The Fats and oils situation

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Title:
The Fats and oils situation
Physical Description:
301 v. : ill. ; 26-28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economic Research Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics and Statistics Service
United States -- World Food and Agricultural Outlook and Situation Board
Publisher:
The Bureau
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publication Date:
Frequency:
frequency varies

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Oil industries -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Oils and fats, Edible -- Economic aspects -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
FOS-1 (Mar. 1937) - FOS-301 (Oct. 1980).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: Agricultural Marketing Service, 1954-Mar. 1961; Economic Research Service, May 1961-<Oct. 1977>; Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service, <May 1978>-July 1980; Economics and Statistics Service, Oct. 1980.
General Note:
"Approved by the World Food and Agricultural Outlook and Situation Board," Oct. 1977-Oct. 1980.
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Item 21-D.

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University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000502965
oclc - 01588232
notis - ACS2699
lccn - 46039840 //r82
issn - 0014-8865
sobekcm - AA00005305_00001
Classification:
lcc - HD9490.U5 A33
ddc - 380.1/41385/0973
System ID:
AA00005305:00001

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Succeeded by:
Fats and oils outlook & situation

Full Text
9r r


UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
: Bureau of Agricultural Economics
Washington
S FOS-1 rc


THE FATS AND OILS SITUATION
; --.--- -------------.- U.S. DEPOSITORY


S'.- i .1 : This is the first issue of The Fats and Oils Situation, one of the
monthly reports in the commodity Situation series recently inaugurated by
the EBreau of Agricultural Economics. The form of this report is experi-
t.:al. Comments, criticisms and suggestions are invited.


CONSUMPTION OF FATS AND OILS IN THE UNITED STATES, 1936








23: :% :
te: = !:.,: =f '












PALM AND PALM ERN-L ..,,*
.........













Sr COTTONSEED

15%
TALW N


NEG 32177 BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMIC


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE







2-

Tabli. l- Summ -r" of nrodlVction, rnt im-,orts, and anparnt
disapoo. r:--nz of f.ts an. oils, EXCLUTDIJ- LARD AID BUTTER,
United States, 1912, 1914, 1916-36


(:TUt d-oorts are indi.'
: Domestic production
Calendar Frc'm From
,t ar *dc-itic imrcrted Tota
nat. rials mat ri-ls


::td b" a minus sign)
: Net :
: imports : Changes :Ap-arent
: or n.t :in Ptocks: disap-
: eorts : 1/ :pearance
of oil :


:1Ui. lb. A1il. lb. M:il. lb. iil, lb. Mil. lb. Mil. lb.


1912 :2,432

191 : 2,b0")


1916
1917
1918


1721
1922
1922

1925
1327
19325
1 32:
1127
1 28


1-22
iP31
19`2

135
1335
1336


2,654
2,445
2,481
2,7093

2, 34i
2,7
2,1'25
2,543
2, G5r
3,3398
3,577
3, 535
3,252j

3,314
3, 3'-, 7
3,1) 7
3,11'
3,'7?'
3, 55
2, 71 4
3, -5


457
531
529
473

535
428
(55


7.5
472)
- 4F
1'35





*:. 2
61



C27
6 '


2,699

3,19'

3,121
2,976
3, 'Dli
3,182

2,S54
3,I 95
2,9.1
3,3-3
3,52-
3,c71
4,221
4,333
3,915



3,78.4
3,572
3,7'
3, 73
3,5'1-
4,':,-3


- 1G3

- 3


55
142
7hS
369

251
23
357
424
552
52,.


71'?
1,wL52

0 2 C'

81
-1 7 5 1
751A

1,7145


2/ + 35
2/ 35
2/ + 87


13
120
21D
31
37
8
307
270
178
173

159
117
15.3
327
332
94
81


2,511

3,187

3,285
3,495
3,793
3,465

3,o62
3,192
3,529
3,697
3,835
4,382
4,522
4,682
4,833
5,113

4.761
4,482
4,c17
4,214
4,757
5,300
5,569


I/ Stock of '-sriinr marmunal oils i- bonded warehouses have been
deducted..
2/ Incluies onl't cottonstd. oil.
1/ Preliminar:y.
4/ Prcl iminar- estimate.


FOS-1







FOS-1 3 -

Fats and Oil0 Outlook for 1937

The general outlook in 1937 appears to be moderately favorable to

producers of fats and oils and to growers of oilseeds or nuts. Since most

industries utilizing fats and oils are expected. to increase their output in

1937, total consumption in the United States will probably exceed that of

1936. There are no indications of any material increase in total production

from domestic materials over the relatively- low level in 1236, and large

imports of oils and their raw maatrials seem likely to continue through

most of 1937. The most uncertain factor in the outlook is the foreign

supply situation, but it is believed tnat increasing demand in foreign

countries will more than offset the price depressing effect of any increase

which might develop in foreign production.

Consumption of fats ?.nd oils in the United States has been increasing

since 1932, and it is probable that the irncrere will continue. Total disap-
(see table 3)
pearance in 1936 totaled a little more than 9 billion pounds,/ sli-itly

larger tnan the previous record high level in 1929, and 12 percent above the

depression low of 1932. Nith favorable prospects for all the major outlets

for fats and oils, consumption in 1937 is expected to be even larger than

that of 1936. The mo-st important utilization is in the food industry, and

consumption in this field will probably show at least a slight increase in

view of the expected increase in consumers' purchasing power. Continuance

of the revival of building construction activity will result in a larger

demand for drying oils, especially for use in paints and varnishes. Nith

the soap industry sharing in the revival of business activity, a larger

consumption is also expected in thvt field. The demand outlook, therefore,

appears distinctly favorable.





iOS-1 4-

Production cf fta ind oils in the United Stites from both domestic

and imported materials was 830' million pounds larger in 1936 than in 1935,

but it v--.s still loss than production in any oth'r year since 1922. Reduced

prosct ion of i:.rd has bcn the chief factor responsible for the low output

since 19`4. The increased dcmand for f,-.ts and oils during these years was

met by a :r.-:ked ciartailment of exports and increased imports. As a result,

net imports of oilr jumped from a quarter of a billion pounds in 1934 to 1.6

billior. pounds in 1935 -nd 1.4 billion pounds in 1936. Imports of raw mater-

ial for domestic processing also were larger than in 1934, but. decreased

from ;935 to 1j35.

Since d-omentic prediction cc.ntinuel -.t n high level during the early

depression yee-rs, large stocks -were -cnrumulatei during this period, the perk

being re-.ch,,-l in L933. See table 9. Incrucsed consumption accompanying

reduced prriductior. in the last 2 years, hc"ocver, h.as reduced stocks con-

siderably from this high level. Since Mtocks r.t t:r.c beginning of 1937 .re

practically the s One as for 1956, chang-e in the tomestio supply in 1937

will dr-nend almost entirely on production 7ndi i:r-orts.

In view of the irouht liquid:-tion of cattle rnd hobs in 1936, a

scrme-.-.hat dcre.ased slaughter m:ay be e.xected in 1937 r-nd consequently a

reducci pr-duction of l.rd, gres.3e, and tallr On the other hand, produo-

tion of butter and cottor.n ed oil may be incru-sed. The 1936 flaxseed crop,

from which most of the 1C36-37 .ras'.ings of domestic seed will come, i7"s

greatly curtailed by the drouJ. t. Moreover, both the soybean and peanut

crops were smaller then in 1935, :.lthoujgh a l.-.rger proportion of these crops

will probr-bly be crashed this ye.r. In view of these circumstances, it is

unli;:,l. th..t total domestic supplies of fats -nd oils will show any mc.terial

increase during the next 6 months, and large imports of oils and raw materials

seem likely to continue. Since the relm.tively high prices for the 1936 pro-







FDS-1 -

duction will probably result in a marked increase in the 1937 crops of oil-

seeds, however, the situation may be modified somewhat during the last

quarter of the year.

In view of the fact th-.t from 20 to 25 percent of the total consump-

tion in the United .State during 1937 -.,ill probably be of imported fats and

oils, or produced from imported ma.terials, the foreign situation is of con-

siderable importance in tie domestic outlook. Information on production and

stocks in foreign countries no:: at h-nod is insufficient to give a definite

picture of the world supply situation outside of the United States. There

are no indications nt present, however, of anl' marked increase in world

supplies, and it seems probable that demand aill increase more rapidly tran

supply, not only in the United States but in other countries as well. This

is especially true of European countries, Where improving economic conditions

coupled with the general policy of increased pre; orednes for war will

probably result in a continued increase in demannd for fats and oils.

The excise taxes imposed b;, the Revenue Act of 1936 r:ill probably

have a significant effect in strengtnening prices of domestic products.

Although attempts are being made to utilize new oils not subject to the tax,

the available supply of such oils is small at the present time.

Supplies and Prices of 1936

Droughts, floods and typhoons, excise taxes on imports and on first
domestic processing, duties, trade :ad barter agreements, import quotas and
production restrictions, strikes, wars ard rumors of wars have all con-
tributed complications to the fats and oils situation.

Production.-Reported total factor/ production of fats -nd oils
from domestic materials in 1936, although about a billion pounds above 1935,
was lower than in any year since 1922, except 1935, and was a billion pounds
lower than in 1929. The total decrease was lr.rgely due to reduced lard
production. Production in 1936, excluding lard rnd butter, was only 48










million pounds less than thpe peak pr-ducticn in 1929. Thirty-eight percent
of th~ ir.er~ ise f 1r'39 rTver 193E product' n was accounted fnr by lard; 88
percent Iv tallrw9, gr'r-.ses, and edible beef fats; 12 rerrent by soybean oil,
and 5 l. 'r-.nt by crrr. and peanut oils. Sp3 tables 1, 2, and 4.

C-nsuir t.iti..- Estimates rf -nsumpticn nf primary fats and rils for
all pur:rsr.s -r, thp Uni+Pt States, n-7vring a period -f 25 years, reveal that
consumptin :' .: the Lal-ndnr year 1"'5 3PxcPeded by 184 million pounds con-
sumption in any 1.revicur year -- the highest nf whirh was 1929, exceeded 1955
ty 400 millilri: r:r.is, r-Ji pxrpPled' by almost a tillior. pounds the low print
cf crr.si.ip.tior. r.-m-h-' In tho depression ypar rf 1922. But this net increase
of mne hiiliin r.-unds consunlrtirn is made up ,f a decreasP of half a billion
pounds -f buttr-r M.Al l-rd, and an inrrPase ^f a billion and a half pounds of
othnr fats a:ri "ils. See tables 1, 2, and 3.

I,.p-.rts nd pxp.rts.- The effect -n tihr trade balance was to decrease
total exFrts End reexiports rf animal and veget.ablP fats and cils from 1,101
million p.~unrds ir, i929 to 178 ruil.ion roundss in 1956, while the total imports
of animal and marine animal fst.s, vcget7blp oils and 1il equivalent of raw
materials ,as only -3,8 rmlii'n prunids lrax--Tr in 193. than in 1929. This
drastic cutt in -xr,-,rt3 :.f fats ard nils lea1v-' -a net irmprt of 2.,80 million
pcurnds an 1936, eomy:r.rrd witi 2,.'I.4 milli:.n prunds in 1953 and 1,0C'8 million
pounds in 1'2'?. See t-bls 1, 2, 5, i', 7, ar. 8.

Decresses in :tail irn:prts in the ealend-r year. 193l as compared with
19 37 were lar(e-ly arrintpd for by ldrPrases in tallo ;, copra, cccnut oil,
flaxseed', palm-kernel oil, ontt'r.s,_d il, and pea;ut nil. Thp decrease in
taLlow aline amu:.untir4- to IF? million p-,ind, ?while ?-npra in terms of oil
and cr,-conut .il dperr.asp.e 88 million p"-unds, prartl:' becaluze of the maritime
strike on the West Coast and ,because -r m:ire attractive Eun.r'ean prices.

St,-cks.- Thtal re-p'rt-d stocks ,t-f fats and )ils including oil equiva-
lent- f rw r.atrr ilJ s, hydr'renat'-1 C.1, red oil, lard cii, etc. (but ex-
cluling crld at *-r~s -i h-ldiir-s of butter) were I Irallicn rrunds smaller un
December 31, .,', than on the same date in 1".?. T-,. larzost. single decrease
in stLcls was in coconut .il anId -,rra (-il equivaici:t) st'-cks dropping from
214 million vruinds Le-n'.'r. 31, L.1'. t 90M nil. irn p-unds 'Fn the sa.me date in
19m,', te lowest since .19:. C-rbinr str.rks -f lard, cottnsped oil and oil
equivalent of cottcrli~ei on December :31, 193;, Perem 25,3 njllrn: pounds higher
thUa the same date i1c:;; s3-- c1.- of 4allo'-w and r'eac u re 5.- ~ million nourds
loss: linsco.- ril and rushers stocks '. fla;:s'?ed in t-rms of ril were -56
m-illicn pounds less; uvt1i.' I.r- 1 r.i rnji.l r st.ec's :.ere almost unchanged.

The burA-.so5e stocks c'.-lumllj3ted rl.rur.g \ire depress1Qn and reaching a
rpeak rf 2.9 billion pnur.ds in 1933, hiav r.no7 been reduced by half a billion
prunTLs to a gr' nt. total rf about 2.4 billion pounds. See table 9.

Fri.'es of rrst r'ts and oils shrviod a d'.'ioately rising trend during
the las'si :ai of 1J36, reacn.riic levels of 1 to h cents higher per pouWd in
Jury l-.-i37 than ir, .Trnuary 1935'. Linsend oil ,7as loss thn 1/2 cent higher;
eottons.:.--l oil was uP 1!- rents; lrd and sr.ybean oil F-lmnst 2 cents; crude
coconut oil 4.4 cents, and j11rdible t"ell :i. .1 rents higher; olive and


- 6 -


FrS-1







FOS-1


- 7 -


teaseed oils both increased a little mere than 5 cents a pound. 92-score
butter at Mew York was almost 1/2 cent lc-7er, while peanut, ecrn, menhaden,
and easter oils showed little difference in the tUn Januarys. See table 10.

The 1936 excisp tax which became effective August 21, seems to have
been almost completely effective in stopping imports of the items on which
the tax was imposed, as there have been either no imports or negligible
imports of hemp, kapok, perilla, sesame, and rape seeds, and hemp, kapok,
perilla, and rape oil during the last quarter of 1936. The imports of rape-
seed for the year were kept high and imports of perilla nil increased 64 per-
cent by the expedient -f increasin- imports prior t. the effective date of the
tax. Imports of tallow dropped from 246 million pounds in 1935 to 79 million
pounds in 193d, but this decrease is spread over the yecr instead of being
entirely confined to the last quarter.

Prospective Supplies for 1937

Butter.- The prime relationships of butterfat, feeds, and nmat
animals, together with the shortage of feed indicate that the relatively high
level of butter pr-duction which occurred during, the fall of 1956 ri ll not
be maintained during the first half of 1937. Put total butter production for
1937 may be abcve 1936.

Lard.- FTrduction f.tr 1937 7ill prmbnbly be lower than for 1936 which,
although larger than 1935 y about 3~5r million pounds, was still rnly 68 per-
cent of average: production fi.r the 5 ye-rs 1929-33.

Tallrow and reae..- Tne increased proAdu.-tin -f inedible tallow and
grease in 195' ,:-.. '-urci to 216 million pounds rvcr 1935 production, being partly
due to drought liiluidLttin of cattle ?_d hogs. Since high production in the
drought yc-r I3-4 was feil'red by drastic reductions in 1935 it may be expected
that production in 1937 will sh ow s-me decrease. This fact together :ith im-
port taxes on tallow njid grease .re factors tenlirng to strengthen prices of
these commodities.

Vectc.ble oils.- Soybean ril production of 2.5 million pounds in 1936
was more ticrn double the 19.5 prrdurtion, but was largely from the abundant
crop of 1'35. S:ybnc:n production from th.e cr-p rf 136 is reported as about
50 million bushels rcmpared with 44 million bushels fo'r 10.93, because of the
effect of the drought. Soybean oil was higher in price in January 1'37 than in
any month since October 1929, and prdluctic.n of -il from the first three months'
orushings of the 193A r-Pp (rictober-DecF:remr) 'was larger than frr the same
period in any other year reported. High prices and demand may cause a larger-
than-usual percentage of the crop to be crushed and enco-urage continued ex-
pansion -f plantings.

Cottonseed producti-ln from the 19'3P crep is estimated at 5,513 thou-
sand short tons compared with 4,729 thousand short tons from the crop rf 1935.
If the 1937 seed crop equals the seed crop of 193F, cottonseed oil production
in the calendar year 1937 sh.luld be slightly abve production in 19.6, which
was 1,245 million pounds.







Peanut oil prc.dl.t ion, 0-tober through Lecember 1936, from the 1936
:ror is re *-rtcd at V. million pi.ns --rr.,are. -ith ': mailli-n 'onmds in the
scre mon-h' of 1935 from : slightly' lar.--r pe.n-it -ro".. Production of oil
i.drir- th- :az.- i-eriod of 193! -'s i'i. million rjnunis from a considerably
sma'lcr r-.an-t. :rrp. Payments c: the Governm -n f'r 'te diversion of peanuts
into r icnini rencnels materially increased .t.-anat ill produc-tion from the
crcFp of iS3 r.n'i l".'

-r.i:- t-:ez of 4A1 :_nts pep. po'Lf'i on sunflo-er, rape, and karok oils
and 2 c-rnts r. rrr .o-. on s. 3ame, rape, and kapok seeds vill reduce imports of
tiese -omrrrdiAi- s r:n tenrl to str'en-r.hc-n ri:.s of domestic: food oils.

-i- ri ;j.- Th.: fl:sre-.i crop of 19'6 -'as reduced by the drought al-
most to -.., lo"I l.veCl of 13711, nnith .ill be reflected in trodu:tion of oil
frcm domens i seed in 133?-37, and navy imports cf fla-xsed -'ill be necessary
i.. 1:'37. im.-rts cf rerilla nil for th-. fir.t 9 months of 1936 --ere almost
t-'o-t.i:.-' more t.an total imrorts in 1935, but drrpp=d to zero after the effec-
tiv.- d'ate orf t-.e tx.-'ise tae o-f 41 :entz per p-?i ,'. .Ten the remember 1936
sto-'i: cf -'` r"tllijn Diti.ds are derlited, rimncrts -,ill probably begin again
buit .n a lo-rer level.

The 2 cents per pcr.i t.x on h.n-mnr.seFd -.ni.ch iz equivalent to about 8
c:nts p.-r p-o ., if brrr. cntrirl.y oy ril yi .ld, will effectizall.y bar imports
for crishrin- -"hich -ere .:;arratii ly 1Lre in 19j.. Imports of citiciza
oil vh:i-:h Ica r no tea -,ill r ...coebly iricrzast over the 2 million -ound. aver-
ae in 135 a-.d Ij T.r. r.: il production from domcst-iz suor-lies has been
ertiratcd at about 2 milli:.r. nc.ar.d fc': l127.U. Under favDratle conditions
this am-,r nt will be d0afini r ely increased in 1957 an more rc-Er jome into
.-arir. 5, b..i. imports -ill -.rn in ah ther- i:- .o '-x.

'-_: Fat: T-id Oils

The short prud'i-in'r. cf iomccti.n fat ,n.-i cil--1 in.the calendar year
1955 and the excise ts.xr-s -f 1'i .' : .:... 1 35 c.:ui-d trh- tr..-e to seek ne-
sourcE: for -- ; "-.i.mdi-,;ru ier 'ih. fLi.'t th. t fLt.; arid Cil are not equally
s'itabl- for all r .,"jr.-s k -,a the rrobiem iione riar tailitv as -ell as
one of nrice and availability .

f the ne-w oils 'th e. ap rarefd cr, tlh' mn.rko:t in recent months,
it-bassi cii seems to nre ;pair.ed tn- rmcst p.il ii- '. It i'ars no duty or
exyis7 tax. and about k'. l io-, :.cund:; )f n ,tL -e1re impcrT :d in 193'. Only
a r.n:liritl-l amomlt cf tahasc: nil, a- za'rn, is im.. rt.:d. but the total nil
onuivalent, of imported nir: aval]Jr: frr Iih ii- -as abrut 36 million oands,
16 million i -nir: of "'hi:.. -r *.i irn t lc rer., '.i rin*-. Kapok oil imports were
not zercratel:,- r-.-F o.rt-:- pric. to i1 but 11 million pou. -'" *"re imported
Jan-riar" thrnut.L-h June 137-, '.rior to tnr 4'- .-rt.ex -is:- tax. riticica oil,
essentially a irvin-- cil, has au,-,r:Rid a si:nifian.c- only in the past t.o
,'ars, and pr:'r--airy -vill r.-.t be f mu-. imrportanoe for som-. time. Only about
2 million rrz-.is per y-ar -'re it mnorted in 15I. end 1336. Tcocr-ed oil is
.-:ry like olive oil, &a1d as it bears n diit v or cxise tax, it is being im-
rTcrt':il :r.. us-.d to ada.-terate.- olivi oil. Sevnri million poLnls -vre imported
in 1.." rnd 8 million r.,oundiz in 1'93 ihe firct vyars for rhi.?h reported im-
*rjt.s -vere of si.Lr.ifi-fnrt quant.iies.


FOS-1


- 8 -







FOS-1 9. -

Other oils which have a.o.ared on the Mnarket in minor quantities are
ouri-uri oil, tucum oil, murnmuru oil, and ucuhuba butter. Ouricuri oil -as
used in the production of oleomnrgCrine to the extent of 442 thousand pounds
during the last quarter of 1936. To name these ne-i oils is to suggest pos-
sibilities of future exploitation,:tut at the moment they adL ver" little to
the available supply.

Fats and Oils Used in Manufacture of Olenmargarine

Total fats and 3ils used in tihe manafactur: of oleomargarine amounted
to about 325 million Dounds in 1936, or about 3.6 percent of total disan-
pearance of primary fats and oils in the United States. Prior to 1919 animal
fats contributedd C4 tc 70 percent of the fats used in oleomargarine. Cotton-
seed oil and peanut oil -'ere next in importance. See tables 11, 12 and 13.

From 1919 to 1933 domestic oils, both animal and vegetable, declined
in relative importance, and coconut oil reached a high point of 75 percent
of the total of all oils used in 1933. Since 1933, and largely on account
of the excise taxes imposed, cor.ent oil declin in importance. In July 1936
it dropped beln-v 53 percent of the total of cal! oils used. It continued to
decline until in November 1936, when far the first time since 191t' the amount
of coconut oil used -vas smaller than the amount of cottonseed oil used. Soy-
bean oil contributed 5 percent and peanut oil 1 percent to total oils used
in 1936.

Ner oils have been a-pearins in r--ment months. Batassu oil -as first
used in oleomargarine in 1935, and in 1?36 represented 5 percent of the total
of all oils used. 3uri-iri oil -as introdu-ed into oleom-ararine manufacture
in September 1936. Thus, animal iilu have been crad;ually spplanted by vege-
table oil- in relative importan-c ir. the rranufa.-ture, of oleomargarine, and
since 1954 there has bcr:n a shift -rcrr. imported ve etablc oils to domestic
vegetable oils; animal oils roru..inr. rat .ti -ally ',.--ianLced in importance.







FC S-I


Tabl 2.- Prit.cticn, net trad6, .iange.s in stoc-.s, and annarent
.isaopr rance :f butt r ai l.ard, 1i'12, 1314, 1316-3o

S__........ et ey.crts are indigr-.tci br a m.rns sign.___
SButt. r ____ :Lard
:.: .. r.rent: : :Apparent
Calent.r: : et :Chanres: disao- : Net :ChFnges: disap-
yv-.ar rro -e : in :-earance: : :rou exports: in :pearance
.tion J: / :stocks :in Cont.: tiin / : / :stc.-s :in Cont.
S__ :.S. : : : : U.S.
:Ll l. b : : .il_ 1_ :il, lb lil, Ib bL. I.


1912 :1,5?2

114 : l,b3^
1?14 : 6s.5

191? l, h73
1,917 : 1,64:



1922 : 1,5 7
121 : 1,7 41
1?22 l,Si'.
1323 : 1,7?
1924 : 2,C82
1325 : 2, 17
1?2- : 2,027
1_27 :2,076
128 : 2, or!
192 : 2,15-

1: 2,116
1 31 : 2,1?7
1932 : 2,2Y)
1933 : 2,312
12.4 : 2,21
13' 6/: 2,125
1736 5/ (2.125)


- 7

+ 1


1,58g4

1,7 :

1,76:3
1,635 :
1, 643 :


1,577
1,757
1,884
1,995
2,053
2,028
2,o4 :
2, ".' 4 :1
2,063
2,116

2,130 :
2,223
2,2. 1 :
2,217
2,277
2,18g4
(2,1R8)


21,

: 1, 657




: 2, 39


2, 7'"
2, ill:.
2,357

2,7 13
2,7
: 2, 3.)


: 2, ( 2



(2, )4

5./ 2, 1 -.3:1
:5/( 312)'


SZstimat~te -f total factory and farm rrod-toctn. All
revision.
2 Includes =zhiptn..-'t to nrno'n.tiguous territory.
]J stir.te of -nrodiction uni-r Federal inspection and
s'-bjet to revision.
_] Les' than 5r( r'l, pounds .
5J Preli-ir.iar, roirh unrffiial c.stimrotes.
C/ PrEflim Lna i.


yE.'rs s-.bj.ct t0


"oth r". Al'. years


1 ,070

1,193


- 556

- 46o

- 4n-)
- 3s86
- 55S
- 793

- .42
- 1'9
- 797
-1,,'74
- 9S6


- 717
- 733

- uSOl


- i-,1
- 500-

I74


1 2
o12
58S
115
112


+ 17
- 26
+ 50
- 42

-3
- 12
+ 1
+ 1
+ 12
- 19
+ 8
+ 5
+ j3
-3

- 31
4/
- 10
+ 91
- lU
- 15
+ 95


1,371
1,197
1,375
1,293

1,417
1,223
1,558
1,709
1,748
1,522
1,584
1,634
1,762
1,735

1,701
1,784
(1,898)

(1,719)
(1,262)
(1,471)


- 1O -





- 11 -


Table 3.- Apoarent disapaarance of fats and oils, 1929-36


Item 1929 133-
:MLil._lb Mil lb


Cottonseed oil
Coconut ril
Palm oil
Soybean oil
Corn oil
Peanut oil
Rape oil
Olive nil, edible
Castor oil
Sesame oil
Palm-kernel oil
Babassu ril
Olive foots
Sunflcwer oil
Olive oil, inedible:
.Teaseed oil
Other 2/


Linseed oil
Tong oil
Perilla oil
Fempseed oil

Butter
Lard
Tallow, inedible
Marine animal nil
Grease
Edible fat 5/
Inedible fat 6/


1,585
557
228
13
137
18
17
95
69
30
72

43

10

10

7s9
llr



2,116
1,735
515
222
301
1 21
23


1,584
255
2U 5
18
127
25
16
93.
53
33
45

43

7

I1

544
Ir,
9


2, 13n
1,701
525
182
284
143
2 '
C-


S1931 : 1932


1933 1934


1* 35 /: 19-3


Mil, Ib Mi_, Ib Mil. 3 1il. lb llil, lb Mil. lb


1,315
5.7
2.l1
35

21
12
76
46
53
45

56
28
12
1
1

479
31
12


2,2293
1,78)4
556
217
278
16s
14


1,240

223
39
i107
15
9
74
38
14
18

41
10
12
1


358
75
12


2,226'
1,898
586

277
112
12


1,295
574
257
32
123
14
11
72
44
1.4
15

43
22
11
1
1

380
10o4
27


2,217
l,8b56
567
221
235
136
l4


1,5'c.
597
184
31
152
206
1''
62
44
10
24

31
25
11
2
3

417
120
25
(2)

2,277
1,719
717
227
304
172
19


1, 431

30)4
103
131
122
68
70'
51
57
55

32
37
19
7
2


470
133
64
17


2,184
1,262
718
32-
254
183
21


Ss,j134


8,5'92 ,4'6 8,174


Total, excluding:
lard and butter: 5,113 4,761 4,482 4,017


8,298 8,753 8,747 9,148

4,214 4,757 5,30'-' 5,569


1/ Preliminary estimate.
2/ Includes vegetable tallow, kapok, mustard, and oiticica oils. Does not
include unnamed miscellaneous items.
3/ Fantory consumnotion. 4/ Ml marine mammal, fish, and fish-liver oils.
5./ Includes edible tallow, elem oil, an- oleost marine.
6j Includes wnol grease and neatsfiot ril.

Computations aru based on production. fror domestic and imported i trials, net
Trade in fats and oils, and stocks.

Leaders indicate less than half a nillin'- oounds, or not separately reported.

Items have bcen rounded to "million nou_-.ds" wit.h.iut adjnstinont to totals.


FOS-1


1, 34o
b39
315
22b
145
120
66
64
6c
55
47
3b
36
28
26
15

16


Total


2,108
1,471
726
333
299
250
2,






FOS-1


Item :, 13 : 1931


S193' :1935 11:1936 1/


Cottonseed uil
Coccnut oil
Soybean oil
Corn oil
Peanut oil
Castrr oil
Sesamr oil
Batassu cil
Palm-kernel oil 1/
ether 1/


: 511
ii
1^4


:2/


1


3., ', *

iLL
121.
2 ,
47
22

7
2


Linseed oil


Butter
Lard
Tallow,inedible :
Grease
Marir.e animal oil 5/:
"ditle fat 6/
Inedible fat 7/


2.1 )


357
112-


2,5)
571

ill
2.-2
12


1. 417

113
14




21
--,
16




2, 1?7

5s7
364
,5
21-
li3


1,571
26 u
33

13
37
7


1


1, 400O

27
129

45


7
2


4 -,


2,260"
2,463
6r'3
513

171
1'


2,312
(2,569)
637
328
133
195
13


1.224
297
35
115
47
42
9

4
7


1,184
253
105
100
45
47
65

23
2


,71 502


2,219
(2,16 )
745
31 3
226
197
12


2,161
(1,312)
442
259
240
194
16


S8,992 o,)4rr 3, ;, 3,29G


-T tal, e:.:_ -1,ld i r : :
lard and bitter : ..-_3_4 L""_-'' __ ,7S34


,%,.1 5,(54 5,973 7,804


-. 3. 7.2


Preliminary.
Oil equivalent of imported seed.. (Babassu oil
740,0- ":' ,ir.i January-Sept -arrber.)
Includes rape, olive edible, kapok, hemnpeeid,
include unnamed miscellaneous items.


3,7oJ 3.67; 3. 5,1 _3_


prcr.l-ric.r. is reported as

perilla, ani mi.stard oils. Does


L/ Es.timr;es, bis=i on factory consumption, `ra-~ie, a?.d stc.;:s.
S/ Marine mammal, fish, and fisii-liver oils.
/ Ir.nluies oleo oil, oleostearine, oleo stock, and e-ditl tall--7.
SInclui'e- -ool -rFase and n atsfoot oil.

et.or-, producji;-r,n,, Bureaa of the C..ni=.s, Animal and V tablee Fats and Oils, ex-
:'tn as other-ise notei.

Leaders indicate less than ,alf a million '..,ornd or not ser.aretcly reported.

Items have been r.:.'']e .o "million pr nris" -.ithout adjizTmncnt to totals.


12 -

Table 4. Pridu-tion of fats and oils from domestic and imported
material., 1929-36 .


1,245
258
225
122
70
65
;2
2/3
11
24


o t al


2,125
(1,676)
609
308
ycs
263
247
13


1/
2/


not


:'il. lb. Mil. Lb.Mil.lb.Mdil.lb. Mil.1b. Mil.lb. Miil.lb. Mil.lb.






- 13 -


Table 5.- Iinnorts of fats rnd oils, 1929-36


Item :199 1930 : 131 1932 1933 : 1934 :1935 1936
__ : __ __ : __ : __ __ : __ __ _:


* i1lJ. lb.J il I1 ,


Palz. oil
Coconut oil
Cottonseed oil
Rane oil
Olive oil, edible
Peanut oil
Corn oil
Sunflover oil
PFlm--kernel oil
Olive oil,ineditll
Olive foots
Other 5/


Tunr oil
Perilla oil
Linseed oil


262
412

19
97
3


70
10
46
53

120
6
10


t I i fi l. 15 Mi l. lb :.!il. lb :.11. lb .!i 1


?27
318

16
93
16


39
7
63
?5


258
325
1
11
70
15

28
23
12
37
6


217
249
-
71
1

12
2

12


316

12
72
1
9
28
13
13
40
6


156
315
9
(20)
56
3
11
18
13
10
36
5

110
25
3


237
353
167
60
71
81
26
37
59
20
34
22


337
321
_/136
62
61
49
29
25
20
15
17
34


120 135
72 116
2 1


Total


Marine ani-r:i
Tallow 77
Butter
'7ool r:rease
Oleo oil 8/


1,107 1,003 87S 716 351 789 1,421 1,361


01.~


144
1
2

2


79
246
23
6
11


Total


Grand total


S 171 140 154

: 1,278 1,143 1,022


101 102 110 364 194


817 1,053


899 1,785 1,555


Preli.ninnr;.
rleporte-. as edible. 3/ Crue -nd refined converted to cru:e basis.
2stinnate, bsed on stocks in bonded warehouses.
Inclu.-des tenseed, soybean, sesi.ne, castor, oiticic?, linseed, '-.:ok,


u.-,bpssu cils, and ve et-tle t-llov-. Does not include unnqi.;e
iters.
Ilarine ;:.apr.l, fish, and. fish-liver oils.
Edible and inedible not se'arately re-orted -rior to A.ril 1935.
Includes nni.-wl stearine.


and.


.Iiscelineous


Leaders indicate less t'.nn half ? million pounds or not se-rnately re-orted.
Items have been rounded to "'.illioh -ounds" without adjustment to totals.


--------------







Ta-.le 6.- Oil equiv-lent of oilseeds imorted for crushin.-, 1923-36

: Oil
Itil 199 1930: 1971 193, : 1333 1934 :19351/: 1936 1/
:yeld: : : : : : : :
: ?ct :Mil lb :il Iil lIbHil 1 :il lb il lj :!il lb il lb :il lb

Co-ra : 3 : 350 375 239 206 416 252 286 230
C'.stor e-.s : -2 : 74 43 43 35 43 39 32 69
Sess-ie seed : .5 : 8 2 63 9 19 10 66 53
Babassu r.nuts : 2J 35
Pal.: .-ernels : 5 7 11 13 7 4 23 11
Ra-eseer / : 75 (7) (6)
Other 4/ 1 1 4 3 1

Fl2:.seec : 3 : 448 234 268 116 255 252 325 284
Hei-see'. / : 24 : (17) (13)

Total 890 6.5 5 679 439 746 572 759 702


I e reli..,inary.
I/ Irmorted seefd '.''e been used mostl;., for nlantiinr 11o crushin"s of
r-.-esce,. have been re-ort,;- but it is known tl't s:r.e n's crushed in
1:i5 r :. 1936. Esti::mtes are based on the excess of irmorts over
previous s nvers ;es.
4/ Incluc.:7s kar~ok, nerilla .ind oil equivalent of crushin..s of .:ustarrd seed.
Does not incl.l'e unnaedr :.iiscellpneous ite.ts. It is believe'. tL.nt
i.'_orted 'o'".j seed is not crushed in the United St-tes. I-.orts of
cottonseed ne-li:ible.
5/ rior to 1 3-4 eer.-';e was used lar ely for urnoses other than crushing.'


Coor-ute. frou ir.-crts on blsis of oil :ields s as publis:'er in "Oil Yield and
Oil or.tert of Certain Ole-.inous Materials", U.S. c--_rt:-ent of A-riculture,
1C'36.
Leaders indicate less then half a millionn --oun-.s or not se-a.ratel/ re orted.
Ite.is have been rourJ.-'e to milliono n -ounds" without a .just:.ient to totals.


FOS-1


- 14 -






15 -

Table 7.- Exports of fats and oils, 1929-36


Item :1929 :1930 :1931 : 1932 1933 1934 :1935 1/ 1936 1/

:Mil. lb Mil. lb Mil. lb Mil. lb Mil. lb Mil. lb Mil. lb Mil. lb


Coconut oil
Soybean oil
Cottonseed oil
Other 2/

Total


Lard 3/
Inedible fat 4/
Edible fat 5/
Butter 3/


Total


Grand total


67 61 49 85 66 45 23 27


866 674 601 576 612 458 115 112
: 66 72 78 59 77 63 19 18
: 80 69 65 60 56 38 14 15
: 7 7 7 6 7 7 6 6


.1,020 822 750 701 751 566 155 150


:1,087


884


799


786


Preliminary.
Includes corn, castor


and linseed oils.


Exports, including shipments to noncontiguous territory.
SGrease, inedible tallow, neatsfoot oil annd marine animal oil.
/ Oleo oil, oleostearine, oleo stock and edible tcllow.


Table 8.- Exports of soybeans and oil equivalent, 1931-36


Item : Unit : 1931 : 1932 : 1933 : 1934 :1935 /
.. ____ ___.


Soybeans


4 2/


Oil equivalent:Mil, lb.:

________________: ___


Preliminary.
Less than 500,000.


FOS-1


1936 I/


---


:Mil. bu.: 2/
::







- iC -


r. cc


xl


CD G-
U-I D
*3>
N r--



a ^
.2 N




7. CO
r-l ft
. r 1--


- '. C- C, Ci.
C" C.) r-l n


' i 1 "r ,



r --
:. ,0 "P ,-
,-4 ...


'3 Ii
L.




T~
iCI




~ C
c~c~


O


01.




a.
r-

0-




H 0







r r


C)



-4
C3
to
CO <







o H



0

k H



0- -
- n
*n47


G-4






C-
r-


r- CO C.








SQ C0.
r. C a




--4 -. ri



-. ,. CO

--4 a


:. :1 .
C : C)

2 2


0







rT. C. .
!1 C' 1 .
-4




















o-
-4
- D r-


r. c. .-'
C-'







r-l






r >
*ri a
3I E-.


0l


FOS-1


.*


i,-, L


c

U..,













'-


'C'
-4
" !.


1 U1 *r


Ea '0

U:


i. -

S--






:- d. CD
-0 W















0 .' .
o -4
4 n 1




















n ,
."-' o






a~r -
r r) +













4 ~ e--


r. r
Oi -i *r










O C
*- F-. C .
o *- n



Li a--4 .-4
0 f-. in




-. iA




04 +








4 3




0 0)
c ,v ul



-3,1 r -
S : r-i







tU) *

tl. R1 C
0 '.I 0C






















r14 1







STOCKS OF FATS AND OILS. INCLUDING OIL EQUIVALENT OF RAW
MATERIALS, UNITED STATES, DEC. 31, 1923, AND 1926 TO DATE
POUNDS
(MILLIONS)


2.800



2.600



2,400



2.200



2.000



1.800



1.600



1.400



1.200



1.000



800



600



400



200


All other
Lard. includingg neutral
Ta//ow, inedible, and grease
Marine animal oil
Coconut oil
Linseed o/l *
Cottonseed oil


1923 1926 1927 1928 1929 1930 1931 1932 1933 1934 1935 1936 1937
STOCKS OF rLAUSEED ARC FACr TO OR CRuSHERS SrOCKS OnlY. Aw 00 DOr .NCi.oDLE WAARiCT OR FAr4 STOCKS
U. S DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE NEG .6807 BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS


FIGURE 2







- 18 -


Taolc 1'.- Pric,~ -. r i .:nni f flot"di f;.ts z-.n iils, annual, 1931-36,
Janu. r;: 1336 and:i 1937


-at .or -il


-.utt-.r. 20, '-.. Y,' r:
Cl. 'm.-T- r : ine, r.ut, '1-c.0
Lard, r fir..-1, whic: :,
Lard 2 -n ,-'.i. s, .i,.:a rc
c-ut 1il, E'..iil ..w Y -"
Ce-ttrrns i oil, crui, f.c.b.
S.E. .ills
S?:',"e'r. cil, refincE, Few York
Poanut oil, dnrmtstic, refined,
.- w Ycrk
Pr, e oril, r finr d, ".C'w 'Y rk
Cl 0c Dil, !*'o., 1, :. w '_'crk
-l1..c:t-arine, barrels, T .w Ycrk

o-rr oil r.fin; w Yfor1.
Cli- oil, t.'i ll :' w '. -rk
Sus:m-.u cil, refi ncd, n w Y'r)-:
Sunflcwr.r cil, rLfin, I '.w Ycr]-
TLaset.d cil, e .ibl,, -<-w York

C,:,o ut 3il, cr'id., Pacifi: C'ra't
T.1ilcw, in iibl., Chic '- c
GrLtas-', hou.-n 'cw Ynrk
Palrm il, ?r'.ie, .w Yo.r
Qli.-c ril f- -tz, b.rrcis, -v ''*rk
P.i m,-': rnd c oil, t'.naturu'i,
V'". YrK
atb.a s.u cil, t. n.c, ..w Y'---rk-
S.--rdii.e oil, tarins, Pacific Co-st

Lirm. ci :il, raw, I..inr.L!- eli s
T-r g oil, dru :i U .. .')rk
Perillar cil, irums, '.'w --rki
.z--.;%y..r -.il, cridt, f. .b. nills
r'hri-cr. o1i r'Aid f.r.b. Balto.
.:: .. eC ill, *ru-le, .'w Y,,.r:.

C-stor -il, i .r. 3, .'w York
',r. cil, Larrcls, ;. .-fcund land


1334
Cents

25.7
3.1
S.S

4.8

5.6
S.2

3.7
5.4
7.9



23.1
8.C
r. 4
Ki

2. -
3.S
3.3
3.5
7.1

3.7

2.7

?.0
S.9


2.


9.S
5.5


a-.'er:Jo : January


1:35 : 1336 1936 : 1937
Cunts C-nts : Cnts Cents

2.s 33.0 : 34.6 354..
12.n 12. ) :11.5 15.0
15.1 12.2 : 12.2 14.
13.1 12.2 12.4 13.7
7. 7.4 6.3 11.6

?.2 8. : 8s.9 10.4
.8 : 10'.3 12.2

13.3 12.5 13.2 13.4
r.3 8.2 7.4 11.3
12.9 11.2 13.14 14.4
1':'.s : ': 12.C

12.1 12. : 12.5 12.9n
3.1 2h.2 : 23.5 28.8
'.5 1?.5 : 11.8 10.2
1' G .5 : '.8 12.6
s. 1).6 : .6 14.7

4.4 4.6 3. )
6.2 5.8 5.7 8.8
.1 5. : 5.7 8.7
.,7 4.- 4.r 6.8
8.0 .7 S.7 10.9

4,. 5.1 :4. 8.5
.C 11.4
4.6 4.5 4.3 6.4

s.o ?.5 : .5 9.
17.' 17.1 14.1 14.6n
.2 8.8 : 7.4 11.7
S.1 7.5 7.b 9.3
4. 4.3 4.8 4.5
8.2 3.9 .5 -

?.8 1'.2 1,.2 10.2
4.7 5.6 5: 6.7


'I Janui--.rv






FOS-1


Domestic:
Year Animl : V gVgetnole : : -
:fts 1/ :CottoU- Otner 3/ Total : Coconut
V C,_ .I_ ohill
Percent Pernt Per t Prc Percen
: Percent Perc.2nt Percent Percent : Perc ent


Ye.r
beginning
July
1919

1926
1927
1928
1929

Calendar


Imoortei
Vegetable
:Otner 3/ :Total
P* rce t Percent
P.;rcen.t Percent


74 : p


49
56
S 6C
1 63


1/ Includes oleo oil, neutral lIrd, butter, oleostecrine and oleo stock.
2/ Include3 peanut, soyben.ni and corn- oils.
3/ Includes palm oil for all ;.ears, pal:'ii-,rnel, sesame and swjuflower oils
when reported, babassu. oil in 1935 and 1936, rape and ouricuri oils in
1936.
4/ Less thr.n one-r...lf of one percent.


19 -



Table 11.- Percentage of fats rnd oils used in the manufacture of
oleomargr.rine, 191', 1926-53


--- -








Table 12.- Consumption and price per pound of butter and oleomargarine,
annual, 1918-36


: AvLr-e price per


: pound _


Consumption


butter, 01
930, : '
r: York : Ch

C nts C


51.5
60.7

61.4
43.3
40.7
46.9
42.6
45.3
44.4
47.5
47.4
45.0

60.5
28.3
21.0
21.7
25.7

33.


eomr.r-
rine,
nut,
icago


ents

25.8
29.0

28.
22. C
19.4
20.2
21.1
21.3
21.5 :
17.
17.3
17.5 :

16.9 :
12.7 :
8.8 :
S.2 :
9.1
12.6 :
15.3 :


: _: Per -capita
Butter : Oleomar- : : Oleomar-
Sgarine Butter : grine


Mil. lb. Mil. lb.


1,443
1,608

1,577
1,757
1,884
1,995
2,0 53
2,029
2,044
2,765
2, .63
2,116

2,130
2,229
2,260
2,217
2,277
2,134
1/2,1C8


347
354

364
215
184
226
230
232
24n

314
353

323
23C'
202
243
263
38r
391


Lb.

13.9
15.3

14.8
16.2
17.1
17.9
18.1
17.7
17.5
17.5
17.3
17.4


18.0
18.1
17.6
18.0
17.2
1.4


B


Compiled as follows:
Prices -
Butter, 1918-20, New York Produce Review and American Creamery.
1921-B5, reports of Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Oleom-rgarine, 191&-26, National Provisioner, and the Oil, Paint and
Drua Reporter.
1927-36, ITation.1l Provisioner.

Consumption -
Butter, comr.ute. from data of the Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Oloraar;-.rine, reports of the Cornissioner of Internal Revenue.


1/ Pra-l 1in- r.-.


Y ear


Lb.

3.3
3.4

3.4
2.0
1.7
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.1
2.3
2.6
2.9

2.6
1.9
1.6
1.9
2.1
3.0
3.0


1918
1919

192'3
192.1
1922
1923
1924
1925
1323
1927
1928


1931



1934
1935
1936


- 20 -


FOS-1







- 21 -


Table 13.-


01ecmarg-rine: "ater-als us.d in manuf .cture, United States,
annual, 19314-3', and De.c -bor 1935 an. 1936


: ?crct-: tage of :
tot,.l fats


1935 :1936


D,.2emb.r


1935 1936
,, l, Ib, 1,00' ib,


:1i .' lb_

Oleo oil 21,e72
Lard, neutral : 7,46
Oleost.arine 3,478
Olee stccI- 1,454
Butt r 11

Cottcns.-.s i oil : '54,77S
Peanut nil : 2,744
Soybean il : 214
Corn oil 4

Babassu oil
Coconut oil : 127,7-
Palm oil : -,
Palm-kernel oil
Rape oil
Sunflower oil
Sesame oil
uricuri oil
Other
p~.rcenta-es 21:


Total fats :
and nils 1/ : 215,596


1,C lu. 1, 0 lb. :Percent


18,227
3, 5
2,612
2, 33-,
1

??,5'04
4,3ii
1,7 34
32

1,s53
174,315
3
'25

71
7


1, 33r
2,199
3,550
1,93:'



4, 140
14, 261
1,238

16,1114
15', 465
1, b.4.
2,4 ,l
9
5
SC
442


3 s,678 324,648 : i1c,:


Percent:l,


Milk
Oth- r nisc.


: 61,C(,3 83,337 75,386 :
: 1,619 22,5: 21,536 :


: 6,932 7,1?
: 1,845 2,'03C


Grand total : 294,118 414,5r,5


422,242r :


41,167


1_ Less than nnc-half of r1ne d recent.
2/ Inclu-ds corn, sunflower, s%.same, ralm, ouricuri, and rape oils.
]/ Includes vegetable nil (unrnam.ed. in 1954 and 1?35.

Compiled andr comnutcd frn- rerjorts of the Ccmmission r of Internal Ruv.nue.


Ptercntagts have beun arbitrrril-- adjusted to equal 1').


Ite.-


Annual


1934


S1935


1936


1,269
164






271
3,'

932
15,r24

ci4

-
2
-


12, F9e
338
3,El2
25


5 :
1 :
1 :
1


33
1
5


5
46

1 :





1 :

I :


27,627


__




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