropped sharply, amounting in 1936 to less thvn 2 percent of 1932
imports.

In Germany, shortage of natural so'p p0teri.ls h:.s sovr:rcly handi-
capped soap manufacturers in the past few ycars, necessitating use of
various substitutes and fillers, particularly sodium silicate nLd starch,
to spread existing oil supplies and n intensive search for new oil raw
materials. Among the latter ure *r'.pe skin end seed oil, tall oil from
paper mill sulphite liquor, ..nd f itty icids from coffee grounds. Domestic
production of oilseeds also h-.s been stimulated, nrd whaling expeditions
have been begun to augment domestic supplies of edible f-ts and thus
release other fats for soap manufacture.

In Russia, the soap industry has been extended to include crushing,
refining, fat-splitting, glycerin recovery, hydrogenation, and synthesis.
Much scientific research is reported. From 70 to 75 percent of the total
use of fats in the Soviet soap industry -.re sunflower and cottonseed oils.
Fish oils, blubber, tallow, and coconut oil are also used. Per copita con-
sumption of soap in Russia is snid te have tripled in the past few years.


FOS-17


- 7 -





FOS-17


Table 2.-


Soap: Materials used in manufacture, classified according
to soap making characteristics, 193F-37


: Materials used in :P'rcentage of saponifiable
Fats and oils, and rosin manufacturee material
:1935 : 1936 :1937 ,/: 1935 1936 :1937 I/
: : ^ !


:IJil. lb. Mil. lb. Mil. lb.:


Hard oils:
Slow lathering -
Inedible tallow
Whale and fish oils 2/
Greases
Palm oil
Other 3/
Total

Quick lathering -
Coconut oil
Palm-kernel oil
Babassu oil
Total

Soft oils-; -
Cottonseed foots and
other foots 4/
Olive foots and inedible
oil 4/
Other
Total

Total fats and oils

Rosin

Tctal saponifiable
materials

1r Prel iiniary.
./ Perc,-ntages for other oi
4/ Estimatecd, '.Ld includes
fats).


Percent Percent Percent


: 663 660 614 : 41 38 34
: 18 161 189 : 8 9 11
98 99 94: 6 6 5
87 78 141: 5 4 8
: 2 1 1 :
389 998 1,039 60 57 58


: 230 307 252 : 14 18 14
37 26 112 2 1 6
: 9 14 1 1
267 343 378 : 16 20 21



: 191 183 153 : 12 11 10

33 26 19 2 2 1
24 28 40 1 2 2
: 248 236 242 : 15 14 13

: 1,504 1,578 1,659 : 91 91 92

: 139 148 136 : 9 9 8


: 1,643 1,726 1,795 1:0 100 100


2/ Hydrogen'ted.
Is averaged from .1. to .3 of
some rmicellanreous materials


1 percent.
(as r-d oil from animal


Compiled as follows:
Fats and oils, Bureau of the Census; foots based on "foots, including loss".
Rosin, livavl Stores Repcrt, Bureru of Cemistry and Soils.
Percentages computed from table.


- 8 -







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Table 4.- Major fits used in soap: Factory production, J nuary March,
and stocks March 31, United States, 1936-38


Fat or oil


From domestic materials:
Tallow, inedible
Fish and whale oil
Grease 2/
Vegetable oil foots 3-
Total

From imported materir.ls:
Coconut oil, crude
Palm oil
Palm-kernel oil
Babascu oil
Total
Grand total 5/


Factory production I
Jan.-MLar.


Stocks, Mar. 31


S1936 1937 : 1938 1936 : 1937 1938
il. b Mil. b l. b Mil. lb:Mil. lb Mil. b Mil. lb


: 1/122
i 49
S 70
: ^--


i/ 169
29
79
m-


1/196
39
so


291
191
63
72


195
203
52
45


226
166
.. 67
58


241 276 315 618 496 517


70 62 75 : 148 76 210
-- -- -- 89 102 158
o/ 0 4/ 8 / 1 : 20 18 16
15 8 12 : 5 4 7
_5 78 88 : 262 200 391
326 354 403 : 880 696 908


Apparent production.
Excludes vool ain rcov,:red gr-ase.
Includes tottons-ed, olive,. and other vegetable oil
Oil equivalent of imported kernels.
Does not include other unnamed oils used in soap.


foots, and red oil.


Compiled and compute -d from Bureau of the Cons'us, Animal and Vegetable Fats and
Oils, annual, and quarterly mimeographed reports.


Stocks of coconut, palm, and palm-kernel oils are crude plus refined
converted to crude. Babassu oil is reported as a total in 1936 and
1938 stocks are crude and refined totaled without conversion.


1937,


The items included in this tabie are, of c6urw also used for purposes other
than soap production.


Figures rounded to million without adjustment to totals.


.2!


S5
.5/


---


FOS-17


- 10 4


I





- 11 -


Table 5.- Specified oils: Production, net imports, stocks at end
of period, and apparent disappearance, 1935-37

Coconut oil, crude


Year


1935
1936
1937 _/
Jan.-Mar.
1938 1/
Jan.-Mlar.


Factory : Stocks end:
production :et imports: of period:
1,000 lb. 1 000 lb. 1.000 lb.


252,841
258,383
266,420-
61,945

74,656


341,073
304,320
328,353
76,486


153,455
75,E73
177,209
75,665

210,313


Apparent
disap-
Eara.nce
1,000 lb.

629,691
640,286
493,437
138,658


Percentage
used in
e soan
Percent


130,s65


Palm-kernel oil


and palm-kernels in terms of oil


1935 : 81,103 30,261 55,203 67
1936 : 32,49o 12,5S3 50,168 53
1937 1/ : 174,037 41,sSl 149,7S9 74
Jan.-Mar. : 32,362 18,251. 27,194
1938 1/ :
Jan.-Mar. : 1,330 16,219 26,992

Palm oil, crude

1935 : 297,579 69,528 305,020 29
1936 : 338,789 93,795 314,522 25
1937 l/ : 411,112 154,971 349,936 4o
Jan.-Mar. : 81,555 101,687 73,663
1933 :/
Jan.-Mar. : 75,376 157,S25 72,522


l/ Preliminary.

Compiled as follows:
Production and stocks Bureau of the Census, Animal and Vegetable Fats
and Oils. Stocks are crude plus refined converted to crude, using
the following: Coconut 0.94; palm-kernel oil 0.93.
Trade figures Foreign Commerce and Navigation of the United States.
For palm oil, edible and inedible imports are not separately reported.
For palm-kernel oil, net imports of oil are added to oil equivalent
of imported kernels to compute disappearance.
Apparent disappearance computed from table.


------------ ------ ----


---~






FOS-17


- 12 -


Table 6.-Tallow, inedible: Apparent production, net imports, stocks
end of period, and consumption, 1935-38

:Apparent : : : Percentage
Year :production :IIet imports:Stocks, end : Factory : used in
: / : : of period : consumption : soap
:1,000 lb. 1,000 lb. 1,000 lb. 1,000 lb. Percent

1935 : 441,682 245,851 295,660 718,357 92
1936 : 608,227 66,124 244,037 725,974 91
1937 2/ : 624,878 2,968 195,917 675,966 91
Jan.-Mar. 168,943 579 195,268 218,291
1938 2/
Jan.-Mar. 196,268 183 225,972 166,396

i/ Estimates of apparent production are computed by the Bureau of
Agricultural Economics. Figures are based on factory consumption,
trade, -nd corrected for changes in stocks, because factory pro-
duction figures do not include considerable quantities produced
on farms and by small local butcheries and meat markets.
2/ Preliminary.

Compiled as follows:
Trade figures Foreign Commerce and Navigation of the United States.
Factory con-umption and stocks Bureau of the Census, Animal and
Vegetable Fats and Oils.

Table 7.-So.p: Imports and exports, 1935-37

l: i;cts : : Exports
:: :: :Toilet : : All
Year :Castile:Toilet : All : Total : or :Laundry: crher : Total
S: other : : : f-ncy : : 1/
S1,CGO 1,000 1,00 1, 1,0: : 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000
: lb. lb. lb. lb. : : lb. 1b. Ib. lb.

1935 : 2,038 355 19,849 2. ^ : : 7,637 12,134 7,350 27,121
1936 : 1,631 587 1,633 3,901: : R,914 11,559 7,404 27,877
1937 3/ : 1,265 608 1,837 3,710: : 9,195 15,355 7,862 32,692

I/ Includes owd'L-red or flarked; scouring sonps, pastes, bricks, and scouring
powders; shaving soaps, creams, rowders, and sticlds; medicated and all
other soap when reported. These data are the total of items separately
report.
2/ The increase in imports came in between October 1934 and September 1935,
the period .'t -r the 3 cents per round excise tax was placed on the
major imported so a oils before the same rate' of tax was imposed on
"articles. .irnufactured. .wholly or in chief value from any one or
more of the oils subjects to. .tax."
3/ Preliminary.


Foreign Commerce and Navigation of the United States.






FOS-17


- 13 -


Table 8.-Oleomargarine: Production and materials used in manufacture,
United States, April-May, 1937 and 1938

: 1937 1/ : 1938 1/
Item : :
S Apr. May Apr. May
:1,000 lb. 1,OCO lb.: 1,000 lb. 1,000 lb.

Oleo oil : 1,359 1,122 : 1,412 1,354
Oleostearine : 279 275 : 240 274
Lard neutral 173 151 : 138 114
Oleo stock : 158 115 : 163 152
Total animal : 1,969 1,663 : 1,953 1,894

Cottonseed oil : 14,789 12,557 : 11,422 9,958
Soybean oil : 2,752 1,490 : 2,356 2,053
Peanut oil 395 194 : 275 257
Corn oil :64 118 : 46 11
Total domestic vegetable 2/ 18,000 14,359 : 14,099 12,279

Coconut oil : 4,095 4,094 : 8,981 7,759
Palm-kernel oil 1,136 834 : 560 470
Babassu oil : 3,032 2,617 : 971 685
Palm oil 164 157 --- ---
Rice oil 3/ --- --- :34 18
Total foreign vegetable 4/ 8,428 73702 : 10,546 8,932

Total fats and oils : 28,397 23,724 : 26.598 23,105

Milk : 6,359 5,244 : 6,063 5,509
Salt and other miscellaneous : 1,611 1,346 : 1,446 1,267


Production of oleomargarine : 34,349 28,741 : 2,641 28,500


Compiled and computed from reports of the Commissioner of Internal Revenue.


Preliminary. 2/ Ordinarily domestically produced.
Bureau of the Census; probably oil imported from Japan.
Not domestically produced.




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