The Fats and oils situation

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Title:
The Fats and oils situation
Physical Description:
301 v. : ill. ; 26-28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economic Research Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics and Statistics Service
United States -- World Food and Agricultural Outlook and Situation Board
Publisher:
The Bureau
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publication Date:
Frequency:
frequency varies

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Oil industries -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Oils and fats, Edible -- Economic aspects -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
FOS-1 (Mar. 1937) - FOS-301 (Oct. 1980).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: Agricultural Marketing Service, 1954-Mar. 1961; Economic Research Service, May 1961-<Oct. 1977>; Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service, <May 1978>-July 1980; Economics and Statistics Service, Oct. 1980.
General Note:
"Approved by the World Food and Agricultural Outlook and Situation Board," Oct. 1977-Oct. 1980.
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Item 21-D.
Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.

Record Information

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University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000502965
oclc - 01588232
notis - ACS2699
lccn - 46039840 //r82
issn - 0014-8865
sobekcm - AA00005305_00005
Classification:
lcc - HD9490.U5 A33
ddc - 380.1/41385/0973
System ID:
AA00005305:00005

Related Items

Succeeded by:
Fats and oils outlook & situation

Full Text



UN


FOS-16



THE F







i,. "AND 01



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71""


ITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS
WASH I NGTON
JUNE 14, 1938



ATS AND 0 I LS S I T U A n', pT
--- -------- __L__ -_ -_- _----



U.S. DEPOSITORY

TED CONSUMPTION OF PRIMARY FATS
LS IN FOODS AND FOOD PRODUCTS,
UNITED STATES, 1937


U.S DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE NEC. 34379 BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS


S": BUTTER, COTTONSEED OIL, AND LARD CONSTITUTE OVER 80 PERCENT OF OUR FOOD FATS. THE
CONSUMPTION IN 1937 INCLUDED SOME FOREIGN PRODUCED COTTONSEED OIL, BUT THIS AMOUNTED TO
ONLY ABOUT 3 PERCENT OF THE TOTAL CONSUMPTION. CORN, SOYBEAN, AND PEANUT OILS EACH CON-
TRIBUTED ABOUT 2 PERCENT. THE FOREIGN OILS ARE USED TO A LIMITED EXTENT, COCONUT OIL
CONTRIBUTED ONLY ABOUT 2 PERCENT, PALM OIL 2 PERCENT, OLIVE OIL I PERCENT, AND ALL
'. OTHERS ABOUT 2 PERCENT. EDIBLE ThLLOW, OLEO OIL, AND OLEOSTEARINE EACH CONTRIBUTED
ABOUT I PERCENT, AND MARINE ANIMAL UIlz Le.ab IMAN UNt-HALF OF ONE PERCENT.




:

FOS-16 2 -

Table 1.- Price per pound of specified fats and oils, April-May, 1937-38


: 1937 : 1938
Fat or oil : : : :
Apr. May Apr. May


Cents


Cents


Cents


Cents


Domestic prices
Butter, 92 score, N.Y. 32.9 32.3 : 27.7 26.4
Oleomargarine,domestic vegetable, Chicago : 16.5 16.4 : 15.5 14.8
Lard, prime steam, Chicago 11.6 11.9 : 8.2n 8.1n
Lard, refined, Chicago 12.6 12.9 : 9.4 9.2
Lard compounds, Chicago 13.7 13.2 : 10.3 10.2
Coconut oil, edible, N.Y. 10.5 9.2 : 5.7 6.2
Cottonseed oil, crude, fob S.E.mills 9.5n 8.9 : 6.9 7.0
Cottonseed oil, p.s.y., N.Y. 10.6 10.5 : 8.2
Soybean oil, refined, N.Y. 12.4 12.3 : 8.8 8.6
Peanut oil, domestic, refined, N.Y. 13.5n 13.2n : 10.1 10.1
Rape oil refined, N.Y. 12.2 12.5 : 11.6 11.2
Oleo oil, No. 1, N.Y. : 13.1 12.5 : 8.9 8.5
Oleostearine, barrels, N.Y. : 10.2 9.6 : 6.7 6.0
L
Corn oil, refined, N.Y. 12.9 12.4 : 9.7 9.6
Olive oil, edible, N.Y. : 33.3n 32.5n : 25.7 25.6
Sunflower oil, refined, N.Y. 122n ---
Teaseed oil, crude, N.Y. 10.5 10.1 7.6 7.1

Coconut oil, crude, Pacific Coast 7.9 6.3 3.1 3.1
Tallow, inedible, Chicago 8.6 8.2 4.6 4.4
Grease, house, N.Y. 8.7 8.3 4.0 3.9
Palm oil, crude, N.Y. 7.0 6.0 3.8 3.5
Olive oil, foots, barrels, I.Y. : 11.6n 11.4n : 8.6 8.3
Palm-kernel oil, denatured, N.Y. 7.1 6.0 : 4.0 4.2
Babassu oil, tanks, N.Y. (futures) 10.8 9.8 : 6.4n 6.4n
Sardine oil, tanks, Pacific Coast 7.2 6.9n : 5.4 4.9

Linseed oil, raw, Minneapolis 10.8 10.9 : 9.3 8.9
Tung oil, drums, Atlantic Coast 15.3 13.8 : 12.5 11.4
Perilla oil, drums, N.Y. 1 1.9 11.5 : 10.6 10.3
Soybean oil, crude, fob mills 9.8 9.0 : 5.9 5.7
Menhaden oil, crude, fob Baltimore 6.0n 5.7n : 4.7n 4.7n

Foreign prices I/ 2
Cotton oil, crude, naked, Hull 6.8 6.6 : 3.8 4.0
Copra, Resccada, Philippines 3.9 3.1 : 1.2 --
Palm-kernel oil, crude, Hull 6.6 6.0 : 4.1 4.1
Whale oil, crude, No. 1, Rotterdam 5.0 5.0 : 3.0 3.3
Tallow beef, fair-fine, London 6.1 6.0 : 4.4 .4.4
Linseed oil, naked, Hull 6.5 6.6 : 5.6 5.5


I Converted to U.S. cents per pound at current monthly rates of exchange.
Prices for April and May 1938 are preliminary.






FOS-16 3 -

THE GENERAL FATS AID OILS SITJATIOU

The large supply of cottonseed oil from the record 1957 cotton

crop and weakness in consumer purchasing power continue to be the major

influences in the general fats and oils situation, the Bureau of Agricul-

tural Economics reports.

Cottonseed oil

The May 25 revised estimate of the Crop Reporting Board placed

cottonseed production from the 1937 cotton crop at 8,426,000 short tons,

compared with 5,511,000 tons in 1936. Up to April 30, deliveries of cot-

tonseed to mills in the 1937-38 season had amounted to only 76 percent of

1937 production, compared with 80 percent a :year ago, and stocks of cot-

tonseed on hand at mills were 595,000 tons, an increase of 437,000 tons

over the same date last year. Stocks of crude and refined cottonseed oil,

(crude basis) on April 30, however, were only 78 million pounds larger

than a year ago. Although consumption of cottonseed oil in 1937-38 will

probably exceed that of any previous year, carry-over of both seed and oil

into the 1938-39 season is expected to be large. A preliminary estimate

of disappearance of refined cottonseed oil for the 9 months August-April

is placed at 1,350 million pounds, which is more than 9 million pounds more

than for the entire 1936-37 season.

Although exports of crude and refined cottonseed oil have exceeded

imports in several individual months, the United States has a net import

balance for the 1937-33 season to date, as it had in each season since 1933-34.

Lard and butter

Iard stocks on May 1 u-re 1;22 million pounds compared with 209 million
pounds a year earlier. Hog nairkutin.s this su-:icr are expected to be con-
siderably larger than last year, but they -re expected to decrease seasonally
during July and August. In view of smaller stocks, the improved export
demand and the prospects for a smaller supply of cottonseed oil next year,
little further weakness in lard prices is expected this summer with some
advance not unlikely.










With butter production decidedly larger than a year earlier and
pay rolls small, butter prices have declined. April butter prices averaged
the lowest for the month since 1934. Production during the coming months
will probably be considerably larger than in the summer of 3937.

The Bureau of Agricultural Economics index of prices received by
producers of all farm commoditi:-s was at 92 in May 1938, compared with
94 in the preceding month and 128 in rMy 1937. This represents a decline
of nearly 50 percent during the past year. Prices of veget.ible oils in
general averaged slightly lower during May than in April and, in line with
market prices of farm products, were about 30 percent lower than in May 1937.

1938 oilseed acreage

First official reports of acr'3-_ge of the major domestic oilseed crops
in cultivation this season will be reicased by the Department of Agriculture
on July 8 for cotton and July 10 for flaxsecd, soybeans, and peanuts. The
flaxseed report rill include a summary, of condition and percentage of pro-
duction.

At the present time the national aercage allotment for the cotton
crop of 1938 under thz Agricultural Conservation Program is estirmted at
about 28 million acres, comp'-red with the final estimate of 34 million acres
harvested last'year.

Tax legislation

The rate of excise tox on imported sesme seed was r.:duced to 1.18
cents per pound, on imported hemps'-cd to 1.24 cents pLr pound, and on
imported perilla seed to 1.38 cents per pound by the 1938 F:venue Act. The
new rates, which replace the old rat. of 2 cents per pound in each case,
become effective July 1, 1938. The rjte of 2 cents per pound was retained
on rape seed and kapok seed. The rate on sesame seed is equivalent to about
2-1/2 cents per pound on the average oil yi-ld, compared with a rate of 3
cents per pound on imported edible sesame oil and 4-1/2 cents on inedible
sesame oil. The rate on perilla sm-ed is equivalent to about 3-3/4 cents per
pound on average oil yield, ,Jhile the rate on perilla oil is 4-1/2 cents per
pound. The new hempse.d rate is equivalent to ever 5 certs per pound on the
average oil yield but is still lowur than the combined t-x and duty on heap-
seed oil which amount to 6 cents per oound.

Among other provisions, the R,.-nue Act permits tax free importation
of rape oil when denatured and imported for use in tice manufacture of rubber
substitutes or lubricating oil, exc-pts products m-de from coconut oil pro-
duced in Guam and American SNaoa from excise taxes, provides that after June
30, 1939, whale oil or marine animal oil of any kind (except sperm), not
produced entirely by American vessels from marine animals taken or captured
by vessels of the Unitd States, shall not be admitted free of excise tax,
and eliminated the so-called nuisanceu" tax of 5 percent on the selling
price of toilet soaps sold :jfter June 30, 1938.


FOS-16


- 4 -







MINOR 0OD OILS

Corn. olive, sesame. sunflower. rare. teaseed. and babassu oils

Recent statistics of the first four of the above minor oils used
in food products in the United States were presented in FOS-5, July 14,
1937, and are here revised and brought up to date. Certain statistics of
the other three minor oils are presented in this issue for the first time
in the FOS series.

Corn il

Apparent disappearance of corn oil in 1937 was 166 million pounds,
the largest volume on record. (See table 3.) This was only 1.8 percent
of total disappearance of all fats and oils, however, and less than one-
tenth of apparent disappearance of cottonseed oil in the United States in
the same year.

Corn oil is a minor by-product of the corn refining industries and
of a very few distilleries, being obtained by crushing the germs separated
from the whole grains by either wet or dry process milling. Production
of corn oil may be expected to expand or contract in direct correspond-
ence with general activity in these industries.

Activity in the corn refining industries has remained fairly steady
in the current season. Wet process grindings of corn in the October-April
period of 1937-38 were 42 million bushels, the same as in the corresponding
period of 1936-37. Factory production of crude corn oil from January
through March was 32 million pounds, compared with 31 million pounds in the
same period of 1937.

Since 1933 domestic production of corn oil has been insufficient
to supply the requirements of the domestic market and net imports have
increased each year through 1937 despite an import duty of 20 percent ad
valorem. Net imports from January through March were 6 million pounds, com-
pared with 10 million pounds in the same period last year. Corn oil is
being imported largely from European countries and Japan.

Corn oil is utilized almost exclusively as a salad and cooking oil,
and in the manufacture of miscellaneous food products other than oleomar-
garine and shortening. Cottonseed oil predominates in these fields and
the price of corn oil varies in close conformity with changes in the prices
of cottonseed oil and other competing food oils.

Olive 2w

Revised preliminary estimate of world olive oil production in
1937-38 is placed at 2.3 billion pounds, compared with 1.6 billion a year
earlier, and an average of 1.8 billion pounds in the 5 years ending in
1936-37. L/ Supplies of olive oil are expected to be about 40 percent
iL Statistics, by countries, of olive oil production, average 1927-28 to
1931-32, annual 1932-33 to 1937-38, were published in FOS-13, March
1938, table 7.


ros-16


-5-






ros-16


-6-


larger in the current marketing year than in 1937, in spite of reduced sup-
plies in Spain. The largest gains in production have been made in Italy,
Greece, Portugal, Turkey, Algeria, and Syria. Italy was the largest sup-
plier of United States imports of 48 million pounds of edible olive oil
in 1937, which were the smallest since 1920.

In response to larger world supplies, imports into the United States
have sharply increased, and from January through March were more than 6 mil-
lion pounds larger than in the same period of 1936 or 1937. Market prices
which have dropped steadily since October 1937, are now (May) roughly 7
cents below a year ago. The augmented supplies of foreign-crushed oil have
moved readily into the hands of consumers, and stocks on hand March 31 were
smaller than on the same date in either of the two preceding years.

Domestic production of olive oil is limited practically to Califor-
nia, and has never exceeded 7 percent of domestic consumption in the 19
years that it has been reported. Domestic production from January through
March totaled 2 million pounds, the same as last year.

Sesame oil

The rates on sesame seed and oil under the Tariff Act of 1930 and
the Revenue Act of 1934 favored imports of sesame seed until August 21,
1936, when a 2 cent excise tax on the seed (which had been on the regular
free list) became effective at the same time that a 3-cent per pound pro-
cessing tax on sesame oil was discontinued, leaving only the regular tariff
of 3 cents per pound. The excise tax was equivalent to about 4.4 cents per
pound on the oil yield of the seed, and imports of seed decreased to 11
million pounds in 1937 compared with 118 pounds a year earlier. Imports of
sesame oil, on the other hand, never previously over 3 million pounds in a
year under the 1930 tariff schedules, jumped to 37 million pounds in the
first 6 months of 1937. With increased supplies of domestic oils in the
last half of 1937, imports of sesame oil were sharply reduced, amounting to
about 2 million pounds, and were still low in the first quarter of this
year. Stocks March 31 were only 2 million pounds, and disappearance from
January through March was only 4 million pounds.

The new rate of 1.18 cents per pound on sesame seed (equivalent to
about 2.6 cents on the oil yield) which becomes effective on July 1, 1938,
may stimulate imports of sesame seed if supplies of domestic oils are
reduced this year. China has supplied almost 95 percent of all sesame seed
imported into the United States in the 5 years 1932-36. No estimate of
the 1937 Chinese crop is available at present. Production in 1933-36
averaged 1,895 million pounds, according to available reports. Most
sesane seed is produced in the lower Hwang Ho and Yangtze Basins.
Purthernore the bulk of export shipments of sesame seed are generally
shipped from August to March, so that no very large volume of seed will
probably arrive until the 1938 crop begins to move into the export market.

Denatured sesame oil (used largely in soap) bears an excise tax
of -1l/2 cents and none has been imported since 1936.






FOS-16


-7-


Sesame oil is used quite largely in factory production of food pro-
ducts, and also directly as a salad and cooking oil. Sesale oil has been
used in a wide variety of uses similar to those for cottonseed oil, but it
has the unique property of resisting rancidity longer than many other oils,
and on this account it is desirable for use in prepared flours for making
pancakes, biscuits, etc. Apparent disappearance was only one-half of one
percent of total domestic consumption of fats and oils in 1937.

Sunflpwer sil.

Consumption of sunflower oil averaged 25 million pounds annually
from 1931 to 1936, the oil being used largely as a salad and cooking oil.

The 4-1/2 cent per pound excise tax on imports of sunflower oil,
effective August 21, 1936 (in addition to regular tariff rate of 20 percent
ad valorem), has eliminated all but negligible quantities of edible sun-
flower oil from the import trade. Inedible oil is on the free list but
is subject to the sane tax and no imports were separately reported in 1937.
Total disappearance of sunflower oil was less than 1 million pounds in
1937, compared with 26 million pounds in 1936. In vie-. of lower general
market prices for fats and oils no extensive imports of sunflower oil are
expected in the near future. Small quantities of sunflower seed continue
to be imported, but these are believed to be entirely used for purposes
other than for crushing in view of the excise tax of 2 cents per pound
(about 8 cents on the oil yield).

In the United States about 95 percent of the sunflo-r seed-pro-
duced is grown in California, Illinois, and Missouri, and production in
these States averaged a little over 7 million pounds in the 10 years
1927-36. There has been virtually no crushing, however, since seed could
not be purchased at a price that would permit a profit to the miller. 2

Russia is the principal exporter of sunflower seed and oil in the
world market.

Ra e oil

Rape is a winter forage and cover crop grown rather extensively in
several sections of the United States. Only negligible quantities of seed
are known to have been produced domestically, foreign seed being imported
for planting and also for use in birdseed mixtures. In 1937, 3.6 million
pounds of seed were imported under the Federal Seed Act. It is not certain,
however, that all seed imported under the Act is actually planted. No rape-
seed is known to have been crushed in the United States prior to 19341 or
1935, anJ it is believed that none is now being crushed in view of an
excise tax of 2 cants per pound (equivalent to about 5.7 cents per pound
on the oil yield) which became effective AuGust 21, 1936.
2/ Sievers, ,-. F. The sunflower: its culture an-l uses. U.S. Dept. of
Agriculture nimeographed report, Septnmber 1937 (rev.)






FOS-16


Imports of both seed and oil declined sharply following the imposi-
tion of the excise taxes in 1936. The combined tariff and excise taxes on
edible oil is 5.3 cents per pound. Denatured rape oil is on the free
list and the 1936 excise tax of 4.5 cents per pound was removed from oil
to be used as lubricating oil and in ;nufacture of rubber substitutes, by
the 1938 Revenue Act effective July 1, 1938. "Imports of denatured oil
for these purposes are expected to exmcnd under the new tax-free status.

During 1935 ind 1936 consumpti n of both edible rnc' uenatured rape
oil expanded sharply. Most of the edible oil was used in manufactured
cooking fats. The urice of refined rape oil is now higher than that of
similar edible oils. Ripe oil has been practically eliminated from the
edible field since the Revenue Act of 1936.

Teaseed oil

Teiseed oil, pecnilirly similar in nature to olive oil, has been
on the free list for a number of yea-: but imports were of very minor
importance prior to 1935. Supplies are virtually limited to China and
Kwantung peninsula.

Imports of terseed oil reached a peak of 27 million pounds in 1937
after a steady 6-year rise. Imports in the first 3 months of 1938, how-
ever, were only 291,000 pounds, reflectinG the influence of materially
lower market prices and increased suL-lies of olive oil.

Babassu gil

Aop-rent disarpearance of babassu oil was 32 million pounds in
1937, 4 million pounds less than in 1936, despite generally higher prices
in the first half of the year. Disappearance in the first quarter of
1938, however, was larger than in the same period of 1936 or 1937.

Both babassu oil and nuts or .-nels are bound on the free list
under a 3-year trade agreement with Brazil, which became effective on
January 1, 1936. While the potential supply of the nuts is understood
to oe large, actual l commercial developDrent has not been rr.pid.

Virtually .ll of the domestic supply of babassu oil is crushed from
imported nuts and kernels. In 1937, 42 million pounds of babassu oil were
reported as used in factory production. Of this, 15 million pounds were
used in oleomargarine, 11 million in other food products and 14 million
pounds in soap.

Kaok oil

Revised figures indicate that 16 million pounds of kapok oil were
available for consumption in the United States in 1936. Its use is large-
ly in food and food products.

Kapok oil- was not separately reported in import statistics prior to
1936, but imports are known to have been received in 1934 and 1935, follow-
ing the imnosition of excise taxes on coconut, palm, palm-kernel, sun-
flower, Pnd sesame oils.


- 8 -








Imports of kapok seed, a by-iroduct of the kapok fibre industry of
Java, British India, Malaya, and the Philippine Islands, began soon after
the excise taxes became effective, chiefly by Pacific Coast copra crushers
who were in search of new and untaxed raw materials.

The 1936 Revenue Act placed a tax of 2 cents per pound on the seed
and 4F cents per pound on the oil (in addition to a tariff rate of 20 per-
cent ad valorem), and no imports of seed or oil were reported thereafter.

Rice oil

An edible oil, reported used in oleomargarine for the first time in
Marmh, 1938, is rice or rice bran oil, which is used as a food and soap oil
in rice -roducinz countries. While not separately reported, the 17,000
pounds used in March are believed to have been shipped from Japan. No
domestic production is known to exist at present.

Table 2.- Specified oils and oilseeds: Imports for consumption,
1935-38


Kind


Edible R/
Babassu oil
Corn oil
Kapok oil
Olive oil
Rape oil
Sesame oil
Sunflower oil
Teaseed oil


_LS
: Calendar year Jan. Mar.
S1935 : 1936 :1937 i/ : 1936 '1937 / '1938 I/
:1.000 lb 1,000 Ib 1,000 b:1,000 l 1 ,000 lb 1.000 Ib


25,746

:70,789
:35,186
S 360
: 37,052
:1/7,346


403
28,672
15,157
60,972
40,526
3,317
24,714
7,904


330:
32,926:
0:
48,343:
979:
38,920:
168:
27,492:


150
7,070
(6,962)
13,638
24,249
53
469
(4,404)


297
10,562
o
14,628
25
15,742
168
(7,373)


5,841
0
o
0, 763
712
342
0
291


OILSEEDS


Babassu nuts and
Rapok seed
Rape seed
Sesame seed
Sunflower seed


kernels 15,261
S12,657
: 29,515
:146,394
/ : 667


55,928
1,930
27,836
117,795
574


54,792:
o:
6,180:
11,065:
496:


23,586 29,584
(1,930) 0
13,433 788
90,963 747
355 496


1/ Preliminary.


2/ It should be noted that these data do not include the volume of inedible
imports of these oils.
Exports from China and Hong Kong to the United States.
Small quantities of sunflower seed are imported for roasting, planting, etc.
Compiled from Foreign Commerce and Navigation of the United States.
Leaders (---) indicate less than 500 pounds or not separately reported.


a),916
o
2,088
840
0


FOS-16


- 9 -







FOS-16


- 10 -


Table 3.- Corn oil, crude: Production, trade, stocks, and apparent
disappearance, annual, 1935-37, January March, 1936-38
(Net exports are indicated by a minus sign)
: : et
SFactory : : et : Stucks, Apparent
Year produc- I Exports exports end of disap-
t: ion Exports or net period pearance
:_ : : : imports :
:1,000 lb. 1,000 lb. 1,U00 lb. 1,000 lb. 1,0O0 lb. 1,000 lb.
Annual
1935 : 99,788 25,746 833 24,913 21,203 131,490
1936 : 127,171 28,672 929 27,743 25,507 150,610
1937 2/ : 126,095 32.926 444 32.482 1.,,471 165,613


Jan. -L.ar.
1936
1937 2/
1938 /


32,209
31,253
31,973


7,070
10,562
5,841


219 6,851
167 10,395
28 5,813


26,907
25,972
17,428


37,660
41,183
38,828


1/ No reexports reported.
T' Prel Lminary.

Compiled as follows:
Production and stocks Bureau of the Census, Animal and Vegetable Fats
and Oils. Production of cru'r oil, and stocks of crude plus refined
converted to crude (using 0.95).
Trade figures Foreign Commerce ai:d iavigaLion of the United States.
Imports reported as edible; exports reported as crude and refined
not separately stated, used as crude.
Apparent disappearance computed from table.


Table 4.- Corn oil: lm.ports into the United States, by countries, 1933-37


Country of origin : 1933 / : 1934 : 1935 :1936 : 1937 2

:1,000 lb. 1,0.0 1b. 1,000 lb. 1,000 lb. 1,000 lb.
Europe -
lNetherlands : ,42 2,652 5,315 6,595 10,144
United Kingdom : 1,480 2,44 4,890 5,120 7,353
Belgium 439 1,G30 6,250 6,565 5,431
France 1,070 736 3,759 2,343 3,741
Germay 2: ,325 1,903 2,415 1,576 3,613
Czechoslovakia --- --- 312 94 --
Japan 1,432 1,646 1,747 2,612 1,905
Other --- 58 1,058 767 739
Tctil 9,169 10,769 25,746 28,672 32,926


Not
Includes


Compiled from Foreign Commnerce and Na:'.ation of the United States.


i/ General irrmprts, 1933; beginning 19Z4, imports for consumption.
separately reported prior to 1933. 2/ Preliminary. 3
Mexico, Canada, and Argentina.






MOS-16


Table 5.- Olive oil, edible:
disappearance, annual,


Year
*


I


Factory
production.


Production, net imports, stocks, and apparent
1935-37, January March, 1936-38


Net
imports


: Stocks,
: end of
p: eriod


Apparent
disap-
pearance


: Factory
:consumption
: I/


1,000 lb, 1,000 lb. 1,000 lb. 1,000 lb. 1,000 lb.
Annual
1935 : 664 70,789 2,986 70,279 2,213
1936 : 4,498 60,972 4,099 64,357 3,972
1937 : 1,809 48,343 2,468 51,783 3,180
Jan.-Mar.
1936 : 4,049 13,638 5,600 15,073
19372 : 1,809 14,628 4,137 16,399
1938 2/ 1,864 20,763 3,554 21,541


/ in miscellaneous edible products.
T Preliminary.


Compiled as follows:
Production and stocks Bureau of the Census, Animal and Vegetable Fats and
Oils.
Trade figures Foreign Commerce and Navigation of the United States.
Apparent disappearance computed from table.


Table 6.- SeSame seed and oil; Production, imports for consumption, stocks,
and apparent disappearance, annual 1935-37, Jan.-Mar., 1936-38

: Sesame oil : Imports
SFactory : Imports : Stocks, : Apparent: of
Year produc- : : : : end of : disap- : sesame
: tion :TIndible Edible Total : period pearance seed
:1,0 b. 1000 Ib. 1,0000 b. 1,000 Ib. 1,000 lb. 1b000 lb. 1,000 lb.
Annual
1935 : 64,977 11 360 371 11,322 56,682 : 146,394
1936 : 51,261 49 3,317 3,366 11,573 54,376 : 117,795
1937 / :2/4,979 --- 38,920 38,920 5,485 49,987 : 11,065
Jan.-Mar.
1936 :23,058 --- 53 53 23,204 11,229 : 90,963
1937 1 :2/ 336 -- 15,742 15,742 16,679 10,972 : 747
1938 :/ 378 --- 342 342 2,003 4,202 640

/ Preliminary.
SOil equivalent of imported seed, using 45 percent.

Compiled as follows:
Production and stocks Bureau of the Census, Animal and Vegetable Fats and
Oils.
Trade figures Foreign Commerce and Navigation of the United States.
Apparent disappearance computed from table.


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Table 7.- Sunflower seed and oil: Imports, stocks December 31, and
apparent disappearance, 1935-38

: Sunflower oil : Imports of
: Imports for consumption i :Apparent : sunflower
Year Stocks, : disap- : seed
Edible :Inedible Total Dec. 31 dran-
:earance :
1,000 lb. 1,00 lb. 1,000 lb. 1,000 l. ,OOlb. b.
Annual :
1935 : 37,052 207 37,259 1,024 36,874 : 667
1936 2/ 24,714 541 25,255 250 26,029 : 574
1937/ : 168 307 475 --- 725 : 496
.1938 3/
Jan.-Mar.: 0 0 0 0 0: 0

y Small quantities of seed are imported for roasting, planting, etc.
No imports reported August December. 3 Preliminary.


Table 8.- Rapeseed and rape oil: Production, imports, stocks December 31,
apparent disappearance, 1935-38


and


:Rape oil : Rapeseed, imports
Year :Factory : Imports for : Stocks, :Apparent :: For
: produc- : consumption : end of : disap- : Total : planting
: tion : Edible :Inedible : period :poarance : : 2/
:1,000 lb. 1,000 lb. 1,000 lb. 1,000 lb. 1,000 lb.:1,000 lb. 1,000 lb.
Annual
1935 : (6,600) 35,186 25,112 12,233 67,549 : 29,515 5,549
1936 : (6,000) 40,526 22,676 14,214 67,221 : 27,836 11,808
1937 3/ : --- 979 4,875 5,065 15,003 : 6,180 3,592
Jan.-Mar. :
1936 : (2,000) 24,249 6,061 23,387 19,156 : 13,433 4,346
1937 --- 25 176 8,385 6,030 : 788 447
1938 : --- 712 1,678 3,905 3,550 : 2,088 1,256

I/ It is believed by the Bureau of Plant Industry, the Tariff Commission, and the
Department of Commerce that prior to 1934-35 imports of rapeseed have been
used for planting and birdseed and not fcr crushing. It is known through
reliable private sources that some rapeseed was crushed in 1935-36. Figures
for these years are estimates of the Burcau of Agricultural Economics based
on the excess of 1935 and 1936 imports over 19Z0-34 average imports of rape-
socd.
2/ Imports,for planting, permitted entry into the United States under the Federal
Seed Act and reported by the Division of Seed Investigations in the Bureau
of Plant Industry.
3/ Preliminary.

Compiled as follows:
Stocks, Bureau of the Census, Animal and Vegetable Fats and Oils, and quarter-
ly mimeographed report.
Trade figures, Foreign Commerce and Pavigation of the United States.
Apparent disappearance computed from table.


FOS-16


- 12 -








FOS-16


Table 9.-Rapeseed and rape oil: United Sta.tes
consumption, by countries, 1925-37


impo5.rts for


: Rapeseed
Country of origin : 1 :
1935 lb1936 1957 1/
: 1,000 lb. 1,000 Ib. 1,000 lb.


Japanese Empire
British India
Argentina
Europe-
Netherlands
Belgium
Germany
Other Europe
Other

Tot al



Japan
Europe-
Netherlands
United Kingdom

Total



Japan
Europe-
United Kingdom
Netherlands
Other Europe
China 2/

Total
1/ Preliminary.
2/ Including Hong Kong.


6,886
2,727
17,799


217
599
613
674


4,349
9,659
3,281

3,546
1,024
471
5,110
396


3,426
415
787


928
274
194
147
9


25.112


22.676


4,875


Compiled from Foreign Commerce and 1iavigation of the United States.
Oil reported in gallons, converted to pounds on basis of 7.5 pounds
per gallon.

Leaders (---) indicate less than 500 pounds.


- 13 -


29,515 27,386 6,180

Rape oil, edible

28,036 38,495 963

3,815 1,121 16
2,335 910 ---

35,186 40,526 979

Rape oil, denatured

22,776 19,771 4,875

10 1,978 ---
21 927
33 ----
1 272 --- ---






FOS-16


Table 10.- Sesame, babassu, and rape oils: Factory consumption by classes
of products and total disappearance, United States, 1936-37

:Sesame oil : Babassu oil : Rape oil
Classes of products : 1936 :1937 /: 1936 :1i37 1/: 1936 :1937 I/

:Mil. Ib Mil. lb:Mil ib.Mil. lb:Mil. Ib Mil. lb


Compounds and vegetable cooking fats
Oleomargarine
Other edible products


33.1
0.1
16.7


29,3 :

3.4 :


5.4
16.1
3.0


0.1 :
14.6 :
11.3 :


30.6

0.8


5.2
---


Soap
Drying industries
Miscellaneous products
Foots and loss 2/

Total factory consumption

Total apparent disappearance 3/


Compounds and vegetable cooking fats 6o
Oleomargarine
Other edible products :30

Soap : 4
Drying industries
Miscellaneous products
Foots and loss 2 : 6
Total : 100


1.9 2.9 : 9.0 14.3 : 7.8 1.0
: --- ---: : 0.2 0.1
--- 0.1 : --- --- : 10.2 7.5
3.5 1.9 : 2.3 1.7 : 1.4 0.5

:55.3 37.7 : 35.8 42.1 : 50.9 14.3

S4.4 50.0 :35.8 31.6 : 67.2 15.0
: As a percentage of total
_: factory consiumtion
:Perce'-t Percent:Percent Percent:Percent Percent


78 : 15
-- 45
9 : 8


-- *
35
27 :


6o

2


36


s : 25 34 : 15 7
--- : ....--- : --- 1
-- --- --- : 20 52
5 : 7 4: 3 4
100 : 100 100 : 100 100


Preliminary.
Foots, or residue, are largely used in soap stock.
Computed from data on production, trade, and stocks.


Compiled from Bureau of the Census, AnimE.' nd Vegetable Fats and Oils, and
preliminary report on Factory Consumption of Animal and Vegetable Fats and
Oils by Classes of Products for 1937.

Figures are rounded to "million pounds" without adjustment to totals. Percentages
computed from table.

Leaders (---) in the upper section of table indicate less than 500,000 pounds or
not reported; in the recent t section, leaders (---) indicate less than one-
half of one percent or not reported.


- lh -







- 15 -


Table 11.- Babassu nuts and oil: Factory production of oil, imports for
consumption, stocks December 31, and apparent disappearance, 1935-38

: Babassu oil : Bab-ssu nuts ?nd kernels
Year :Factory : Not : Stocks, : Apparent: : :Stocks,
: produc- : imports : end of : disap- : Imports : Crushed :end of
: tion :: apriod : pearance: : :period
.:1.000 lb. 1000 lb. 1.000 lb. 1,000 lb.:1000 Ib. 1.000 lb. 1,000 13.
Annual
1935 : (9,614) (9,614) : 15,261 (15,261)
1936 : 37,541 403 1,913 1/35,764 : 55,928 61,554 566
1937 /2 : 32,929 330 3/ 3,219 31,953 : 54,792 4/(53,846) 1,620
Jan.-Mar.
1936 : 14,774 150 4,566 j/ g,6oo : 23,586 24,184 674
1937 2/ : 7,929 297 3,827 6,312 : 29,584 12,790 4,830
1938 2/ : 11,965 5/ 3/ 6,6go 8,504 : 20,916 19,190 3,902


j/ Reported factory consumption.
2/ Preliminary.
3 Reported as crude and refined. Refined converted to crude, using 0.93.
SComputed from table.
5] Less than 500 pounds.

Computed as follows:
Factory production, stocks, and crushings from Bureau of the Census, Animal
and Vegetable Fats and Oils, annual, and quarterly mimeographed reports.
Trade figures from Foreign Comrierce and Navigation of the United States.
Apparent disappearance computed from table.

Table 12.- Teaseed oil: Exports from China and Hong Kong into the
United States, 1930-35, and imports into the United States, 1936-38

Y : Teaseed : Taseed : Ye Teaseed
Yearoil oil :: Yoil
: 1,000 lb.:: : ,000 b :: : 1.OO lb.

1930 441 :: 1934 2,407 :: 1938 -
1931 : 834 :: 1935 7,346 :: Jan. : 0
1932 : 707 :: 1936 / 7,904 :: Feb. : 82
1933 : 1,380 :: 1937 :2/ 27,492 :: Mar. : 209


j/ Includes 20,810 pounds from Kwantung in May, and 20,318 pounds from
the Netherlands in September.
2/ Includes 112,899 pounds from Kwantung.


pos-16




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

I IIIIIIIIIIIII I 0I 8 lll13ll 2611 ll I1Il ll
3 1262 08904 2328
**1


- 16 -


Table 13.- Kapok seed and kapok oil: Production, imports for
consumption, and apparent disappearance, 1332-38
: Kapok oil : hpok seed
Year : Production :
: 1/ : Imports Net sports
1,000 lb. 1,000 lb. 1,000 lb.
1932 66 --- 368


1933
1934
1935
1936
1937


2,631
2,278
347
0


15,1657
0


---
14,618
12,657
1,930
0


1938
Jan.-Mar. : 0 0 0
O/ Oil equivalent of imported eeed, using 18 percent.
Compiled from Foreign Commrerc, and Navigation of the United States.
Leaders (---) indicate less than 500 pounds or not separately reported.

Table 14.- Oleomargarine: Production and materials used in manufacture,
United States, Mari-ch April, 1937 and 19L8


I


Item


Oleo oil
Oleostearine
Lard neutral
Oleo stock
Total animal

Cottonsecd oil
Soybean oil
Peanut oil
Corn oil
Total domestic


vegetable 2/


Coconut oil
Palm-kernel oil
Babassu oil
Palm oil
Rice oil 3/
Total foreign v.;ctable 1/
Total fats and oils
Milk
Salt ard other miscellaneous


S 197 1/ 1938 1/
: ar. : Apr. : ar. : Apr.
:1,000 lb. 1,000 lb. :1,000 Ib. 1,000 Ib.
1,558 1,35S : 1,553 1,412
238 279 : 264 240
182 173 : 155 138
: 160 158 : 109 163
:2,138 1,969 : 1,s81 1,953

: 14,'44 14,789 : 16,327 11,422
: 3,563 2,752 :2,514 2,356
: 321 395 : 525 275
S 148 64 : 4 46
18,976 18,000 : 19,370 14,099

5,197 4,096 9,555 8,981
960 1,136 1,238 560
2,354 3,032 :1,1i5 971 /
S 214 164 --
: --- --- : 17 34
C,725 8,428 : 11.955 10,546


.9,)J39 28,397 : 33,206 26,598


6,774
1,.31


6,359
1,611


7,605
1,773


6,063
1,446


Production of oleomargarine : 5,.9'4 24,349 : 40,961 32,641
i/ Preliminary. 2/ Ordinarily dor.-.stically produced. j Bureau of the
Census; probably oil imported from Japan. 4/Not domestically produced*

Compiled and computed from reports of the Commissioner of Internal Revenue.


FOS-16