Poultry and egg situation

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Material Information

Title:
Poultry and egg situation
Physical Description:
v. : ; 26 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economic Research Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service
Publisher:
The Bureau
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Creation Date:
September 1944
Frequency:
quarterly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Poultry industry -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Egg trade -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Citation/Reference:
Bibliography of agriculture
Citation/Reference:
Predicasts
Citation/Reference:
American statistics index
Citation/Reference:
Index to U.S. government periodicals
Statement of Responsibility:
Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with PES 1 (Jan. 1937); ceased with PES-308 (Dec. 1980).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: Agricultural Marketing Service, Dec. 1953-Mar. 1961; Economic Research Service, May 1961-Dec. 1977; and: Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service, Mar. 1978-Dec. 1980.
General Note:
Cover title.
General Note:
Description based on: PES-301 (Mar. 1979).
General Note:
Previously classed: A 93.20: and A 88.15/2:

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000502977
oclc - 04506769
notis - ACS2711
lccn - 79643440 //r81
issn - 0032-5708
sobekcm - AA00005304_00011
Classification:
lcc - HD9437.U6 A33
ddc - 338.1/7/6500973
System ID:
AA00005304:00077

Related Items

Succeeded by:
Poultry and egg outlook & situation

Full Text




























'"" ', i. North Centrol
... .,,": .:'i '' *, _9 *, = x -? -.



Western J







An:f, 29 1932 1935 1938 1941 1944
li l irds. This probably represents a continuation of an upward trend in Turkey pro-






.. .... that prevailed in the 1930's and which was temporarily halted in 1941. Especially pro-
,. 12'n that prviled in the 19301s and which was temporarily halted in 1941. Especially pro-
S wounded have been increases in areas close to consuming centers and in areas with relatively
favorable feed supplies.

4.1i











: i T It 1 1i i


II U -STATWFIrCAL BIHUAT. *


PrmIC


AMS


I I


104.


JuLT


Sc I- I I I-r4 I


p Laers on famum, umber ,'. .
IEflher of gffs laid per les '. '. ..
total fam. production t ofe|s .*
( tocks, aggs t (L
ll ... .1.J. .....
SPou ..... '. ......
btal, shell ad troasm .
Dried hoale egga . .
Ipparest egg dlosppearanci civilian:
btal shall egg eqaival .
Dried egg production . .
i C ercial bhtchery operations
sgge aet . .
Chick hatched . .
C: eui tis
r Piltry, dresmd, four markets .

Poultryt live, Chicago .
Poultry, live, New Tork .
Poiltry, live, Midwest, per plat .
Pod. Ihaul, live, Nidwet, per-plast
TeOaI stock. liv., KIdwest, per plaat
Stocks, politr .
Broileri . .
Pryers . .
Ioastere . .
tLa ltesl . .
Tarkeys . .
Dcks . .
HNlcelaseons ad naclaaillfed .
Total poultry . .
Prices received by famerS
Bggs, per dose . .
Egg, parity price.per dm .
Eggs, perceatare of parity .
Chicken, per poud .
Chickens, parity price per pound .
Ckickes, permeatage of parity .
Turkeys, per psend .. .
Turkeys, parity prica per pond .
Turkey percentue of parity .
a1 fau cmondltfee 19-160- 3ai
Chickens and egga I193-U4. Nei
elesalIe prices, Chicago:
111s standard, per dozen .
Live heavy keas,'per pond .
Live broiler%, per pound .
Live Tryers, per pound .
Live rtoters, heavy per pound .
Wholeoale prices, New ork:
Dressed broilers, 16-0 poeda per
doses, per pound . .
Dressed roasters, 48-14 posads per
doses, per pond . .
Dressed lolas, 48-4 pounds per
doses, per poed . .
Cash gas iacllhe
Total marketings . .
Poultry ad eggs . .
Price ratioec
Chicago, broiler-feed .
Chicago, light roaster-feed .
Pa1s, e--ted . ..
Fans, chickes-feed ..
Fas trkey-feed . .
Fani, egg-laylang Mash .
Laying mash, cost per cat. .
Feed met per cw., fam paltry ration
Ialesale food prices I 85-U 1 61
Retail food prices I I35-1- 3. 1i
Prices paid by farmers inclsdiag lter-
est id tass l1 -149l- I I .
Retail prices ILIa:
hfasters, dressed, per ponad .
glgs, strictly freshk per dos
loasricultelral employes coapesa-
tioa I331, -.i36) .


million
rmber
HIl. dos.
1,000 chose
2,000 cae
12 000 cags
Hil. I,
Nil. dof.
Mil. I6.
MilM cm
Milion
Mil. Lb.
Nil. lb.
1,000 lb.
2,000 lb6.
1.000 lb.
111. lb.
MiL. Lb.
NMil. 16.
Nlt. lb.
Mil. 16.
Ntl. Lb.
Nil. 1b.
Mil. lb.
113. lb.

Cent
CaMt
Percent .
Dust


ditdd no.-
Indes no.

c st


Oust
cent


cost
cost


Mi1. dol.
mi1. dot.
il. eol.

Lb. fed
lb. feMl
Lb. fa4
Lb. yetd
Dollar
Dollar
ZIdeoz no.
Index no.
Index no.
Cent

Index no.


318-41
l88-41
353-t1
133-41
3ll-4l
13ll-43


193-4.
--- "j




39It-41
3iU-43
3ll-41
33- 4


113-4A
193-41
1933-41

111-41
1l33-43
U33-43


Ilt-4
933-43
W33-43
193*-411
ll98-42

3M-43
ll33-43
1938-4
311-41

1ll5-4
IM-43
191-43
o3-43


285-43
1911-41
103-41
lil-41
U -ll'4
3ll-41
1ll-41


3938-41
ll -41

U31-43

133-431
I-il










1933-43
1911-4
133-43
198S-i|


5t.3
35.8
T. IfT
11a
is. a







i
I 4
3M.1



I4.

I 0

I.I
U. I
I.I
.5I
31.1
3.5
14.1
14. I
14.3

28.9



3.3
I.l


3.5
31.3

3.5




414
t.3
16.4
14.4
11.3
11.1
3.3

1,LS


ALI

34.1
1.06


1. 331
11.11
AIl


31.4

-a.


U.1
5.3
3.I

9.#

.I1
8.451


3.I
II.

I.1
14.4



14.4
14.0
II'
115

3.3


i5.i
31.I


U.I
30.

31.
1.1
3.5i




1. I








3.6
It.
33.1





Ul.1


S31.4
All.
313.4
I. 3
iin

9.318

.8I
4.5
13.1
U.S
4.4
I5.5
11.1


3.3
6.9
11.6
I5.
L 2
i.1



1131
3.31
3.1
U..
ALI




11:.
38.3



M.3
3.3
31.6

3.$


3l4


L144


ILl
IT. I
18.4
11.1
3.12
136.5
134.

44.3
54.1
MS.8i


MMIt


ILO
.1.

ELI

31.43
u.I
E.1
I.4
1.4
15.3
ALI
5.


3.3

1.
11.1

U.6I
411
U.I
3.I

3.e








U8I
31.1



U.I




IS.*
33.1


ILl
11.1
*M4.

11.81

8.1



19.3
44 .
53.1
33L.3


3144


IULT I mmugr


3n-4
IIl.T
A.LI





81.11


m..

4.1
9.4
-3.131
11.11
ti


.3
4.8
T.I

ll.1 i
*I.




141.1
3.3

3.1

5l1
M.45
116

IM
IIff. 4


M.3

IT.4




1.53

IL2
ILT
3.6



1i. 4


II. I
I1.1
1LT
SOLO


4a.1







..-0


L.4`


1il
3.1





U.4


1 .
14




111


M.1
n.1




18.4
i.3
p.,


IL



.4
15.1
.111
U1.S







1.3
ILK


14.0




1e


- A ,
eipnt 1.4Wa.,


.. .. .ii4


*SI
,g
31
il

'-.1-p
S5

IiL




35
r .


3183
M !1
338


:33

43
311

.IST
WSt
|lir U-

435






:II
We
4i
U'



S
15
" i:l ~!







Ir





U,
4.4
.4

UT

I,
3
3,
Msj







.3
*I



334
WA *




l3.
S;
IE *




*I'


31
4,
*T1
Mil
A I~
*I
1..
*w


in:











is


I


.1,


i.f









Is








Ml3



19
I





















lid
115
SW
S1S




Iii
























33 6


%Wd of momth. Presn eggs converted to cass equivalent.
Fresh first July ad August 133-42 avergSe. Current aceiptm. July 1-11. 143: atadard@. 44 pounds. July 1131.
and July. Aiguat 1944.











.. ....... ................. 1


Iel EgIT 110101g6 at 35 %,=kets
as, a Ba sfm t Estmati~ atal
ol .........holdings 1



P Tces recolved ,by farmers for eggts d uri ng the ext =Tmoths are
se oe ssthan. la',he, sane _monhs I of 1943-44. lto ugh egg

dsotio will be. smallri the' r, peri od,, compare < with the f our@t,
teto ot 1943 ana h fis ure ot 1944,, the decreased requirements
t.. e 3 e ro
v:e.l eNNps r h



71 bupdeqp~s h6 recbof4 a tor kge ftt6dk Pf 68e a"thl
w-1 1p, 0 -obly leavre a greater quantity, of egg -Prod2uct s available_ fer


Thenfrm..pfide: f or turkeys dur ng, the 194L-45 marketing season
-*rob*ably aVeragp_ at least as much'as in the 1943-44 season. Tu~rkey__.
du 'oft is estimated at about one-half billion pounds, dIressed weight
't odre, than 20 million potmds above prOvious es -imates base on
Ot mentions. reort. This is 9:peroent above last: year, and exceeds
A, Odtickn in any o that previous year on:-record. However, high consumer, A,
ft and Mer on vlan, demands will probably result in a -potea
eivlin emand exedn-avial oliese, dnd wholesale. and re-

3.pices will b at czeilitg levels.
.. ... ... .. ..V
.. ........ .. .







With one-fifth f ewer c I icln s r ai sed on If '9Z 4g in

maketingq of poultry seat during the next few mouth's "ih1 b below

of last year, Despite recordl receipts during the 1,943- -Wiba ting

season,. wholesale and-ret.ailj prices of Imost lasses of paelltry ,m~a

the 4-month Deriod, Octobor 151, -Ja3uaY 1949,,76: w-r o Sr 00
levels. Since consume-r-itcomes, are not i er iffjd Sli year'

and as supplies of Poi~ry and posby o redmti 1:5 te

year, prices received ty farmers for poultry meat may be slgt ly

than the prices of a year ago.

Egg production' in August was 334 million dozen'(11.1 mI i Ab ilo

3 percent aho~ve, the previous, August record.in 19,43. There were 2 p Zto

more layers on farms and the rate of lay was 1 percent higherthni

August last year. For .the first 9 months of 1944, egg producticlou d

3.7-Iillion dozen, .6, percent above thie previnus-record in 1943 rexPOP

1942 and 1943, farm egg production for the first 8 months of 1944"ece64d

th 1-mnt tta i ay previous yesar on record, Egg prducti on i

7nected to be smaller in.the-ifourth quarter this year than last, e

the smaller number of chickens raised last qsri ng.

9The farm price for eggs on August 15 was 33.0 ie at S, 1.81 cent sr

the mid-July nrice but 5.9 cents below that of August 15, 1943. .sin(6 ids

August'. Vholegale pri ces have shown About usual, seasonal increases,

peciall-y on tan: gradea, Iost of: the better grades are selling at or, 24

ceiling levels. However, quotations on lower grades and eggs in weig

classifications below large are6 below ceilings.



















of 2 Diet'mrlays in4




of~ d,, o `Urm tuin Q~utae
jtars -v priorJ-4 to
ng gust wkgus.,as 12 gg ersyean
"0' -iayerr ,hus -a,rfti prated~o at1I

layer by 0.y thes th~c a7s s



Jift 'erenag.Clang e es in ae gen m ido o 1Auust fovr Ieggs--

ii~~~igre~~~~iswa of th erceni o ;. x td ofat


Der een e



fog Wt aetebr
tof nilleA~notofSI t lbr 15~g fer
the ceiing, b t ce s b e








af deasofthlly d linino vupplles of fr~heg
high- levelsi 6dmand -for the to-6 grades Is, ih
available& -su'1elis. bome of. thea advance in the 1ef
bisen '.c Iiom AFthe iYotiw,ent, by- War Food lopitr$0
during erbtekber it tol 6caethe total oigab


-64 a, manUvoturerldtsm seVwd for the r1Gnt)1; of tmer19
Ja~nupxy 14 tt

The gg-eed r'ie rlations hipimodfrt dlik
ki ut, but wasr stila, below the 1(_year ':(Ic Ho4 ,vrgg,
agpe-feed, ratio showed greater. relative: gaius than other )j "hO*
ratioc,._The increase _n thearatio vat due mainly to sUaspSaAY'
egg -pri-ces4./ Ieed parices remained comparatively stqblve.

abrle. 1. Livestock-fe~ed -or-Co. ratios: teife u

-a41fuY 15 n Augst 15 : JiY 15
io averagee 1 avra-e l/14


Poultry-feed 114.01090.

Butterfat-feed.: 22-3 23.4 V232-82


1);or -egg and chicken-Teed, the, -ferio he19}$ r r
It is 1923-42.
V/ Inaludies an 6,llovanco far- dairy' noduc~tion ymn.

Dried anld Frozen EAmge roductlion
for FirsA-7 Montht-at


Ylt1hough the facilities' available for the Droducdtion"of d'rj
f,-vzen eg-s. were not very different in 1944 from those Iiin 1:943, a
of-these rroducts during the first 7 months of l1944 6exeAed tha
-previous rpeord Tproduced in 1943. Dri ed egg _Cdcto 'oma (1
1942 and 1943 was as follows:


Total
Tear: Jan. -Ma Fe.:u My:June.: July Jan-- IT

I 000 19000 a1,000 1j000G 1"0001,0 1001,0
:1b. l-b. j1x. 1t3. lb, lb-. kLb

19 42 0t 7 14'566 190 91 ?2542,9 ,2222,9 17992
194:1,00 0,782388 2,560 24422,8 0619 159,`02 26L,9
192-:21,565 26,206,3i,060 3'3'172 35,234 32, 513,%311.517 211-,2









06t Aelive lshlfo tk
pqgde, 194A 3 1;nade yndors -

Vo g hae be '. 9@
hirabl ti e- tot of" their
eqv io. ld, qt'racti
i,,f tb epe pno ra e
ofth "I ngut ew a


1. o a


Feb. a. n, My June Juy an:J,

W,9 ,0 ,0 1,000 1 000 J- 000 1,000Q. 1 000


1 4;6 #68 1 657,9 54*756. IT.755 93 7
46,'19 1 t16 yg760- 19- OQ 95,666'93,172 10, 735 -3Fn 575 42 1
39. 3 9t, 167 q,3 `89,000105,76j 79 ,95? 57 A4 451 W440'. .. .


hoses e inddsty has exmp ex di"ng< nee the. early 1p'c
adnesAon durliig th-e T930' vas rimarIly due. tO the Anceaseus
-, g i h utf ye -of urp .etsed' titemz, gelmllially by jth
ndutity. Patere bnpo- ini the fi~olzen a,'. tnutysns

6e u',4,,i dryling'dur Ing the fall io'nt'hs.I 1944, howeirer,, the
metii "I tat er drin'$ are not as hayas: in the orxeviou
,and the great increase 'In nro4 action dir-ingl the. fTrSt 7
of ,19 41 wa's rnrobably dnue largely to ',he lo gg6Vee inoh
(Reeits s havy during the flush season n or, er-tokep
le *11 pi tanble I~ b. !an h the idsr broe-,agd,.froze


1~ 0s4.u e



shl egcs qaiv-Alent),, and .'a IoedaTaty ',
WOvf a1t date 'byr :0,000 =ease iShe 11 egg holdihgt',I' 'i old
1r, Pere,' 7 .1 Willion casosl 1. million isel~g-- abolvai
apt for thAt'date since 1937- The o'ut-of-storage&di emaf
't fil August a the hoaiq I n 'tod ndao e to 1,7





























Shell .......... 7,b0SU b,2lb 7,529 XXV;W
Prozen g/....... 9,906 8,796 9,163. *
Dried i/ .......: 1io,868 3,362 ,:

1/ Includes WA (formerly FSCC) holdings. ..... .... .
/ as e equtialett converted on'-baki s d6f37-?5 pounds to- theease.
Case equivalent converted -on basis of 10 pounds t'o the cas- : :

Record Nvmber of Turkeys Rais.e. in 19'44

The Bureau.of Agricultural Economics estimates that 3547' ll,
will be raised in 1944. This is 8 percent above last year and 4:i:.
the previous record crop of 1940. Preliminary estimates based oh tb~ #.
report of February 15 indicated a crop of only 33.8 million tutreyee:=:..::

With S percent more breeding hens than' last ear, the 3supj p4A%
eggs, .which was a limiting factor 'to production in 3,943, was :s
the 4emnd as._bring about the record productiba..'tfemproved'f-ed
favorable weather," and consumer incomes at levels indicating a.. s
all turkeys raised, resulted in production reaching the record[ He
greatest increases were in the North Atlantic and North Central t
cover chart). '. ',, a
A'TIM
4 .: :::"i ..: ;











































14 o
In In ~ N
ui


!. 0 0 0 lfl,54
o In 0 oo o -a N
-- u,


~, -I 'I ^\r
000
_^ IL. ^ I
-I-- l-- aIM^ I^"*
I I -I .
u






i "4
a 02
.
- r2 -,'r ,i ---r.^---7_L ""

ho,
--, '*s' J .^ :

g.- ^ la-t;,-- : :

-1 1 0
1 i S -
b. 4
ClC
7 I I 1 E
-- q- z_
L -. 1 1
*2 3
N N -AL_
0* ._ 1
- I--- -'- 0" 1



-l, &G i s
I .In

-;'-5.CC..,-11-

-I- F. -1N 1
-oo

4- M!

0 U' cc






Thas is the rlret year tfnat tne number or wTrjeys raised s aoove
the intentions as reported in February. For the past 7 years, BA has
been issuing both an intentions report in February and in August, a
preliminary estimate of the number of turkeys raised. Comparisons between
the intentions and the estimated production are as follows


Year s Intentions as percentage : Istimated production as per-
8 of previous year a centaae of previous year
a Percent Percent

1938 106 104
1939 127 125
1940 105 102
1941 a 97 97
1942 10o 100
1943 112 100
1944 102 108


September 1 Cold Storage Stocks of
Poultry Continue at Record
Levels

Total cold storage stocks of poultry on September 1 were 160 million
pounds, almost 3 times those of September 1, 1943, and a record for September 1.
The net input of 18o3 million pounds in August was a record for that month.
Poultry cold storage stocks have.been running high, especially of roasters
and fowl, because of large non-civilian requirements.

Marketing of Young Stock Increasing
Seasonally but Below Last Year

Marketing of young stock exceeded marketing of fowl for the first
time this year in the week ended August 12, as indicated by reports from
mid-west primary markets. However, receipts of young stock at mid-west
primary markets were below the quantities marketed last year. For the
-week period ended September 9 receipts of young stock were 8 percent below
last year. Twenty percent fewer chickens were raised on farms this year
than last.

Marketings of fowl are continuing to run ahead of 1943. During the -
4-week period August 12-September 9 receipts of fowl at aid-west primary
markets were 32 percent above 1943. The large receipts of fowl reflect
the increased number of layers on farms early this year compared with last.
and a culling rate about the same as in 1943,

OUTLOOK

BACKGROUND.- The average price received by farmers for eggs
in the fourth quarter of 1943 and the first quarter of 1994
was 45.7 cents and 32.2 cents per dozen, respectively. In
terms of parity, these prices were 99 percent for October-
December 1943. and 100 percent for January-March 1944.












































: e at.-.or nar ceiling.le,.vels. With only minor changes in ceiling prices.
f.iom last year, it .s expected that.prices received by farmers.for ohintke .
Ft^W.XI .not shqw much change in .October 1944-March 1945 from those in the-sX v...
',ericd of 1943-44.

SHSLLL .GG 'HOLDINGS AT 35 MARKETS AS A BASIS FOR ESTIMATING .
S :.. TOTAL COLI-STORAGB HOLDINGS
Many members of the egg industry use the holdings (f shell eggs re-
pported weekly for 35 markets as a basis for estimating total U. S. cold-
storage stocks of shell eggs. The rrQ pedure is to use the holdings of the
',35 markets as a vercontage of the total,.na& then estimate total holdings,
In the past 2 years, 'however, estimates based on earlier relationships
'etweeen the A5 market and,. total holdings have not been accurate because of
eainges in the. proportion of the toti at the 35 markets.


--TC4-
i "-.?"Y : ..t




B II I II IIIIli ll il li l
x,*K ,3 1262 009040793


Eggs, shell: Storage holdings at 35 -BAT ftB.M Al
total United States stocks, fs" t 'g
April-December, 1931-4k ...


.. ... -.- .. .
l ar r I May 1 'Jun 1 .u 1 Aug 1 L.Spt 1 :;Oct:'i : ; :, l^

: Percent Percent Percent, Prcent Percent. Percent PoeBat
-4N
..3l 75 7 4 75. 74 7,4 7 .. '
i,32: = 70 72 72 2 73., 73t 73. '
'1933 : 72 72 75 76 75 7 77 SO:
75 73 73 74 74 74 -74
A935 : 66, 67 70,. 71 72 71 77
936 : 6 70 72, 73 74 74 75'
-:1957 : 6s 70 7m 73. 73 7 n. 74. *A.-';:
1938 : 71 75 77 77 77 78 79 2
: 199 : 66 71 74 76 76 .76 77 .
13o ;' -t 7i 72 74 76 77 77 .777 '
I" 1941 : 65 71 74 7 T75 '77. -. s
19142 59 65 69 69 70 70 70.. X
1943 : 59 58 60 62 62 -63 6 .66.
9 44 63 61 57 52 55 61.

Pri or to 1942 the 35 markets held, on the averag0e.'be'
-. *-S percent of th .tptal holdings, PThe. variation frb -m.oswt
S afew exceptions, was minor, and the estimate ,of total ..hdiags
vious relationships proved to be fairly accurate. In 19 2,o,
tiation of the dried egg program let to the storage of 'shell "
the large markets close to drying plants. This trend onttinn.dA
primarily because of an increase in the egg-drying.pto avA.a
of the cold storage situation. In 194'4, when egg prducttA..
7a ll-time high and large purchase of shell eggs were made, b 1F '
-aupprttiug.surposes, it was tound necessary to: use att'ra sx
way places, As a result, the percentage of the total" reneq4
ings. in the 35 markets has become smaller. ftrthermore, h .
S month to month -increased greaily in 1944." 'Thus estiM.tes b.da4
-ings at the 35 markets have varied'widely from the total' di. .
in the Monthly Gold Storage Report. .
-V "~ ~: 2 [''



A0 ., .,:,