Poultry and egg situation

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Material Information

Title:
Poultry and egg situation
Physical Description:
v. : ; 26 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economic Research Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service
Publisher:
The Bureau
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Creation Date:
September 1951
Frequency:
quarterly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Poultry industry -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Egg trade -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Citation/Reference:
Bibliography of agriculture
Citation/Reference:
Predicasts
Citation/Reference:
American statistics index
Citation/Reference:
Index to U.S. government periodicals
Statement of Responsibility:
Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with PES 1 (Jan. 1937); ceased with PES-308 (Dec. 1980).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: Agricultural Marketing Service, Dec. 1953-Mar. 1961; Economic Research Service, May 1961-Dec. 1977; and: Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service, Mar. 1978-Dec. 1980.
General Note:
Cover title.
General Note:
Description based on: PES-301 (Mar. 1979).
General Note:
Previously classed: A 93.20: and A 88.15/2:

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000502977
oclc - 04506769
notis - ACS2711
lccn - 79643440 //r81
issn - 0032-5708
sobekcm - AA00005304_00011
Classification:
lcc - HD9437.U6 A33
ddc - 338.1/7/6500973
System ID:
AA00005304:00099

Related Items

Succeeded by:
Poultry and egg outlook & situation

Full Text


I .. ..- .. I 9". r


SITUATION


BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
PqES- 155 SEPT.- OCT. 1951


B


30


20


SUPPLY OF POULTRY MEAT
PER PERSON
S/*






__. _i FARM AND NONFARM


.Si A L IZ IBROILERSD"NTRPRi ISE S| ||c c
SPECIALIZED ENTERPRISES .

.TU K ..=l..


1930


1935


1940


1945


1950


1955


*FOR CIVILIANS


"iAL. 5. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
Broilers form specialized enterprises have bee
Supplying an increasing proportion of the U. S. pouJ
try meat supply. In 1951 they will supply almost
half of the country's chicken meat, compared wit
a negligible amount 15 years ago.
k.

VH;,


NEG. 48227 XX BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS
n Recent increases in turkey production have also
I- resulted in an increase in the proportion of turkey
it in the total poultry meat supply. The increase has
h been less spectacular than in the case of broilers,
but it has been almost as consistent.













: ant
Itemit I Or A 1950




I I

Sprution ...................... N11. do. Aug. 307.k 356.2

Average number of layer on fern ....: Ml1u :Aug. 291.2 307.3

late of y per hba ..................: Aug. 12.7 13.9

Awpansmt rilian per capit :
appea ......................: J 26.8 32.0

Proen eag production ................ Ml. lb. JUl7 26.1 17.7

Dried gg produation .................: il. lb. *July 11.1

Price received by farare ............ Ct.par dos. Aug. 37.1 38.0

Nrice received by farars u a :
p tage of rarity ................ Percent Aug. 96 72

Reail price (BAZI ................... :Ct.per &o.: JulFy h7.8 50.0

Rgg-fed price ratio .................: Lb. feed Aug. 12.6 10.2

Stoks:

hel .. ........................... :ho.mea: Sept. 1 5,788 2,568

frosn .............................: MN. lb. Sept. 1 239.6 155A.

Dried .............................. mi. lb. Sept. -1 109.2

Chicks hatched by comercial :
hbtcerie ..........................: Miliona : Aug. k0.5 75.9

Polljta not yet of layiug age o n
ftrm ...............................: Mllo BaSept. 1 a69.5 24.h

Pam price of poultry nrata ......... :Dal.per ot: Aug. 3.02 3.73




Price received by farmr-n rfor
hictkens, 11ive ......................:C. per lb.: Aug. 241.0 25.41

Price relieved by farmer : a
percentage of perity ................: Percent Aug. U16 86

Retell prim of chlkens,
dresed (AE ........................ :Ct. ar lb.: I lj y 09 5b.o

Price re ved by former for
turheaj, tie .......................:Ct. per lb. Aug. 28.3 33.8

Stoke: :

Poultry, excluding urte w .........: Ml. lb. Sept. 1 92.1 67.7

tate ........................... M1. lb. Sept. 1 22.5 37.A
icksa-feed prime ralo .............: Lb. foad Aug. 8.1 6.8

birT -fed price ratio ..............: Lb. fe d Aug. 9.1 9.1

Avege weekly rocelpta of poultry :
St Caterl WeasUM PFIr ay
MUit, pr plant .................: houm. Lb.: Aug. 27.6 31.3

Avesage w jl placeant of olack
in 7 brler areas..................: Millia Aug. --- 7.1
:


1951 :i or
: : date





352.6 : Sept.

302.2 :: Sept.

i1.0 :: Sept.

32.3 : Aug.

19.5 :: Aug.

0.7 Aug.

19.7 :: Sept.

91 Sept.

67.3 :: Aug.

12.6 :: Sept.


1,615 Oct. 1

176.3 : Oct. 1

30.1 :Oct. 1


86.9 : Sept.

26.4 :: Got. I

3.96:: Sept.

Poultry


26.0 :: Sept.

83 Sept.


55.5 :: Aug.


35.3 Sept..

:
96.7 :: Oct. 1

24.8 : Oct. 1

6.6 :: Sept.

8.9 :: Sept.


1.1.2 ': Sept.

8.2 :: Sept.
!:


I
I


A 190 1931 si






270.5 328.9 333.9 hish
the a ...
308.1 330.2 327.8 : e r

10.5 12.0 12.2 :

26.6 31.1 30.9

11.3 13.A 10.9 *

5.2 0.5 .

40.6 40.6 55.0

9. 70 93 :

51.6 56.1 71.9 ;

13.6 11.0 13.8 TAToanbj tp:.


4.171 1.558 931

213.3 133.0 152.0 :

1- 11.5 25.8 m aei


36.3 72.9 74.1 :

210.1 166.2 178.9

3.0o 3.68 3.99:





23.9 24.5 25.2 :


115 B2 81

k2.0 W7.4 55.0

I lIrbetinge a-
29.3 33.5 36.3: Sag meee ta



n1.O 7.6 2. :.5

22.6 2e.7 to.5

8.1 6.7 6.3

9.7 9.1 9.1 J


35.9 O.L 47.3

Seceel war 0li
--- 7.3 7.6: raen St



.





















he production and price outlook indicate that the- total value of
Vou' .' y products produced next year may be as much as 5 percent higher th .Ban
i estimated 4 billion dollars for this year. Costs also will rise and W.
ltu s to poultry producers may be a little lower than in 1951.

Most of the increase in egg production over 1951 is expected to occur "'
,, the first three quarters of 1952, Five percent more chickens were raised
his year than last, and the number of potential layers on farms next Jan. 1
is likely to be 2 or 4 percent above a year earlier. Furthermore, the rate
of lay is likely to continue its long-time upward trend. .

With egg production in the spring expected to be higher than a year:.
- earlier, prices may average about the sane or a little less than in the springg
of 1951. Since feed costs will be higher, the egg-feed pzice.ratio will qbe,


-be down to or slightly below 1951 levels. .

S ,A reduction in number of chickens raised on farms next year would* re.i
siupply of meat from young chickens, This would be largely offset by an In-
;rease in slaughter of mature farm chickens from the increased Jan. 1 invesw. V
story. Commercial broiler production, on the other hand; probably will con00
tinue its long-time increase, though the rate of gain is likely to be ma
: than in 1951, The rise in broiler output will more than offset any pos iNb
I.:decline in farm chickens and the total chicken meat supply will be large .
r than in 1951.

S consumer demandd for chickens and broilers next year is expected to lbe ^i;
Kstr ng enough to offset the increased supplies and prices for the year pro
Sbably will, average about the same as in 1951.

The outstanding feature of the outlook for turkeys is the prospect
t hat farmers will raise more small birds. The record turkey crop of 52.8 :
I alllion birds produced this year included 8.3 million Beltsville Small Wht-
||cpompared with 5.3 million in 1950, an increase of 55 percent. The growing L;
^Pyopularity of small turkeys for year-round use suggests a further increase.
,tear-round production of these birds is more easily accomplished than is '
..a. :for the large breeds. Indications for 1951 are that the increase !' S
i" ).r' duction of large turkeys, most of which are marketed for the ho.l.if ia
h .abpt 10 percent over 1950. .
.. :!'*1
li :+, lt



















fat 123.8
rn 124.8
2: 15.6
l; .126.3.
M 127,1
:; 128.0
.,l 128.9
037.- 129.6
9 5: 130.7
9s9. 131.7?


133.0
134.2
137,6
139.3
.140.8
142.3
145.0
147.5
150.Q


Percent Percent Mil. Mil. M1i


95.4
96.1
96.8
97.3
97.9
98.6
99.3
99.9
100.7
101.5


102.5.
103.4
104.5
106.0
107.3-
108.5. -
109.6
111.7
113.6
115.6


? :; .. .
50: 15 2,6 117.6
1nAA5.3 /119.6


106
101
99
100
96
.92.
99
101
101.
110


112
120
139
162
166
170
:160
157
153
170


S-182
. 1/191


420
402
386
391
385
350
363
380
353
376.

393
381
428
489
524
474
474
436
426
413,


. 443
1/6.28


39,067
38,532
36,298
35,514
34,429
33,609
34,534
37,564
37,356
38,843

39,695
41,878
48,597
54,539
58,530
55,858
55,590
55,252
55,158
56,629


777
709
736
750
644
658
715
601
651
697

634
745
844
1,001
832
915
746
* 745
637
744


60,046. 670
3 07/1


389
'304
352
384


* 240
.263
202
218


286 284
365 245
412 275 :
526 347
387 404
441 369
322 338
385 289
282 287.,
367 259
303 292


S34
,-.43
S 53'
68
82
106


143
192.
228
285
265.
3V6
376
295
356
.501


..0

1,05!
1,1%
9.6
S96


616 1,21


-Preliminary. "'i[

. '
... ...
i~i: ..'. :;


b~. .I*


la.. .* *~


*. w...


.. :, P


.: L






















Sat 25 to 30 percent above 1950; turkey prices may be 10 percent .-i
a:-Chicken prices of 1951, including broilers, are likely also to 'iil
somewhat higher than in 1950.
.1ime general economic outlook indicates a prospective level of demand:!
ll support average 1952 prices at near the 1951 level. A continued.
2'1 employment and Income in 1952, an extension of the defense effort,
aspects for slightly higher prices foremost goods and services are o fte:
ng points in the general outlook. They are more fully discussed in the'-,
per 1951issue of The Demand and Price Situation. Barring short-term
tion p the markets, the civilian demand, bolstered.by continuing fa-:
ie. Incomes, should hold prices of eggs and poultry near the average :
.vtiels.. A factor in this is the expected level of competitive red meat:-)

...prices of most production items poultrymen buy will be sustained by ,;.;
.ai'ecoaomic conditions that will tend to maintain the prices of eggs"':
X.1%t.ry feat. Feed prices by mid-1952 are expected to be higher than 4-N
*t4eagiier- Wage rates for farm help are higher than last year, and are :
ted:to A6onbntinue upward in response to the competition from non-farm jolk;
unities. Building materials and specialized equipment will continue"

ipoti. ....1:95

The 703 million chickens being raised in 1951 for laying flock replay3
, are 5 percent more than a year earlier. This increase has raised Oct$f76
& 1951 numbers of potential layers on farms to 24 percent above the
i n-1950, and is likely to result in a 2 to 4 percent increase in the.
:r of potential layers on farms January 1, 1952. On January 1, 1951 Wt
of potential layers on farms (hens and pullets) was 428 million.





nm : C :,,




















'1951 production on farms ... .

Springtime Egg Prices

Although flush springtime egg production in 1952 wili'be
perhaps 4 percent greater than.in 1951, the U. S. population Vifll
I" than 1 percent larger than a year earlier. Congequently e"gi
per capital will be almost 3 percent .greater. than in the spring.i

If there are no Government purchasing programs and umilitl5
.chases are not on a scale significantly greater than in 1951,
cent excess over last year aftere r population adjustment) would (
', lent to 2 million cases of eggs from February-May production. '
pares with the 7.3 million cases (equivalent) as the peak.stprap
in shell and frozen form ,.n 1951.) .

On the basis of the probable supuiles expected next spring;
Q. :. .slight change, if any, could be expected in the 1952 springtime lj
.level as compared with 1951. Some observers take a more .pessgisi
S... but en balance there appears to be good reason to believe .that 6
.production could be absorbed by the increased population and by .
:increase in storage. 'Shell egg storage in 1951 was the second
since records were begun, while storage holdings of frozen egg
4, : than in 8 of the past 10 years. Storage requirements tould thel.
absorb more eggs, particularly if during the spring it beqpmeas
that fewer chickens will be raised, and accordingly egg produeti
be smaller late in the year. Next yehr'7s prices will be t.furt hr;
.by the increased demand expected at that time..' The expeotatiarW
0 would be for only a moderate decline from 1951 iin springtie


9... ...
























S 10.6

S" 3
S 10.9
.. 11.4
.,. 13.1
r 11.4
12.6

:- 11.5
., 13.2


:* 11.9
*:":" : .1 73
*::** ... 9.8


i .1 1 ..
i flip"'.6


736
S750
644
658
715
601
651
697


634
745
844
1,ool
832
915
746
63745
637
744


670
1/ 703


230
237
238
212
226
249
215
242
254

240
278
319
350
301
325
285
285
268
300

276


77
109
123
176
105
115
72
121
111


83
111
115
111
76
114
93
95
87
130

76
119


91
104
102
86
102
. 109
84
107
107


91
118
113
119
83
110
82
100
86
117


90
1/105


r as follow; Proceding November, 1; preceding December, 2;
A reh 5; Aprt1, 3; MBay, 1.


S4 4*.'*
S* *~. 't~:
w.V. *. ::~: ~ 4 :. ~ ~p~!~9.


94:
103-
100

3o107
110 :
86-
113


ii6 i
116
110 MIwl
86i
108


94
12'




















note to table 2. Under this relationship, even at the least-ataf
bination of egg-feed prices indicated in the preceding sections,
in chickens raised is hot likely to exceed 5 percent d&'er. 2
under the most favorable price relationships the decline might be;:.
as 2 percent.

In recent yeaig declines in chickens raised have not result
proportionate declines in the number of pullets (laying and not y
S n farm flocks on the following January 1. 'This has been due not
.'increased popularity of sexing. with the resulting increase in $'-
of pullets raised, but it also follows from how critically fareii,
the pullets that they wish to retain for egg production. Y
Slightly-Reduced 1952 Farm Chicken Supply
to Sell at Prices Near 1951 Average .

If fewer chickens are raised in 1952 than in 1951,. a reduce ..
.of meat from young farm chickens will result. Partly offsetting t.4Y
ever, is the expectation that the slaughter of mature farm .chicke&A:i:
in proportion to the 2 to 4 percent gain expected for January i n'
.result is likely to be a very small net reduction from 1951 in 1953.;0j
I. of chicken meat that will be available from these sources. '.

; There has been a steady decline in the proportion that farn
production is of total chicken supply. This year, almost equal p
of the chicken meat supply will come from farm chickens and from.
..produced in specialized enterprises. Next year, the proportions
to change further in favor of broilers since that .enterrise is e
:" increase its output substantially, while that of farm chickens maY:.
ip slightly. '.":i
I Average prices for farm chickens in 1959 are..not.likelif o'
different from the 1951 average to date. This would be 's.Lg li hi
present levels, which are seasonally low. The mid-September farmna
25.2 cents was about 2 cents lower than the average for the"first .8
of 1951.

based" Expectations for average chicken prices in 1952 to equal I)9
based principally upon the general demand outlook and the substitu
between chicken and red meat, coupled with the expected small d1 r
fa: arm chicken supply being offset, pricewise, by the broiler t:nre

.. ., 0 4




















3,.xv.3 423
W.!4,' 28
10.6 27
S14.: 5 '30
Weast North Central,

10.8 211
13.9 2h6
S1563 286
S11*8 239
3 .12.9 259
12.1 .215
11.0 216
S..8,8 163
I 2:.5' 195
~.. 9.2 175
Ca: ~~en1a82
i tat South Central
t" ..- *


9.6 -

::; 13.,6
2:": 10.8
S12.0 -
." 11.2
10,7 '
9.5
S12.0
I ?9.2


J-4< v7 (--
112 65
13.9 80
11.0 73
12.8 1/84
South Atlantic

9.6 84
11.6 91
12.8 108
10.2 93
11.7 94
11.2 81
11.0 77
10.1 72
12.0 76
9.7 68
11,7 _1/70
Mountain


11.0 23
13.5 27
15.2 33
12.1 26
13.6 30
12.9 23
11.7 24
10.7 22
13.2 25
9.9 22-
11.6 _. 2


90
101
120
94
104
*84
S83
72
85
74
._1/75_ __


. L J J L .
9.5 117
12.4 143.
9.2 .30
10.9t Centra131
East gugh Central


9.0
11.6
12.6
10.2
11.4
11.3
10.6
9.5
12.0
9&4
112


67
78
89
13
76
70
67
63
68
58
1/59
Pacific


11.6 .42'
12.8 45 '
15.4 53 ::
1.8 42 .
13.6 51 .
12.0 38 9-
12.2 41 "
10.6 '40
12,7 46
9.5 k3 2
312.1 1 4


t average of monthly ratios as follows: Preceding November, 1; precek
2; January,3; February, 4; March, 5; April, 3; May, 1, except for the
eh ii based on the months January to May only.
, .f ....G
,. : .I .', .. =..
ji= "! = .


L~ '" d
-t

















1930
. .1931
'1932
~1. 1933
1934
i; 1935
S.1936
- ,. 1937

1939


:1 1940
!. 1941
1942
1943



1947
1948
P"*1949

1950
1951


777
709
736.
750
644
658
715
601 .
651
697

634
745
844
1,001
8Y2
915
746
745

744

670
7? 703


244.
230
237
S238
212
226
249
215
-242
254

..240
278
319
350
301
325
285
.. 285
'- 268
..* .300


31.3
32.4
32.2
31.8
32.9
34.4
34 9
35.8
37.2
36.4


.'S


37.9
37.3
37.7
34.9
36.2
35.5
38.3
38.3
42.1
40.4

41.2


1; For farm flock replacement; excluding"
iLaying and not yet laying.
J Computed from unrounded data.
Preliminary.
. 5/ Intentions to purchase.
t"" .. ...


epecIalfzed. b


rollers.*


..=..
4 + 1..i


4'
>: .:;*.;
:.:.. ";,:, ,::::P i.
.... m
"" .. ...... ... : !:: A MIN'
~ ~ -dv ?' ,x' xw ::+ ,;


276


4 *





























tisome cases difficult to find at any price. Feed prices are higher
ina.ateany time in the past 2 years, with the prospect that they will
FWither within the year. Under these circumstances, investors may be
NaS d!bout further extensions in the business.

.nlt the spring of 1951, weekly broiler placements in 7 reporting' areas..:
d PCh' as 40 percent above the corresponding figures a year earlier. .
I'"c tober, the weekly gain- over the figures a year earlier had fallen
tr. Although part of this decline may be attributable to a sea-' |i
-bvptage of hatching eggs, the trend may also be indicative of a slowed
..i'th. in the industry for the near future.

.,2kobr'l1er 'prices in the last few months have averaged between 26 and
4~s per. pound in the Del-Mar-Va area, the largest of the specialized .i
.i.g areas. Earlier in the year, occasional weekly average prices had. :
ttrifle' higher, but there had been no sharp declines to 18 and 22 centl:l
C:I had happened twice in 1950. This greater steadiness of the market-ii
."a result of ,a. better organized processing and marketing system, in, -
J.h.e greater use of quick-freezing for ready-to-cook chicken and
: parts. This development can be expected in the future to help
e short-term price-breaks that have frequently occurred.

|f..the broiler industry maintains or expands its production, there
Sson to expect broiler prices significantly higher than the average
t !.3l951, The attainment of such an average would put prices somea- .:
ig1i:fthan: they were in. mid-October, but such increases from the fall:
VI.O just about absorb the additional demand expected from further.i:
Ieas. E employment nd incomes of consumers.
i~il ;" : .. ....


..:.

.. ~ ~ ~ ...: .. .: .......-
:.: :::!:. :.A
~ ~ Ht L ': "I ., r ,,


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:.*. .... ,..,.:. .J:., :* ,:. .. .: ,#



















V The remarkable developments In the turkey industry in
> the 10 percent increase over 1950 in the number of large turkes%4
the increase of 55 percent in the number of Beltsville Small- I
the sustained price for this increased output. To mid-OctoberE,
U. S. prices received by farmers had continued well above last jh
the prices are apt to exceed 1950 for holiday marketing also .;
spective 55 and 10 percent increases for Beltsville Small Whit0p-A
other turkeys average out to the reported 16 percent gain for SteI
as a whole.) :;."

The rapid increase in the output of small turkeys is sboat
table below. ".H

S: Table 5.- Turkey production with breed-size breakdown, 1950 and'.
f,.' 1951 ,I
-' _(Co.puted from unroundod data) A".
Ie19 Estimated : In
Item 1950 : 1991 : 1

Total turkeys raised, millions : 15.7 52.8 :
... Percent Beltsville Small Whites : 12. 16.
S umber of B.S.W ,'s, millions 5.3 8.3 :
R"., 'Percent increase in B.S.W.'s
m Number of other turkeys, millions : 40.3 44.5 -
Ki.. *Percent increase in other turkeys : I


The popularity of small turkeys in the markets. suggests t.
numbers will continue to increase. Because they are better egg-lpi
the larger-breeds, and the availability of sufficient breeding si
I, assured, a large increase in their numbers is likely to ccuzP be
physical limitation in the .availability of eggs or parent stoek b
limiting factor. Further, the year-round character of thi smppljiA
demand for small turkeys means that off-season production capaci.
be used for Beltsville Small Whites in a way that is not practidca|
larger birds for which the principal demands occur at the holiday;

": ..











































, ,Nt 4o U r4 r j NH C Y r 4N 0

*, .. a e :::.




0




W. .,"Q CA A H 41
1 41
I I I Q I 0 l, ::i
nt N 0 0 0- 4 0 N 4t f 4 l- cr 4 HOo, ') '
S. ..






: ." .** .. ;
0 -4 N 4 C-. NQ C- O 0 4 4Hflc -r / C- O 0 0 r l


O 1 CM a* C7O 0 % ON ^C' ON Hr 0iOM7f0 M" WD M8 N
.r .no r, r- r4r r4 H r r4 .:r
.i .
*. A* a




. ... 00 Se C .. .* p ... .. :.. .. .. .* ** .. .. .. i ..42 f 4 5 9
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I'liim Million
Spounda
A1ja1' I 2,414


344 2,6526




35 2,4196
S93 2.3457


393 2;457


Pounds

1.7

1.8
1.7
2.1
2.4
2.2
2.1..
2.7
2.7
2.7
3.0


Pounds


19.7

21.5
19,4
19,7
20.3
18.8
18.1
18.1.
18.0
16.8
18.7


Percent Percent Percent

91 9

91 9
S91 9
91 9 U
91 9
88 9 3.
87 8 5
86 8 6
84 8 8
83 8 10
81 8 11


i:-. 470 2,483 3.5 18.7 78 8 14
1 469 2,715 3.5 20.5 75 8 17
i 3,097 3.7 23.4 74 8 18
4, 3,959 3.3 30.5 75- 7 18
tt 406 3.467 3.3 26.8 75 7 18
555 -3.742 4.3 28.8 71 7 22 .
... 3.542 4.5 25.4 .73 7 20
|. Ta 3.387 4.5 23.6 71 7 2'
:: .3,375 3.6" 23.1 65 6 29
S619' 3.790 4.2 25.5 60 6 34

755 4.069 5.0 26.9 54 6 40
37' ,. 4,511. 5.5 29.7 51 5 44

rit'ttorn of civilian consumption is assumed to be. similar to distribution
haition.*
d. backyard flocks. ., :i
t.nary eati.ates.


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1 :. .. 1 A .
", .:;i; ;. ;.. .. .




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
IiIIhIIEluuiII
3 1262 08903 572











.. keys, the year-round aspect the, narketingsan e~
l: ".public eating places, :. us.. at" be considered. This eas: tha. ... .
ton oes not necessarily mean proportionate o










S.ukey crop, and. of which about 60 percent are typi cal:'y :te
L A,.RY-,..:.










..The number .of large turkey which will be gro,. ,... ...








i were considered favorable, rsuting- in a tuirkiy-feed: .ce.

past 20 years, profits have be"en adequate .to Induce' a ave... .....
6 A
". .. .4 4
















". ".....The successive early indicators 'which will be relevant '" B...... :
..'of number of breeder hens n fas January 1: ":
publ .onicdeat placsm uste cnsid h mr as ta .e




flund.t oreo s bt "e>e


.comparedwith 92as the average of the 5 previousSo tbt
lt be in siat rew tpt.
V.7,:, pri The successive ear hnhu s icwil ich will, be rcelszxt.; t
I include (a) 1951 holiday prices, ;b) the J
S. tentions to grow turkeys;' (a) the volui.er tf tu.r i a,2'bt
of number of breeder hens o hfrm:. Jauatj1

iYi aso f ot6pe~~ ntae upt "' :""':