Poultry and egg situation

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Material Information

Title:
Poultry and egg situation
Physical Description:
v. : ; 26 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economic Research Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service
Publisher:
The Bureau
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Creation Date:
January 1951
Frequency:
quarterly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Poultry industry -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Egg trade -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Citation/Reference:
Bibliography of agriculture
Citation/Reference:
Predicasts
Citation/Reference:
American statistics index
Citation/Reference:
Index to U.S. government periodicals
Statement of Responsibility:
Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with PES 1 (Jan. 1937); ceased with PES-308 (Dec. 1980).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: Agricultural Marketing Service, Dec. 1953-Mar. 1961; Economic Research Service, May 1961-Dec. 1977; and: Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service, Mar. 1978-Dec. 1980.
General Note:
Cover title.
General Note:
Description based on: PES-301 (Mar. 1979).
General Note:
Previously classed: A 93.20: and A 88.15/2:

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000502977
oclc - 04506769
notis - ACS2711
lccn - 79643440 //r81
issn - 0032-5708
sobekcm - AA00005304_00011
Classification:
lcc - HD9437.U6 A33
ddc - 338.1/7/6500973
System ID:
AA00005304:00094

Related Items

Succeeded by:
Poultry and egg outlook & situation

Full Text

IFOR RELEASED
MAR. 1, A. M.i


SITUATION


BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
QIJ JAN.- FEB. 1951


RISE IN TURKEY PRODUCTION


MIL. TURKEYS I
S[ Turkeys raised
.40


1930 1935 194 --- 1945 1950
DATA FOR 1950 ARE PRELIMINARY


1955


U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


NEG 46000-XX BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS


The average increase in the number of
turkeys raised in the United States has been
equivalent to an annual growth of about 6 per-
ceqnt per year for the industry, compared with
the average annual increase of .1 percent in


population during the same period. The trend
within the industry has been for the number
of turkey flocks to become fewer but larger.
Also there has been a recent trend toward the
production of birds of the smaller breeds.


PES- 150


*


30


20


10


0









The ."eyan


.. .. A l .. ... -

.* : Avenge: : :
: unlt H.or u : 1939-48: 1919 /: 1950 3/::

The and-stuationEatag


PFar production. ...................: 411. doza. :De.

Average number of layers on Mt"r- .: MKlllons :Dec.

Rate of lay per hen ............... Egg :Dec.

Apparent civilian per capital
dipappeasance ..................... : Egs :Nov.

Frozen age production ............. Mil. lb. :Nov.

Dried ega production .............. M11. lb. :Nov.

Price received by farmers ......... :Ct. per doz.:Dec.

Price received by farmers as a
percentage of parity .............: Percent :Dec.

Retail price (3AE) ................ :C.per doz.:Nov

Egg-feed price ratio ..............: Lb. feed :Dec.

3toksa:

thell ........................... :Tnous.casee :Jan. I

Frozen .......................... Mil. lb. :Jan. 1

Dried ........................... Mil. lb. :Jan. 1

C-'.!- watched by commercial
hA-therte s ....................... 11Mllone :Dec.

Pulle'.* not :'et of lAyina ag on
rams ............................: Millione :Jan. 1

Farn price of poultry ration ...... Dol.per cvt;Dec.


Price received hby farmers for
cnlckenr-, l ve ................... :Ct. per lb.:Dec.

Price received bty farmer a' a
nercente.B of parity .............: Percenr :Dec.

Petaill price of chicken,
dree-en ( .E) .................... :C., per lP.:[tov.

Pr*.re r-celvean .y farmers fnr
turke-, live ................... :Ct. per 1h.:Dec.

3to..ki.

Podltvry, excluding turitey- ...... Mill. lb. :Jan. 1

Nirke.y* ......................... M11. lb. :Jan. I

Chir en-feed price ratio ...........: L. feed :Dc.

Turkev-f-ed price ratio ........... ILb. feed :Dec.

Average veekl. receipts of poultry:
at Cer.ttl heateern Ptrima-r
Harkets*, per plant ............... Thous.l1-. :fec.

Averagee weekly placement of cnlrke
In ro'.ler areas ............... : MIlons :Dec.


: verage:.. ..
: 1939-.8: 1919 ?/: 1950 3/xCoaeto an aurreabt mt iont
21/


326.1. 431.2 a 18.6 : Februq 1 aiS U tar about.
: equal to Jast ear
391.7 "0.2 39.6 :

10.0 12.8 12.7


266.7 377.2 356.3 :Jan.

386.9 101.0 390.1 ::Jan.

9.1 11.3 11.0 Jan.


25.9 29.7 29.5 ::Dec.

--- 3.7 2.'4 :Dec.

1.5 1.1 ::Dec.

L.1.7 40.5 57.7 ::Jan.


89 66 95 ::Jan.

55.6 65.3 61.9 ::Dec.

15.0 i.o 15.1. ::Jan.



129 110 31 ::Feb. I

106.7 53.9 47.3 ::Feb. 1I

--- 70.2 96.1 ::Feb. 1I


32.1 '5.3 6,. ::Jan.


1.9.2 31.1 29.9 ::Feb. 1

2.81. 3.38 3.7.::Jan.
Pou. '.-*


21.7 22.3 22.1 ::Jan.


107 81 74 ::Jan.

1.1.: 50.. 1.9.L ::Dec.


31.* 3t-.3 3h.1 ::Jan.


17,1 i6t.6 171.9 :Feb. 1

67.7 126.0 110.1 ::Feb. 1

7.:' 6.1 6.0 ::Jan. 1

11.0 .J.1 9.2 ::Jar.



19.9 16.9 21.3 ::Jan.


5.9 7.2 ::Jan.


1/ Except when data are for January or February, when average la 191.0-,9.

2/ Except when data are for January or February, whvn entries *%re for 1950.

L rxrepL wvhe data are for Januar-j or Februar, when entries are for I'f1.


Item


I


27.5 31.0 31.3

--- 9.3 1.14

--- 8.7 0.5 : Affected 1by status of IBM
Spice support
3t.2 31.2 12.6


)h 62 82

;'., 55.2 81.1:

12.8 9.3 11.0 : Iare tavwarabl to producer
than year ag


29h' 38D 76

81.3 55.1 32.1

--- 76.3 91.1

SEgg in Inscubators and
52.1 83.7 92.1 : advance ordasn, abo abhala
of last year
30.6 21.5 19.1

2.88 3.38 3.89:



21.9 20.3 241.3


1.J 71 80


.2.-" 7.8 17.7


3.J 32.6 33.9



152.3 158.1 16F.2

76.2 137.6 116.6 : SBason peak

7.0 6.0 6.2

10.1 9.6 8.7



9.8 12.6 15.7


6.1 7.5 : Febraury lbely to sensed
J: an a















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-be re Ued, tn.'1195 th 95D T, the, Ini
gat in 411 egg pro4ueti on tro,


Aqojxy, so vare hifopt;, i
7 ea ot meat
tb 34, vi I c vt1oh
y IV TI
-a d,&es 1,41 -cont' 6k
3 PO J,
ITT,
raso 1, Prclellt" t A
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lth*' r4see, in 1550. Moa't of 't)lo, ri&"
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upntetedj

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till,
ariabI6,., &OA
101 P404
ing v,61v o
rwro Owh
t `7V
bet,u spot azi:d futuxv 3
to the'jpl of -this futxwe'p
I
"Of tbq-Ipna-tpp6tr -in last
betwen'"'
percer#W of pari and minimum qr!oq.l0vviI,
:-d Ings can be e8tabliahe4. Th ige -factore'l
r$D4 tq,,p* raqt,,t4vqerp in tk..e6g future

1* '*,*6wo, ,Oorpe qf #olqua4itities -and movements that veio,, inip,
V
Ip Ih the, p comparlsons that-
&Oved, pmente ggmarke:t T hAD -
p4jf-Ar for 19.51. in&icate s=e' chane'q fr-op. lap :Yeap. Is e,



y- prpdUctiat qWdisppOipn. of lam
egg Owliek, JaMIA U. 4 1950.1:

e
QPC Capita
an
,istoram, I -Oaoes for. 3*4&noe it
-'z to sho 11 price 440appe
L"rozen SLIPRC)rt
Tbtpard.- Thousand--.,- :MoUpa r
moo
_Oases-,: .:Qf e
qi

14,297 301 307 1;66 35A
141,492 A3,,,044-- 33-1
71
1, 640 %,22 56. 0:',
lj79.. 14
',-174961 1192
a. -1)751', 13) 3 .33.5
356 48.1:1:; 14,494. i 37.5 31-2

"'A
.7 146, 6,503 ::89, ...1206,* Sk,
., 9 ..... .....



IJ*7n,,,ccosw*tion milAttwy use,: h6tchirw A. ons.*01al intomtl
















stoag i the pwtpriwrese
6 Ordngtote eonigt
didn .4hJ
liiome wille dfre
infuea ~ arba
B supports avauying .b ital

this yer wil9'im ate'aI n' It i,, 0nVI

crinreas develbu on.90
mere upon & on

codstrage in the spr : vig;monfh 191when* vs to.1s,
Other actr factor a toe a Austmer vral16nsc
it 1 4ltion-dublished intet-ona., 'nrae
and h agb incoe 19i9. Theyate',,ually Pes~r,
rasin fame nuenabe probal willhore tha ofst.b
prc ually pburyinned..1 ecn
Mary fvrbedrn h
Frado ers71intendedtou4 at fucheewrDrcn
1111 ,a 1 Pe e
o re tan the w ..er.... -.......







diffbrivn es's that umy dehe "loabtvhen 'berYb'gw
pueaseos v11repenoprtl upo e npedprcserq
response~ toe puln toi.....
On: Februay ..
edto uldii 2p
chcstd n14oTe eul*prhs,1 pretliv-
199=arir Ineddt-ucae7pretmr aytik
'teyiatull piiied17pecetimoe;iiiiiiiIihe"e&-O
shprmndvr aoal uin h @ci~ eat-;g
fanesItne o ucae2 ecn






staih -"chce2PretVmpUJq-Jk.&A,pret

ThsyaIhypa t u 3pe64si-1bNuncNow
ard',: pecentcockrels















140 40 49 7 46 6
100 43 51 6 46 49 5 -K
92 60 36 4. -s -- 38 -5
88 62 32 6 33 5
102 79 19 2 80 18 2'
1.' 7 .2 '25 3 .71 26 3.
.' 9. 17 4 75 18 7
S100 64' 29 7 63 30. 7 :
102 50 46 4 51 6 3 :

6 63. 32 5 63 33 .. I


4044;
a',
V.... ..


1RE" ''


..... -th h c...n s ra n, .;::
Prnaent indications auggest that egg prices during the hatching season .:
ptialf at levels higher, than a year ago. If this price expectation ::
AJ farmers nay revise upward their February 1 intentions for raisinagii
i 1951. Their intentions as of February 1 were to buy 4 percent ":
for laying flock replacments in 1951 than they had bought in
: bi intentions are more fully discussed in the preceding section of

reased fall supply .of .'gs from cold-'storage is likely. '.'If s&Ich-:
h Is Ccambined with expectations regarding a lSger number of chickens
1ki19- -tEhan.. in 1950, the result would suggest a larger supply of eggs
.able beyond mid-sunmer 1951 than 'as the case in 1950. The price-redciu
r 'of such a supply should be considered in corectiozn with the price '
ftt ores which stem from growing employment and expanding consumer
Ant together with thi rising price or developing scarcitie. for itet

Sa part of t ei letter consideration; it should -be recognizedL that
iible. .tfltoAult^g.tut";theW-distiribution of other oamno ties. satder- price
StMr Snay increase the demand for eggs, which will be taken as a substit~e e.
du eAvelop-, the consequent price rises: that might then .occur .:et*::: a
be quite substantial before prices reached .100 percent of paritl,.be2L'i-!a,
JSa no controls are imposed on unprocessed agricultural commodities. Egsa:. 1
tapoltry are the-.nly remaining major animal products. substantially below

I'. iev. of thp below-parity.position of the. grain components of the
6 rai'abin -there is great likelihood of. continued rise in those Pvtes. :;||
te; values of poultry rations are likely to continue through the spring
*%r than a year .ago. In January 1951, the value of the ration was 15 per. ,i
b "tiove a pr earlier, and a margin at least this wide is likely to con- i
JarUt.e next few months.,


*uw Outlook ;
_S .- -- ^ ,-


.














ratio of a year earlier.

S Poultry Prices Increase;
SExpected to Continue Firm
Chi*en prices in mid-January were 9 percent higher thh
earlier, and 8 percent higher than tuo months prertviohly. The.
M:F: January price of 24.3 cents per pound (live) compresm with 20Q :
T ...- for January 1950. :.

Broiler prices have increased more than the average- fof
chickens. In the specialized production areas, the 5 to 8 odd
. that have occurred since mid-December have probably been a
'V. increase that has been reported since then in the. settings of q
incubators. In mid-December, and for 2 or 3 months prioryi!a
T: growers received prices which provided little or no returnst.t 4..
for their labor, management, and investment. .

Present marketing of turkeys are at .a seasonal; .4w p.....
bulk, of the output from the 1950 crop .hair.ig beno.ld" U
the months .prior. Breeder hens will Ioe to market 'in. a few
however. These birds normally sell at a discount a" compareded ;
Younger birds sold in' the October-Jan ary period precedin g.
against breeders ordinarily shows up as a seasonal decline in- th
farmers receive for turkeys in the spring months Acqmpared. wi*.
preceding fall and winter. In'view of the present extraordinary !
however, such a seasonal decline may be. sialler..than occurred la

SFebruary storage holdings of chickens were 158 million
3 percent decline from the seasonal peak of, January 1. Turkey s' .
February 1 were 61 million-pounds above the Jpnuary 1 holdings
the season peak. A comparison of the accumulation of present a
poultry, and of the prices prevailing at the time of the in
cates that in general the stocks were accumulated on a rising
a lower, price level than that prevailing in February 1951.

V, Larger Turkey Crop Intended; *
Increase Mar Average 1 Percent :-. *- :-.

Farmers in the United States acprding .to- a survey'of theflthmaC
intentions expect to raise 1 percent more turkeys than they did I .br1.'
Of course, farmers' actual performance may differ from their earliS.'.e
tions but past comparisons of intentions and performance indicate a"'i i
S relationship between the two.
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bea
a basis for ]Anigpoidibio ad
line vith the, prospective suppajthtib
the dates of the intention report a4nd Air OMa91n
aqter intention's and of course t*1 fi~p6 p
also affects the extent to ihich, a niabr of thke te
correspovds, to the intended mnumber

A. further, indication of V4e 10% 'turkey outpub,
is the report that showed 3 percent mdre breeder bens on',
19a1, than were held a year earlier



In, Decemer 1,950 the United.States 11froze" the Ameri
ances owned bY:RedChmin or by, her nationals,- and the ReC
4eclared'an embargo itpon exports to the United Stateso'

If these actions; are effective, the result could. be a
0. -S, imports or dried egg yolkf. Of the 7.4 million pdap sa
Imported into the United States in 1950.,7.2' million pouwngs
vere from China.

The quantity of dried yolk imported from. Clona i hi
to the yolk from 982 thousand eases of eggs. jImports _of -
sources during the same'period were 192 thousand pounds,,,t
albumen from only 68 thousand ,cases of eggs. This indinae
potential decrease in Chinese imports is to be. offset b.an
mestiec production of egg products separated into the fl p
components,, there will be an 'increased supply,, ofabme
dqmetic production*

The principal uses of dried egg yolk are in the manufal
goods, #mayonnaise, noodles, and ice cream. Albumen is usowd
goods and fancy pastries, in: candy-omakding, anhd in certain non-
where its adhesive qualities. are useful

Table 10 indicates the relative importance of separated
albumen,. from both domestic iand foreign sources,, in the total
Processed egg products It'indicates that Yolk and al9en
from whole -egg 'or mixed egg productscprs an imporiet
-the trade in frozen and. dried. egg. products. .AceordingJ7,
Proportions of ,albumen and yolk available in the V. S. ,
expected to alter' the price relationships between the:-, ine c '6o








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Tipp .......



d lk 4

)'67 17
;LU,429 6;IW3 t,%PQ*
22,P59
''Aquivalga+ of qjAntjty Aritd 12;553 144 9,

76417

.1 ...............
Othew W=" .... .......... 4.:
10 vax>dxlq'tlcn .................. 1". 21
............................ 2,732 966
T89 279,

4mstlc 1ff a- 4 1,94.3 6 ap 31A

d ilbmiNn
IT
......... .....
q T
10 07 6 90P
110 lj!
P&Cambor 31 .... 23097 -1,14
!'lhLUlVa3ent Of kU=t1ty dried 9
'dp66ic use
........ 93
.................
............... 36,00 li!5% r6-l"
36'*f
!L
I *O' dcnmtin prcaucltipn' for
"l;iMnZte camereva upe ................... .7,006 696"
S. 1), .4. salqAfqr ik"at;w food, UOov j.1
NIt W'tj for Om6poia- umotia -1-
-TOWtiev, a=lVMUK,*haiWB in StaftOO
-t 749, 771
"I T. ....... v w;p' o a....
gE Alizid. Yholo a mimed egg
.................. ......
'bimwtdp we 139,
pawtvoa -" '11*" 307,24
otqV3,y ......... ;;,827 74P,4 WO ,
9,276 ft 22;631,11
8,439 1 567
333,20 23K &a
a. Prsbuma4 siallability C*V I
203.p845 %382 7 4*1

Iwo= gl
41
.761A
Onaft, dried 1 943
UI or 4 Oa 1 75 "T18
Whole ar mLx&d egg, dried ........... 7 6D6 74
LIW or fralk ......... 201," 5,3ft 205,.!ft

J7 Dmmvia- led bers mrs 70110"t
I O-e 00 dozen) equalb 37-1/2 iONAN ligXd4 or 10.13 Powls dried YhOla'aggo
'T, I men y1elft 16.&15 poudb of )jqjA4 yolk or:?.l POM" of drICA 7OU a6d. '20."
06 tl&t
am&. Imstaxwes, matrift in this ca*m Men ra "UipjI
ramm tbm 0-.'5.
lowl "Unal"Giflair appDrtiorAd -I %bal -4bWIWAI
'Omlomtad 03AONM tGai 'w Sao 'Otter. 11 Tr












4
Pent





eswver f or a.
t, 'ui deborlbed ab-
vair w"Tact tha,
4, Ox fbri ohicXfta and turkeV %W16 t
Aao the parity compgtati -aT,6r
611'5dljuztixlgourrent fAm prices for aea.`
41
tionA, iri the year 1951,
tively 11.1. and '14,2, tsnta. 1*r,oivd
-14,froW the 'U. S. averge xes pW to f
price, these figureis im'sfbo 'umIti
d", ea,'paid, by famam L, including" int treA t ax e s,,,,
thttbe'a-0ided by 1CO.- *anuayy 3.951,;v-,
its"Ape in the previoUs -ti4o'month$ had,
r','torith. -The" aldvent. -.of,,'Price' cob rol can,
but, not stop entlrely
T,
r ntaevr P,rty, nt pr
th
by 0
ft'rwra in 'the Uxii:ed $t4tea' J
V 1 DLaesj, V11& is$ d:

rbf pr*6 V41d; n taxed, end
"'th c Aent PACO -at oT par itv.
U;1 as
a bae,04P 1 A' rice 21,.5 cdzts 'Pei? aqpa. This va%,
UITB* .jSt
th6 Ourft`at frael or prices,
plying b.
1 then =Iti v


"t, rim
4 Ch
In 'it vao: reported:,at 266
points' in aach of t)i ,j$XAjj"







"?W F



Jb 71


AfUr-11m,

04
price mov be MJUM
OOq*a*4.Vlth t4e, Pan* prlot"'

The .'fas_'-tore'uEled-t6 AAjuOt ejo 1*10"
J

Oay ..... I ... 97
'AteUst .........
111 with '*t
118
WaraOer 116,'
114


To the adjustwnte uvift tho, C i %
for the mmt6'bJorA J4"'4951'

t
al"Ven a Ove" "ilicky Can bq,'
JIS tpast there bwm'
the-'se iKnt'h

are,
1& 1,10 the above ffl"Qpal 'SAJUkIr
celv0d Par# fw .
011*11A4 curreat prices re Y,
,,MO'Pssari4lol that t 64" u
ac
Agrleultilo in t=neqtlcm-"d tbl' xTe A jrl4'P
jpr"i"d In Sbotion 402, (d) tl*

After the SeaseraU,744dMted,0 0
It Is dlV_1404 by


As in the came f-r chick
'PerCwjata6p of Wltr aiv Wioat In,
the- 3"im cey fbr tbe 6
4,









rm

It A
I ttL
A22 t t
Nt'




"tit
tTw









m Imr il"I
-2sarmt vl~sa'bim ootbeen
"bopA~m ,ta~ to eve o cqrA
a,,zieaab a.l
ol frata'V
t!I~inttyp"ng pies'cn ee~eie t au Cw r
IsAD- ",Cllbov we
th n[]znhreot ro~~ovd
ik-~aote idmt te esv4
|tOvseese evo hedara g fteP 1
LUotwihsmmrzste6U
Th rlttta hr sarealnbtomV664"
,*AW okaACiog, n #S a rg a i 0 6o
1.lalBlaeta, n sdfiiey ndetrl
fo h otp|t,019 i
$Wsmo0up n hlsl rop o.4ratt.,
The hOIO~aequ~ttIOS usd Inthqfdu 6 tettdh _
',A~ths iaou
WV.0 :1W orkhe ric quoad~y te I~i~ii
mi-men dwdclr. xra o ag
thtscha4ad a otqoedtememt
1)I
inr)itW a eb ae sj3t l Nl


oV te noisteomp -abe gmde.
(b) or Cims, th prce tkenwm or xtria,
:b te U $.-aretXw Srvce Wie qot~o L
vaentaalbefr xrsIn_2.te
Xrtro6,vasuse, Inrerentyeas ths. ~s,1*,

)0preto|r ,S
ftaoeswslto rds|d~g -n bpeAb











EGGS: U. S. FARM PRICE AND

NEW YORK WHOLESALE PRICE


ARM PRICE

L JAN.

9 i


l.: -


JAN.-JUNE
(4 PER DOZ.)-----


- MAY


'49%
'48 -
1943;/ '
'50 45


220


40


LL~W~


60 20 40 60
NEW YORK PRICE (4 PER DOZ.)*
*FOR DESCRIPTION OF NEW YORK PRICE, SEE TEXT


w."OPRNN PARCLUENG 71-XBRA FARCLUA CNMC


APR.


-491f

1943/,
'50 46'45

. l I I I .l I | i ... .


:;'


^
<. t"


'I1 .. .
:: "" :*
ft


.

Lr


80


.1'/EPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


NEG.47657-VX BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS









EGGS: U. S. FARM PRICE AND
NEW YORK WHOLESALE PRICE


FARM PRICE (t PER C
JULY
'47
'48 9
40 '45 '49
'46 *0 1943
7', '50
'44

2 0 .... I.. i .. I .. .


60



40




20

60




40


.1.31...


20 -
20


JULY-DEC.
)OZ.)


II I I I .


SEPT. '47/
'480 i'49
'46 / 49
1943;
'4 ,
'44


4C


0'

194,
I I-/


60 20 40
NEW YORK PRICE (4 PER DOZ.)*
FOR DESCRIPTION OF NEW YORK PRICE, SEE TEXT


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MEG 48012-YX BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMIC


p6'48
69


'45 -


60


80


U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


NEG 48012-VX BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS









EGGS: U. S. FARM PRICE AND

CHICAGO WHOLESALE PRICE


JAN.-JUNE
DOZ.) ---


60 20 40
CHICAGO PRICE (4 PER DOZ.)*
*FOR DESCRIPTION OF CHICAGO PRICE, SEE TEXT


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE NEG. 47556-VX BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS


FAR M



40 -



20
60



40



20 L

60




40


MAY


1'48 .49
-~---
'45
**1943
'50/ '46
e'44
* I i i I I i I I I *I I *I J


20
20


40


60


80


I


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


NEG.47656-VX BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS





26


EGGS: U. S. FARM PRICE AND

CHICAGO WHOLESALE PRICE

JULY-DEC.
PRICE (4 PER DOZ.) 1- tA| I


40 60 20 40 60
CHICAGO PRICE ( PER DOZ.)*
*FOR DESCRIPTION OF CHICAGO PRICE, SEE TEXT


U.S.------- DEPARTMENT OF AGE N -N MI


FAR M


40



20
60



40




20


60




40


20-
20


-I
SEPT.

'46 9
1943 *
^ ------ n '45 e-, 50 ---- u
S* *404 4
" **r' "


49-


*45 *'50
' 5
'44


80


* n I n *n *


. . .


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


NEG.48011-VX BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS






PES-150


: January : February : March : April
Fam : Nev Chicago: Far: v : Chicago: Fars: Nov i :F : Ncv :
: York: : :York York : : York; C:icago
: Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents Cente Cents Cents Cant. Cante Cents Cents

1943 : 39.0 41.8 39.7 34.2 38.5 36.3 34.0 40.9 38.4 33.7 38.8 39.0
1944 : 34.6 39.0 36.8 31.9 36.1 35.2 30.1 35.5 34.8 27.1 34.9 34.6
1 : 1 41.0 47.2 44.0 35.8 42.0 38.9 33.1 39.8 37.2 33.0 39.8 37.2
46 : 41.1 44.8 42.8 32.6 38.0 35.9 32.1 38.0 36.5 31.3 38.0 36.2
-1947 : 41.3 44.7 42.4 38.6 43.9 40.1 40.1 47.1 45.3 40.8 48.8 47.0
1948 : 48.7 51.9 47.8 45.0 47.0 45.9 42.6 46.9 45.6 42.6 49.o 47.5
1949 : 47.1 46.9 46.4 41.8 43.3 42.7 41.2 47.1 44.8 42.3 48.6 47.6
950 : 31.2 34.4 33.5 29.6 33.8 32.7 31.6 37.7 35.9 30.9 35.5 33.7
3951 : 42.6 41.9 40.1
:ay : June : July : August

19*3 : 34.2 40.0 39.4 35.2 41.3 40.2 36.3 44.5 39.5 38.8 48.0 44.5
1944 : 27.2 33.8 32.2 28.1 33.8 34.8 31.2 40.9 39.2 33.0 42.5 40o.
1945 : 33.7 39.8 37.2 35.8 41.8 39.0 37.9 43.8 40.8 40.8 48.6 46.0
1946 : 32.8 38.8 37.2 33.5 39.0 37.8 37.1 39.5 38.9 39.1 44.2 42.1
1947 : 40.7 49.1 44.6 41.5 47.0 45.0 45.7 52.8 51.4 47.5 52.2 52.2
1948 : 41.5 47.8 45.2 43.4 47.8 45.9 45.8 48.5 48.5 49.2 52.8 53.2
1949 : 43.4 50.8 47.9 44.1 50.4 51.1 45.3 56.5 52.8 48.8 57.8 56.0
1950 : 29.6 34.8 31.7 30.1 36.1 33.7 34.3 37.5 37.4 38.0 39.0 38.3

: September : October : November : December

1943 : 41.6 48.8 45.2 45.2 50.8 46.8 47.1 51.8 48.3 44.9 48.8 44.8
1944 : 35.4 48.6 46.4 38.8 50.2 48.6 43.4 52.8 50.6 44.5 52.6 50.4
1945 : 39.6 44.6 42.8 42.6 51.6 48.5 47.1 53.8 50.8 48.2 53.6 50.8
946 : 44.5 51.1 51.2 51.5 57.4 58.5 47.8 50.8 55.5 67.0 50.6 49.2
1947 : 53.0 62.0 63.0 55.3 60.5 64.8 53.4 52.8 59.8 58.7 63.2 63.5
1948 : 51.4 55.6 54.4 54.7 62.0 64.9 58.3 66.2 64.8 52.8 53.1 52.8
1949 : 52.5 64.9 65.2 51.4 58.5 58.8 47.1 53.2 55.9 40.5 42.2 38.9
1950 : 40.4 47.2 48.6 43.2 52.5 54.6 45.8 53.4 54.5 57.7 63.3 61.9


The wholesale quotations listed above are:

(a) for Hev York, the price quoted by the Urner-Barry Company for mid-western
mixed colors, Extras No. 1 large, (or in the event that such a grade was not quoted,
the nearest comparable grade). In recent years, this has been taken as Extras
(70 percent A's) or the nearest comparable grade.
(b) for Chicago, the price taken was for Extras 1 and 2 as quoted by the U. S.
Market New Service. When quotations from that source were not available for Extras
I and 2, the highest quoted grade of Extras was used. In recent years, this has been
taken as Extras (60 percent or more A's).

The dates entering into the averages for these wholesale quotations were the
15th of the month and the 3 preceding business days, except that when the 15th of the
menth fell an a Saturday or Sunday the series of 4 daily prices was arranged to end
aon the Friday immediately preceding the 15th. The daily prices used were the averages
of the high and low quotations.


-27-
Table 11.- Eggs: Price per dozen received by farmers and wholesale prices
at New York and Chicago, by meonthe, 1943 to date


V






JAM.ARY-FEURUARY 1951


- 28 -


Table 12.- Chicks placed on farms in specified commercial broiler areas, and broiler prices
and broiler-feed price ratios in the Del-Mar-Va irea, by weeks, 1950

Placements of chicks roilTr S MI
Week : East Del-Mar-:Shenan- :Chatham-: orth : Texas : : Cuu- : price feed
ending Conn. : Ve d: oah : Wilkes :Georgia :Arkanas area : Total : lative : per price
::Valley : C. : 0: : : total : found : ratio
: 1.0 1 00 1000 1 0 1.000 1.000 1.000 1.000 Cent. Lb. feed


Jan. 7 226 2,8324
1 : 25h 2,865
21 : 214 2,131
28 257 2,370

Feb. : 263 1,619
11 251 1,959
19 252 3,340
25 229 3,561
Mar. : 246 3,=86
11 271 3,694.
18 219 3,209
25 259 2,901

Apr. 1 206 2,869
8 282 2,613
15 172 2,812
22 265 2,934
29 2: 9 3,022
May 6 197 2,917
13 263 2,851
20 186 2,825
27 260 2,951

June 3 283 2,857
13 342 2,906
17 217 3,013
24: 238 3,161

July 1 262 3,116
8 229 3,137
15 225 3,152
22 157 3,153
29 180 3,310

Aug. 5 164 3,193
12 183 3,271
19 : 284 3,179
26 : 291 3,106

Sept. 2 266 3,056
9 221 3,161
16 262 3,302
23 278 3,318
30 293 3,268
Oct. 7 189 2,998
1 : 202 2,71h
21 175 2,829
28 s 121 2,618

Nov. 14 157 2,512
11 138 2,7141
18 : 150 2,730
25 114 2,965

Dec. 2 177 3,3914
9 259 3,1.62
16 217 3,275
23 2: 5 3,10.
30 229 2,917
Total or


282 1,000
293 1,008
329 1,103
338 1,144
333 1,219
398 1,358
432 1,352
.23 1,355
4.82 1,412
11 1,501
1.77 1,467
399 1,4.01
b16 1,169
40. 1,188
434 1,369
447 1,353
135 1,371

311 1,367
381 1,350
393 1,368
.20 1,330
153 1,361
4441 1,329
453 1,361
1t27 1,375
.90 1,382
157 1, 127
.59 1,355
4o0 1,317
392 1,338
4.05 1,260
4.,3 1,309
395 1,267
120 1,244.

1l3 1,198
413 1,271
419 1,272
432 1,319
123 1,301

398 1,319
435 1,312
436 1,215
123 1,231.
123 1,208
389 1,268
376 1,208
384 1,176

364 1,273
103 1,262
356 1,211
376 1,061
252 983


705
700
654
684

722
658
698
731.
830
100
979
992
1,028
982
1,003
905
918

865
799
783
799

754
738
703
688

633
757
671
61.7
627
695
6149
769
719
710
714
576
672
650

688
690
712
658

695
633
688
710
706
791
797
788
894


576 6,251 6,254 18.9
607 6,363 12,617 18.3
606 5,986 18,603 18.4
677 6,01o 24,647 22.8
c68 5,436 30,083 20.3
663 5,821 35,907 24.0
768 7,5014 13,.11 25.3
771 7,719 51,130 26.2
896 8,1.37 59,567 28.6
386 8,1490 68,057 28.0
90o 8,188 76,245 28.7
379 7,693 83,938 29.0

896 7,715 91,683 29.0
906 7,511 99,194 27.9
861 7,475 106,669 27.2
837 7,507 114,176 28.3
750 7,458 121,631 27.2
748 7,144 128,778 24.6
710 7,014 135,792 24.1
694. 6,903 142,695 25.3
661 7,064 149,759 25.8

712 7,098 156,857 26.8
750 7,249 164,106 26.5
731 7,224 171,330 26.0
700 7,321 178,651 25.4

691 7,307 185,958 25.9
709 7,1.47 193,4 05 26.9
733 7,250 200,655 28.8
658 7,044 207,699 33.3
703 7,185 214,884 34.0
720 7,085 221,969 32.9
683 7,179 229,148 30.5
727 7,287 236,435 31.2
715 7,162 243,597 30.2
728 6,956 250,553 28.7
673 7,086 257,639 28.3
701 7,186 264,825 28.9
721 7,162 272,287 27.2
769 7,400 279,687 27.3
802 7,021 286,708 25.3
826 6,731 293,439 25.0
819 6,768 300,208 23.8
849 6,546 306,753 22.3
892 6,492 313,245 24.2
856 6,588 319,833 24.6
837 6,577 326,410 25.3
858 6,834 333,244 24.1

782 7,380 340,624 23.0
890 7,811 348,435 23.2
866 7,416 355,851 22.9
937 7,188 363,039 22.4
898 6,707 369,746 22.7


average : 11,802 155,117 35,460 21,058 67,237 39,160 39,912 369,746


26.1


4.1
4.0
4.0
5.0

4.5
5.2
5.6
5.7
6.,
6.0
6.1
6.e

6.2
6.0
5.8
6.0
6.0

5.1
4.9
5.1
5.2

5.3
5.4
5.3.
5.8
5.3
5.5
6:1
6.7 ..
6.4
6.0
6.2
6.1

5.9
5.7
5.9
5.6
5.6

5.2
5.2
5.0
4.5
5.0 ,
5.1
5.2
4.9

4.7


4.4-,
















3Deg
IU8









2,0

735 1,737
1,112 3 1,103
,X W ,112,2


2,13 2,15




332
4,3DO 4130

Is,66192 2,M6 03
i~~~i5 30511"

197610 917 72
50 0 4
346 34 -7
56 71 V
75 23 ,2 1
1,177 1,171ii
34 .884 W
534 -"




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

3 1262 06003 5751












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