Poultry and egg situation

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Material Information

Title:
Poultry and egg situation
Physical Description:
v. : ; 26 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economic Research Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service
Publisher:
The Bureau
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Creation Date:
June 1941
Frequency:
quarterly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Poultry industry -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Egg trade -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Citation/Reference:
Bibliography of agriculture
Citation/Reference:
Predicasts
Citation/Reference:
American statistics index
Citation/Reference:
Index to U.S. government periodicals
Statement of Responsibility:
Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with PES 1 (Jan. 1937); ceased with PES-308 (Dec. 1980).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: Agricultural Marketing Service, Dec. 1953-Mar. 1961; Economic Research Service, May 1961-Dec. 1977; and: Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service, Mar. 1978-Dec. 1980.
General Note:
Cover title.
General Note:
Description based on: PES-301 (Mar. 1979).
General Note:
Previously classed: A 93.20: and A 88.15/2:

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000502977
oclc - 04506769
notis - ACS2711
lccn - 79643440 //r81
issn - 0032-5708
sobekcm - AA00005304_00011
Classification:
lcc - HD9437.U6 A33
ddc - 338.1/7/6500973
System ID:
AA00005304:00061

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Succeeded by:
Poultry and egg outlook & situation

Full Text





THE C

T H E amIT U A T IO N


BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

PES-54 JUNE 1941


IN THIS ISSUE:
WHOLESALE PRICES OF LIVE FOWLS AND
CHICKENS AT CHICAGO, 1930-41



CHICKS AND YOUNG CHICKENS PER FARM FLOCK
ON JUNE 1. UNITED STATES. 1927-41


NUMBER
-EP FLOC.


uuII It

300

360


AVERAGE NUMBER OF LAYERS ON FARMS DURING
JANUARY UNITED STATES. 1928-41


SiNCE 1927, THE PERCENTAGE CHANGE FROM A YEAR EARLIER IN THE
NUMBER OF LAYERS IN JANUARY USUALLY HAS BEEN ABOUT HALF AS LARGE AS
THE PERCENTAGE CHANGE FROM A YEAR EARLIER IN THE NUMBER OF YOUNG
STOCK IN FARM FLOCKS THE PRECEDING JUNE I. BECAUSE OF THE MORE
FAVORABLE FEED-EGG RATIO IN PROSPECT FOR THE REMAINDER OF THIS YEAR,
HOWEVER, IT IS EXPECTED THAT FROM 5 TO 10 PERCENT MORE LAYERS WILL
BE ON FARMS NEXT JANUARY FOLLOWING THE 8 PERCENT INCREASE IN THE
NUMBER OF YOUNG STOCK ON JUNE I, 1941 OVER JUNE I, 1940. AS A RE-
SULT EGG PRODUCTION NEXT FALL AND WINTER MAY BE THE LARGEST ON RE-
CORD FOR THE PERIOD.

.. ... ..
.. [..I. ... ..


as agemsm go amahami


Me goneI guess e, atcuseum ammcs


... M., ... I --


.11 -'. U-4.









THE EGG SITUATION AT A GLANCE,


EGGS
I DOZENS I

8


7


6


5


4
CASES
I MILLIONS i

8


6



4


2


0
CENTS PER
DOZEN
30



25



20



15


CASES
( MILLIONS )

12


9


6


3


0
NUMBER
I MILLIONS I

325


300


275


250


225


JAN. APR. JULY .OCT. JAN. APR. JULY OCT.
A M S DATA. EXCEPT NONAGRICULTURAL INCOME JNDEX NUMBERS. ADJUSTED FOR SEASONAL VARIATIONS
'FIRST OF TIlE MONTH. EXCLUDING S. M. A. HOLDINGS, BEGINNING APRIL I. 1940


U S.DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


NE& 38961 BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS


FIGURE I


LAYERS ON HAND




194 1940





A verage.-
1930-39


I FARM EGG
PRODUCTION


1940






1930-3
1930-39 -






PES-54


T H E P 30 J L T R v A I .I 1 T A T J ) :'


Surnary

The number of layers or farms in Jdanuar" 1 )L2 is -:xr. cL:d to be fro.n

5 to 10 percer.t larger turn .n .n!anr:' of this yeir.

On June 1 about S percent more young thieck'Yns e.'e in floe-S of cron

rep.'rters than a year earlier. Since 1927 thie charge frcm v-ar earlier

in the nuia.ter- of La.ers on f- rm e-.cn Ilanuar-y has -vraged abtut half as

larre -as the change from a year earlier inr nmnbcr rcf ,u-g chi"!:kens report d

in farm floc.:s the nrevio's June 1. Ir,dividual instances, helio..ver, hav.e

dcvicted c-.nside:-aby fron this usual relation3hin. Pe.a.:se :,f thE mrruch

nore favorable feed-en: ratio in orcsoepct for tL'e rest of' 1941 as camoared

with a yevar earlier, the incr;ae in t.l,e r.u.er of .av-.rsJ b-' n.:yt Januarv

is expected tc a'pr'.it tt.c inc-reas. r.n nur.b-:r of vro-n, c-.ic' ens rcoort-

id in June. Ar ircreas -': lrvir,-r lors of close to 10 -2-c:nt is :ieedd

to attain the D3nartient nof Atric .!jtur- 's Foal .r-i-r -th. fo.)-'or-HrieLena-",

Dropramn.

Total ege, produ-t ion n',"' s r .r t the sa.:e ?s '-ar --f ''-.7 pro-

duction for the first 5 .o7r.tht.s f 'l.is v'.r *s a tt.Afe ov r 3 or-rcant

larger than a year earlier, but suu ar pnod.iction in l%0i is .xr3ct:A to b3

about the sa':ri as in 19L.O. Ph.e iarfer nur-ber of null -ts r'- :! t'lis -car

'rill bePin tj sho)v up ii layir.g flocks after tnd. scasona lo ioi.nt in nI,-

ber of layers in August. Total aor oto-it next fall and "Lit 21'. c.L 'rfo'e,

n.ay be th3 larFest on record fo:' t.hr.t period.

'nbllesal egg orices advar.ced about 2 cents from uid-:,ay to i..id-Jiris

and are no-" 8 to 9 cents (50-60 percent) high:-r t'lar a y.Er aro. Efg prices

in general ar'. exnected to crntinua wll -tov.- thin -).t yesr earlier


- 3 -





JUIE 1i41


during the rest of 1L41. However, th. increase from June to the fall neak

may be s,.aller this yeir than lIst, cr'i.mrily because of the prospective

large fall production.

Thins ever's lar-e chick output is beginning to increase supplies of

poultry r~et .aLt*.ri.tll;.. Prices of your.Lg stock hve declined a little in

recant -.r. Tks while fi.'ri prices advanced slightly. Prices cf ywoin- stock

n.Tow, are t.th: low3e:t relative to fowl prices sir.c. 19!6. This dipsprity

pr"obly will ron-inue for se,verl- months as a r .'tult of restricted market-

ings of fowl and iarge -suopli.s of ,ounr .toc's to be .i rket-3d. Fut prices

received by farmers for chic'(.r.s Ere exrzct.ed to continue higher than a year

earlier during th- r-emrndr ?f *.he v.-.r. Tur!.- reduction this year is

expected to be about a7 %rr'fe Ps in 1940.

June 20, .941

F=D "IT'IATO-1!

Growing conditions so far this year hove Locan fv!orcbic throughout
practically the entire orn 2lt. ,ecunt rains have improved the condition
of fora.cj and feed grcir croos in tn- Corn :'-sit raid in th : n-rt'heasu section
of t.ie couLi try. S.:polims of corn in 1941 ...-y be evfn l,?rer than in 1940.
Dorestic euppl.es of c-t.ts ?.nd barl,- co .bined ."may b. a little. liarg-r this
ye: r '.h?.n i"st, .,:.d .:un li2s oi what .n.; be the largest or r.cord. C'rr'nt
production and coiu.vunpt'on of high-Drctoin f3uds is the lareoit on record.
Exports of such fc'. is have been ur.us..;all.y .riall, and inpots hnvj' oDen t.hj
larg-st in r-.cer,t years.

Fe'ed prices in ranoral advercn d lightly J:ri:g thm nest nonth. On
th- bo.sih of Chic?.,o ,tiesalj prices, hcwy:var, ccrn l':ten f:ied, thr.,at
middlings, and .,,bs*.n raal hna' continiiue relti'.ely crnea:.r thl.n cotton-
S3',d m'eal and corn.

In recent i.r?k:? about 2 ozen fr-e-r egrs '.re required to purchase
100 pounds of noultrv ration .?t C',ic- -o t :n n. r r A-riiPr. The :,.argin
below the 10-yr r verac -- is n'.erly 1-1/2 Joz-.ns. The fePd--r ratio is
expected to continuE ,.icr, favor' ble to ,roi.'cers than a v.r e-arlier for
th; nrxt f.7-- months bit n.,rhaos by :. d.clininz7 m':arrin.


- 4 -





PES-54 5 -

Feed-egp ratio at Chicago

(Dozens of eggs required to buy 100 pounds 'of poultry ratic'rn)

: "eek ending as of 10L _
Year : Feb.: Aor. : :ay : Jrne :JL'ly_ : ug. : Nov.
: 22 2 : 17 : 24 : 31 : 7 : 14 : 21 : 2 : : 30 : 29
:Doz.: Doz. Doz. Doz. Doz. Doz. Doz. Doz. Doz. D2z. DP'z. Doz.
Average:
1930-39: 6.06 6.71 6.79 6.97 7.11 6.91 6.77 6.75 6.36 6.90 6.07 4.23

1939 : 6.21 6.65 7.14 7.21 7.45 7.14 6.90 6.78 6.71 6.61 6.13 5.68
1940 : 6.23 8.21 7.79 7.92 7.82 7.82 7.7? 7.74 7.57 7.34 6.78 4.53
1941 : 7.L8 6.07 6.03 5.90 5.?3 5.66 5.62


HfTCHI"C-S

Commercial hatchings continue to
exceed previous records

Production of chicks by coaru.ercial hatcheries in th: first 5 .months
of this year was about one-fifth larger than in the corresoontcinr period a
year earlier. Production of chicks br *oor.iiercial hatcheries in il.ty vwas about
one-fourth larger than in -Lay 1940 and about one-t'nth larger than. the pre-
vious record hiEh for ,ay in 1?39. The number of e.rs set in nay was about
40 percent larger than a year earlier, and the nu:.ber of chicks on advance
order on June 1 was about twice as larr' as on June 1, 1940. In tha 3 im-
portant months of hatching for flock renl-scen'?,t (karch to i.iay) total hatchery
output 'was about 14 pDrcant larger th-n in th- corresronding m-nths of 1940.
In recent years close to 70 percent :.f tie an.,'al hatchery output of chicks
has been produced in these 3 :.onths.

Despite th- record hatcr-:.ry output to dzate this near, the average
number of chicks and oaung chickens in floc.:s of .roo r.porters on Jaun 1
nwas only about 3 oerc.nt larger than a v;Er earlier. The increase over a
year earlier rmay be larger- for hatchery outout than for indicated nuiibers of
young stock on hand for tvo reasons. First, brcil:r production apnet.rs to
be by far thi larg-.st on record and, -*:cond, farmers nrob-.bly honr; -hatched s
smaller orcnortion of th.-ir chir 's this viar than last. The avLrare "rice
naid by form-rs in th.- UnInitd St?t .s n,.r 100 chic':s this y.ar, as reoortcd
by th- Agricultural :arketinr 3.rvice, -'is only 4 nerc-ent (31 c-nts) hi--er
than in 1-'40, but total zash farm income to dat.- this v3.?r has baen 1tell
above a year earlier and inroi.;,. frnm :rgs has bien oartic.tl-rly f-vorable.

ECC- SIT"ATIOr'

Number of lay.ars expected to
increase 5 to 10 pnrcejnt

The y.ar-to-year ch-nc-es inc tih av.r9ic r.ur.iL .r of yo.nir stock in
flocks cf crop reporters on E-l-ct2d dates and th;i c'.rn.. fra,- 7-v.?r to
ycar in nur.bars of layers in January are r,.?s.it A in t.b fcllow'irng table:






JUJE 1941 6 -

:I jb.r of ayer-- in January aid ch'ick and youn .-icke'ns in farm
flo-ks on selecLted da.te, 'nitel 3Strie, 1928-4l

(Pe_______rcente of ,recerdinrc i-ar)o .
: a A.ar .A-r runrber )f chiic;s and yo-ang chickens
ayer : in floc'k- of crur reporters
Year in
January April 1 .:.ay 1 Junr 1 July 1
P-arcent P.'rc-nt Prce'.t P-rc-nt Percent

192 : 103.0 90.5 90.5
1929 : 93.6 106.2 103.7
1930 : j04.3 142.3 122.5 1 5.4 99.5
1931 9 a5.6 ?. 7?.7 57.4 P9.8
1932 4: 6.0 10o.& 95.c 102.6 106.3
1933 -101.5 5.1 107.2 106.2 102.9
193. : ?.? '.3 85.5 5. 7 39.8
1935 : 91.- 11 5.3 1 .'. 9 .. 1-2.6
1?36 103.3 97.3 25.0 111.7 110.8
1937 105.4 111.3 93.2 85.4 81.3
1938 : ''.9 ..17. 11i .7 111.8 112.9
1939 104.9 104.1 115.4 102.7 102.6
1940 103.1 74.? 81.7 S:t. .1.8
1941 1' : 7.6 12L.0 1-JO.0 10.4

P/ Pr li-dirary.

Since 1927, the- erc:'.ta-e chan'..c ce:iner.d to a ,'... r arlir in tha
number cf layers on farin.s cac-i, .J.n.iar, ha-s .vrc ad about nalf as iarga as
the p-trcnr.tar'c IIcanL.e in th3 r.u"r:b.c r fi' yul CiU .ic ns renortcd in farm flocks
the previous uun. 1. in so'.u y..ars, i.c've-rr, Lth- c.cLal chang w .-r.s onsider-
ablPy different from ths avrrgc: r--]itionrhip. In 1939-40, for e:amnla, the
increase in layers ',3as sl:.ghtly l-- ar than the. incr.as. in rnuL.iber of young
chickens. Becaus-, of the much nor- f-vorable % el-e.p rat io in croso:ct for
the remainder of this y2.ar croip.re. to a yeir .rli..:, th: n-vb.r -f layers
or. farms in January 1942 IE cxp..ctjd 'n Lb, fro. 5 to 10 nercenjt 1-'rger than
in January 1941. An incruese of aoout 10 aDrcent is nzc:-ss.ry to attain the
Dep- rt.:ent of Acgriculture's poil for -xopnsion of iayinr flocks ujider the
food-for-def2nsa program.. The l..r-st previous inocr':-s in th-% nun-,bjr of
layers occurred in 1936-37 when th, numb. jr inr JanurAry 1937 r'ws s-.4 p.Drcent
larg..r thin in January 1936.

2hu incr'a.s-s, by regions, in Lto 2verr,. number of 'oung chickens in
flocks of crop report-rs on June 1 -"-: as. fellows: north h k.tl'rntc, 4 ocr-
cent; nEst North CntrPi, 5 narcen-t; "'-st ilrth C ntral, 11 no.rcant; South
Atlantic, 3 o:-rcent; South Central, 10 p:rc:nt; and westernn 2u .orcent.
Hlumbcr of layers daclininr lss th'n :'supl

Thj decline in the avcriage number of l "ers nor flock during the first
four months of this Ycear ,wa3s about the sn Fs F. veer -.earlier. Sinc3 .,>-y 1,
however, th3 effects on thes- numbers of the hif.her ear prices and Government
encourigonent to restrict fovwl mr.rkAtinps have become notice able. The decline






in the average nimber-of layers per flock from LPay 1 to June 1 this ynar
was less than either the 1940 or l0-yePr average decline for that neriod.
Moreover, receipts of live fowl :Pt nid-west rn nrinirv markets in recent
weeks have been' as much as 45 percent smaller than a year earlier. The de-
cli-ne in nur.ber-s of layers for June and July is expected to be mut:h less
than in the corresponding months of 1940 and the increas--, from September to
January may b: the sharpest on record as a result of rzesricted marketing -
of fowls and the increased number of chickens raised on farms this year.

The monthly output of eggs per layer in May was 2 percent higher
than a year earlier, but total egg output for the r.ionth "!'as 1 percent s..ialler
than a year earlier because .of the 3 percent fewer layers. Tthr monthly out-
put per layer for the first 5 months of this year averaged 6 p-rcert higher
than in the corresponding period of 1940. Total egg production, therefore,
in the period"January-!iay of this year '-.as a little over 3 percent lp.rgar
than a year earlier despite the 2 to 3 percent fewer layers on fa-ms per
month. Total egg production this simn.er is cxozctcd to be about the same as
that of last summer. "'ith a 5- to 10-percent increase in layers ard normal
weather, however, total egg production next fall and winter probably vill be
larger thin the record output in the fall and winter of 1940-41.

Number of layers on farms, United States

Year Jan. :Feb. :iJarchA.or. ..:ay, :June tJuly :Aur. :Seot.:Oct. >Nov. ,Dec.
: l. Ilil. .il. i :i il. .i'l. l. l. il. 1 .il. I-il. :il. E lil.
Average:
1930-39: 332 325 315 301 284 267 253 2/,6 256 278 300 322

1938 : 307 301 292 278 262 2L8 236 234 245 269 293 314
1939 : 322 316 306 292 276 260 2L.6 2L2 253 279 305 326
1940 : 332 327 318 304 289 270 252 207 257 279 303 3?0
1941 324 318 308 295 280


Average number of eggs oroducAd ?er lay.nr, United States

Year :Jan. :Feb. Wi.Zarch:Apr. : >-,y :Jane :July Aup,. :Sept. 0ct. I'ov. *Dec.
: No. No. TNo. o10. No. 1Jo. N'o. no. No. No. N o. No.
Average:
1930-39: 6.6 8.9 L4.3 16.7 16.8 14.2 12.7 11.2 8.9 6.8 5.0 5.2

1938 : 7.9 9.9 15.4 17.5 17.3 14.9 13.6 11.8 9.4 7.5 5.9 6.4
1939 : 8.0 9.7 14.9 17.0 17.0 14.6 13.2 11.7 9.3 7.4 6.0 6.8
1940 : 7.2 9.0 14.4 16.5 17.0 14.8 13.4 11.8 9.7 7.9 6.2 6.8
1941 : 8.7 10.3 15.0 16.9 17.4


PES-54


- 7 -




JUNE 1941


Total farm production of eggs, United States


Year Jan., Feb.:, 1r.. Apr. May : June', July. Aug.eSept. Oct.: Nov.: Dec.
: il. M. Mil. Mil. Mil. Mil. Mi.. Mil. Mil. Mil. wil.
:cases cases cases cases cases cases cases cases cases cases cases cases
Average:
1930-39: 6.0 8.0 12.5 13.9 13.2 10.5 8.9 7.3 6.4 5.2 41.1 4.7

1938 : 6.7 8.3 12.5 13.5 12.6 10.3 8.9 7.6 6.4 5.6 4.3 5.5
1939 : 7.2 8.5 12.6 13.8 13.0 10.6 9.1 7.8 6.5 5.7 5.1 6.1
1940 : 6.7 8.2 12.7 14.0 13.7 11.1 9.4 8.1 7.0 6.1 5.2 6.0
1941 : 7.9 9.1 12.8 .13.9 13.5


Current stocks of shell eggs smaller than a
year earlier but frozen stocks larger

The weekly net into-storage movement of shell eggs since the season
began has averaged smaller than in 1940. Total United States stocks on June 1
were 10 percent smaller than a year earlier, while privately ovmed stocks were
12 percent smaller. The Department of Agriculture held 415,000 cases this year
on the first of June compared with 318,000 on June 1, 1940.

The weekly net into-storage movement for frozen eggs this season has
averaged heavier than a year earlier. On June 1, stocks were 15 percent
larger than a year earlier and the largest on record for that date. June 1
stocks of all shell eggs and shell-egg equivalent of frozen eggs were only 1
percent smaller than a year earlier.

Eggs: Storage stocks in the United States and storage
movement at 26 markets

: United States : Into-storage movement, week ending as of 141
Year : stocks : May : June : July
: !Jay 1 : June 1 : 31 : 7 : 14 : 21 : 28 : 5
: 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000
Shell: : cases cases cases cases cases cases cases cases
Average :
1930-39 : 4,131 6,868 354 291 234 179 130 89

1939 : 3,357 5,890 338 279 249 156 86 56
1940 :1/ 3,316 I/ 5,662 323 377 341 257 180 99
1941 :j/ 2,816 12/4,962 169 263 185

Frozen:
Average
1930-39 : 2,277 2,995 --- --- -- -- ..

1939 : 2,539 3,369 102 112 117 109 71 52
1940 : 2,270 3,537 157 181 136 141 105 93
1941 : 2,844 2/j4,060 170 148 199
1/ Excludes Surplus Marketing Administration holdings as follows: DIay 1, 1940,
25,000 cases; June 1, 1940, 318,000 cases; M5ay 1, 1941, 215,000 cases; and
June 1, 1941, 415,000 cases. 2/ Preliminary.


- 8 -





PES-54


Liquid egg production in the first 4-months of this year was about 27
percent larger ftan a year earlier. Dried egg production probably "as pro-
portionately larger, since the percentage of liquid egg output dried each
month was about the same as in early 1940. Primarily because of the heavy
demands for drying purposes, total production of liquid eggs ir 1941 probably
vill be much larger than the previous record high output in 1937.

Eggs purchased b:- the Department
of Agriculture

In the middle of Fay the Department of Agriculture began purchasing
dried and frozen egE products in addition to shell eggs. The quantities of
eggs and egg products purchased since the first of' May ere shown in the fol-
lowing table with-conparatle figures for direct purchases of shell eggs for
the corresponding veeks in 1940.

Purchases of eggs by the Department of Agriculture

: Shell : Frozen : Dried
Week ending .- .
as of 1941 1940 1941 1941 1941
: Cases Cases 1,000 pounds 1,000 pounds

may 3 34,099 141,756 --- ---
10 : 55,852 137,606 --- ---
17 80,591 103,233 12,642 618
24 254,296 42,000 1,247 100
31 260,475 35,600 1,638 157
June 7 263,265 25,201 1,379 145
14 233,560 10,400 1,776 350
21 : 199,261
28 : 161,895


Total direct purchases of eggs in May this year (shell eggs plus ap-
proximate shell-e-g equivalent of egg products) vemre about half again as
large as total direct purchases in May 1940. The rate of purchase of all
products combined in early June, however, ivas lower than a year earlier. In
June 1940, a total of 370,0CO cases ofe ggs were purchased by the Department
of Agriculture. (Data or. direct and Blue Sta.ip purchases of eggs by months
from January 1240 to date ,,ere presented in the Piay issue of this report.)

Egg price-increase resumed

Wholesale egg prices advanced about 2 cents from mid-I1ay to mid-June
after remaining about steady from early April to mid-May. They are noi 83 to
9 cents higher than a year ago. Egg prices generally remain about the same
or decline slightly from mid-May to mid-June. The margin of this year's farm
price over that of a year earlier widened from less than 1 cent in add-March
to about 5 cents in mid-Eay. Factors contributing to the marked contra-
seasonal advance during the past 3 or 4 months are: (1) A sharply rising
consumer demand in this country, (2) large purchases by the Department of
Agriculture for domestic purposes and for export, (3) a record strong demand


- 9 -




JUJNE 1941


for eggs from hatcheries, and (4) capacity operations in the egg-breaking and
egg-drying industries.

Consumer incomes are expected to continue to expand during the re-
mainder of this year, but further advances in egg prices will tend to be
restricted to son'e e::tent as production increases later in the year as com-
pared with a year earlier ard as a larger proportion of current production of
eggs becomes available for current human consumption. Requirements of eggs
for both hatching and for egg-breaking operations are greatest in the spring
months. The egr-drying industry this year ivill operate lorgur than usual in
order to fulfill requirements under the food-for-defense program.

Price per dozer received by farmers for eggs, United States

Year : Jan.: Feb.: lar.: Apr.: [Jay : June: July: Aug.:Sept.: Oct.: Nov.: Dec.
: 15 : 15 : 15 : 15 : 15 : 15 : 15 : 15 : 15 : 15 : 15 1 15
:Cents Cents Cents Cents Certs Cents Cents Certs Cents Cents Cents Cents
Average:
1930-39: 22.8 18.8 16.1 16.0 15.9 15.7 17.0 18.7 21.9 24.7 28.2 26.3

1938 : 21.6 16.4 16.2 15.0 17.6 18.2 19.b 21.0 24.9 27.1 29.0 27.9
1939 : 18.8 16.7 16.0 15.5 15.2 14.9 16.5 17.5 20.6 22.9 25.8 20.5
1940 : 18.3 20.2 15.4 15.0 15.1 14.4 16.4 17.2 21.0 23.7 26.2 26.8
1941 : 19.7 16.8 16.4 19.7 20.1


POULTRY SITUATION

Large hatch beginning to increase
meat supplies materially

Farm marketings of total poultry at central western primary markets in
recent veeks have been 10 to 20 percent smaller than a year earlier. Isrket-
ings of young stock at these markets have been nearly twice those in the cor-
responding period of 19C, but fowl marketing have been as ruch as 45 per-
cent smaller. The number of fowls on farms has been a little smaller than a
year earlier, and the rate of culling in recent weeks has been restricted by
the much higher egg prices. This probably was fairly general for the entire
country.

Receipts of dressed poultry at four markets

(New York, Chicago, Philadelphia, Boston)
: Week ending as of 1941_
Year : Apr. : I-ay : June -- :July : Aug. : Oct.
: 26 : 24 : 31 : 7 : 14 : 21 : 28 : 5 : 30 : 25
: 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 -1,000 1,00C 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000
:pounds pounds pounds pounds pounds pounds pounds pounds pounds pounds
Average
1930-39 : 3,793 4,501 4,615 4,967 5,150 5,274 5,428 4,682 5,308 7,641

1939 : 3,640 5,749 5,668 6,823 6,436 6,515 6,139 5,357 6,081 8,438
1940 : 4,623 6,671 5,522 6,609 6,726 6,584 6,653 6,044 7,547 9,796
1941 : 4,348 6,344 6,380 6,959 6,620


, -.0 -









THE POULTRY SITUATION AT A GLANCE


POUNDS
( MILLIONS I
40



30



20



10


0 -
MILLIONS

C(



200





100




0 .
CENTS PER
POUND FI



15




13






JAN.
A M S. DATA


RECEIPTS OF POULTRY
AT FOUR MARKETS



-- ----- 1940 ^


APR. JULY OCT. JAN APR. JULY OCT.
A FIRST OF THE MONTH f INCLUDES BROILERS FRYERS AND ROASTERS
DATA FOR 1941 ARE PRELIMINARY


U.S DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


NEG. 39177 BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS


FIGURE 2


POUNDS
I MILLIONS I
60




40




20



0
POUNDS
I MILLIONS I
60




40




20




0
POUNDS
I MILLIONS)
60


U S. STOCKS OF FOWLS^




/1941
- -I- 1940 -

A average 14 /
S1930-39 /o

_>




JUNE 1941


- 12 -


The movement of young stock off farms during the remainder of this year
will be heavy, reflecting the larger number of chickens raised on farms. Dur-
ing the next several months marketing of chickens from the general farming
areas will tend to lessen the volume of commercial broilers needed to supply
market requirements of live young chickens.

Storage stocks of all poultry now
about the sane as a year ago

With the exception of turkeys, stocks of all classes of poultry on
June 1 were larger than a year earlier. The margin of total stocks over a
year earlier, however, was narrower on June 1 than it has been for several
months. Stocks of fowls declined more during lay this year than a year
earlier, reflecting the higher prices and restricted sales of fowls by farm-
ers. The net decline in storage stocks of turkeys also was larger than a
year earlier, reflecting the continued strong demand for turkey meat. Storage
holdings of young stock declined less than usual during May apparently as a
result of the increased chicken production.

Stocks of turkeys on June 1 were 24 percent smaller than the record
June 1 holdings in 1940. Holdings of other classes were above a year earlier
as follows: Broilers, 19 percent; fryers, 95 percent; roasters, 126 percent;
fowls, 26 percent; and ducks, 60 percent.

Poultry: Storage stocks in the United States and
storage movement at 26 markets

: United States : Storage movement, week ending as of 1941
Year : stocks : May : June : July
: May 1 : June 1 : 31 : 7 : 14 : 21 : 28 : 5
: 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000
:pounds pounds pounds pounds pounds pounds pounds pounds
Average :
1930-39 : 61,170 51,065 -1,222 -795 -385 62 -323 77

1939 : 70,568 66,796 + 327 +668 42 + 506 -783 -430
1940 : 86,226 76,904 272 +356 +2,048 +1,634 +817 27
1941 : 101,129 1/87,427 994 2 -450

T7 Preliminary.

Fowl prices strengther but prices of
young stock decline somewhat

Prices of fowls at wholesale markets have continued about steady since
early April, reflecting the strong consumer demand and restricted culling of
farm flocks. Usually the fowl price starts declining in late May or early
June as the heavy movement off farms gets under way. Wholesale prices of
fowl at Chicago in early June were 5 to 7 cents higher than a year earlier.
Prices of young stock in mid-June, on the other hand, averaged about the same
as a year earlier. Fowl prices now are the highest in relation to young stock
since the unusually heavy marketing of young chickens in 1936.




PES-54


- 13 -


The average price received by farmers for chickens in mid-May was
nearly 3 cents higher than a year earlier and the highest for that date since
1936. Despite the expected larger marketing of chickens in the next several
months, prices received by farmers for chickens during the remainder of 1941
probably vill be above those of a year earlier. The prospective smaller sup-
ply of pork is a strengthening factor to chicken prices. Moreover, a given
increase in consumer incomes appears to result in a greater increase in demand
for chickens than for eggs.

Price per pound received by farmers for chickens,
United States

: Jan.: Feb.: Lar.: Apr.: May : June: July: Aug.:Sept.: Oct.: i'ov.: Dec.
Year : 15 : 15 : 15 : 15 : 15 : 15 : 15 : 15 : 15 : 15 : 15 : 15
:Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents
Average:
1930-39: 14.0 14.2 14.4 15.0 14.7 14.4 14.1 14.C 14.3 13.7 13.3 12.9


1938 : 16.7 16.0 15.9 16.2 16.1 15.7 15.0 14.2
1939 14.0 14.2 14.3 14.4 13. 13.4 13.7 13.0
1940 : 12.0 12.2 12.8 12.9 13.6 13.3 13.6 13.4
1941 : 13.7 14.0 14.4 15.7 16.3


DOMESTIC DEMAND


14.3 13.6 13.6 15.6
13.6 12.7 12.4 11.7
13.7 13.3 13.1 13.0


Industrial production rose to a record high level in May, is rising
further in June, and is expected to continue to follow a general upward course
during the remainder of the year. Incomes of consumers already are sub-
stantially above the average rate for 1940. With more industrial plants con-
ing into operation and t-age rates increasing generally, consumer incomes will
continue to expand. Despite increased taxes and continued heavy purchases of
Government securities by the public, the total amount of money left for ex-
penditures for consumer goods in the fiscal year 1942 will approach the record
established in: 1i29. The per capite. peak of a decade ago probably v.dll not be
reached, hoyvever, since the total population now is about 7 percent larger
than in 1929.

Underlying economic conditions remain definitely favorable to further
advances in the general rice level. The extent and rate of further gains will
continue to be modified by the vigor with which Coverrjernt controls are applied.

Index numbers of nonagricultural income

(1924-29 = 100, adjusted for seasonal variation)
Year Jan.: Feb.: M.r.: Apr., May June: July Aug.: Sept.: Oct, Nov.e Dec.
Average:
1930-39: 83.4 83.1 33.4 32.9 82.4 83.6 82.7 82.5 82.1 82.3 82.3 82.7

1939 : 90.6 90.9 91.3 90.0 90.8 92.1 91.8 93.3 93.3 95.0 95.9 97.1
1940 : 96.9 96.2 95.9 95.3 96.4 97.4 97.8 99.1 99.9 100.3 101.7 104.1
1941 :104.7 105.6 106.4 /06.A

/ FPreliminary.







JUTE 1941 14 -

WOLESALE PRICES OF LIVE FOWLS AND C3ICOERS
AT CHICAGO, 1930-31 TO 19i40o41

The accompar-._zig chart and tables show monthly price quotations for
specified breeds -rnd market classes of live fowls and chickens at Chicago
from 1930 tc date. In presenting these data an attermt has been mar.e to
eliminate som-e of thE confusion which has resulted from variations fron
year to year and season to season in the marketing terns used. Because
of the variations in terms employed it has been difficult heretofore to
compile continuous quotations on a single class of poultry over a period
of years. To add tc L h confusion, the market tcrmirology in a number of
cases has been quite different from that used by the goreral public.

The term chicken, as used in the market, applies to all birds under
a year old, and includes the market classes: Irailars, fryers, ar. roasters.
It is so used in the accompanying tables.

The term fol, as used in the market, refers to mature hens. In the
caec of live biris, the terms hens, fowl, and fo-vls are used interchangeably;
in the case of dress:d birds, only the ter-s fowl cand fowls are customarily
used. This terninolgF e-lso is followed in the accompanying tables.

The term sprina chicken, as usc-d in th,. rarket, generally applies to
two classes of roasting chickens: li'ht-rei-hn roasters and heavy roasters.
To avoid confvsicn, these more specific terms Pare used in the accompanying
tables and discursion rhen the broader term mi-tt be misleading.

Source and availability of data

Two nrincitrl sources of historical data on wholesale prices of
fam products at C:icze:o care available, nxd both have been used in preparing
the accompanying table. The older of the two, the (Chicago) Daily r-rade
Bulletin (produce section), was first published in 1S67. The second source,
the Chicago Price Current, was first published in 1931. Similar datp0a wore
carried in both publications from 1l31 to 197 but since July of the IP.tter
year the Price Gurrent alone has been published.

Continuous price auotati-nsz on live broilers hanv been available
since Jcanmiry 21, l-36o. Prior .o that tie .ricos rrc oaioted only in the
important marketing rnoths. For exam-Ile, in 192 r-uotations were given
from M-y 9 until late su_-=er. The length of the period during which those
prices were quoted in any one year gradually lengthened until, in 1930,
quotations were c-_rried from January 8 to Sepjember 2. Each year there-
after prices were q.-otod later in the fall, cmD in 1936 the quotations were
continued through the Christmes holiday season and into the next year.

Since 1930, prices cf live roasters (spring chickens) have been
quoted during about 10 months of the ye-r. Continuous quotations have
been available since January 24, 1938. Live fryer prices have been quoted
in from 3 to 8 -jnths out of the ysar.





- 15 -


Compiling the data

The daily prices used in preparing the tables were compiled from
the (Chicago) Daily rrade Bulletin or the Chicago Price Current for all
types and breeds of live broilers, fryers and roasters (spring chickens)
except the lowest grades, i.e., number 2's and barebacks. In all years,
except 1930, separate prices were listed in these trade publications for
White (Plymouth) Rock, (Barred) Plymouth Rock and Colored breeds during
most of the period in which prices were quoted. Prices of Leghorn broilers
and Leghorn chickens wore listed during at least part of each year, and all
available quotations were compiled. Prices of heavy end medium-heavy live
hens also were compiled.

Prices on these classes wrre given in the trade publications for a
variety of weights varying from year to year and season to season. Hounver,
by observing when one price series left off and another began and by ob-
serving the relative prices at the beginning and end of each period, many
discontinuous series were combined in the tables into E. relatively few con-
tinuous series.

A marketing season beginning on April 1 .rcs adopted. The farm
hatching season is roughly March, April, and May. Prices for the season
beginning April 1 therefore would be for chickens from only one farm hatch-
ing season.

Major series of prices on the heavy broods
of live chickens

In general, at any one tine, the her.y breeds of live broilers -ere
listed in the trade publications under a sinr-le weight classification. The
weights varied from time to time but the last nrice quotation under one
weight was usually approximately equal to the first price quotation under
the new weight. Thus the various quotations could be combined into a single
series. The naxinur. weight in any year for these birds was 2-1/2 pounds
and the most common quotation was for "up to end including 2 pounds". Since
1936 live broiler prices have been quoted continuously.

Quotations for the heavy breeds of fryers wore likewise generally
listed under a single-vcigeht classification. The nost common quotation
for this class was "over 2 pounds and including 3 pounds". The number of
months in any one yerr in which fryer prices are quoted varies greatly from
year to year but no significant trends in the number of months are apparent.
The average nunbor of months in which fryer prices were quoted was 5.8.
Quotations began in the period February to M.sy and ended in the period July
to September.

Quotations for the heavy breeds of roasters (s-jring chickens) :ere
generally listed under two weight classifications. Quotations for the
lighter weights were given during 9 to 12 monLths out of the year whereas
quotations for the heavier weights generally ra:re given in those months
when quotations on fryers were not given. Weights for lizht roasters have
usually included "over 3 pounds and under 4 pounds" but havo occasionally






JUNE 1941


- 16 -


included "under 5 rounrs". The weights for heavy rcaster have been "I
pounds and over" or "5 pounds and over", defending on the weight classi-
fication for light roasters.

By combLniLg similar discontiruors series, it was possible to ob-
tain four series of prices on the heavy breads of live chnc'-ns, t.70 of
which wore apprcxiimatcly continuous throuaho-ut the year a.-d the othar two
of which together w'rc quoted con~iruouisly alth-ug-h the two parts icre for
quite different weights. The series are r.s follows: (1) broilers, gencr-
ally including bi:ds up to 2 :ouAds, (2) fryers, includiar bidris weighing
over 2 and ur to 3 pounds, generally quoted fro .April to Sertehrber,
( ) light roasters, gearrally including birds over 3 ard under 4 pounds,
(4) heavy ro=asters, icl-u.ing birds weighing over L pounds, quoted in those
months when fryor =riccs are not quotCA. In 1940, ho-evrr, aqu'oations .oro
not given focr fr crs, but both the hea-.-y ud light-weight roaster quotations
w:cro carried throughout the year. Since 1951, scoarate onotatirns on each
of these classes have been available for (Parr3d) Plymcuth Rock, White
(Plymouth) Rock, ani Colored breeds. Mo-thly average ouotations for these
'reeds and classes arc given in tables 1, 2, ar. 5.

The heavy breeds generally include (?arred) Flymouth Rocks, Write
(Plyrouth) Rocks, and Colored. Th. first two clc.ssifications include birds
of other bree'-s hav-ing approximately the sane quality as the two t;-ps of
Recks. Thu- Colored brepis include Rhode Islrzi Rods -nd birds of sore
other breeds nct mnctir.g the general standards of tho first two classes*
Separate ouotations are ?iven in the trade n-ulications for the Leghorn
and Black breeds.

Major series of prices for live leghorn chickens

Quotations on heavy and light-weight Leghorn broilers generally -ere
available in the trade publications during about the same period as eroe
fryer prices. Light-ueight Leghorn broilers rore varicusly listed! as "under
1-1/2 pounds", "under 2 pnrnd.s", "2 pounds and un.er", -nd during short
pericis in 1939 Ln 19'-1i.- as "2-1/2 rounds and un-or". Heavy Leghorn
broilers included -ill the heavier ycung birds rith no maximum weight
specified. Sometinc between September and Janu-ary in each year, except
194G-41, the ouotatica for heavy L.ghnrn broilers *.as dropped and a cuo-
tation for Leghorn chickens -was added at about th- sane rice. This quo-
tation generally 7-as certinued until March or Anril. Monthly prices for
these classes are given in table 4.

The auotatiins on heavy broilers rnd Loglorrn chickens were sometimes
listed in the trr-co publications under "broilers" ad sometimes under
"spring chickens". Ho-ever, the weights for the heavy broilers were core
nearly equal to those for broilers in the heavy breods than to those for
rEasters; hence the torn "teavy broilers" has Scen adA-ted in the tables.
nowebver, .during the tzie of year that aoutations on Leghorn chickens are
given, the birds are .oct of sufficient quality to warrant placing then in
zither a broiler or a roaster class. Hence the term "Leghorn chickens"
has beer. retained. At any given time, prices )n this class were the
lorcst of any coacileA.








FOWLS AND CHICKENS. LIVE: AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OF SELECTED
BREEDS AND MARKET CLASSES, CHICAGO. APRIL 1939-MARCH ;940
HEAVY BREEDS
CENTS PER I I
POUND BROILERS Plymouh
20 A I Rock. s


LEGHORNS


APR MAY JUNE JULY AUG. SEPT. OCT. NOV. DEC. JAN FEB. MAR.
1939 1940
U 5 DEPARTMEhT OF AGRICULTURE NEV. 33254 BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECOlUHICS
FIGURE 3





JUNE 1941


Prices of the heavy breeds of hens

Quotations on live fowls or hens have been compiled for two weight
classifications, heavy and medium heavy. Since 1932, the quotations given
in the trade publications have been for "over 5 pounds" and "5 pounds and
under", respectively, from January to July or August, and "4-1/2 pounds
and over" and "under 4-1/2 pounds", respectively, for the remainder of the
year. In 1940, however, the "5 pound and under" and "over 5 pounds" quo-
tations were carried for most of the year. A single quotation in each
weight class includes all of the heavy breeds. Monthly averages of these
prices are given in table 5.

No quotations have been compiled for Leghorn hens.

Figure 3 shows how weekly averages of the seventeen series of nrices
given in the tables varied in 1939--40. The rice rclationshios and seasonal
movements in this year arc fairly typical of recent years.


R. J. FOOTE


- 18 -




- 19 -


Table 1.- Chickens, live: Wholesale price of (Barred) Plymouth Rock,
by classes, Chicago, 1931 to date


Year : Jan.:.
Ct.

1931 :
1932
1933 : 14.7
1934 :
1935 : 21.8
1936 : 25.8
1937 : 21.3
1938 : 20.6
1939 : 16.5
1940 : 16.4
1941 : 18.0


Feb..
Ct.


16.0
23.0
23.1
24,1
23.8
20.3
17,1
17.9
18.9


S* : : : :. Oct.:
Mar.. Apr.: May.June .J:ly Aug. :Sept.: Oct.. ITov.. Dec.


Ct. Ct. Ct.


19,7
26.2
24.4
24.1
26,0
21.9
19.2
19.1
21.0


21.7
24.3
24.1
25.4
24.7
23.4
19,2
21.1
21.7


19,4
19.6
23,1
21.6
24.9
23.8
21.0
18.5
22.9
19.7


Ct. Ct. Ct. Ct. Ct. Ct. Ct.
Broilers
24.7 20.8 19,3
1621 15.4 13.7
16.3 13.8 11.9 12.2
20.9 19.1 15.6 17.3
19.6 16., 18.2 19.6 20.0
23.5 18.5 16.1 16.0 16.0 16.7 1629
19.5 21.2 23.3 24.5 25,8 26.0 24.2
18.6 17.2 16.6 17.1 17,9 18.7 16,3
18.5 17.0 15.1 17.7 18.0 17.5 16.1
18.4 17.3 17.6 17.3 18.0 18.7 17.9


1931
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936
1937
1938
1939
1940 1/
1941 1/


1931
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936
1937
1938
1939
1940
1941


Fryers


23.3 23.6 22.5 .19.2
22.0 IS.6
24.8 25:1 22.9
22.6 24.4 24.8 23.6 20,8
: 24.8 26.2 25.9 25.1
26.8 25.6 26.0 21.2
: 22.0 23.8 24.7 22.5 18.8
18.9 21.1 20.8 19.9 19.7


_: Roaster

: 16.0 20.2
14.6 15i6
: 13.8 16.1 19,0 22.9 25.9 24.8
: 18,4 20.0 20.0 24.8 22.6
: 23.0 25.0 25.3 27.5 27.7 27,1
1: .2 20.5 26.3 27.4 23.6
: 23,2 23.5 24.5 26.S 24.5 20.4
17.6 19.8 22.7 22.4 22.2 22.7
: 16.7 18.2 20.2 21.9 24.0 19.6
:19.5 20.1 22.1 22.2 19.5
: Roaster


25.8
16.6
15.8
20,3
18.3
21,0
22,1

18.2


22.8
13,8
12,6
17,3
18,9
17.2
24.4

15.9


18,9
14.2
12.4
16.1
18,6

23.9


s. 1- ht ____
28.4 24t7 19,3 16,3 16,8 15,8
19,0 16,0 13,9 11.5 10.3 10.8
18.3 14.0 12.2 10.5 9.3 11.1
22.7 19.1 17.4 14,7 ?1h4 15.0
20.1 20.6 18.5 19.0 19,5 20.9
23.8 18.9 16.8 14.9 14.5 14.2
22.8 24.4 23.4 21.5 21.9 23.2
* 19.3 16.6 16.0 15.4 15"4 16.2
19.5 15.6 15.9 15.1 15.0 16.2
17.6 17.3 16.4 15.8 16.1 17.6


js, heavy


1931 : 16.3 16.S 15.S
1932 : 16.0 14.0 12.1 10.5 10.3
1933 : 12.1 14.6 11.0 10.0 11.7
1934 : 17.5 15.1 15,0 16.7
1935 : 18.4 20.0 19.7 19.4 21.6
1936 : 22.2 17.9 15.3 15.0o 1.7
1937 : 21.5 21.1 22.1
1938 : 23.9 17.4 16.0 14.9 14.6 16.6
1939 : 15.5 16.2 13.9 13.2 13.8
1940 : 16.9 19.7 22.1 23.S 26.6 24.0 19.7 1S.5 16.6 15.4 15.4 17.6
1941 : 19.S 21.8 23.6 23.9 21.6
rerages computed from compilations of daily prices from the Chicago Price Current.
I Not quoted.




.JUE 1941 20 -

Table 2.- Chickens, live: Wholesale price of White (Plymouth) Rock,
by classes, Chicago, 1931 to date


Year Jan. :Feb; :Mar; .Apr. : May. .J
Ct. Ct. Ct. Ct. Ct.
B__________________ :
1931 :
1932 :
1933 : 20.6 18.8
1934 : 21.0 24.2 23.0 -21.9
1935 : 20.6 22.2 23.8 24.3 21.7
1936 : 24.6 23.6 24.1 25.5 24.7
1937 : 20.6 22.6 25.3 24.6 23.8
1938 : 20.6 20.0 21.9 23.9 21.8
1939 : 16i1 16.7 19,4 19,3 18g4
1940 : 16.4 17.8 19.4 21.0 23.0
1941 : 18.0 18.6 20.5 20.9 19.5


une ;July .
ct. Ct.
rollers


16.
16.0
18.7
18.0
23.,5
19.5
10.1
18.4
18.9


24.7
15.4
1i.4

16.0
16.9o
16,9
21.2
17.4
i6.4
16.9


Aug. Sept..Oct ov.. Dec.
Ct. Ct. Ct. Ct. Ct.


20.8
13,7
11.0
14.6
17.2
16.o
23.4
16,5
15.1
17.4


19.3
11.4
16.2
19,0
15.9

17.0
17.8
17.5


20.0
16.o
25.8
17.9
18.0
18.1


16.7-:
26.0 o
18.7
17.4
18.6


16,2
24,2
16.2
15.7
17.5


23 .8
24.9
25.8
21.8 23.8
20.4


23,8
25.1
26.4
25.2
25.5
20.1


21,9
24.7
23.9
26.1
26.0
22.9
19.4


Fryers
25,6
18.7 16.6
1.8.6 15,2
22.2 17,9
19,3 17,5
25.2 20.1
21.7 22.3
18.5 15.3
20.1 17.9


Roasters.
2


21,1
13,8
11,3
15.6
18,1
17.0
23.2


C


S16.o 19.0
: 4.6 18.1 1
:13.8 15.8 17.0 21.6 25.7 24.8 22.0 1
1S.3 25.0 23.0 20.3 2
23.0 25.0 25.3 27.4 28.0 28.0 24.2 1
17.8 20.5 26.8 25.0 23.5 2
: 22.9 23.5 24.5 26.9 25.2 20.7 19.8 1
16.7 19.1 22.3 21.7 22.0 23.8 19.8 1
16.2 1l.2 19.7 21.5 24.4 20.0 17.8 1
: 18.9 19.4 21.2 21.2 19.2
_: _Roasters, heavy


1931
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936
1937
1938
1939
1940
1941

1331
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936
1937
1938
1939
1940
1941

1931
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936
1937
1938
1939
1940
1941


Averages computed from
g/ Not quoted.


14.6


19.5 22.0 23.8 27.0 24.6 20.4
21.2 23.2 23.6 21.5


compilations of daily prices


17.3


3.1
.5.8
.3.5
.8.0
_0.0
-.8
3.5
6.4
L5.6
.7.6


18,7

11.4
15.5


19.2
13.9
12.0
16.6
17.8
16.4
22.7
15.8
15.9
16.3


16.3
11.5
10.1
14.3
1s.6
14.5
21.5
15.5
14.5
15.8


16.3
12.2
10.9
15.6
19.8 19.6
17.8 15.7
21.5
15.8 15.1


17-.0
11.2
9.7
14.6
19.7
14- 5
22.3
15i8
15.0
15.3


17.0
11.2
10.5
16.0
19.8
15.4
21.4
15.2


15.9
10.9
11.0
14.6
21.1
14.4
23.3
16.1
16.0
17.7


15.9
10.9
12.0
17.3
22.2
15.1
22.6
17.0


16.o 14.o 13.5 13.6
18.5 16.6 15.7 16.o 18.0

from the Chicago Price Curr


: 16.0


18.4
: 22.1

: 24.1
: 18.9
16.7
19.6




PES-54


- 21 -


Table 3.- Chickens,


Year : Jan., Feb., Mar.:


1931
1932
1935
1934
1935
1936
1937
1938
1939
1940
1941.


1931
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936
1937
1938
1939
1940
1941


1/
11


: Ct. Ct. Ct.



: 20.1 24.2
: 20.6 22.2 23.6
: 24.3 23.3 23.4
: 19.9 22.0 25.0
: 20.6 20.0 21.2
2 15.3 16.2 17.9
: 14.1 15.1 16.4


live: Wholesale price of Colored, by classes,
Chicago, 1931 to date

Apr.. May June, July. Aug.. Sept Oct.: Nov., Dec.
Ct. Ct. Ct. Ct. Ct. Ct. Ct. Ct. Ct.
Broilers
22.6 19.7 16.6
18.1 14.4 14.2 12.8
20.6 17.5 14.7 12.1 10.7 10.7
23.0 21.8 18.6 16.1 14.2 16.1
23.3 21.1 17.9 15.2 16.9 19.0 20.0
24.7 24.1 22.6 16.9 15.5 14.9 15.0 15.7 15.8
23.8 22.8 19.0 19.8 21.8 22.2 23.8 24.0 23.1
22.8 20.7 17.0 15.6 14.7 15.5 16.7 17.7 15.2
18.3 17.1 17.5 15.4 13.2 15.4 15.5 15.2 14.6
18.8 21.2 17.0 15.9 16.1 15.5 16.2 16.3 16.6


: 17.2 17.8 18.9 20.2 18.5
: Frye
21.4 22.0 21.3 17.3
20.3 16.6
S.23.8 23.7 20.5
22.0 23.6 23.9 22.5 18.4
23.8 24.9 24.6 23.5
25.4 23.8 24.2 19.7
S 20.7 22.2 23.2 21.3 17.1
: 17.1 18.7 18.5 17.9 18.1


rs
24.1T
14.6
13.1
16.4
16.0
18.3
19.9
16.1
15.7


asters, light


1931 : 26.7 2
1932 : 16.0 20.1 22.0 18.4 17.4 1
1933 a 13.7 13.9 16.4 1
1934 : 13.1 15.1 17.0 21.6 24.4 23.2 20.1 1
1935 : 18.0 19.5 20.0 23.5 20.4 17.9 1
1936 : 22.1 24.0 24.2 25.6 26.1 25.8 21.0 1
1937 : 16.3 18.5 24.0 25.3 22.0 20.8 2
1938 : 22.3 22.7 22.8 24.6 23.0 18.5 17.3 1
1939 : 16.1 17.6 19.7 20.0 20.0 20.5 17.7 1
1940 : 14.4 15.6 16.4 18.8 22.3 18.1 16.2 1
1941 :17.6 18.4 19.3 20.3 18.1
_: Roasters, heavy
1931
1932 : 16.o 16.8
1933 : 11.2 13.7
1934 :
1935 17.8
1936 : 21.4
1937
1938 22.2 1
S1939 1 I
1940 : 14.2 16.1 16.4 18.9 23.2 22.1 17.8 1
. 141 : 18.1 19.5 20.6 22.4 20.4
rages computed from compilations of daily prices fr
Not quoted.


20.2
12.6
10.8
14.5
16.9
15.5
21.7

13.3


16.5
13.1
10.7
14.7
16.7

20.1


1.9 17.2 15.3
4.2 12.5 10.8
2.0 10.5 9.4
6.5 15.0 13.5
8.2 16.5 17.4
7.0 14.3 12.9
1.8 20.1 20.0
4.7 14.1 13.2
3.7 13.9 13.0
5.9 14.5 13.9


i6.o 15.4
10.4 o10.1
8.8 10.2
13.4 14.o
18.6 20.1
12.6 13.2
20.8 22.0
13.8 14.9
13.0 14.4
14.3- 16.


15.3 16.o 15.4
11.1 10.4 10.1
9.9 9.5 11.1
15.8 13.8 14.6 16.3
17.8 17.9 18.6 21.2
15.7 14.1 14.3 14.4
20.0 19.7 20.6
5.4 14.3 13.5 13.8 15.8
3.7 14.2 12.4 12.3 12.5
7.1 14.7 14.2 14.8 16.5
om the Chicago Price Current.


*





*JUNEL 1941


- 22 -


Table 4.- Chickens, live: Wholesale price of Leghorns, by classes,
Chicago, 1930 to date


Year Jan.. Feb., Mar., Apr..


May June July Aug. Sept Oct. Nov. Dec.
May '. June". July: Aug.. *Set c.^ *"ov: Dec.


Ct. Ct. Ct. Ct. Ct. Ct. Ct. Ct. Ct. Ct. Ct. Ct.
Broilers, light .____
21.7 18.2 18.2 18.9
20.6 18.5 18.4 17.6 15.3
15.0 12.6 13.2 12.4 12.3
13.2 11.6 11.0 10.1
17.8 14.8 13.1 14.4
17.6 14 14.1 17.1 16'.5
22.0 22.4 22.2 17.2 15.6 15.1
21.8 19.6 16.4 18.4 21.0
18.4 15.6 15.2 14.8
17.0 15.2 14.7 13.5 14.8 14.2
19.0 20.0 17.9 15.3 15.0 13.5 12.4 11.4 10.9
12.0 12.5 19.0 18.3


1930
1931 :
1932
1933
1934 :
1935 :
1936 :
1937
1938 :
1939 :
1940
1941 :

1930 :
1931 :
1932
1933 :
1934 :
1935 :
1936 :
1937 :
1938 :
1939 :
1940 I:
1941 :

1930
1931 :
1932 :
1933 *
1934 :
1935 :
1936 :
1937 :
1938 :
1939
1940 :
1941 1/:


27.0 32.3
31.2

17.8
21.6
21.0 20.8


30.0 28.6
31.1 25.7
19.9 17.2
17.2 16.0
20.4
21.4 19.4
23'.3
21.8
21.5 20.1
16.8 17.8

19.8 18.5


22.1
20.8
13.4
13.2
17.0
15.3
19.9
18.5
16.4
16.7


heavy
20.9 20.4
20.2 18.1
13.3 12.2
11.6 10.2
13.8 13.8
14.8 16.4
16.5 15.1
18.4 21.0
15.3 13.5
14.9 12.4


15.3
11.6
9.5
14.9
15'.2


13.1
13.1


9.7 9.5





11.1 10.1


ns
18.4 15.7 l4.9 13.9
12.8 11.9
g.6


11.2 12.3
14.4 14.5


Averages computed from
I/ Not'quoted.


13.2
16.1
13.8
19.8


16.1
12.3
18.4
12.8


15.8
11.5
17.4
11.9


16.4
11.4
15.9
11.8
9.6


compilations of daily prices from the Chicago Price Current.


______________Broilers,


25.8











17.3
15.7
12.0

9.3
13.7

12.1
16.7
13.o0
9.8


21.8


19.1
17.5
12.9


13.0
16.o
13.0
10.0


16.0


_ Broilers,


-~ ~ f --- ----


*






- 23 -


Table 5.- Eens, live: Wholesale price at Chicago, 193C to date


Year : Jan.: Feb.:
: Ct. Ct.


Mar.:
Ct.


Apr.
Ct.


May : June. July; Aug. :Sept.: Oct.: Nov.: Dec.
Ct. Ct. Ct. Ct. Ct. Ct. Ct. Ct.


Medium, heavy


1930
1931
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936
1937
1938
1939
1940
1941


25.2
19.2
16.5
12.4
11.9
16.2
21.8
18.3
22.4
17.6
14.9
18.0.


26.2
20.0
17.6
12.7
13.8
18.2
23.1
17.7
21.0
18.3
17.0
18.4


27.8
22.3
16.8
13.0
15.0
20.2
22.9
19.7
22.6
18.8
16.5
20.9


27.1
23.2
16.4
12.4
15.8
20.3
22.1
19.7
21.8
17.5
16.6-
21.6


23.3
20.1
14.7
12.5
13.9
19.1
19.9
18.0
20.2
15.5
16.3
20.3


21.2
18.8
12.6
10.0
12,4-
17.6
19.3
16.9
-18.5
14.7
13.7


13.7
11.3
12.1
15.5
17.7
18.5
-17.4
14.8
15.3


18.4
14.7
10.1
12.9
17.6
16.9
20.0
16.8
14.5
15.0


16.9
14.1
9.7
14.1.
18.3
15.8
19.1
16.1
i6.s
14.7
16.0


15.6
14.8
11.1
8.6
12.3
17.3
14.4
18.3
14.5
12.5
13.1


14.7
13.5
10o.4
7.8
11.7
16.7
12.9
16.9
13.4
11.2
12.6


14.7
13.0
10.5
9.1
11.6
18.5
12.6
17.8
14.0
11.8
13.5


: Heavy
1930 : 26.4 24.1 25.0 25.8 20.5 197- 20*2 -20.2..22.4 20.1 18.5 18.6
1931 : 20.5 17.9 20.8 20.2 17.9 17.7 18.8 20.4 20.8 19.1 17.8 16.2
1932 : 17.4 15.5 15.3 15.2 12.9 12.3 13.8 14.8 15.7 14.3 13.1 12.8
1933 : 12.9 12.1 11.7 11.9 11.9 10.6. 11.6 11.4 11.8 11.9 10.1 10.8
1934 : 11.9 12.5 14.4 14.2 13.3 12.8 12.6 14.5 17.1 14.8 13.8 14.2
1935 : 16.8 17.4 18.2 20.1 20.4 17.4 16.2 17.9 20.7 20.3 19.4 20.4
1936 : 21.6 21.2 21.0 '20.8 18.7 1S.3- 18.2 18.7 19.2 17.5 16.6 15.9
1937 : 18.0 16.9 18.8 18.3 17.3 17.4 18.8 21.5 22.5 22.0 20.7 20.3
1938 9 21.5 19.4 18.9 19.5 18.5 17.8 17.8 17.6 18.5 17.5 16.7 17.2
1939 :17.6 17.1 17.3 16.5 15.0 14.0 14.4 14.7 16.6 15.0 14.2 13.9
1940 :15.1 15.o0 15.o0 15.9 14.9 14.0 14.5 15.o0 16.0 15.1 14.9 15.5
1941 : 16.9 16.7 17.4 19.3 18. ___
Averages computed from compiltions of daily prices from the Chicago Price Current.


r


m







- 24 -


IXiEX OF SPECIAL SU JECTS DISCUSSED IN 'EE
POULTRM AND GC- SITUATION

--


Tholesale prices of live fowls and chickens at
Chicago, 1930-31 to 19r40-AI ..................

A moving -seasonal adjustment for egg prices e...

u0-tlook for turkeys in 1:41l ................ ,..,

Downward trend in costs of egg production .....

United States foreign trade in poultry products
i 1.40 O .............. ....... ................

Estimated storage r.arg-a -n shell egs per dozen,
averages 1916-35 a=- 1925-34, annual 1935-40 .

Eggs, rer dozen: Estinated st-rac.e =argi,
1916-37 .................................... .

Geographic location of storage stocks of eggs ..

Ceogranhic location of storage stocks of poultry

Factors affecting the average price received by
farmers for turkeys in the United States .....

Poultry and egg c-atlok for 1341 ...............

CMick Hatchery Survey, 1937-I3 ............... ..

A comparison of four food-egg ratios ........ *.

Feed-egg ratio defined .e......................


J

V

K

K


12 7


8- i


9

6-8

11


13-16



11-13

10-13

10-11


Ju33 19141


February

December

November


October 1910

September 1940

Augnst 1940

May 1, 1940

December 4, 1919


LUiVERsrrY OF FLORIDA
1111111111111111l
3 1262 08904 0538








Issueiii


ne 1941l

ay 1941

arch 19411

arch 1941


ebruary 1941 J


february 194 1
br= zgt