Poultry and egg situation

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Material Information

Title:
Poultry and egg situation
Physical Description:
v. : ; 26 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economic Research Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service
Publisher:
The Bureau
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Creation Date:
April 1951
Frequency:
quarterly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Poultry industry -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Egg trade -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Citation/Reference:
Bibliography of agriculture
Citation/Reference:
Predicasts
Citation/Reference:
American statistics index
Citation/Reference:
Index to U.S. government periodicals
Statement of Responsibility:
Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with PES 1 (Jan. 1937); ceased with PES-308 (Dec. 1980).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: Agricultural Marketing Service, Dec. 1953-Mar. 1961; Economic Research Service, May 1961-Dec. 1977; and: Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service, Mar. 1978-Dec. 1980.
General Note:
Cover title.
General Note:
Description based on: PES-301 (Mar. 1979).
General Note:
Previously classed: A 93.20: and A 88.15/2:

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000502977
oclc - 04506769
notis - ACS2711
lccn - 79643440 //r81
issn - 0032-5708
sobekcm - AA00005304_00011
Classification:
lcc - HD9437.U6 A33
ddc - 338.1/7/6500973
System ID:
AA00005304:00096

Related Items

Succeeded by:
Poultry and egg outlook & situation

Full Text





















% OF PRECEDING YEAR



120

mn, l-- --


OU I. .
1930
WEIGHTED 7-MONT
t BASED ON INDICATE
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE NEE


Profits from egg production during the
hatching season are the best general indicator
of changes to be expected in the subsequent
number of chickens raised. In turn, the number
of chickens raised (for laying flock replace-
sent) affects the number of pullets on hand
at the beginning of the following year, and
consequently egg production in that year.
M"


Changes from year to year in the egg-feed
pr:ce ratio are a convenient approximate mea-
sure of changes in profits in egg production.
The ratio now is more favorable to producers
than it was last year at this time. The number
of young chickens on farms May 1, 1951, is 5
percent larger than a year ago.













Sit or atlg a 1350 1950 1951 ior da.t:gIO-. : 1950 : 1951 a on u nll:


fciu .....................1 l do-.
Suier of law re an tfm..... Millions
I2
at flWg par bm ................. Sgi
tciTlla per ampita
...................... 1 .
a pirootion ................ 1L1. lb.

0 pwodction ................. NI.1b.
IM Seind If fararn ........... SL.ier doz.
4iNaC ecalnuo tv fatamr as a a
pp of parity .............. Prnt
Finanj pace 014a) ...................C..par dos.

c fi4u pries ratio ................ Lb. foed
stacks.
Saul ............................. :Thona. caw
horen ............................. U lb.
Drlej ............................. Mil. 1l.
Chiclda hatched tr oumerclal a
batchrles ........................: lillioun
OAcas and mung dicke on faem ..: Millions
Nam price of poultry ration ........ -bl.per art.


Price received ly fimrse for
cicta live .................... Ot.per lb.
Prim seeimled bt farirs an a I
per tp of parity ..............I Peroent
Bretal price of chidcans, dressed
(BA) ............................ Ct.per lb.
Pita. riweived y taimra for
tmqa'.. ive ..................... Ct.pr lb.


e* dtx, acludig tamage ........: I. lb.
fakv *........................... IUl. lb.
Chldma-fe price atio ............ Lb. food
lktey-f eda price ratio ............. Lb. fted
Ainrmu wai receipts of poulti
at Central Wtemr PrimL q
Matts, per plan ................ Thous. Ib.

In 7 broiler areas ................I MUllon

5


50D.8 58.5 528.3 Apr. 519.4
374.7 382.8 373.2 Apr. 357.8
16.o 16.9 17.0 Apr. 17.4


95 72
44.5 43.4
10.1 9.3


1913 1296
104.7 116.5
79.8


314.3
25.6
1.8
163.7

96
57.8
10.9


309
62.3
74.5

268.8
210.8
4.00
Peniar t S


22.5 23.8 28.9

110 a4 93

12.1 45.3 53.0

28.3 31.6 35.3


104.7
58.0
6.0
9.8


5.7 8.5 13.41

- 5.1 9.5


Apr. 96 73


55.7 526.5 : Slitly belo last per
364.1 354.9 a
17.7 17.8 2 lon-tlm tuad tML mOBinms

38.0 39.81
77.9 67.1 :
10.3 2.2 1
30.9 .43.1.
I


94:


Mar. 43.3 47.2 63.7
Apr. 10.7 8.9 10. :


w I o015 21q7 990
MHa 1 155.5 155.1 111.5-:
My i 79.9 61.5

Apr. 298.6 284.5 319.-~

Negr 1 418.6 1105.1 1625.0 a
Apr. 2.93 3.48 3.99


Govermnent-oaed itodcs decluinia



StaBst. lacra se in chIAs for
fami flock replameat


Apr. 23.2 23.4 29.3

Apr. 113 L 93

Mar. 41.9 50.2 55.5

Apr. 28.2 30.1 35.3


May 1 E.4 74.2 86.6 :
hDeclining
me 1 46.6 92.8 60.8 :
Apr. 8.1 6.7 7.3
Apr. 9.6 8.6 8.8


Apr. 6.4 U.5 17.3 Imncms in

apr. 7.5 10.1 s haurd high


seannely


eamanoy


5


-- '




















pfwunry ou IuWa WIL. jcar v86 priwUV reUeivwu uj Lormax-nb nanvU uecin niunLAiU
atenots per dozen higher than a year earlier. Since egg prices have ri*s$:n
p than prices of feed-during the past year., the egg-feed, price ratio itsfi-:i.
re:.~avyorable to producers than-last spring. In most years, such a- change @'*"ii |
Zthe ratio-results in'an increase in the number of chickens raised for A
i)ng flock replacement.

g. So -far this year, reports on numbers of chickens on farms indicate
V percent increase in the number of young chickens on farms. This sug-
is.an increase in the number of chickens raised this year, and in the
hber of'potential layers January 1, 1952. However, since the number of
so* chickens on April 1 was 7 percent under last year, the new pullets
iIi- not be substantial contributors to the egg supply until quite late
S':year.

Egg. prices have been high enough tChis spring to sharply reduce
wefomt Into storage. Since fewer early pullets are being raised.th"lis
r:than last;-the seasonal reduction in-supplies from spring to fall may.
SgrPeater-than usual. At that time, supplies available for consumption
libbly will be below a year earlier. 'To date egg supplies have be6n
timing above a year ago.

Despite large marketing of broilers from specialized enterprises, ...I
.the -seasonally increasing dales of faim-produced- chickens, chicken ...1
16iA continuee only slightly changed 'from. the 29.3 cents per pound (live)
n"s8 the average price received by Tarlers in April. This was 93 per-
iit of parity. Recent broiler chick placements have continued at record :
.. nd are well above last year.

:,.Cuxrrqnt feed. supplies for production of eggs -and poultry meat are
4u* but prseeht and prospective livestock populations indicate that
rItoe stoiks of the feed grains are being or will be reduced.
"+i~i : +!....
























lag the prospective supply situation for the third quarter of rI t
(a) the likelihood that only small storage Bstooks will be aSid PAVlA
S use than, (b) the expectation that military procurement will O :W.
and (a) the expectation that production on fears In. the fall v2J..4 II
i. any larger than a year earlier. '1

a: Notmally, about 10 percent of the January-June egg prod.,t:
withheld (stored) for use later In the year when fresh supplles'iS
cant. The.net cold storage accumulation through April this :eap
about .4 percent of farm production through the same month. This a
so far this year a larger percentage than usual of the springtime:
was taken for immediate consumption. As a result, supplies for
, were less than normal. The low level of stored supplies will
. tion in August and September when stored stocks normally supp
: seasonally reduced supply of fresh eggs. In 1950, 11 percent, oa
ian egg consumption in August-September cam from stored eggs, a ie
or frozen.

Egg purchases by the Defense Establishment may slaken sliti
the fall, particularly if egg prices rise relative to those of at
foods,- Cold storage listings do not indicate that the military h"r..
shell. eggs for fall use, beyond the oontinuthg "pipeline" require
Therefore, no abrupt decline in military purchases should be expbbt

There is little likelihood that the smaller quantity of egl"
age will be offeet by production increases in the late samer and.
number of layers now on farms is about 3 percent emller thaf aSW
This relationship to last year is not likely to changee .greatly: .
from the 1951 hatch are added to -laying flocks. Since the.lnubtiar
chickens on farms April 1 was 7 percent lower than a year before,
maturity of early watched pullets is not likely soon to ineroea.e
flock numbers above a year earlier. An a matter of fact numbers.
in the early fall months are likely to remain enough. below 950 1W
pract ically offset the gains in rate of lay that usually occur in
months.
M *"











A 1, f


41



P, prXX,

14fto8nixed'Att
$
T, ITT",



TI t,4at,
I 51 t
""0, ", ri 'Prioe* t
tor t, e" term's bf, the-
-7 ",&`b, Vpqd,--be 6ppl ','Love
in 4y:
oil 47''
d6t6
,shoiu b ro gniat
ibd Lffatj=., Th6 freeze, I t Opu 1,
tA, I T eap 6ia Alng parity,,jeiv6lS".1 ''or BUPP164
ul, a 0 f qo.u A is P; I
iori :e'44
athioi"t"Iavkr"Of tilt
4,th pasi;-thro*h"
t', f lty.
C16,r.,,16i0es ;p4'h 1,00 pp 6 ea, c, a

0 1 1 ndrd porI66iat of, par1f. l''VithIn' th4,
towArd their staponal
bhw* r1l, qn -v-oi P
thon,,FouI4 b thai,-in'th
tevlpg" Pbr i d"O ,Iievlat i on jloi
JU
of the ---eft's6n6
in tIK6 Mnrths of 195. t. 1 4
'h4 4,ut ;he, var-4,
+,Orf00,P31,00 control,
ig5l.


,tgj,
phlckens on. farms ware


tV
tho largostpa;t of 19', a a, uatiDh.
4,1 WtIl AN
ITT
t 4


M,
"A
IJIT t




#!ala

61I
raP I
ic mxisU4
th eprO 1,,YOeg
anz e' ~,]ree ,~
j du'44,'4 Woliegln 4Rni
ofit~~llyezo AruqAurrI152M
a|er
itisw e 1, nlG V,~
broi~r h iis m, 'bnto I ncrase
eanathatt*'i
::ok ilcw t; iii no lieyto!ti
in iiiiiiiipu (Lle 1
i%
Tfi ....... 1.5 nub r o!hei*ft lt
@,efI ;twul'e'h U,.
-U eWfoi~iertbhge,; aa
eaea nrae niIro h~m Me
4i !a~ro ult' nhn ~aur sal-t~o 81
dhces, a z4 ..
































Th T lmt


:.,- a J.... U EIW hU C ..UUU. A-ULC .L I J.IULIAU .aw a ,a.UI
, -::i : iI oh l l.l ii "' Thou


33 3,489 96 513 1,933 1,084 1,170 9,4,
: 383 3,609 1,018 536 2,047 1,244 1,305 10,142
:p. ', -J ."


"2323'.. 3,173 658 349 1,137 814 894- 7,257
2.93 : 3,060 618 351 1,561 971 938 7,79-
j. ..*35- "3,373- 852. 469 1,844 1,130 1,179 9,201


: 241 3,234 890 434 .1,455 955 887 8,0 "
.. 239 2,849 784 427 1,397. 952 837 7,485
35 2..3 2,87 663. .394 1.354 802 703 7,036.
"' additional ress 3
e,.:. .1 4vi. ems- t Total : : Total'
t....... ... .. ppi : areas: 11


627 191 365 565 1,948 i, 43
85,: .. 87 399. 598 2,034 12,17"
S./2,i00 l/12,,


Sthelae 4.of data for part of month.

A 4 MlzbI prtbr -to Jwuariy 31951.


:c.., I
,. ,. :..


~,L.


.'..... ...... .


flit. __.- f>


,::,


\f
,i

"
.d


;:,
ii









are beilo theiiiannua:iii
bearea hipek oiesdld
hi,.U brom aeple ilhl at-high
a=onl obang*: -.llove those of the last tom 7eTit
Increase in arwkati & f oocxn ta now thto.IFIPV
or. This. ITcrah ,wil.nld amgony&6a
lziiiiii Aiii :az-& k

It= bto re prbduced In:'peialize try es
Imminent Feed Short ee:

:Prospect fbr tlohter freed s,1uppls SM io*ey to -in
66pedteq fqr. poultryment- in the coming year
'In the last 3 year, stocks, of food have beeb .1arge
~ith: at nefrcr~ees uigteCurret odei
-large, liveettook.v pouaich oix oMV rs scasmt
'U > vare produced. As 'a reblts st ck are 6ng dsg te
tio isinprospec t for 1`9-512 unles fedgrinfit

To relieve Othis situations,, the Depa~rtMebt orr-Aegrioulty
go-, acreage goais fbF the- productonffed th i 95
'I,- U 1ne ththese gokls. woul ,low e rate at !ich t6
T0t corna, 6ats,. barley, and. sorghuzse -my be depleted. by the'e
livestock population of 1951-2.
Therefore, unlas yields per agre are'higher' tpA. expel
a e mmch more econocal _at a. fbeking thah ,
there ill ave to be an eventual adjustment of lit*
,oig the grain consuming animal Volpulation In linh a ith,
.eources.
Pouiltry, depends more than ayother class of lf'O
$&itb no" through commerc ial =hnnls CUEikectti,
orage-UusUaly produced on, the, famhere the 'cale
ly --ed: d'mncdo





6imost entirely aeenet Uppn todcacnrae'
ized lioul-try enterprises thoder concentae r
commercial channels.
This. Mans that for the poultryman tor be aseen 16f50 ,fO 0,e
aval-libility of his food supply..it iW hrn~eosaVt h
feed gainss, particularly corn, ;htor tonrtl sa bef
.tha.protoln feed an& the, 1A.iln _ypebte 5 A
other eompononter of the poultry atib44,.
While the above statement is not 86ddty ial
hIighly specialized poultry flockg of th6 kid-*iats 6i V11 for-
enerrse.....on..t.cats.....ac etit'"
raino helyn e i abmic o su











-14 1,
0,*)Ult,Z' MaaJ00 b6
addition, matut*b '0 ....
pffnc ij 4 ipgr6dj A

f t4o, t6ttj, -wrn disajt e
con ent:t a' fii
foq4s 1ntbO'1,1,,'
'6 A to B.)
13 Lon

n.q;a*a_ piopbr4on of the cOZ11, PrOp vi11 *Mtime, U be
411- 40ix 1 jro&j;ced# anet xoves Into, regular c rci
-AW e4pplyproben probably more acute t
Ives, Oct' wqvqrj past ex
'i iridustry'as a V4,010. ',')o
jLQ n t im''66, of fe attekn'of,
jP that
j,
not maintained.,, In eerwral .-producing farms,
-veeVare alao liveatock-proftcing f ivestook"',
IZ,to SOM6.,,i,,Atent, on idoo 'i' have'dprior Cla
-Od an% they, are',advantagpd, iover, conaumerb
OjigWlj. i4n coru pricoe-are d=trq.V11ed
,Oieextant, of those needis -on corn-producing fArms may be somewhat
i0d,,.Py the rel&tlve profl.tabilitY of livestot;k e4" ria.e a dt the t I M6
_j=&uqtiog, decisions are niade4 -gage on hand.piumably will. be f04,'
-U ,,the fiog ratio is unfavorable,-and a mnaller hoe onerprise I ,
IaM-AJor the following year. Nevertheless,, hogp3,w# other
ady on oorn-produc ing fa2W have'.' the, a tronges, claiaupon.corn
-rom current prcductibh,, In the event ot.a tight f6 d,,ffituiLti6n,
-Df Wrn 4yailable t rcial poultrymen will depend upon,,,
Aweral, e-vailuatioh of ihe re'lati'*Vt. profits I of (a) feeding liveat6d
'Com into, reg :Mannels r4t.het:-than fr, any
am -udgembnt
;VvofitS 10f`, fb) feeding, lopal'liveatbck vaj.:.Toeding poultiy:.-..

'Aeptially thw VaeU on: VhIch. feed eupplies becme: aNtal I
1al,'jp6,ultrYmen. 'The priae n6rnitaly is determined bythe Inteia;0-
i0,4 14maPd,(JnclqdingL th e::.erfe6ta'of I oW Eiticl storage %)o4 bt
d I am I ard). Thie situation,'hov'e'vier, is likely to be abanged If
veld, at -Aic'h ceili be impoed 1-f C
the, Parity le n9s may
r"ent jamdtrven and'othero fiom biodng c and oth grainb-'
jveat6ck = thefarme vhere tfw feed As Produced Ubh the a-va
`feedinthe, deficit gr4inareas Vould be adversely affected.
z -that,,the, .da substantial of,
U9604t tirynan using titles
cop,, 1' tl' int6re a ts iii the feed vituatlon. H pa
U& prjce for 4$6., feed to,.Ud 0 plies, &,;ay
Other c faeees't livestock, particularly livestock f6d on farmO
'11o P'rQ#uced* He also desires: to buy his feed as' cheapi'y
exteAt -to vhich future Pricea.,of grain and &ainproducts
06110,ting, iilt I ereBts 1411'. be`Ar,IzVoritan't 4 nant, of
ip,094, and level ofreturna ta, the Poiatx;y *P"try..





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73











,4.tarage JIV



I ,j
YOUng Mixture., 'All 1,Lvt ;Vi-6du6,r

-1tv d
we I At,
Mi U o1i
Pounds Fooiids Pounds. poisdft`
04W



3.
3,8

3.8, 2 '3,93-, 114'
39 2 P-6l,,,
33:. ]-,1536 15,
ko-' 1, 417 2, q
1,28e 787 2,
3.9 .1 481 :2

3,3, :4.9 4'. 1 1 -` 08 71P 2,1 !>a
4i! 1, 67 YA
34 69 2 V2`
3.5 4.2 2.?o46 68a- 2 tn, Lj
,3 : 3.5 5.1 4,e 211836 67 3,i
: 3-6., 5. i 4, 3 2,64,r, 644
3.6 5,1 4. 3' 2,1670 68B 3,1,va
3.6. 5.2, 4.3 2,287 676 9,
3.7 5. 4 2, Ij54,,, 653'
4
3.6. 5,3 4.5 1, 641, 1; 1
:398- .3 4-4! ,960 ",V,

,;L9O 2 5.3 4*5 1, 872 23.4




k8laughter is the am of salea'64d cowwipti6ft m farms $A
pre 1 imin=y








"VIT
v-?) "A
%m
44 k


4
a62-
20,mmmm
N7i

wki,07
A'O -20 015
A5,
4' 3,di0






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AI14


ux,0 N5 U S
"OM ,
la 17 .0
4 4= 6''-6,-4'p N
Apu
10 g
IW m 36 |
5- IA %
'Zi Z': .k~
Ims

71WI Ikig~cw Mvuot




__I4



IJ

























|,: 12.1
i:;* 12.7
1 13.0
-12.9
S 13.2


13-5
.I.. 1,.2
13.1


,- TiTkeysI Nunbers on farms January 1, m ibers raised, sold,
and total slaniter, available data 1930 to


sma merB o. Ls=i deSan. I.
100 i Breeders : Others
1Lusan a iobuaeands







i3.40 2'g77
iTi 3.222 2.874
i." 3 ,' 149 2.575
1,607 3.962
2.:'7.]: 3..
31294 3.135
iP :: 606 2," 597
: l5"241. 3,252
k 2.771 1, 679
3,711 1,829
3 .940o 2,046
: 4053 1,922
i .


Raised


17, 419
18.249
22.333
23,241
21,702
20,821
27,981
-25.755
33.581
34.047
32.902
32,805
35,6i1
44,221
10,724
34,970
.279
45,041


Sold
Thousands
15 ,999
19.393
21,733
20.615
18, 827
25,530
24.227
24,861i
29, 21

33.778
31.209
32, 420
30.278
34.749
41,790
41390
36,105
29.727
.40736
43.887


consumed on farms where produced.,
date


I uonuma
: on farms
S where
: produced
: iabusands
1.704

1.623
1.505
1,428
1,425
1,291
1,297
1.170


47
711
744
7143
753
798
845


: Total
;aa.aughter jj
Thousands
17,703
172, 95
21,058
23.356
22,120
20,255
27,015
25,652
26,152
31,118

322
33,22M


42.501
142,14
36, 4m
41.534
44.732


13.4
13.6..

14.05.
14.1

14.8
14.9
1..9
7.9 14.9
.1 15.1
1.6 15.3
1.5 6.2
1.4 l6.
..4 17.4
.o 17.9
.4 18.1
.5 18.2
.3 18.7
.0 18.6


17
I.E
15
is
15
15

21
a
22
.22
22
23
23


w.
m. .









148
164
a202e



259
2E
273
272


15.4
19.9
27.5





35.1
32.8
-67

. 32.98


. i,


Idr is the am of sales and consumption on farms where produced. The difference between raised.
Md is counted for V (a) difference in January 1 inventories, and (b) death losses.
::'A I + ... ''+


P- ., ::'! "




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

SllI 22llli 0lllI IHlllllllmI llI
3 1262 08903 5892


:ai f ." "- ^ "
R l 12, ;t: T
".N .+i" k


S 3 52-5/513700
IF N, 1001


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