Poultry and egg situation

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Material Information

Title:
Poultry and egg situation
Physical Description:
v. : ; 26 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economic Research Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service
Publisher:
The Bureau
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Creation Date:
May 1953
Frequency:
quarterly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Poultry industry -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Egg trade -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Citation/Reference:
Bibliography of agriculture
Citation/Reference:
Predicasts
Citation/Reference:
American statistics index
Citation/Reference:
Index to U.S. government periodicals
Statement of Responsibility:
Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with PES 1 (Jan. 1937); ceased with PES-308 (Dec. 1980).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: Agricultural Marketing Service, Dec. 1953-Mar. 1961; Economic Research Service, May 1961-Dec. 1977; and: Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service, Mar. 1978-Dec. 1980.
General Note:
Cover title.
General Note:
Description based on: PES-301 (Mar. 1979).
General Note:
Previously classed: A 93.20: and A 88.15/2:

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000502977
oclc - 04506769
notis - ACS2711
lccn - 79643440 //r81
issn - 0032-5708
sobekcm - AA00005304_00010
Classification:
lcc - HD9437.U6 A33
ddc - 338.1/7/6500973
System ID:
AA00005304:00010

Related Items

Succeeded by:
Poultry and egg outlook & situation

Full Text

'C.'



I..


Farmers produced a record-large turkey crop in
1952. The resulting abundant supply was a factor re-
ducing the 1952 price 10 percent below 1951. As a
result of the lower price, farmers' gross income
from the larger crop was about 1 percent below that


from the preceding smaller crop. Besides receiving
lower returns, producers incurred increased produc-
tion costs on account of the larger quantities of feed
and supplies necessary to raise the larger number
of birds.


FARM INCOME FROM TURKEYS
Number Raised, Price, and Gross Income, 1951 and 1952

ALTHOUGH 15% MORE
WERE RAISED IN 1952...

S I525MlL ,,,... ...'..' :. .." M L60 4 M I L.:
... .. .
'51 '52 --
THE PRICE TO FARMERS
WAS 10% LESS...

37.44 PER LB. ,
S\33.69 PER LB.
'51 '52
AND GROSS INCOME WAS
DOWN $4,000,000 (1.2%)
$345 MIL.
$341 MIL.
'51 '52
U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE NEG. 49164 -X BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS


FOR RELEASE
JUNE 10, P.M.






MHA-JUNE 1953


S POERY AND ID SITUATION AT A GLMAE


: | : : : aI: I I
2 : Month 9V Ae' ar 1952 1953 Coe ats G
Itm : nit : o r 4-1952 :1953 : or192-51 A v1r3 s u antin
: I data -. date
______________; ______ ; ; ; *** ____ i ---- i ---- 5 ---- i----------


Fear production ........ Mil. doz.

Average number of
layered ao farm ....... NMilllons

Monthly egg production
per layer ............... Esse

Apparent oivillan per
capital disappearance .. Eggs

Frozen egg production .. Mil. lb.

Dried egg production ...2 Nil. lb.

Price received by
farmsrs ............... Ct.per doz.:

Price received by
farmrs as a percent-

agg-feed price ratio ... Lb. feoed

Stocks::

hell ................ ous.cases:

Frozen ............... 1il. lb.

Chicks hatched by am-
imrolal hataheries ...... mllleons

Young chlckene on
farms ................. 111i.Le :

Warm prie of poultry
ratia ................:Dol.per oat:





Price received by farm-
ers for chickens, live
Brollore .............. :Ct. per lb.:
Farm chicken ........ Ct. per lb.:
All chickens .......... :Ct. per lb.:


Price received by fara-
ere for all obickens as a
a percentage of parity .2

Price received by
fare for turkseye,
live ................... C1

Stocks:

Poultry, exalnae :
turkeys .............

Turkey ..............

Warm chicken-feed price
ratio .................
Turkey-feed price ratio

Average weekly place-
aent of ohok n :in
11 broiler areas ......:


Percent :



L. per lb.:




Nil. lb.

Nil. lb.


Lb. feed:

Lb. feed


es:


]DGS

Mar. 525.1 532.2 524.8 : Apr.
2:

Mar. 379.7 360.3 351.1 Apr.


Mar. 16.6 17.7 17.9 Apr.


Mar. 36.6 38.9 38.3 :: Apr.

Mar. 65.7 51.6 61.1 "I Apr.
:.2
Mar. 15.1 2.3 2.1 z Apr.


Apr. 35.0 35.2 )5.5 M::



Apr. 97 80 110 :l May
:2
Apr. 10.7 8.3 11.5 :: May

:2

Apr. 1 1,880 1,596 375 :: May 1
:l
Apr. 1 111.8 8h.3 65.2 I2 May 1
:l
Mar. 261.2 292.5 289 :: Apr.
:l

Apr. I --- 217.8 215.2 :: May 1
:2

Apr. 3.33 14.2h 3.91 :: May


FODLUT




Apr. 30.0 27.1 28.1 :: May
Apr. 26.0 21.0 25.1 :: May
Apr. 27.8 26.2 27.2 : May
::


Apr. 111 85 89 : ay


Apr. 31.8 3h.5 33.3 :: ty




Apr. 1 111.6 139.5 81.8 :: May 1

Apr. 1 67.3 93.1 92.. :2 Hay 1


Apr. 8.0 5.7 6.4 :: Hay

Apr. 9.7 8.1 8.5 :: may


Apr. --- 13.1 111.3 i M1ay I/
________________ f


531.9 512.2 507.8 Declining from season peak


362.1 31h.7 336.11


17.7 18.0 18.1 1


33.3 36.9 35.1

77.1 55.0 61.8 Exceeding 1952, but stocks
are lover
16.5 2.3 2.1


35.5 34,.2 15.9 )
:)
2)
:) Continuing favorable to
97 78 109 :) producers
:)
10.7 8.1 11.7 :)


3,690 2,181 827 :) Season peak for frozen my
:) be about the same as 1952,
164.1 111.2 97.3 :) but shell will remain be-
low last year

312.3 289.8 301.9 : The Increases to May 1 were
: evidently for broilers
--- 381.5 379.9 :


3.37 1.23 3.92 : Declining




:


30.0 25.3 27.2 : ) ill be influenced by large
25.7 22.5 25.1 : ) broiler supplies, season-
27.3 21.1 26.5 : ) ally increasing rketings
: of farm chickens


111 75 86 :


30.7 32.0 32.5 :



85.8 122.5 67.7 : Low

54.1 72.5 72.8 : Slnace April 1, about the eam
: an a year earlier

7.8 5.3 6.1 1

9.3 7.6 8.3


--- 12.3 14.0 :


/ Average for first three weeks of month.

Note: Data regarding retail prices, formerly published on this page, are not presently available. If they again become available,
or if a substitute series is chosen for The Poultry and Situation, the data will again be published on this page.


- 2 -





PES-165


THE P 0-U-LT F Y A' D EGG S I TUATI O N
J -- -> -_ -1 -

Approved by the Outlook and Situation Board, June 3, 1953


SUMMARY

The spring-time hatching season for laying flock replacement is
drawing to a close, with indications that the replacement hatch in May
and later will exceed last year. Through April, output of replacement
chicks was about the same as a year earlier, despite higher egg prices
received by farmers ana lower feed costs.

In recent years, increases in the profitability of egg produc-
tion from one hatching season t.- another have invariably resulted in
increases in the number of chickens raised. An increase also is likely
this year but it will be apparent only in the late-season hatch and will
be much smaller than would have been expected on the basis of the 24 per-
cent increase over the previous year in the weighted egg-feed price ratio.

With fewer layers on farms, egg-production so far this year has
been running a little below a year earlier. This summer and fall monthly
egg production probably will exceed a year earlier if the tend toward
increased rates of lay in those seasons continues. Any increase in
chickens raised for flock replacement this year is not likely to affect
egg production until the last month or two of 1953, since the expected
gain in chickens raised will occur late in the hatching season.

If increases from last summer and fall in rate of lay materialize,
the gain in egg production could be almost as large as the decline from
1952 in the supply of eggs held in cold storage. On May 30, stocks of
shell eggs in 35 cities were less than 1 million cases, the lowest on
reeordLfor-the date and 1.4 million case, less than a year earlier. Stocks
of. frozen egg in 35 cities were -equivalent to 1.9 million cases, 0.3 million
cases.lees than a year before.

Current marketing of commercial broilers are large, reflecting
the near-record chick placements made in specialized broiler areas
2 1/2 month ago. More recent chick placements indicate that supplies
of broilers will continue large, at least into early August. By then,
sales of broilers from specialized flocks will be competing with season-
ally increasing supplies of farm-produced chickens which are a byproduct
of egg production and the rearing of replacement layers.

Turkey production in 1953 will be-smaller than 1952's record crop
of 60 million birds. Reports from hatcheries indicate that for heavy
breeds the output will be reduced about as much as the 12 to 15 percent
reduction recommended earlier in the season by a Government-sponsored
industry conference. For turkeys of the lighter breeds, the cut so far
is greater than that reported for turkeys of the large breeds.


- 3 -





MAY-JUNE 1953


This issue of The Poultry and Egg Situation.includes a summary of
1952 poultry and egg output, prices and income. In general, 1952 was a
much less favorable year for poultrymen than 1951. To date, 1953 is prom-
ising, and gross income for the year from eggs and poultry is likely to
exceed the 1951 record of 4.0 billion'dollars.

This issue also includes a discussion of U. S. foreign trade in
eggs and poultry. Commercial exports and imports in peacetime have usually
been less than 1 percent of the annual U. S. production of these co.mmodi-
ties.

SITUATION AND OUTLOOK

Small Increase Over 1952
Expected in Chickens Raised

Young chickens on farms May 1, 1953, numbered about the same ap a
year earlier. Although there is likely to be an increase in the number
of chickens raised for laying flock replacement before the end of the 1953
hatching season, it will not approach the' gain that would normally have
been expected from the 24 percent increase to date over a year earlier in
the weighted egg-feed price ratio. In view of the favorable price rela-
tionships, the small increase this year is unprecedented. In the pasts
spring-time egg-feed price ratios as favorable as those of this spring
had resulted in substantial increases over the year before in the number
of chickens raised for laying flock replacement.

On May 1, the number of eggs in incubators was 10 percent above a
year earlier, thus indicating a larger hatch than last year for the first
3 weeks of May. May usually is the third largest month of the year for
chick hatchings, being exceeded by April and March. The increase in eggs
in incubators includes eggs set in broiler areas, where the gain is 25 per-
cent over a year earlier. Thus, the increase to be expected in the output
of chicks of egg-laying strains during the first 3 weeks of May is smaller
than indicated by changes in the total number of eggs in incubators on the
first of the month.

Even if a 10 percent increase in May hatchery output were fully re-
flected in the number of replacement chicks available, it would increase
the total number of chickens raised this spring by a much. smaller percent-
age. In 1951 and 1952, May output of replacement chicks averaged about
20 percent of the seasons total. On that basis, a 10 percent gain in May
would increase the season's total 2 percent. In 1951 and 1952, the hatch-
ings in June and July together were 9 percent of the season total for lay-
ing flock replacement. In view of the prospective late hatch this year
there probably will be an increase in the production of replacement chicks
in May, June and July, compared with the corresponding monthly output in
1952; but the percentage increases for the respective months will result
in a considerably smaller percentage increase for the season as a whole.


- 4 -





PES-165


Table 1.- Chicks:
purposes,
chickens


Production, presumed distribution between broilers and other
and relation'to numbers of young chlicens on farms and
raised, monthly for January through June, 1951 to date


: : : : Presumed number
: Produc-:Reported:Presumed: of chicks for


tion of: broiler: total
chicks : place- :commer-
Month : in com-: ments : cial
: mercial: in :broiler
hatch- :special.: place-
eries. : sized ments
:_ :areas 1/: 2/
Million Million Million


other (than
:broiler) purposes
: 33/
Total : Cumu-
for the: lative
: month: for the
month .
l: M oyear
Million Million


: Young chickens on
farms, first day of :
9 Number
following month of
: : As a per- :(
: : centage of :chickens
Number : cumulative : for the
: : number of :
: non-broiler: season
: : chicks :
Million Percent Million


566


88
98
102
88
85
82
75

618


90
83
100
97


*1951
28 28
88 116
185 301
230 531
181 712
60 772
25 797

797

1952
34 34
92 126
190 316
202. 518
131 649
35 684
10 694

694

1953
37 37
90 127
189 316
205 521


201
406
523
508


218
382
485.
463


67
76
73
66


* 69
74
75
68


663
4/(83)


617
4/(89)


Jan.
Feb.
Mar.
Apr.
May
June
July
7-month
total


Jan.
Feb.
Mar.
Apr.
May
June
July
7-month
total


Jan.
Feb.
Mar.
Apr.
May
June
July


1/ 1951 and 1952, 11 specialized areas; 1953, 12 areas (including W. Conn. and
Maine).
2/ Placements in specialized areas were presumed to be 60 percent of the total
broiler placements.
3/ Without allowance for variations in chicks destroyed, in number for non-farm
(backyard) rearing, or farm-hatched chicks.
4/ In parentheses; chickens raised as a percentage of presumed number of chicks
for laying flock replacement (before allowance for chickens raised for non-farm
flocks).


96
161
270
317
271
: 143
105

: 1,363


122
190
292
290
216
117
85

1,312


127
173
289
302


215
380


371


54
50
60
58


- 5 -





MAY-JU'NE 1953


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* .......................... .... ....................... .... .......

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- 6 -


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PES -165


Thtbl 3. Indicators of the June output of chicks from
S...mercisal hatcheries, 19.40 to date


: Orders booked : Eggs in
Maj 1 for : 1-ncubators
Year : June delivery, June 1, per-
percentage of : centage of
previouss iear previouss year
: Percent Percent


1940.
1941
1942
1943
1944


1945
1946
1947
1948
1949


1950
1951
1952
1953


83
184
115
255
45

231
37
103
100
15.4

57
157
94
127 ,


110
183
105
135
51

160
27
165
100
141


136
81


: Chicks hatched in June

: Percentage of :
* Number.
previous year
Percent Millions


106
157
97
162
?8

245
36
136
102
126


136
82


79.5
*1?4.7
-121.6
'197.5
75.0

183:7
66.3
90.7
*92.7
116.7

104.7
142,9
116.6


The response of poultrymen to date is more restrained than would
have been expected on the basis of egg-feed price relationships. In- the
past, the numbers of chickens raised have been reponsive to-the egg-feed
price- ratios during the months when farmers normally plan for the coming
production year. Of course, the existence, of favorable relationships
at.hatching time offered farmers no positive assurance-that similar relation-
ships would prevail at marketing time, so such responses were not necessarily
well-advised. However, in the past, the responses occurred., and-were
remarkably consistent.

Farmers reported .intentions to reduce by 4 percent the number 'of
chickens to be raised in 1953 compared with the previous year.- The inten-
tion was expressed in the first few days of February when the egg-feed
ratio was already more favorable than a year earlier. But farmers could
have felt that egg prices at that time had not yet taken their -full seasonal
drop, and-that lower prices were in prospect. Since February, however,
egg prices have been appreciably higher than last year--often-10 cents or
more per dozen higher--and the egg-feed price ratio in most- of those months
has been more than one-third higher than 12 months earlier. .These favorable
changes from a year earlier have resulted in only a modest change from
farmers' February intentions. Cn the basis of past experience, an increase
of 10 percent or more for-the season as a whole would have been expected.


- 7 -


i





MAY-JUNE 1953


No particular reason is clearly apparent to explain why farmers'
behavior with respect to laying flock replacement is different this year
than it has been in the past. One possible explanation is that it may
have been March before farmers became firmly convinced that egg prices
would hold at favorable levels. At that time it was too late to increase
chick output except for late in the season.

Decline Seen for 1953
Turkey Production

Fewer turkeys will be raised in the United States in 1953 than in
1952. For heavy turkeys, of which there was a surplus in 1952, the reduc-
tion is likely to be within the 12-15 percent range recommended by an
industry committee which was called to Washington by the Secretary of
Agriculture. For light-weight turkeys, the decline to date has been even
sharper than that for the heavy breeds.

A special turkey survey, made by the Bureau of Agricultural Eco-
nomics, found that to May 1 the output of poults of heavy breeds in 14
important producing States was 16 percent below a year earlier. For poults
of light weight breeds, the reduction was 28 percent. The average reduc-
tion for all breeds was 19 percent.

The Bureau's regular survey, covering the entire U. S. but not dif-
ferentiating among breeds, reported that poults hatched from the beginning
of the season to May 1 had been 17 percent fewer this year than last.

For the 14 States (which are listed in table 4), the May 1 survey
found 11 percent fewer eggs of large turkeys, and 13 percent fewer eggs of
small turkeys, under incubation than a year earlier. The average reduction
from last year in the number of eggs in incubators May 1 was 11 percent in
the 14 States, 7 percent in the U. S.

The turkey eggs in incubators May 1 governed poult output through
almost all of May, since the incubation period is 28 days. In recent
years, about three-quarters of the poults have been hatched by June 1.
Therefore, it seems clear that a reduction in line with the industry con-
ference's recommendation will be achieved. For light-weight turkeys, the
likely cut for the year is difficult to estimate so early in the season
because their hatchings do not taper off so sharply after June as do those
of the large breeds.

The likely change from last year in poult production through late
May can be indicated by assuming normal hatchability rates for the eggs
in incubators May 1, and adding the resultant prospective poults to the
actual hatchings already reported. On this basis, through late May the
reduction for heavy breeds in 14 States is 15 percent and for light breeds
25 percent. The average is 17 percent.


- 8 -





PES-165 9 -

Table 4.- Turkey hatchery operations as of May 1, 1953, and projection
to late May, 14 selected States l/ and U. S. 2/

S_ (all data as percentages of corresponding 1952 figures)
: : TProjection of poult
Poults hatched to : Eggs in incubators eton of poult
May 1, 1953 May 1, 193 : output to late May
State : "a 1 1: Ma 11 : 1953
: Heavy : Light :Total : Heavy : Light : Total: Heavy: Light: Total
:breeds :breeds : :breeds :breeds : :breeds:breeds:
: Per- Per- Per- ?er- Per- Per- Per- Per- Per-
: cent cent cent cent cent cent cent cent cent


SPennsylvania

Ohio

Michigan

.Minnesota

.Nebraska

'.Virginia

:.South Carolina

Washington

p:regon

.California

Others 3/

Total 14 States:

United States


78 79 78
88 140 96

83 150 94

81 140 90

86 28 853

50 64 60

83 40 70

91 71 83

69- 83 70'

90 39 81

91 79 90

84 72 81

-- -- 83


81 75 90

90 84 89

90 51 86

88 118 93

95 70 94

69 81 75

79 77 78

108 93 104

88 77 88

.90 82 89

96 98 96

89 87 89
--- --- 93


!/ Based on BAE Special Poult Production Report, May 12, 1953.

2/ Based on BAE report of Hatchery Production, May 15, 1953.

3/ Missouri, Iowa, Texas, and Kentucky.


79
89

86

83

89

58

82

97

73

90

93

85


78

117

124

133

43

68

48

78

82

44

84

75


79

93

91

91

88.

64

72

91

74

33

92

83





MAY-JUNE 1953


- 10 -


In addition to current production, the amount of turkey in storage
will have an important bearing upon the turkey prices next fall. The
storage holdings from the 1952 crop were record large, exceeding the
comparable holdings from the 1951 crop by 23 percent. The "commercial"
stocks on February 1 were not record large, however, since the total in-
cludedl8 million pounds held for delivery to the surplus-removal program
of the Department of Agriculture,

In February and :larch 1953 the net out-movement of turkeys from
storage averaged 25 million pounds per month, against 11.5 million in those
months of 1952. The February and March out-movements included 14 and 4 mil-
lion pounds respectively of USDA turkeys. By April 1, 1953, with USDA
turkeys consumed, the storage holdings were about at the corresponding 1952
level.

During April, stored turkeys were used at about the same rate as in
April 1952. Consequently May 1 stocks also were about the same as a year
earlier. If the rate of use of stored turkeys for the next 3 months sig-
nificantly exceeds the 1952 disappearance, the price outlook for producers
of turkeys will be considerably improved. But if September 1, 1953 ioldlngs
are at the high 1952 level, prices may be held below the levels that might
otherwise have been expected from the reduced turkey crop. This .is because
the existence of large stocks of 1952 turkeys would under-cut the current
market for birds of the 1953 crop. For the 1953 crop, the demand for
storage will likely be smaller than last year.

Turkeys recently sold to consumers have competed with beef at rela-
tively low prices, and pork at relatively high prices. A year ago the
price situation for the 2 red meats was reversed. As is usual at this
season, the stored holdings of 1952 turkey are now competing with breeder
hens being slaughtered as the hatching season draws to a close.

Broiler Marketings to Continue Large
Through the Summer

Broiler marketing in May and early June were large, reflecting the
placements of broiler chicks in late February and March. The weekly rate
in 14 reporting areas in February and March averaged 13.8 million chicks,
slightly smaller than the large placements a year earlier. The 1952 place-
ments resulted in a marketing glut in May of that year, with farmers selling
broilers as low as 18 cents per pound in Texas and Arkansas.

No such glut has occurred this year. While May prices for broilers
were slightly lower than earlier in the year, they did not repeat the
extremely low levels of a year ago.

On May 1, 1952, cold storage holdings of chicken (total poultry
minus turkeys and ducks) were 119 million pounds. On May 1 this year the
figure was only 66 million pounds. The difference is equivalent to a
third of a pound per capital. Some market observers during May commented
upon the scarcity of frozen fowl available for sale,





PES-165


- 11 -


Storage holdings of chicken on May 1, 1953 were slightly below
the season-low of 1951 (66 million pounds; July 1) and well under the
1952 season low of 84 million pounds on September 1. Storage stocks of
chicken normally decline until mid-year or thereafter, then increase as
the marketing of farm-produced chicken rise seasonally.

The expected seasonal increase in marketing of farm chickens,
especially young birds ready for sale about July and thereafter, will
come at a time when supplies of commercial broilers will still be large.
Through early June, placements in 14 reporting areas have continued near
the 14-million-per-week level, and eggs in incubators at the beginning
of the month suggested that the same rate might be sustained for 3 weeks
longer. This would assure large marketing of broilers to early Septemter.

Egg Output Laps Behind 1952;
Partial Recovery Likely
After Mid-Summer

Egg production in 1953, to May 1, was 1.7 percent, or roughly
1.1 million cases, below the corresponding 1952 output. Factors in the
decline were the 3 percent fewer potential layers on farms at the begin-
ning of 1953 than in 1952, and the 1 percent fewer layers on hand May 1,
1953, than a year earlier. On the other hand, the January-April rate of
lay was 1 percent above last year.

The reduction in supplies has been reflected in higher egg prices
than last year, and In a smaller accumulation of shell and frozen eggs in
storage. Egg prices received by farmers averaged 35.7 cents per dozen in
January-May 1952, and 44.8 cents in the same month of 1953.

Stored stocks of eggs this year are small, particularly shell eggs.
In 35 cities, May 30 stocks this year were 950 thousand cases, against
2,333 thousand a year earlier. Holdings of frozen egg were less sharply
below 1952, at 75 million pounds this year against 85 million last year.

From the beginning of the year to May 1, for the U. S. the net
accumulation of shell and frozen eggs in storage was equivalent to 1.9 mil-
lion cases, 1.3 million less than the corresponding 1952 figure. With
storage declining more than production, total civilian disappearance of
eggs in January-April was a little larger than in that period last year.
In view of the increase in population, however, the January-April per
capital disappearance declined 3 eggs to 145 eggs per person.

Beginning early in the summer, monthly egg production on farms is
likely to exceed last year. The number of layers on hand is likely to
continue about 1 or 2 percent below a year earlier until early fall.. But
from July on, increases in the rate of lay, if summer temperatures and
other factors are normal, are likely to more than offset the reduction in
the number of layers. If the rate of lay increases in lihe with the year-
to-year trend, egg production in the last half of the year- may be up enough
from a year earlier to nearly offset thq drop in the first part of 1953.




MAY-JU!E 1953 12"-

During May et-'- pricess in' te3.minal 'markets weakened temporarily, and
movement into storage picked up considerably. This suggests that for the
next few weeks demand for storage will continue to provide a strong backlog
which will limit any possible 'price dips that ma;,' .ccur before the normal
seasonal price rise occurs in the summer.

In June last year, egg prices rose rapidly because hot weather re-
duced the rate of 'lay, and at the same time had more than the usual seasonal
*effects"ii reducing the proportion of the egg supply that was of top quality.
Assuming more: nearly normal temperatures this summer the eLR price rise
should be less abrupt.

The amount of the total rise from'spring t.. fall might not to so
great as the 18 cent rise last year from March to Novenboer in egg prices
received by farmers. The reason for the expectation of a smaller total
seasonal price rise is that supplies of fresh eggs in.the fall will likely
exceed those of last fall, contrasting with a smaller production this spring
than a year earlier. The smaller seasonal rise that is expected will likely
bring fall egg prices to a level fully as 'high as or h ijher than in 1952.

Frozen Egg: Stocks Be lw 192,
Prices Sharply Higher Except for Yolk

The prices of mixed whole frozen egg in April end May, which normally
are near the season's low point, averaged higher than in any month in the
.previous year. The May average in New York of 39.2 cent:; por pound com-
pared with 29.35 cents inMay 1952, 38.1 cents in May 195', end a 1952 monthly
high of -35.1 cents in December.

The current price of frozen albumen is about double the price last
spring,"but below the 1952' peak. The relationship between albumen and
mixed whole egg prices changed drastically during 1952, with albumen prices
'rising from 62 percent of the value per pound of mixed whole In March and
'April, to 108 percent of the value of whole in January 1953. In May, albu-
men, at 33.8. cents per pound, was valued at 86 percent o' the price oif mixed
whole,

Present prices of yolk (4h percent solids) are only slightly higher
than a year ago. The average for May was 55.8 cents per pound, against
51.8 cents in May 1952. From May 1952 to January 193l the trend of yolk
prices was downward, with January averaging 46.5 cents.

Table 5 shows that the indicated disappearance of liquid and frozen
egg so far this year has been ahead of 1952 by a slightly wider margin
than production of those products. Also, 1953 opened with smaller storage
stocks than were available January 1, 1952. The result is apparent -In
the smaller storage' stocks on hand: Maby 1. Unless the stocks are supple-
mented by a substantially larger output than last year in the remaining
month or so of heavy production of eggs, peak stocks will be insufficient
to support a continuation of the recent monthly rates of use, unless (a)
there is more out-of-season breaking than usual, or (b) end-if-season
inventories are reduced considerably below the level of recent years.




PIS-165


Table 5.- Frozen and liquid egg: Production,. storage tooak(skdnappearance,
and mice, monthly, January 1951 to date


Production : Stocks : Presumed : Ave
S : Total : Total : :disappearance:: Ne
: : net, : re- : Net :net production:
Month : Total : Dried :for use :pted :'change of liquid
liquid: egg : as : bbS te ing and frozen : Mixed
egg : / :liquid: ning : on: egg adjusted : whole
or : of : : for changes :
frozen.: month : : in stocks :


rage price in
vw York Citv


Yolk Albumn


MillionMillion Million Million
pounds pounds pounds pounds


.:Million
:pounds

1951 :
Jan. : 22.7
Feb. : 34.7
Mar. : 77.0
Apr. : 83.7
May : 87.5
June : 49.6
July : 22.5
Aug. : 13.7
Sept..: 7.6
Oct. : 4.3
Nov. 3.1
Deo, : 2.3

1952 ,
Jan. : ..22.0
Feb. : 46.5
Mar. : 62.7
AprI : 63.5
May 71.1
June : 47.9
July : 21.8
Aug. : 12.1
Sept. : 11.0
Oct. : 7.0
Nov. : 6.0
Dec. : 6.6

1953
Jan. : 20.5
Feb. 4: 5.3
Mar.q : 71.7
Ar.- : 70.6
May


21.1
33.3
76.0
80,6
84.5
47.2
21.2
12.3
5.5
2.1
1.5



21.4
45.o
59.8
61.1
68.9
46.0
19.1
8.2
5.7
4.2
1.7
5.0


19.9
44.6
70.5
68..9
97, 3


47.3
31.2
32.7
62.3
109.3
162.7
190.0
190.8.
176.3
151.3
121.6
95.1


67.2
53.1.
60.6
84.3.
111.2
145.9
166.4
163.4
144.3
123.7
95.3
72.5


50.2
35.0
42.4.
65.2


-16.2
1.6
29.6
47.0
53.4
27.3
0.8
U14.5
-25.0
-29.7
-26.4
-27.9


-14.1
7.5
23.7
26.9
34.7
20.6
-3.1
-19.0
-20.7
-28.3
-22.9
-22.3


-15.2
7.4
22.8
32.1


Million
*pounds


37.3
31.7
. 46.4
. 33.6.
. 31.1.
. 19.9.
20.4.
26.8.
30.5
31.8
. 27.9.
27.9.


35.5
37.5
36.1
34.2
34.2
25.4
22.2
27.2
26.4
32.5
24.6
27.3


35.1
37.2
47.7.
. 36.8


Cents Cents Cents


34.7
34.6
35.8
36.3
36.1
36.8
36.4
36.4
36.5
36.5
35.5
35.5


33.0
29.0
28.2
28.8
29.3
30.7
32.7
32.8
31. 4
31.0
33.1
35.1


32.8
35.0
36.9
38.2
39.2


55.0
55.5
56.9.
56.8
61.1.
61.7
61.4
61.0.
60.5-
60.6.
61.0
61.4


60.2
50.9
51.2
52.4
51.8
50.6
51.5
53.0
52.1
51.2
47.8
46.6


46.5
47.1
50.1
52.2
55,8


21.5
22.8
25.6
25.5
26.6
25.2
24.6
24.8
24.6
25.9
26.0
27.9


25.0
20.2
17.4
17.6
19.4
22.7
3/31.9
30.9
29.5
30.6
33.1
34.7


35.3
34.3
32.3
32.6
33.8


Liquid weight of eggs dried.
2 LAes than 0.5 thousand pounds.
3/ Carlots not quoted. Price given


1.6
1.4
1.0
3.0
3.0
2.4
1.4
1.3
2.1
2.2
1.6
2.3


0.7
1.5
2.8
2.4
2.1
1.9
2.7
4.0
5.3
2.8
4.3
1.6


0.6
,7
1.2
1.7


is L.O.L.


.... N--


------~ ----


_ I "


I


--


- 13 -





MAY-JUME 1953


Table 6 .- Frozen egg: Prices of yolk, albumen, and mixed whole egg,
New York City, and values of the yield from 1 case of
shell eggs, by months, January 1951 to date


Separated yolk and albumen


: Frozen whole :


: Albumen : Combined :
Ydlk Albumen ^^ ;
: o _: : value :
: Value .: : Value : of 17.36 :
:Price: of ':Pries: of :pounds yolk:Price:
: per : .17.36 : per : 21.36 :and 21.36 : per
:pound: pounds :pound:ounds : pounds :pound:
: /: I/ : I/ : albumen 1/:
:Cents Dollars Cents Dollars Dollars Cents


g6
Value
of :
38.72
pounds :

Dollars


Greater value
of separated
components
of 1 case of
eggs over
equivalent
of whole egg

Dollars


21.5. 4.59
22.8. 4.87
25.6 5.47
25.5. 5,45
26.6. 5.68
25.2 5.38
24.6. 5.25
24.8 5.30
24.6 5.25
25.9 5.53
26.0 5.55
27.9 5.96


1951
Jan.
Feb. '
Mar.
Apr.
May
June
July
Aug.
Sept.
Oct.
Nov.
Dec.

1952
Jan.
Feb.
Mar.
Apr.
May
June
July
Aug.
Sept.
Oct.
Nov.
Dec.

1953
Jan.
Feb.
Mar.
Apr.
May .


9.55
9.63
9.88
9.86
10.61
10,71
10.66
10.59
10.50
10.52
10.59
10.66


10.45
8.84
8.89
9.10
8.99
8.78
8.94
9.20
9.04
8.89
8.30
8.09


8.07
8.18
8.70
9. 06
9.69


14.14
14.50
15.35.
15.31
. 16.29
* 16.09
15.91
15.89-
15.75
S16.05
16.14
16.62


15.79
13.15
12.61
12.86
13.13
13.63
15.75
15.80
15.34
15.43
15.37.
15.50


S15.61 :
15.51; J
15.60
16.02
16.91


These quantities are the average yield from 1
breaking operations.
Average for weeks ending on specified, dates.
Carlots not quoted. Price given is L.C.L.


case of shell eggs


in spring-


Month


25.0
20.2
17.4
17.6
19.4
22.7
3/31.9
30.9
29.5
30.6
33.1
34.7


35.3
34.3
32.2
32.6
33.8


55.0
55.5
56.9
56.8
61.1
61-.7
61.4
61.0
60.5
60.6
61.0
61.4


: 8
60.2
:50.9
: 51.2
: 52.4
: 51.8
: 50.6
: 51.5
53.0
: 52.1
51.2
47.8
46.6


46.5
47.1
50.1
52.2
55.8


5.34
4.31
3.72
3.76
4.14
4.85
6.81
6.60
6.30
6.54
7.07
7.41


7.54
7.33
6.90
6.96
7.22


34.7,
34.6
35.8
36.3
38,1
36,8.
36.4.
36..4
36.5
36.5
35.5
35.5


33.0
29.0
28.2
28.8
29.3
30,7
32.7
32..8
31.4
31.0
33.1
35.1


32.8.
35.0
36,9.
38.2
39.2


13.44
13.40
13.86
14.06
14.75
14.25
14.09
14.09
14.13
14.13
13.75
13.75


12.78
11.23
10.92
11.15
11.34
11.89
12.66
12.70
12.16
12.00
12.82
13.59


12.70
13.55
14.29
14.79
15.18


.70
1.10
1.49
1.25
1.54
1.84
1.82
1.80
1.62
1.92
2.39
2.87


3.01
1.92
1.69
1.71
1.79
1.74
3.09
3.10
3.18
3.43
2.55
1.91


2.91
1.96
1.31
1.23
1.73


I


I _


1


-14






PES-165


- 15 -


During both of the past 2 years, the price relationships between
mixed whole egg on one hand, and frozen yolk and frozen albumen on the
other, have changed considerably from the spring-time breaking season to
the year end. As each year progressed those changes have been in the
direction of making yolk and albumen relatively more valuable than an
equivalent quantity of mixed whole egg (table 6).


POULTRY PRODUCERS' 1952 GROSS INCOME
BELOW 1951

Aggregate poultry and egg production in 1952 exceeded all previous
records, but financially the year was unfavorable to most producers.
Relatively low prices for eggs and turkeys reduced farmers' cash receipts
from poultry and eggs 6 percent below 1951, while relatively high costs
for feed through most of the year, combined with increased feed require-
ments almost in proportion with increased output, probably resulted in an
even greater reduction from the year before in poultrymen's net incomes.

The number of eggs produced in 1952, the number of broilers raised,
and the number of turkeys raised exceeded the previous records of 1951.
Despite large supplies in 1951, which supported near-record per capital
disappearances of the respective products, the index of average poultry
product prices then was the highest since 1948. Feed prices during 1951,
representing the poultrymen's largest cash expense, were higher than in
the 2 previous years, but not so high as in 1947-48.

Low egg prices during the spring were perhaps the most unfavorable
factor bearing upon poultrymen's 1952 incomes, compared with the year
before. ( .- explanation advanced for those low prices is that storage
demand for both shell and frozen egg is the marginal influence upon
springtime egg prices. In 1952 the demand for storage, particularly for
frozen egg, reflected the unfavorable out-turn to stores of the previous
year's operation.

Feed costs at a higher level than at any time except 1947-48 were
another factor making 1952 a relatively unfavorable year for poultrymen.

A third notable change adversely affecting income from poultry
compared with the year before, was in turkey prices. The October-December
average price received by farmers was 33.7 cents per pound, compared with
37.7 the year before. (In 1950, the comparable average had been 32.8 cents,
but that year's crop had been produced with cheaper feed). On account
of the large supplies and low prices, the Department of Agriculture under-
took a surplus removal program in the fall of 1952 which resulted in the
Government purchase of 48 million pounds of eviscerated turkey, the equiva-
lent of about 6 percent of the year's slaughter.





MAY-JUNE 1953


- 16 -


To date, 1953 looks like a much more favorable year than 1952
for poultrymen. The combined gross income from eggs and poultry meat
is likely to exceed the 1951 record of 4 billion dollars. Egg prices
so far have been at record-high levels, and yet have not induced in-
creased numbers of early-hatched pullets whose later egg output might
speed the seasonal downturn in egg prices which will occur after peak
prices have been reached this fall. Feed costs to date have been about
the same as 1951.
The turkey crop will be significantly smaller than in 1952, and
prices are likely to be higher. Broiler prices so far this year have
been about in line with the 1952 average. Even though there is no
present indication that the exceedingly favorable broiler prices of
October-December 1952 will be repeated, the recent prices to producers
have been followed by near-record chick placements, which through May
have been sold without resulting in prices so low as those of last May.


U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE NEG.49163-XX BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS


FARM VALUE OF POULTRY
PRODUCTS

1952
(Value of Sales Eggs
Plus Home
Consumption) 55%



> Sales Chickens
(farm \
(" Home consumption produced
14% Broilers
TOTAL $3.8 BILLIONS 20%


Other
2%


*FROM SPECIALIZED ENTERPRISES


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


NEG.49163-XX BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS






- 17


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- 18 -


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PES-165


- 19 -


Table 9 .- Eggs: Production, annual rate per potential layer, and
disposition, United States, 1920 to date
: Eggs
SHens Eggs produced : : A Value
Rena : con- : : Aver-
of
Sand :Per : sued : : age
Spullets : layer Per hen on : Eggs : annual eggs
Year : on : : onan farms : sold : price,: snd
Total bullet and
Sfarms :: hand : parm where: : per :
:Jan. 1 :: during on fa pro- : dozen con
: : year : Jan1 duced : samed
: Thousand
Thousand Millions Number Number Millions Millions Cents dollars


1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928
1929

1930
1931
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936
1937
1938
1939


341,474
331,632
353,875
371,930
389,626
390,517
393,819
414,875
427,139
403,774
420,451
401,776
385,826
390,743
385,341
350,407
362,619
379,754
352,964
376,141


o40 : 392
41 : 381
42 427
?43 : 488
?44 : 523
45 : 473
46 : 472
>47 : 431
?48 : 417
49 : 399
50 : 423
951 : 410
752 : 419
53 2 : 405

1/ Revised.


,655
,315
,911
,959
,587
,880
,820
,446
,570
,380

,773
,200
,861
,635


29,700
30,800
33,000
35,000
34,592
34,969
37,248
38,627
38,659
37,921

39,067
38,532
36,298
35,514
34,429
33,609
34,534
37,564
37,356
38,843

39,695
41,878
48,597
54,539
58,530
56,221
55,962
55,384
54,899
56,154

58,734
59,265
61,016


112
118
117
119
119

121
127
121
118
118
122
121
130
135
134

134
139
142
142
148
152
156
160
166
170

172
175
178


87
93
93
94
89
90
95
93
91
94

93
96
94
91
89
96
95
99
106
103

101
110
1114
112
112
119
118
128
131
141


7,100
7,300
7,600
7,500
7,221
7,086
7,378
7,612
7,413
7,147

7,519
7,995
7,992
7,922
7,406
7,205
7,416
7,884
8,204
8,238

8,035
7,652
7,425
7,349
7,711
7,502
7,551
7,133
6,800
6,685


139 6,864
144 6,552
145 6,686


2/ Preliminary.


21,556
22,398
24,267
26,392
26,333
26,910
28,845
29,958
30,268
29,779

30,613
29,628
27,415
26,737
26,266
25,739
26,448
29,162
28,624
30,092

31,224
33,795
40,740
46,711
50,455
48,365
48,148
48,029
47,903
49,282

51,705
52,565
54,195


143.5
28.3
25.0
26.5
26.7
30.4
28.9
25.1
28.1
29.8

23.7
17.6
14.2
13.8
17.0
23.4
21.8
21.3
20.3
17.4

18.0
23.5
30.0
37.1
32.5
37.7
37.6
45.3
47.2
45.2

36.3
47.8
41.6


1,038,780
700,377
663,895
748,447
741,225
856,964
870,254
781,600
877,374
911,882

750,603
546,072
412,335
394,315
473,561
635,834
610,509
651,582
616,528
551,093
582,211
807,261
1,196,475
1,667,518
1,570,670
1,751,381
1,743,016
2,077,719
2,145,041
2,102,955

1,765,793
2,348,066
2,104,694


1is
1i
1i
1S
1i

1i
s19
1s
19

1s
19
19






MAY-JTUE 1953


Table 10.- Eggs: Production, annual rate per potential layer, and disposition,
by States and divisions, 1952 I/


: Hens ena : Ee produced : E : : Average : Value of
State : pullets Eg poue consumed : : annual : Vuo
and : on s : : Per hen and : on fares :Eggs : price, : eggs sold
division : January 1 tal :llet on fame: where : : per : con ed
:: : January 1 ; produced : dozen :

Thousand
Thousands Millions Number Millions Millions Cents dollars

Maine ........................ 3,815 663 174 29 633 55.2 30,152
New ampaehire ................: 2,713 431 159 15 415 56.2 20,138
Vermont ......................: 948 171 180 20 151 53.2 7,581
Massachusetts ................ 5,484 911 166 23 887 56.5 42,846
Rhode Island .................: 627 108 172 3 105 56.2 5,057
Connecticut ..................: 4,127 713 173 18 694 56.5 33,523
New York .....................: 15,005 2,368 158 148 2,218 53.3 105,090
New Jersey ...................: 14,681 2,503 170 38 2,461 53.6 111,622
Pennsylvania .................: 23,385 3,683 157 214 3,464 50.8 155,702

North Atlantic ............. 70,785 11,551 163 508 11,028 53.3 512,011

Ohio .........................: 18,568 2,795 151 256 2,536 42.1 97,952
Indiana ......................: 17,112 2,734 160 204 2,527 36.8 83,751
Illinois .....................: 21,139 3,148 149 291 2,853 34.6 90,651
Michigan .....................: 10,719 1,601 149 175 1,424 h31.9 55,831
Wisconsin ....................: 13,74.3 2,139 156 217 1,919 39.1 69,598

aist North Central .........: 81,281 12,417 153 1,143 11,259 38.5 397,783

Minnesota ....................: 23,585 3,730 158 262 3,465 34.9 108,394
Iova ..........................: 29,555 h,692 159 321 4,366 32.6 127,331
Missouri .....................: 19,014 2,583 136 332 2,246 32.1 68,961
North Dakota .................: 4,190 594 1i2 94 199 29.6 14,628
South Dakota .................: 8,661 1,238 143 103 1,133 30.2 31,106
Nebraska .....................: 12,626 1,758 139 182 1,574 30.6 44,778
Kansas .......................: 12,952 1,862 1H4 231 1,629 31.7 49,135

West North Central .........: 110,583 16,457 149 1,525 14,912 32.5 444,333

Delavare .....................: 967 138 143 10 128 47.0 5,405
Maryland .....................: 3,704 515 139 48 466 47.7 20,432
Virginia .....................: 8,387 1,149 137 193 953 47.6 45,458
West Virginia ................: 3,426 478 140 99 378 47.0 18,683
North Carolina ...............: 10,924 1,298 119 297 997 47.0 50,682
South Carolina ...............: 4,529 462 102 132 326 51.6 19,694
Georgia ......................: 7,059 828 117 200 622 49.4 33,839
Florida ......................: 3,157 382 121 52 328 53.4 16,910

South Atlantic ..............: 42,153 5,250 125 1,031 4,198 48.4 211,103

Kentucky .... .................: 9,746 1,244 128 305 933 37.4 38,585
Tennessee ....................: 8,916 1,023 115 281 734 38.8 32,819
Alabama ......................: 6,710 732 109 215 511 44.6 26,983
Miseissippi ..................: 6,490 649 100 185 455 43.0 22,933
Arkansas .....................: 6,578 705 107 195 504 38.3 22,310
Louisiana ....................: 3,974 385 97 118 262 44.5 14,092
Oklahoma .....................: 8,389 1;123 134 201 918 34.6 32,264
Teneas ........................: 21,474 2,921 136 397 2,516 38.9 94,429

South Central ..............: 72,277 8,782 122 1,897 6,833 39.0 284,4315
Montana ......................: 1,765 254 144 54 199 39.7 8,370
Idaho ........................: 1,800 271 151 46 224 43.8 9,855
Wyoming ......................: 705 lo04 148 20 84 40.9 3,545
Colorado .....................: 2,680 393 147 71 321 39.9 13,034
Nev Mexico ...................: 956 115 120 32 83 45.9 4,399
Arizona ......................: 573 80 140 10 70 58.2 3,880
Utah .........................: 2,762 434 157 29 405 43.3 15,660
Nevada ........................ 163 24 147 7 17 51.0 1,020
Washington ...................: 1,801 782 163 79 702 51.0 33,193
Oregon .......................: 3,451 552 160 71 480 50.8 23,326
California ...................: 23,126 3,550 154 163 3,380 47.0 138,767

Western ....................: 42,782 6,559 153 582 5,965 46.8 255,049

United States ................: 419,861 61,016 145 6,686 54,195 41.6 2,104,694


SPreliminary.


- 20 -






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MAY-JUNE 1953


Table 12.- Farm chickens: Average live weight, sales, farm consumption,
and value, available data, 1930 to date

: : : Total :Slaugh-:
Average live weight : :consumed: ter, :Weighted: Value of:
: : : : : on :live : annual: :
: : : : Total : farms' :weight,: average: :ale
Year : :sold, : where : from : price : Sales : plus
: young : ture: All : live : produc-: farm :received: from : home
weight: ed, : pro- : per : farms:con-
live :duction: pound : :sump-
S weight I1/ : : : tion
Million Million Million Million Million
Pounds Pounds Pounds pounds pounds pounds Cents dollars dollars

1930 2,713 18.4 333 495
1931 : 3.8 2,506 15.8 258 390
1932 : 3.8 2,547 11.8 189 293
1933 : 3.8 2,657 9.5 161 247
1934 : 3.8 2,383 11.1 171 259
1935 : 3.9 1,414 847 2,261 14.9 207 324
1936 : 3.9 1,536 798 2,334 15.0 239 374
1937 : 4.0 1,417 752 2,169 16.0 225 354
1938 : 3.9 1,282 787 2,069 14.8 195 320
1939 : 3.9 1,481 779 2,260 13.2 199 309
1940 : 3.3 4.9 4.1 1,508 712 2,220 13.0 199 292
1941 : 3.4 5.1 4.1 1,673 699 2,372 15.6 264 372
1942 : 3.5 5.1 4.2 2,046 689 2,735 18.7 389 518
1943 : 3.5 5.1 4.2 2,836 678 3,514 24.3 696 863
1944 : 3.6 5.1 4.3 2,645 644 3,289 23.7 635 790
1945 3.7 5.2 4.3 2,616 669 3,285 25.9 677 852
1946 : 3.7 5.2 4.4 2,318 638 2,956 27.6 639 814
1947 3.7 5.2 4.4 2,144 598 2,742 26.5 568 727
1948 : 3.7 5.3 4.5 1,804 568 2,372 30.1 543 711
1949 : 3.8 5.3 4.4 1,954 575 2,529 25.4 497 643

1950 : 3.8 5.3 4.5 1,847 586 2,433 22.3 411 540
1951 2 : 3.9 5.3 4.5 1,877 581 2,458 25.1 472 615
1952 : 3.9 5.3 4.6 1,767 573 2,340 22.3 393 518



i/ Slaughter is the sum of sales and consumption on farms where produced.

2/ Revised.

M/ Preliminary.


- 22 -






PES-165 23 -
Table 13.- Chickens: Number raised and sold; number consumed on farms where produced and value of
sales plus home consumption, by States and divisions, 1952 _/

Chickens consumed o : on
S cChickens sold con u Aver- Value of
and Chickens age sales plus
Division raised uer eit : : price, home con-
Number "ubrper pound sumption

Thousand Thousand Thousand
Thousands Thousands pounds Thousands pounds Cents dollars

Maine ................: 6,989 5,926 31,h08 261 1,399 25.5 8,366
New Hampshire ......... 5,915 5,418 26,568 173 796 26.0 7,109
Vermont ..............: 1,877 1,600 8,800 197 1,o61 27.3 2,692
Massachusetts ........: 8,971 7,790 U,2,066 350 1,715 26.6 11,6L6
Rhode Island .........: 1,067 931 6,562 51 265 26.5 1,279
Connecticut .......... 8,303 7,280 35,672 319 1,h99 27.0 10,036
New York .............. 19,681 15,1h3 7h,126 1,925 10,010 27.6 23,222
Newv Jersey ............ 16,6144 11,418 57,090 890 6,091' 27.6 16,887
Pennsylvania .........: 36,851 26,792 133,960 3,288 16,769 27.8 h1,903

North Atlantic .....: 106,098 82,598 416,232 7,;460 37,611 27.2 123,160

Ohio ................. 24,852 17,207 36,035 6,890 22,h94 22.6 24,528
Indiana .............. 26,893 18,981 89,211 4,666 18,757 21.6 23,322
Illinois .............. 27,271 17,203 80,856 6,176 25,322 22.1 23,465
Michigan .............: 18,62l 13,952 71,155 2,658 13,290 26.7 20,858
Wisconsin ............: 20,355 16,077 66,754. 3,919 18,027 22.0 18,212

East Borth Central..: 117,795 81,420 392,009 22,109 97,890 22.6 110,385

Minnesota ............: 27,637 19,581 90,073 6,668 20,072 16.1 18,064
Iowa ..................: 41,669 30,166 146,787 7,013 30,156 17.7 30,965
Missouri .............: 26,650 17,877 82,234 6,819 26,656 20.7 22,126
North Dakota .........: 6,h12 3,967 18,156 1,732 7,101 17.8 6,496
South Dakota .......... 11,929 7,992 37,562 2,555 10,676 15.7 7,562
Nebraska ............: 19,156 12,959 55,724 6,978 19,416 16.7 12,568
Eansas ...............: 18,530 11,239 69,52 5,993 20,976 15.6 10,846

West North Central..: 151,783 103,759 677,988 33,788 132,851 17.5 106,587

Delaware .............: 1,571 1,203 5,616 240 1,056 26.9 1,740
Maryland ... ..: 5,096 3,375 16,200 1,218 5,237 26.9 5,767
Virginia ............ 10,769 6,327 19,906 5,289 18,512 23.1 8,87t
West Virginia ........: ,351 2,135 9,821 1,629 6,675 24.3 4,009
North Carolina .......: 18,981 7,656 31,307 8,812 28,198 23.1 13,746
South Carolina ........ 8,520 2,066 7,61h 5,182 16,061 26.6 6,306
Georgia ............... 12,139 3,926 15,311 7,026 22,677 25.2 9,522
Florida ..............: 5,619 3,386 12,528 1,257 6,600 27.7 4,689

South Atlantic .....: 67,326 27,872 118,129 30,650 102,619 24.9 56,653

Kentucky .............: 16,502 6,227 28,022 8,318 28,281 20.2 11,373
Tennessee .............: 15,006 7,537 30,902 6,333 21,532 19.6 10,277
Alabama ..............: 11,970 3,933 1',965 6,531 1.8,295 23.8 7,911
Mississippi ..........a 11,697 6,259 16,906 5,596 16,228 26.7 7,690
Arkansas ............. 10,470 5,585 22,898 6,130 12,390 21.2 7,681
Louislana ............: 8,005 2,890 11,271 6,630 15,968 29.5 8,030
Oklahma ..............: 12,588 6,671 25,237 5,296 17,677 17.0 7,261
TeOs ................: 26,568 13,663 50,553 9,901 30,702 20.6 16,739

South Central ...... r 112,786 50,565 198,736 50,541 160,853 21.1 76,762

Montana ..............: 3,562 2,252 9,658 963 3,968 25.2 3,378
Idaho ................: 3,128 1,759 7,388 1,009 6,036 23.0 2,627
Wyoming ..............: 1,106 593 2,372 M"8 1,702 25.1 1,022
Colorado .............: 5,oh3 3,253 12,687 1,530 5,508 19.7 3,584
New Mexico ...........: 1,266 548 2,028 538 1,560 20.9 750
Arizona ..............: 776 oo00 1,600 248 893 298. 708
Utah .................: 3,759 2,9h7 11,788 421 1,476 18.9 2,507
Nevada ...............: 310 199 836 99 356 23.8 286
Washington ...........: 8,962 6,788 28,510 1,568 6,192 21.9 7,600
Oregon ...............: 5,310 3,h38 14,783 1,200 5,060 20.0 3,965
California ...........: 28,046 19,199 76,876 3,050 10,370 23.9 20,373

Western ............: 61,266 61,376 166,326 11,056 41,079 22.6 66,798

united States ........: 617,056 387,590 1,767,618 155,602 572,903 22.3 518,325

l/ Preliminary.





MAY-JUNE 1953 24 -

Table 1k.- Broilers from specialized enterprises: Production, average live
weight, price p r pound, and value of production, 1934 to date


: Production : Average : Average pr
Year : :live weight,: received


ic





1'





1s


: Number
: Thous.

934 34,030

935 : 42,890

936 : 53,155

937 : 67,915

938 : 82,420

939 : 105,630

?40 : 142,762

l : 191,502

942 228,187

?43 : 235,293

)44 : 264,999

45 : 365,572

946 292,527

?47 : 310,168

438 : 370,515

?49 513,296

?50 630,816

?51 I/: 805,603

?52 2/: 886,036


Lj Revised.
/ Preliminary.


S per : producers,


_v


:pound,


:


: Pounds
: (live)
Thous,

96,662

122,884

152,447

195, 916

239,503

306,272

414,074

559,605

674,087

832,837

790,346

1,107,174

833,855

936,442

1,126,643

1,570,197

1,938,000

2,462,661

2,695,358


bird
Lb.

2.834

2.87

2.87

2.88

2.91

2.90

2.90

2.92

2.95


2.99

3.03

3.02

3.02

3.04

3,06

3.07

3.06

3.04


live
Ct.

19.3

20.0

20.6

21.4

19.0

17.0

17.3

18.4

22.9

28.6

28.8

29.5

32.7

32.3

36.0

28.2

27.4

28.6

28.8


ice : Value
by : of
per : production
weight:
Thous. dol,

18,694

24,651

31,493

41,876

45,609

52,059

71,729

103,111

154,650

238,262

227,104

327,059

288,603

302,170

405,171

442,530

530,147

703,213

776,929








Table 15.- Broilers from specialized enterprises: Production, average live eight, price per pound,
and value of production, by States and divisions, 1952 1/


State : Production:
and. : Pounds
division Number (live)


: Thousands

Maine........................: 23,01.
New Hampshire................: 6,051
Vermont......................: 559
Massachusetts................: 16,167
fhode Island.................: 1,136
Connecticut..................: 19,950
New York.....................: 8,1964
Nev Jersey...................: 6,666
Pennsylvania.................: 18,035

North Atlantic.............: 99,766

Ohio .........................: 11,102
Indiana......................: 33,671
Illinois.....................: 27,393
Michigan.....................: 3,309
Wisconsin....................: 11,166

East North Central .........: 86,661h

Minnesota ....................: 6,161
Iowa .........................: 8,590
Missouri.....................: 23,5h1l
North Dakota.................: --
South Dakota .................: ---
Nebraska.....................: 6,384
Kansas.......................: 3,272

West North Central.........: 45,951

Delaware.....................: 65,191
Maryland.....................: 56,966
Virginia.....................: 50,662
West Virginia................: 19,075
North CArolina...............: 3,366
South Carolina...............: 1,301
Georgia......................: 112,621
Florida......................: 9,980

South Atlantic............. 372,11.2

Kentucky.....................: 3,677
Tennessee....................: 8,762
Alabama...................... 23,686
Mississippi..................: 30,751
Arkansas..................... 72,627
Louisiana....................: 8,113
Oklahoma.....................: 6,728
Texas........................ 60,996

South Central..............: 215,136

Montana.....................: --
Idaho ........................: 1,126
Wyoming......................: --
Colorado.....................: 2,129
New Mexico...................: -
Arizona......................: 825
Utah.........................: 1,63h
Nevada.......................: ---
Washington...................: 7,513
Oregon.......................: 5,093
California...................: k8,079

Western....................: 66,399

United States..............: 886,036


Thousands

87,532
23,599
1,956
59,7664
1,630
73,815
29,679
25,247
61,319

366,371

36,637
107,757
82,179
11,251
36,868

276,672

12,067
25,770
70,632


13,1541
9,162

136,165

202,092
176,595
156,990
62,938
121,125
60,043
315,339
27,9h6

1,103,376

11,399
24*,534'
63,o07
36,103
203,356
22,716
18,166
170,783

600,6661


3,060

6,1741

2,675
6,902

23,290
15,788
153,661

21h,330

2,695,358


Average


live
weight,
per bird

Pounds

3.8
3.9
3.5
3.7
3.9
3.7
3.5
3.8
3.6'

3.7

3.3
3.2
3.0
3.6
3.3

3.2

2.9
3.0
3.0


2.8
2.8

3.0

3.1
3.1
3.1
3.3
2.8
2.8
2.3
2.8

3.0

3.1
2.3
2.7
2.8
2.8
2.3
2.7
2.8

2.8


/ Preliminary.


: Average price :
: received by
: producers, per :
:pound, live weight:

Cents

27.0
27.4
27.7
29.9
23.9
29.1
31.5
31.7
29.5

23.9

30.0
29.8
29.8
31.1
29.9

29.9

28.2
29.0
28.8


29.9
29.5

29.0

28.2
28.2
28.0
23.5
28.h6
28.5
28.1
30.0

28.2

29.0
28.5
28.8
28.0
28.2
29.5
28.5
28.9

28.5


32.9

31.0

32.9
31.0

30.7
30.6
31.2

31.1

28.8


Value
of pro-
duction
Thousand
dollars

23,667
6,b66
512
17,266
1,280
21,830
9,034
8,003
18,099

105,807

10,991
32,112
24,4.89
3,699
11,018

82,109

3,h03
7,673
20,3.2


5,536
2,703

39,157

56,993
69,800
1'3,957
17,9'0
36h,85
11,1412
88,610
8,383

311,577

3,306
6,992
18,261
26,109
57,366
6,701
5,177
49,356

171,248


1,000

1,916

816
1,520

7,150
4,831
69,502

66,731

776,929


PES -165


- 25 -






MAY-JUNE 1953


-26 -

Table 16.- Turkeys: Average live weight, sales, farm consumption, and value,
available data, 1930 to date


Average live weight : : Value of:
Turkey sold. o Total consumed : Total Weighted annual-: Sales
Ye:_ V t e sol ...:--.Total sold, on farms, where : laughter, : average price Sales plu ho
Hens Tom : All :live weight, produced, live :live weight : received per Saes : cn-
: weight pound :euaption
S b. Lb. Mil.lb. Mil.1b. Mil.lb. Cents Mil.dol. Mll.dol.

1930 13. 21h 23 237 20.0 46 51
1931 13.6 214 21 235 19.1 42 16
1932 13.8 268 23 290 12.7 38 41
1933 : .0 30W 23 327 11.6 36 38
1933 1A.1 290 21 311 15.1 42 15
1935 1'.5 274. 20 290. 20.1 52 56
1936 1.7 374 21 396 15.6 62 65
1937 11.8 359 21 380 18.1 63 67
1938 1.9 370 19 389 17.5 66 69
1939 : 11.9 17.9 14.9 4h), 19 '63 15.7 71 71
19o0 12.1 18.1 15.1 509 17 527 15.2 78 81
191l : 12.7 19.1 15.9 496 15 511 19.9 98 101
192 : 13.0 19.6 16.3 527 13 540 27.5 115 148
1913 : 12.9 19.5 16.2 490 12 502 32.6 165 164
1911 : 13.2 20.1 16.8 585 10 595 3b.0 199 202

1945 : 13.5 21.1 17.4 715 12 727 33.7 241 245
1946 : 13.9 22.2 18.0 740 12 752 36.3 269 273
1917 : 13.8 22.5 18.1 634 12 646 36.5 232 236
19a8 : 11.0 22.6 18.3 549 11 561 k6.8 257 263
1919 : 14.2 23.3 18.8 7y8 12 760 35.2 263 267
1950 : 11.1 23.0 18.6 797 11 808 32.8 262 266
1951 IJ : 13.6 22.2 17.9 911 11 922 37.1 341 3h5
1952 2/ : 11.3 23.8 /16.7 1.o00r 12 1.016 33.6 337 341
-1 Revised.
2 Preliminarj.
Including frBere at an average eight of 7.5 pounds which wrvght was reported for the !'irst time for 1952.

Table 17.- Turkeys: Numbers on farm January 1, numbers raised, sold, consumed on farms where produced,
and total slaughter, available data 1330 to date

Numbers on farms Jan-jary 1 Consumed on
Year Raised : Sold F: arms where : Total
Breeders Others : : produced slaughter _/
: Thousands Thousanda Thousands Thousands Thousanda Thousands

1930 : 17,419 15,999 1,704 17,703
1931 : 18,219 15,746 1,549 17,295
1932 : 22,333 19,393 1,665 21,058
1933 : 23,241 21,733 1,623 23,356
1931 : 21,702 20,615 1,505 22,120

1935 : 20,821 18,827 1,428 20,255
1936 : 27,981 25,530 1,185 27,015
1937 : 3,81 2,877 25,755 24,227 i,125 25,652
1938 : 3,222 2,874 26,887 24,861 1,291 26,152
1939 3,914 2,575 33,587 29,821 1,297 31,118
1910 : 4,607 3.962 34,017 33,778 1,170 34,948
191 : 3,86k 3,329 32,902 31,209 996 32,205
1942 : ,003 3, 82 32,805 32, 20 82e 33,211
1943 : 3,984 2,616 32,309 30,278 747 31,025
194 : 4,294 3,135 35,616 31,749 647 35,396

1945 : 1,606 2,597 42,900 to,999 691 41,690
1946 : 4,81a 3,021 o0,lk2 41,030 699 41,729
1917 3,779 2,100 33,975 34,938 675 35,613
198 : 2,537 1,422 31,541 30,017 666 30,683
19k9 : 3,148 1,474 41,266 39,841 676 40,517
1950 : 3,270 1,854 13,792 42,918 648 43,566
1951 ; : 3,301 1,790 52,476 50,853 614 51,-97
1952 / : 3,828 1,991 60,146 59,996 715 60,711
195 3/ : 14,6 1,893
1 Slaughter is the sum of sales and consumption an farm where produced. The difference between raised and slaughter-
ed is accounted for by (a) difference in January 1 inventories, and (b) death losses.
2/ Bevised.
I/ Preliminary.







UNITED STATES FOREIGN TRADE IN POULTRY AND EGGS I/

by Reward Karpoff

Imports and exports are not la-.ge factors in the poultry industry
in the United States. Except for the years during which the United States
exported dried eggs unrd.er Government programs, neither imports nor exports
of either eggs or poultry meat have ever been as much as 2 percent of our
national production. In most years, they were less than 1 percent.

In general, the scale of the domestic poultry industry is geared to
the domestic market.

Before World War II, the outstanding feature of United States inter-
national trade in poultry and eggs was the import of large quantities of
dried egg from China. This trade lapsed during the War, was restored to
a larger-than-prewar scale in 1950, and was cut off in December 1950, after
Korea, by freezing Red Chinese dollar balances in the United States.

During World War II, and thereafter until 1952, the United States
exported significant quantities of dried egg. These exports were the re-
sult of Government purchases, first as a part of the war situation and then
as a part of the defense afterimath. They were not commercial exports in
the usual sense, and are not likely to recur except under unusual circum-
stances. They were related to the price support programs then in effect.

Even including the dried egg, in the 19501s the United States im-
ports and exports of eggs have been very small in the national picture.
With dried egg included, 1952 experts were 1.1 percent of United States
egg production, and imports were 0.1 of 1 percent.

For the past 10 years the largest source of shell eggs imported to
the United States has been Canada. The United States in turn exports some
of our eggs to Canada, and some poultry meat. At least a mall amount of
trade in poultry and eggs occurs continually back and forth across the
Canadian border. At r-mes, when prico relationships favor it, this trade
becomes large enough to be an important factor in terminal markets located
near the border.

When this trade with Canada expands for short periods to take advan-
tage of temporary situations, the terms of trade for poultry meat see:a most
often to develop in favor of United States exports to Canada, while the
bulges in the egg trade are must often in the other direction. In the
last year or longer the Canadian dollar has been selling at more than
100 U. S. cents per dollar, and this has discouraged exports of eggs from
that country to the United States, but has made Canada a more favorable
place for the sale of United States poultry.

l/ This summary was originally prepared for the Senate Committee on Agri-
culture and Forestry, 83rd. Congress.


PES-165


- 27 -





MAY-JUNE 1953


- 28 -


The most important current outlets abroad for shell eggs produced
in the United States are Venezuela, Cuba, and Mexico, and to a lesser
degree other Caribbean nations. Canada is a strong competitor in supply-
ing these markets, and some European countries, notably the Netherlands,
are also interested- in those markets.

Egg and poultry production in western Europe has by now recovered
.from its.wartime reverses, and the traditional European exporters of high-
quality eggs, such- as Denmark and the Netherlands, are now much better
able to export than they were during the late 1940 's. Three or four years
ago the United States was exporting eggs to Switzerland, a highly unusual
situation considering that country's location. But by 1951 the situation
had turned so abruptly that not only was Swiss consumption being supplied
from European sources, but at the same time the Netherlands was exporting
shell eggs to the United Statesi

The 1951 Netherlands exports of eggs to the United States were
accomplished under the benefits of a foreign exchange arrangement whereby
the Dutch government permitted exporters to retain more of the dollars
than was ordinarily the case. In that year the Netherlands exports to
.the United. States would have been larger had more refrigerated shipping
space been available for eggs.

The;United States market, as well as the Caribbean, is of special
interest to European suppliers because the Western Hemisphere is a hard-
currency, dollar, area.

The area to which the United States exports poultry meat more or
less corresponds to that to which we. export eggs, but the trade is of
relatively less importance from a national statistical viewpoint. Poultry
producers in many prospective importing countries have sought help from
their Governments in protectingg" their local markets, and restrictions
upon trade have becomean increasing problem to exporters of poultry
meat, as well as of poultry..breeding stock.

The. trade described here is naturally very important to those.
directly engaged in it or directly affected by it, but as a part
of the overall national picture it is not large. In effect, the size of
the poultry industry in the United States is geared to supplying domestic
demands.

Tables with the statistics bearing upon these points are shown
on the following pages.




P:S-16

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30

Table 19 Imports of egg and egg product, by country of origin, average 1937-39,
1940-41, 1942-45, annual 1946-52

Average
Ite Unit : 1946 1947 1948 1949 :950 1951 1952
S: 1937-39: 1940-J1: 1942-45:


Shell eggs : 1,000 doz.:
Chicken : do.
Canada : do.
Australia : do.
Dominican Republic : do.
Argentina : do.
China : do.
Hong Kong : do. V
Netherlands : do. :
Other : do.
Total do. :

Other than chicken : 1,000 doz.:
China : do.
Hong Kong : do.
Netherlands do.
Other : do.
Total : do. :

Dried whole egg 1,000 lb.
China : do.
Hong Kong : do.
Other : do.
Total : do. :

Dried egg yolk : 1,000 lb.
Canada : do.
China do.
Argentina ; : do.
Other : do.
Total : do. :

Dried egg albumen 1,000 lb.
Canada do.
China do.
Other do.
Total : do. :

Eggs, frozen or
otherwise prepared
or preserved : 1,000 lb. :
Mixed whole egg : do.
Canada : do.
China : do.
Other do.
Total : do. :

Egg yolk : 1,000 lb.
Canada : do.
China do.
Other : do.
Total : do.

Egg albumen
Total : do. :


5 3
10 115
--- 4,337
114 10
129 1

102 37


376 478 527 1,400 3,250 5,162 4,857 6,034
1/ / I1/ / I / 11 40 60
257 152 a4 o02 18 2 ---
252 --- ---.. .... .. _
1 1 2 6 2 ---
... ... .. 2/ 2- -
-- -- 1,75 -
9 2/ 7 1 1 3 3 12


360 46503 9 631 559 1,403 3,359 5,1M5 6.696 6 5


3 110 2/ 41 112 190 222 239 49 2/
S 64 --- 6 14 13 13 12 126 119
1/ 1 / 1 /1/ / 146 18
3/ 1 2 2/ 1 2/ 8. 4 6
2 175 2 47 126 204 235 3


88 42 2 --- 4/ 28 93 147 4 --
196 --- --- --- --- --- --- -r- ---
5 1 3 1 1 1 4/ --- ,--
289 43 5 1 1 29 93 147 --


--- --- 6 ---4/ --- 125 1 ---
2,147 2,294 142 --- 2 1,767 7,208 4/ -
--- --- --- --- --- --- --- 15 57 54
2 8 --- --- --- 26 44 19 1
2,149 202 206 --- 4/ 231 ,1 67 69


/ 40 6 65 52 --- 4 ---
1,350 331 38 4/ --- 2 43 192 69 2P
4 1 14/ --- --- 5 4/--- 5/210
1,739 332 7 6 65 54 4 1 69 2




--- .12 4/ -- --- 45 25 --- 32
8 --- 2 4 2 3 1 ---
-. -. -.. 2 4/ 4
,,8 4/ 12 2 2 48 .5 4 3

--- --- 10 -- --- 283 149. 4/
659 6 --- / / 4/ --- 7 --
66 10--- --- --- --- --- 13 --
65 6 Io 1/ it 4/ 215 156 -W


4/


4/ --- --- 4/ --- 192 1. --


1/ DIporte, if any, shown with Nother".

2/ Less than 500 dozen.

3/ Not shown separately prior to 1940; included in statistics for chicken egge.

4/ lAM than 500 pounds.

5/ Including Brasil 22 thousand pounds, Italy 118 thousand, and Denmark, k4 thousand.

Note: Totals may not agree with um of individual items due to ronding.


--




PEs-165




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MAY-JUTF 1I

Table


953 :


- 32 -


21.- Poultry meat: -Production, imports, and exports,
nite& States, 1930,to date
(Weights in equivalent of New York,dressed)


Production


Year. : Chickens, :
: including :
S specialized :
: broilers :


Turkeys
: .' -


. .: Internetiotal


: : : trade as a
percetage,
: Imports: mrports: of dmes-ic
Total : prodcq-tion
:. Imports :Exports


1930
1931
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936"
1937
1938
1939

19o40
19441
1942
1943
1945
1946
1947
1948
" 1949

1950

1952


Million Million
pounds pounds

2,626 216
2,426 2141
2,465 264
2,572 297
2,392 283'
2,297 268
2,393 360
2,273 3045
2,214 354
2,458 421


2,514
2,789
3,241
14,135
3,903
1,154
3;630
3,479
3,288
3,830

4,061
4,598
4,6.90


479
465
492
457
541
662
684
5863
510
691

736
839
925


Million Million
pounds "-poundsc

2,842 3
'2;640 6
2,729 1 .
2,869 2/
2,675 1
-2,565 1i
2,753 2
2,618 6
2,568 2
2,879 2:


2,993
3,254
3,733
4,592
4,j444
4,816
14,323
14,067
3,798
4,521

4,797
5,437
5,615


2
2'
4
5
27
-26
2/:
14
43
18&


Million
pounds

S 3
3
1
2
2-

1
2

3

2 .
3

1
1

74
18
9
S11


13
24
16


Percent Prcent


0.1
.2





-.2
.1
.1
/iI




.1


-.
.1




.1
.1
.6
.5
. I
.3
1.1
.14


.1
1/
.1


0.1;
"" "".1
.1i
.1
.1
S.1
1/
.1
.1"

.i
e. r

.1
.1i
.1
o. 1/


.,1.7
.4
* .2
.2


S .3
..4
.3


S1/ Less than 0.05


percent.


2/ Lees than 500 thousand.


-; 5. -.5 1. p -


, ,,, i "


1


I,


llI I I


I


I r I






PES-165. 33 -

Table 22,- Poultry, all forms except baby chicks _/: Exports by destination,
Imports by origin, 1948-52


Country or Area 1948 : 1949


: Million Million
: pounds pounds
t-


19950 : 1951


Million Million
pounds pounds

A. Exports


Canada and
Newfoundland ........

British West Indies,
Bermuda .............

Canal Zone and Panama

Cuba .. .......... .... .

Mexico ...............

Netherlands Antilles

Venezuela ............

Other Western
Hemisphere .........

Western Europe .......

Far East 3/ .......

Other ..... ..........

Total ... .............



Canada

Other

Total


1

1

1
_2/

1

5


g/
1

1

2/



3


2


2.1

1

1



1

6


2/


1


2/ 2/ 2/ 2/ 2/

9 11 13 25 16

B. Imports

41 17 5 2 3

2 1 2/ 2/ 2/

43 18 5 1 3


I/ Converted to New York dressed (blood and feathers off) equivalent
weights.
2/ Less than 500 thousand pounds.
3/ Phillipine Republic, Japan, Hong Kong, China, Thailand (Siam), Indonesia.
Note: A record of exports of baby chicks was not kept until 1952, in which
year 12 million were exported.


1952


Million
pounds




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
3 1262 08904 0066IIll
3 1262 08904 0066


MAY-JU n 1953


Table 23,- Digest of effective tariff rates upon selected egg and poultry
'products for import into the U, S., as of April 1953
~lfc '..*.< ---- -- ... ------- ---- ---- ------ ----- --------- ------- i --- -------


Commodity


Eggs in the shell
Eggs of chickens
Other


Egg products
Dried
Frozen or otherwise prepared


Live birds
Chicks
Chickens, ducks, geese,
guineas and turkeys
Live birds not specifically
provided for:
Valued at not over $5
Valued at over $5


Slaughtered birds
Undrawn 1/: fresh, chilled, or
frozen
.Chickens, ducks, geese, guineas
Turkeys
Other

Prepared or preserved
Drawn chickens l/ but not cooked
or divided into portions
Other


I/ Drawn and undrawn are terms which more
descriptions specified for these categories.


Rate



: 3 cents per dozen
: 10 cents per dozen



27 cents per pound
11 cents per pound


2 cents each

2 cents per pound


25 cents each
10% ad valorem


3 cents per pound
10 cents per pound
2L cents per pound


5 cents per pound
10 cents per pound


or less correspond to the customs


Source: United States Import Duties, 1952. There have been no changes in the
listed poultry items since 1952,


- 34 -