Poultry and egg situation

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Title:
Poultry and egg situation
Physical Description:
v. : ; 26 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economic Research Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service
Publisher:
The Bureau
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Creation Date:
March 1937
Frequency:
quarterly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Poultry industry -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Egg trade -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Citation/Reference:
Bibliography of agriculture
Citation/Reference:
Predicasts
Citation/Reference:
American statistics index
Citation/Reference:
Index to U.S. government periodicals
Statement of Responsibility:
Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with PES 1 (Jan. 1937); ceased with PES-308 (Dec. 1980).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: Agricultural Marketing Service, Dec. 1953-Mar. 1961; Economic Research Service, May 1961-Dec. 1977; and: Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service, Mar. 1978-Dec. 1980.
General Note:
Cover title.
General Note:
Description based on: PES-301 (Mar. 1979).
General Note:
Previously classed: A 93.20: and A 88.15/2:

Record Information

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University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000502977
oclc - 04506769
notis - ACS2711
lccn - 79643440 //r81
issn - 0032-5708
sobekcm - AA00005304_00011
Classification:
lcc - HD9437.U6 A33
ddc - 338.1/7/6500973
System ID:
AA00005304:00013

Related Items

Succeeded by:
Poultry and egg outlook & situation

Full Text
*1


1JTIITF STATES D2PARTi::-;NT OF AGRICULTURE
Bureau of Agricultural Economics
Washington


* ,*
I-,


FES-3


March 9, 1937


T HE P O.. LTR Y AND EG G S I TU AT I O N



SumL.ary

The Bureau of Agricultural Economics reports the following as important

among the month's developments in the poultry and egg situation: (1) the grow-

ing evidence of a reduction in the 1937 hatch from that of 1936, for which a

feed situation unfavorable to the poultryman is largely responsible; (2) the

greater than usual seasonal decline in the size of the farm laying flock, also

due to the feed situation; and (3) the less than usual seasonal decline in the

farm price of eggs attributed in part to the Agricultural Adjustment Admin-

istration egg purch..-zin- program which gives promise that spring prices will

be no lower than in 1936.


The feed-egg ratio in recent months

level of a year earlier, from which it has

(farm and commercial) is likely to be some

From the standpoint of poultry prices this

ease in clearing the present large storage

marketing next fall. The seasonal decline

after May is likely, therefore, to be less

all, as in 1935.


has averaged 40 percent above the

been estimated that the total hatch

7 to 10 percent less than in 1936.

will probably result both in greater

holdings and also in smaller poultry

in poultry prices which usually occurs

than average; or it may not occur at


From the standpoint of egg prices, the lighter hatch, together with a more

rapid reduction of laying flocks now, points toward fewer egg marketing this fall

and in early 1938 than a year before and, hence, to somewhat higher prices if

consumer demand is maintained above the 1936 level

The spring level of egg prices for 1937 seems to have been about reached by

the end of February. Though there may be some further decline, it is not likely
that egg prices will be carried below those ef 1936.







PES-3


Feed situation

The feed situation in Febrarry continued to depart from its drought
year parallel, 1934-35. High fee-i prices and seasonally declining egg
prices have kept the feed-pgg ratio at a high level.


The course of tine
weekly ratio, at Chicago,
upon Unit l"aYetr%,e farm-


feed-igg ratio during February i. indicated by the
which is bascd upon market prices there rather than
:rice- as i.; the rronthly ratio.


The fi.,-egg ratic at Chicago, b:,- weeks, January 2 to February 2?,
average 1926-35 and 19.37

(Dozens of eggs required to bu;,' ICO pound; of poultry ration)


W"ek ended as :Jan.2 :Jan.J :Jan.i:JarL.23:Jan.3'':Feb. 6:Feb.13:Feb.2C:Feb.27
of 1937 : : : : :
:rsozns Fozr n P'oz S n en7 ozen:3 DIozens Dozens POzens DozenS Dozens


Average
1926-35 ....: 4.21 4.23 4.50 4.72 4.92 5.09 5.27


1937 .......... 6.98 ?.76 8.79 9.30


5.e1 5.89


9.03 9.16 9.40 9.-26 9.13-


The ferd-rgj ratio normally rises until May or June, more eggs being
required to purchase 100 pounds of feed in those months, ordinarily, than at
any other time. Since this coincides roughly with the period of heavy pro-
duction, however, a high feed-egg ratio is not so unfavorable to feeding as
it is during the winter when production is low. Th,":-c some :f.tk.er rise
in the ratio seems likely at this time, it is not expected to be as great as
the average seasonal rise, unless new crop prcspjct., are poor, and it may be
so little as to be in.-.igr-ificant. The season: course of the feed-egg ratio
is shown in the monthly table for the United :t.,es.

The United States farm feed-e-gg ratio, by months, average 191C-33,
annual 1 T ,4-35 to 1i'2C--7


Year : Aug.: Sept: Oct.:

: Dos. Do. Loz.


Nov.: Teo.: Jan.:

-' z. CZ. !,oz.


Feb.: Mar.: Apr.: May

Doz. Poz. Doz. Doz.


A1910-33 ...: 7.17 6.05 1
1910-33 ... : 7.17 6.05 41. .D- 5 3.'2 4.35 5.59 7.16 7.75 7.91


1934-35 .....: 8.12
1935-36 .....: 6.19
1936-37 .....: 8.21


6.84
5.25
7.66


5. 1i

5.41


5. 91
3.8'
5.95


6.45
4.97
8.32


6.29 8.38 8.02 7.38
4.56 6.66 6.89 6.5C


- 2 -











Chicks and Young Chickens Per Farm Flock
on June 1, 1926-37


NUMBER I -
PER FLOCK




140 -


AV. 1926-35
134.4

130 -





120 1
1925 1927 1929 1931 1933 1935


U S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


PERCENT
OF 10-YR.
AV. 1926-35


105



100



95



90


1937


NEG. 31505 BUREAU OFAGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS


FIGURE 1.- THE NUMBER OF CHICKS AND YOUNG CHICKENS PER FARM FLOCK ON JUNE I IS
A MEASURE OF THE TOTAL HATCH. THE DOTTED LINES INDICATE THAT THE 1937 HATCH IS EX-
PECTED TO BE BETWEEN 7 AND 10 PERCENT LESS THAN IN 1936.



CHANGES IN NUMBERS OF CHICKS AND YOUNG CHICKENS
PER FARM FLOCK,JUNE I,AND CHANGES IN AVERAGE
FEED-EGG RATIO IN PREVIOUS OCTOBER-MARCH


0 20 40
FEED-EGG RATIO, OCTOBER-MARCH
(PERCENTAGE CHANGE FROM PREVIOUS YEAR)


U S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


NEG 32225 BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS


FIGURE 2.- IN A GENERAL WAY, AN INCREASE IN THE FEED-EGG RATIO HAS BEEN FOLLOWED
BY A REDUCTION IN THE HATCH. THE RELATIONSHIP IS NOT PERFECT BECAUSE OF MANY OTHER
CIRCUMSTANCES WHICH MAY INTERVENE. THE 1936-37 FEED-EGG RATIO IS ABOUT 40 PERCENT
GREATER THAN IN 1935-36.









Hatchings

The 1937 hatch is expected to be less than in 1936 largely because
the feed situation is so unfavorable to the poultryman. The exact extent
of this reduction cannot, of course, be foreseen now; many circumstances
may occur to disturb such predications as -may be made.

One basis for estimating the future extent of the hatch is the
report of commercial hatcheries. In January this report showed a reduction
from 1936 of 24 percent in the number of salable chicks hatched. No estimates
are available on c'-.Rnges in farm hatchings.

One of the best measures of what the total 'hatch, farm and corn~ercial,
has been is the number of chicks and young chickens per farm flock on June 1.
Figure 1 shows how these numbers have varied since 1926. Note the peal:
recurring at regular 3-year intervals. The dotted lines indicate the range
within which the 1937 hatch is expected to come. The upper line corresponis
to a reduction from 1C'.3 of 7 percent; the lower line to one of 10 percent.

The feed-egg ratio just prior to and during the early hatching
season greatly affects the size of the hatch. In figure 2 the percentage
chanj-, from .year to year in the October-March feed-egg ratio has been
compared with the percentage change in the hatch for the years 1927-36 and
the average relationship has been indicated by the heavy line. Thus, with
a 40 percent increase in the feed-egg ratio, as seems likely this year,
there is a 7 percent decrease in the hatch. The effects of the many other
circumstances which influence the hatch keep this relationship from being
followed exactly in any one year. Important among these influences in other
years is the price of eggs during the period from October through March.
Since this price will be about the same in 1936-37 as a year earlier, no
effect on the hatch from this source is anticipated.

Poultry marketing

Receipts of dre.-;i poultry in the first half of the year usually
decline to a low in April about 46 percent below the January level. A
seasonal rise begins in late spring. This year receipts at the four marketss
in February declined from the January mark a little less than average(1925-34)
and were 11.7 percent greater than in February 193#.. T'e less-than-averc.ge
decline and the excess over 1936 are both likely to continue until mid-spring
beca-...'e of the large storage stocks, which are partially reflected in receipts,
and because of larger flocks than in 1936. After mid-spring the seasonal rise
is likely to be less than average and receipts are lilkly to be under those
of 1936 because of the probable reduction in the 1937 hatch.


PES-3


- 4 -





PES-3


Receipts of dressed poultry at the four markets, January-June,
average 1925-34, annual 1935-37


Year Jan. : Feb. : Mar. : Apr. : May : June : Jan.-
: : : : : : June
:Million Million Million Million Million Million Million
:pounds pounds pounds pounds pounds pounds ounds pounds
Average
1925-34 .....: 28.5 20.2 17.0 15.4 18.6 21.0 120.7

1935 ......... : 21.0 15.1 12.6 13.5 14.4 18.3 94.9
1936 .......... 19.6 13.7 14.2 14.5 17.9 21.7 101.6
1937 .......... 21.3 15.3



Poultry storage

Storage holdings of poultry decline from a maximum in January 187
million pounds this year to a low point sometime during the summer. By
July 1 the United States stock is usually between 35 million pounds and 55
million pounds. In years when the summer carry-over stock is large it tends
to depress fall poultry prices by weakening the demand to store poultry and by
adding to the fall supply.

At 26 major storage centers, stocks were 141 million pounds on January
2 ,and 122.7illion pounds on February 27. By July 1 these stocks usually average
(1925-34) about 35 million pounds. To keep in line with other years, then, the
stock in the 26 markets would have to be reduced by 106 million pounds in the
period January through June, if it is not to burden the new crop of poultry.
This would be about 74 percent greater than the 1925-34 average out-of-storage
movement. Th- out-movement this February was but 55 percent greater than
average. The';: reduction in storage stocks from January 2 to February 27,
however, has been exactly the 1925-34 average percentage (17.9 percent) of
a total movement by July 1 of 106 million pounds.

Out-of-storage movement of frozen poultry at 26 markets, average
1925-34, annual 1935-37


Year


Average
1925-34


1935 ......:
1936 ......:


:Jan.-
: Feb.
..1.111 i .-'n
:pounds

10.9


19.8
16.2


1937 ...... : 19.0


Jan.-
June
Million
pounds

61

67
50
Will this
be 106?


:Jan.-Feb. as ; Week ending_
: percentage : Mar. : Mar. : Mar. : Mar.
:of 6 mos.total: 6 : 13 : 20 : 27
Million Million Million jillion
Percent pounds pounds pounds pounds


17.9

29.6
32.4


17.9
(of 106)


3.5


4.5 4.5
1.2 2.6
Movement needed


6.4


4.6 4.7

4.3 3.9
3.0 3.7
to clear 106:

8.0 8.2







PES-3 6 -

Chicken prices

The 'seasonal rise in the farm price of chickens is no- well under
way. From "iV-. low point in December the ri ice had risen 7.9 percent by
February 15. The average (1921-30) rise in this period is 6.6 percent. De-
cember, however, was an exceptionally low month and the rice from January 15
has been less than half of average. Tnh seasonal rise usually reaches a
peak in May about 12 percent above the January price corresponding to a
price of 15 cents per 'o-ni this year.

Average price per pound received. for chickens by farmers in the United
States, 1 .th of the month, 19 5-37


Year Jan. : Feb. : Mar. : Apr. : May June : Set. : Dec.

Center Cents C- nts Cents Cent s C Cente Cents

1935 ........: 12.4 -,.L 1)i,2 I. 15.7 15.,6 15.7 l6.T
1936 ........: 16.' i-.9 16.6 16.9 D 1 .6 16.4 14.c 12.b
1937 ........ 13.4 13.,

____A:-era-,e rs.aso.,ai in d:: (s.everae for the leat-r = 1'
Average
1921-30 ...: 94.9 SJ.3 100.0 103.9 105.9 lc5.7 98.5 92.2


In many years this rise is greater or less than 12 percent. While an
average rise this year is by no means unlikely, because receipts are below av-
erage, (thc ..-h above 1936) and consumer incomes are higher than in several pre-
vious years, the effects of tremendous storage stocks make a somewhat less-
than-average rise the more probable occurrence.

In appraisin. the effects of these stocks on prices it oL-rht to be kept
in mind that as evidence of a reduced hatch becomes stronger and more clearlyy
indicative of the extent of this reduction, the price deressini-- tendenrLy of the
storage Aoldlnzs will be less. With a light hatch a larger share of t.e late
sprir.-- and summer poultry consumption must be supplies from storage. This -ill
make it easier to clear stocks for the new season.

If no burdensome storage surplus exists rv mid-s.nmmrr, the lighter hatch
in prospr ct will very likely diminish the extent of the seasonal price decline
in the last half of 1937; if .;onumers' incomes are maintained arov,: those of
1936, the hatch ,a8v result in a Ronrulo of -pri.cvs similar to that of late 1935.







PES-3


Index of national income, excluding agriculture, a-'r --
1925-34, annual 1935-36


Year :- Jan. :. .et,.: Mar. : Apr. : May : June


Oct. : Pec.


Average
1925-34 ...: 91.o


1935 ........ :
1936 ........
1937 ........ ;


73.5
78.6
87.5


90.7 9 2 89.7 89.6 -89.6 ss. ss.9s

75.5 .74.4 72.3 74.4 73.S 74.3 79.9
78.5 81.6 78.7 82.2 83.3 1/87.3 1/97.2


I] Revised from last month.

Laying flock size

The number of hens and pullets of laying age in farm flocks averaged
4.3 percent more on February 1, 1937, than a year earlier. The size of the
laying flock quite regularly declines from a peak in January to a low in
September. With the flock size already much below the 1925-34 average, the
significant feat-are of the current situation is that numbers of layers are
declining more rapidly than usual. Thus, while numbers on February 1 for the
10 years 19Qr-34 averaged a third of one percent below those of January 1,
this decline in 1937 -"as 2 percent.

Average number of laying hens in farm flocks, average 1925-34
annual 1935-37


Jan. 1: Feb. 1


Mar. 1: Apr. 1: May 1 : June 1:

IT ,'r-',--r h.ir',r- NJumber Ii..riL r


Oct. 1: Dec. 1
-T, -- ,


Average
1925-34 ..: 87.5


87.2 s4.7 82.1 77.4 73.4 70.4 81.9


75.8 72.9 69.1
76.7 74.8 70.5


65.1 65.1
66.5 66.9


Rate of egg E',%:i,:

The rate of egg production reported on February 1 was 7 percent greater
than it was a year earlier. In January, it' will be remembered. it w-as at a
record high level for the month and was 15 percent above the previous January.
With weather conditions becoming more nearly normal for this time of the year,
the high feed-egg ratio is forcing the rate of egg production down to 1936
levels. It is likely that this effect will continue so that the rate of egg
production in the spring months will be near the 1925-34 average for those
months.


Year


1935 -
1936 .. .
1937 .. .


78. 3
80.6
84.2


77.6
79.1
82.5


76.6
78.8


- 7 -


:








PES-37


F-'-; lail rer In"'' h:-n an.' pallets of laying ape in farm flocks,
a-.'er.:ge 1? -, annual 1935-37


Year :Jan. 1 :Fet. I :Mar. 1 :Aur. 1 i May 1 :J'une 1 :Oct. 1 :Dec. 1

:. Li-r ir .- : .L r.i cr Eu :r I. .u~: er I.-umter I,.nmber


A- r a,- o
1925-34 ...

1935 ........ .
1936 ........ :
1937 ........ :


R

i.e. 7
1.
L~.


I -. 7


7.3 53.3 55.2 .35 2.1q 12-6.
",'. h.7 5r4. 5 r1.2 25.1 1 ..


E<. mn rk- t in.gs

Receipts of eggs at the four markets in February -ere 20 percent be-
low the February 1925-34 average. Th- lower receipts were due inr part tc. the
greater-than-usual reduction in nrlmbl-rs of layers andi to the les--than-usual
increase in the ratc of production. With the rate of prod-.-'tion likely to
be near average this spring, receipts will tend to move in relation to the
numbeL- of l-.t-rs -- that is, belo-w the i -,_-34 average but above 193,.


Re.ceil-pt of .---- c- frur mark-t -, av.rc-ra. 195-3:4, annual 1935-37


Year : Jan. : Fi-b. : Mar. :


I, ~ 1*~~>~,
mires *-~~is'-


Average :
1925-7L ..... :

1935 ........... :
1936 .......... :
1937 .......... :


a-.
rC.


i .Ui~
1


Jan. Mar.



2,C


: Anr. June



i 1,5
Ca&g'- *

ig


2,S5 1
4q,24


S,12
I1,012


*TE storage stocks

Stora. stocks of eggs are no-v at their low r-oint, of the year. Pela-
tive to other v-. rs, however, they arc nigh because of the unusual storing
in January. If consumers' incomes are maintained atrov.: those of 1936, and
with production likely to be no greater than the 1 ,25-314 average-, the quantity
of eggs stored this season, both in the shell and frozen, will probably not
exceed the average of 12.2 million cases (shell eq- eqAivalcnt) and may be
but little above th.c level of 1936 --. 10.6 million cases.


- 8 -


" .2 33.4 5,.S 5:.1 U .5 2 .0 13.9


,,-)751





PES-3


Cold storage holdin-s of eprs at 16 markets,
average 1?:'7-34, annual 1935-37


Week ending- : Jn.: Jan.: 7cb.: Feb.: F-. : Feb.: Mar.: 1MUr.: ?Mar. : ?ar.
as of 1937 : 2 : 30 : 6 : 13 : 20 : 27 : 6 : 13 : 20: 27
:1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000
:cases cases cases.cases cases c r:e; cases cases cases cases


Ave rare
1925-34..: 787 238 174
1935 .......: .7.S 11 5
1936 .......: 608 109 53
1937 ....... : 554 399 346


123 92 90
4 9 31
15 7 5
305 263 219


153
114
11


278
285
56


462
534
143


709
822
340


A.A.A. !er purchase nroramr

The Agricultural Adjustment Administration' s ecr n-urchasin; program,
beLun January 15, was continued in February. By February 30 some 250,000 cases
had been bought. Durin:- this period, the purchases enounted to about 60 percent
of the excess of receipts in 1937 over 1936, at the three main Eastern markets.
The effect of this pro 7ran upon eor prices cannot, of course, be deter-ined
exactly. Nevertheless, in spite of exceptionally' heavy marketings in January,
prices did not decline by as much as the usual seasonal amount. The basic aim
of the oror-ram, therefore, has been accomplished.

3= prices

The farm price of er-s on February 15 is usually about 18 percent less
than a r.onth earlier. This year the decline was only 13 percent. It will be
remembered, however, that fro:. Dece-ber 15 to January 15 the decline was greater
than usual.

Average price of e-,-s 'er dozen, mixed colors, special packed
at New York, and the United States farr. rice, 1935-37


Year and price: Jan.


Feb.


ar. : A -r.


May : June : Oct.
: !


N. Y. rice:
1935
1936
1937
U. S. farm
rice:
1935
1936
1937


Cents

22.9
27.9
26.5


25.0
22.8
23.1


Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents


31.0
32.6
24.3


25.6
23.8
20.1


24.1 26.6 27.5 26.9
23.5 22.8 23.9 25.1



18.6 20.0 21.4 21.0
17.5 15.8 18.1 18.9


Cents


32.8 32.3
33.5 34.3



27.9 28.7
27.6 30.5


Seasonal index of farm 'rices (avera;'e for year 100)


74.4 723.6 73.7 74.2 118.9 151.2


Dec.


: 125.0 102.0


- 9 -


1921-30








PES-3 10 -

.'hile the lc'line in e nriccz froT: February 15 to the sarinu; level
aver-.eE nihout 2' -n.ircrcnt, th.erc has been little decline in late February;
en it f'trt: r r.'-, is rot cT-Cccted. t... carr.; -rices below those of the sarin- of
13.36. In .':in this ,c-lut atin :f tnhe situr.tion, fo'r factors oa-ht to be
note. t c th re ceint: .tnl consirner' s incn:..es d-rin this -eriod *vill .Drobably
be near --ere (lJCS-4)_ th:'ough b:ovc l-t ,ye-r, and thereby cause the seasonal
decline t bc: b.. t crn c. Or, the thr i'L-nd, the effect of thec relatively
rrnfit:tle stA: r, e sea'con ju-.t closing 'ill be to preventt so treat a decline,
since the de.n.n to store iil be stren_:thenct.. Also acting to kee- prices up
is the rs'-c'ctive reacticn in the ha-tch, since a licht hatch '.iens that a
lar-er sh.-re of fall r-. winterr c.e-- c.-nsrisuption -.iust be supplied from storage.

The extent of this re-laction in hItcI -7ill be -n inCortant influence on
e- n"rice? next ':inter and in t..e s-rini of 19J7. Layin flocc!s are no-.- below
.nver--e for thick tie of year. Sach 7- reduction in the hatch as no"r seeans
likely -. -, therefore, result in rel.ativel;; hi- prices in early 1338 '-hen eCrs
fr,'. '..i cr-;, o*f bullets '.'ill -e an i.in:ort-,nt source o f supply.


SUPLE EiETA.Y DATA


T'blc 1.- iL.:.uer of rhic'.: -n- ,' un- chickens
June 1, l' C-.6


aer forr.' floc:,


Yc0r Ir.ter Year -i-nber


23 : 141.7 1: 32 : 130.6
-? : 14 .3 13:: 3 : 133.7
IL-' : 13.7.2 12'34 124.4
Ir17 : 1-3. 3:: 1325 1: 3.6
1 ', : 145.7 1936 : 13.0
121 : 12 7.3



Tn.ble z.- Aver? e feed-e,-- rrrtii, October-oIrch
1325-2 to 1135-36

Ye-r : zen Year : Dozen


if'1p-26
12:26-?7
i1[,7-[ -%

1i23-29
?~S-


4.59
4.54
5.10

4.70,
5.71


1 31-32
1932-33
1933-34
1934-25
1935-3E


4..36
2.32
5.14
c. 42
4.83







PES-3


Table 3.- United States cold storage stocks of eggs, August 1,1916-36


: Shell eggs

: 1,000 cases


r: rz.n eggs
: (shell egg
: equivalent)
1,000 cases


6,060
6,895
6,568
7,850
6,872
7,605
10,161
10,509
9,267
10,024
9,845
10,746
10,496
8,962
11,198
9,504
6,431
9,507
n ,961
7,947
7,335


166
440
435
544
573
799
796
1,034
1,005
1,224
1,480
2,326
2,333
2,614
3,322
3,277
2,832
3,076
3,473
3,322
3,300


Ye ar


Copies of "Agricultural Statistics, 1936" Available


A limited number of copies of "Agricultural Statistics,
1936" are still available. This 420-page printed volume
contains statistics which cover practically all of the import-
ant farm products of the United States. The statistics
relate to acreage, production, farm price, farm value, and
foreign trade of the principal commodities. Copies may be
obtained from the Superintendent of Documents, Government
Printing Office, Washington, D. C., at 50 cents each.


L _.,.... _.______


: Total

1,000 cases

6,226
7,335
7,003
8,394
7,445
8,404
10,957
11,543
10,272
11,248
11,325
13,072
12,829
11,576
14,520
12,761
9,263
12,583
12,434
11,269
lo0,635


1916
1917
1918
1919
1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928
1929
1930
1931
19/32
1933
1934
1935
1936


-11-




uNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
1 3ijIIl IIIII lII II ll3 9 U9i I
3 1262 08903 9639









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* -Ai