Poultry and egg situation

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Title:
Poultry and egg situation
Physical Description:
v. : ; 26 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economic Research Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service
Publisher:
The Bureau
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Creation Date:
May 1952
Frequency:
quarterly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Poultry industry -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Egg trade -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
statistics   ( marcgt )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )

Notes

Citation/Reference:
Bibliography of agriculture
Citation/Reference:
Predicasts
Citation/Reference:
American statistics index
Citation/Reference:
Index to U.S. government periodicals
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with PES 1 (Jan. 1937); ceased with PES-308 (Dec. 1980).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: Agricultural Marketing Service, Dec. 1953-Mar. 1961; Economic Research Service, May 1961-Dec. 1977; and: Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service, Mar. 1978-Dec. 1980.
General Note:
Cover title.
General Note:
Description based on: PES-301 (Mar. 1979).
General Note:
Previously classed: A 93.20: and A 88.15/2:
Statement of Responsibility:
Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Record Information

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University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000502977
oclc - 04506769
notis - ACS2711
lccn - 79643440 //r81
issn - 0032-5708
sobekcm - AA00005304_00004
Classification:
lcc - HD9437.U6 A33
ddc - 338.1/7/6500973
System ID:
AA00005304:00004

Related Items

Succeeded by:
Poultry and egg outlook & situation

Full Text

SFOR RELEASE
JUNE 20. A. M.

TH E

SI ION
BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONpM'ICS ,
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGR'ICULTIU.hE
PES- 159 MAY-JUN 1952



Approved by the Outlook and Situation Board, June 5, 1952

SUMMARY

In May and early June prices of eggs and chickens were about
one-fourth lower than a year earlier, and about one-sixth below
the corresponding prices of 1947-48. In 1947-48, feed costs to
poultrymen were somewhat higher than at present, but except for
that period, the present value of the poultry ration is a record
high. In mid-May, the egg-feed price ratio was the third lowest
for the month since 1924, and the chicken-feed ratio was the lowest.

The price-cost squeeze is resulting in cutbacks in hatchings of
baby chicks for laying flocks and for broiler production. On May 1,
hatcheries had 15 percent fewer eggs in incubators than a year earlier.
However, because early-season hatchings were ahead of last year, the
present reduction in hatchings for laying flocks will not appreciably
affect egg supplies until 1953. Broiler marketing are tapering down-
ward, but marketings/of cockerels from farm flocks are increasing
seasonally.

Turkey prices in recent months have been closer to the average
relation with feed costs than prices for either eggs or chickens.
Present indications point to a substantial increase in 1952 over
the record turkey crop of 1951.

A Government purchase program for surplus removal has been
announced to absorb up to 500,000 cases of eggs from the seasonally
large springtime production. Vendors of the eggs are to store them
for delivery to the Department of Agriculture in the last four months
of 1952. The program resulted in the purchase of 78,370 cases of eggs
before its originally intended expiration date of May 30, but it has
been extended for an additional month.







-2-
The poultry and egg situation at a glance


Month: : : Month :
Item Unit : or : Average : 1951 : 1952 :: or : Average : 1951 : 1952 : Commnte on
date : 194-50 : : :: Date : 1941-50 : : current situation
S: ,1 t


Faru production ..................... mi. lot.

Average number of layers on farus .... LU ons

Rate of lay per hen .................. Egas

Apparent civilian per capital
disappearance ........................ Eggs

Frozen egg production ................ ..il. lb.

Dried egg production ................. Mil. Ib.

Price received by farmers ............ :CL.per doz

Price received by farmers as a
percentage of parity ................: Percent

Retail price (BAE) ................. :Ct.per ad1

Egg-feed price ratio ................. Lb. feed

Stocks:

Shell ............................... Ious. caeil

Frozen ............................. i M lt. It.

Dried .............................. Mil. tb.

Chicks hatched by commercall
hatcheries ........................... Millions

Chicks and young chickens an farus ...: mllons

Fara price of poultry ration ......... :Dol.per cvt




Price received by farmers for all
chickens, incl. broilers, live ...... Ct. per lb.

Price received by farmers as a
percentage or parity / .............: Percent

Retail price of chickens,
dressed (BAR) ........................ :Ct. per Ib.

Price received by farmer for
turkeys, live ....................... :Ct. per lb.

Stocks:

Poultry, excluding turkeys .........: Mil. lb.

Turkeys ............................ 1il. lb.
Chicken-feed price ratio .............. .Lb. feed

TBrkey-feed price ratio .............. Lb. feed

Average weekly receipts of poultry
at Central Western Primary
Markets, per plant ..................: Thoa. lb.

Average weekly placeent of chloks
in 11 broiler areas ................. MNllaons


52..0 503.3

358.4 337.5

17.6 17.9


516.0

34L.2

18.0


3B.9



2.3

35.2


96 91 80 : ay

.5.7 63.7 5.5 :: Apr.

10.7 10.8 8.3 :: May


1,958

111.9


309 1,596 : May 1

62.3 8..3 :: a I

74.5 1 .8 :: Hay 1


Mar. 252.7 270.4 2912.4 Apr.


Apr. 1 2:1.6 201.4 219.4 May 1

L: Apr. 3.11. 3.99 4..24 May

Poni try



Apr. 26.5 30.0 26.0 May


Apr. 113 93 84 : May


Mar. 44.2 55.5 53.1 -Apr.


Apr. 29.9 35.3 34,5 : May



Apr. 1 108.4 112.1. 139.5 : May 1

Apr. 1 63.9 80.5 93.4 May 1

Apr. A.8 7.5 6.1 ay

Apr. 9.7 8.8 8.1 : ay



Apr. 7.0 17.3 26.1 : ay


Apr. 12.2 12.1 May


May 500.9 190.1

May 338.6 320.0

Pay 17.8 18.4


Through May, 105 percent
498.6 :of ear earlier.

326.2 oM evidence yet of culling
more rapid than mel.
18.3


36.9

63.5
10-year average reflects
2.2: price-support and
: foreig-upply activity.
34.2:


96 98 78:

45.4 62.1 53.0:

10.7 11.2 8.1:



3,896 973 2,185:

163.1 109.3 112.1:

58.9 1A.0:
Egg ae chicken prmsen
304..2 317.2 296.7 unfavorable to producers
factors in femr
chick orders.
424.7 405.6 383.6:

3.16 4.02 4.23,




Broiler markets broke
26.0 29.0 24.3: early In MVa: ma
recovery followed later.

fl3 93 7&

44.9 56.5 53.6:


28.7 35.4 32.0:

Pay 1 cmhtntd poultry
83.5 87.3 122.6: stocks highest smce
1947.
51.7 59.9 72.5:

8.5 7.2 5.7:

9.3 8.8 7.6:


11.0 26.5 30.4:
121 hou May 19SM, 111
- 12.1 11.3 aemt aof year earlier.


I/ For 1941-50, a for 1951, the prices as a percentage of parity Lre based on umr sed chicken price.


IMY-JIM 1952


i ii i


r


I i=





PES-159


PFYVIUT AND OUTLOOK


Egg Prices Receded After Easter

At 34.2 cents per dozen, average prices received by farmers for
eggs in mid-MKa were only slightly higher than in mid-March 1?hen they
were the l vest .-f the year to da;.e. In the last half of March and the
first part of April, prices of seme grades of eggs rose to a peak that
lasted until a f,'w days after -aster, (April 13).

The eluip that followed was attributed to the unwillingness of
egg breakers and egg stores to absc:,rb the available eggs at the higher
prices. The recovery that has since begun reflects the decreasing
supply of high quality eggs, because cf seasonal declines in total
production and the adverse effects :-f warm weather upon quality.

An extreme example of the presumed influence on the markets of
stores' willinFness to absorb e..s Lccurred in New York City. There,
at certain tdines in April and May, nearby white eggs sold for less
than midwestern whites, the reverse of the usual relation between the
two classes. Apparently,' the explanation is that as they arrive at
market the nearbys are less acceptable for storage, since they are less
closely-graded (though perhaps of higher average quality), are packed
in second hand cascs and pacl:'..ng materials, and of ten include washed
eggs.

An e-:g purchase program was announced by the United States
Department c-f Agriculture on Apri5.. ?-. The Department stated that,
beginning April 29, it would c ,ns':r wv.c''.ly offers for the delivery
of stored shell e~gs to the COvernia:it in bhe last four months of 1952.
Purchases totaling about 100,-'., cases have been made through June 5.

The program is described in greater detail in another section of
this report (page 4 ).

The egg-feed price ratios in each month since January have been
the lowest, or nearly the lowest, on record for the respective months.
During this period, these price relationships usually have considerable
influence on farmers' plans for ordering baby chicks for pullet
replacement stock. Adverse ege-feed price relationships usually result
in farmers ordering fewer chic's. Consequently supplies of eggs usually
are somewhat reduced in the next laying year. This year, however, the
adjustment in numbers came late in the spring and egg production will
not be greatly affected until late in 1952 or early 1953. Therefore,
price relationships between eggs and the prices of feed are not likely
to improve to near-average levels before the end of this year.


- 3 -





MAY-JUME 1952


- 4 -


Despite the adverse e,--fe -i ratio that prevailed in .the first
3mouthsof this year, the number of .youn: chickens on farms on April 1
was 9 percent larger than a year earlier. Pullets grown from these
young chickens, plus older birds already in Geying flocks, will produce
the eggs which will come to market in Most -of the remaining months of 1952.
Consequently, the outlook is fIr continued relatively large supplies
of eggs through 1952. Prxduiction in the fall may exceed last fall's
output--perhapa by 6 or 8 "erc-:-, if the normal .:!tentia.lities of
expanded pullet numbers and higher rates of lay are realized. Such
production will be supplemented by stored stocks of shell eggs
exceedin; last year's supply. Therefore, the seasonal price rise may
not carry fall egg prices to levc1s as high as in either of the past
2 years.

Purchases of chicks for laying flock replacement declined
sharply in April and May, compared with the levels of a year ago.
Pullets hatched in these 2 months probably will begin producing large
eggs in Eiovembler and. December and market supplies at that tiLae are not
likely to show the same incr-see over a year earlier that Is expected
for Septejrblor and Octcber. This --r defer the usual fall down-turn
in egg prices until INvemb-r or even December, which would be a month
or two beyond ordinary expectations.

Government E."a 1jr-rc"lh
Program Announced

On April 9 the Department of Agriculture announced a program
under which as many as- 500 thcus-jn cases of e.g.s -ay be bought for
delivery in the last 4 months of 1992. Thee:- eggs will be used in
Schocl Lunch programs and in other outlets.

The program cperatce through weekly offers of carlots of eggs
of the specified grade. The accEptcd bids result in contracts calling
for the delivery of eggs in any approved refrl;-:era-ed warehouse. The
eggs bought in May were stored before June 1 and are to be delivered
to the Department in Septemb.r, October, .'Nvember, or December 1952.
Under an extension of the original rro:!az, purchases will continue
through- J'ne.

The contracts specify that the eggs delivered shall be not less
than 60 percent A's, and with a loss not exceeding 0.3 percent. The'
purpose of this program IP to help relieve the springtime surplus of
eggs. The quantity involved in tiis pror-aem is limited to the capacity
of the available outlets fcr the commodity. The announced half
million case limit is mtich smaller than the dried-e,7gg purchases,
equivalent to 8 million cases made by the rerartment in 1950.






PES-119


The USDA has used two types of purchase programs to strengthen
producer prices. The present program, with the objective of surplus
removal, is sharply, different from the price support programs under
which the Department's past purchases of dried eggs were conducted.
The earlier programs were financed directly from the capital funds
of the CCC. Under that type of program, the Department announced its
willin-ness to accept any quantity of product offered (in accord with
specifications) in order to support producer prices at a pre-announced
level. Such programs were typically used for non-perishable com-
modities, such as grains and cottc.n, and when that type of program was
applied to eggs the product purchased was in most cases dried eggs
which are relatively non-perishable.

For commodities purchased for price support a procedure exists
for resale 'into domestic trade channels, if subsequent price trends
make this practical. Through 1949 the egg price support rendered by
this type of program was mandatory at 90 percent of parity under
the terms of the then-existing lecisJ.atinn.

The surplus removal program differs from price support
operations in that the programs are not underta!:en until after a
surplus has developed, and the quantities -o be purchased are
specifically limited in line with the practical outlets that exist
for the commodity. With this limitation, relatively perishable
commodities can be bought.

The eggs currently being bought will be used in the School
Lunch Program. In 1951-52 about 9.4 million children participated in
the national School Lunch Program. Purchased eggs could also be
distributed through other progracam of a beneficent nature.

The legislative authority for this type of surplus removal
program is Sec. 32 of Public law 320 ('i'4th Congress) as amended.
The funds appropriated by this Section are to be used, among
other purposes, to encouragee the domestic consumption of .
commodities by diverting them from the normal channels
of trade and commerce The funds thus allowed are 30 percent
of the annual customs receipts of the U. S., with the limitation
that not more than 25 percent of the allotment may be spent in any
one year for any single commodity, .and the funds must be used
principally for Perishable commodities.

Commodities acquired by the Government under this authori-
zation are not available for resale.


- 5 -


1.





MAY-JUNE 1952


Shell FgE Storage Etocks Ahead of
MaZ 121;* Frozen About the Same

On IAy 1 the total Un!ted States holdings 7f shell eggs in refrigerated
storage were 2.2 million cases, compared. with 1.0 million cq7?" on May 1, 1951
and the 2.4 million cases at the July 1 high point last year. Reports from
35 principal cities indicate that the storage movement has continued fairly
large since May 1. At the end of May, 35-city holdings were two-thirds
larger than a year earlier. The likelihood, therefore, la that shell egg
holdings in 1952 will exceed considerably 1951.

Frozen egg holdings, at 112.1 million pounds o May 1, were also
ahead of 1951, but by a considerably smaller margin. May 1 st-cks in 1951
were 109.3 million pounds and they rose to the season's peak of 190.8 mil-
lion pounds on August 1. On May 31, 35-city stocks of frozen egg were 4 per-
cent below the corresponding 1951 holdings.

Earlier in the season, 1952 stocks of frozen egg had considerably
exceeded the comparable 1951 holdings, because of the relatively large
67 million pound carry-over of frozen egg on January 1, 1952. The net
in-movement of 45 million pounds from January 1.to May 1 was actually smaller
than the corresponding movement of 62 million pounds in 1951. In mid-May
this year, the weekly rate of in-movement of frozen egg t" storage in
35 cities was somewhat smaller than the corresponding rate a year earlier.
This suggests that the oeak holdings of frozen egg in 1952 will continue
below the 1951 level.

The prices of both frozen -.olk and frozen albumen are lower than
a year ago, following the generally lower level of egg prices, but the
reduction in prices of albumen has been much sharper than either yolk or
mixed whole egg. Table 1 indicates the proportion of the c;irrent hold-
ings which are of whole and separated frozen egg products compared with
previous years. Table 2 offers price comparisons.

The. May 1 holdings of frozen products were equivalent to 2.9 million
cases, 57 percent of the total holdings of .shell and frozen eggs.

Table 1.- Frozen egg and products: Totrl holdings and
composition of holdings May 1, 1952, with comparisons

: Composition of holdings 1/
: Fr-zen : :
Tctal
Date holdings : hols or. : Frozen : Frozen
: ing xed : yolk. : albumen
: : a' .egg
*: l.11-. Percent Percent Percent

May 1, 1952 112.1 44.4 24.6 31.0
April 1, 1952 : 84.3 45.0 25.4 29.6
March 1, 1952 : 60.6 45.0 27.3 271.7
May 1, 1951 : 109.3 45.7 24.7 29.6
May 1, 1950 : 155.1 42.0 23.2 34.8

li Includes "unclassified" apportioned among "mixed wh le," "yolk", and
"albumen" in the same proportions that the designated classes bear to each
other.


- 6 -




PES-159


Table 2 .- Prices of frozen egg products at wholesale in New York City,
per pound, 1.941 to date

FFrozen: Frozen : Price ratio
Year whole : yol albumen ;Abumen to yolk Albumen to whole

Cents Cents Cents Percent Percent

1941 22.1 32.6 14.4 44 65
1942 28.1 39.4 21.3 54 76
1943 32.4 45.5 24.2 53 75
1944 31.1 46.8 22.3 48 72
1945 31.4 46.4 23.8 51 76
1946 29.8 46.0 21.8 47 73
1947 34.6 49.5 28.3 57 82
1948 35.,' 43.8 34.7 79 97
1949 37.0 53.3 29.1 55 79

1950 28.7 53.0 15.2 29 53
1951 36.1 59.4 25.1 42 70
Jan. 4/34.7 55.0 22.3 41 64
Feb. : 34.6 55.5 22.8 41 66
Mar. 35.8 56.9 25.6 45 72
Apr. 3'.3 56.8 25.5 45 70
May : 38.1 61.1 26.6 44 70

1952
Jan. 1/33.0 60.2 1/25.0 42 76
Feb. 2/29.0 3/50.9 2/20.2 40 70
Mar. 28.2 51.2 17.4 34 62
Apr. 28.8 52.4 17.6 34 61
May 29.3 51.8 19.4 37 66
]/ Spring pack.
_/ Current pack.
3/ Light color.
Fresh pack.

Fewer Chickens to be Paised in 1992
but More Early-Season Pullets

On May 1, the number of young chickens on farms was 5 percent
lower than on the corresponding date in 1951. Coupled with the fact that
15 percent fewer eggs than last year were in incubators in hatcheries on the
same date, this indicates clearly that there will be a reduction in the
number .of chickens raised this year for laying flock replacements. This is
in line with the expectations based both on farmers' intentions to buy chicks,
and the egg-feed price ratio, which for each of the past 5 months has been at
or near the record low for the month.

The number of young-chickens on April 1, was 9 percent over a year
before, reflecting large hatchings in March and earlier months. This
suggests tkat more early-season pullets will be added to laying flocks this
fall than a year ago. However, so far as egg production later in the
season is concerned, this early increase will be more than offset by the
subsequent reduction in the number of young chickens on farms.


- 7 -






Table 3.- Springtime numbers of young chickens on farms and numbers
of pullete for laying purposes at end of year, 1931 to date

Chicks and-young chickens on farms. 'Pullets on farms
*" F~~nQemmhAr 31
Year :Numbers, first of month:As a percentage of preceding year: Percentagi
April: May: June: July April : May : June : July I Number : of preced-
.. : ; : ; : ing year
Mil. Mil. Mil. Mil. Percent Percent Percent Percent Mil. Percent
1931 : 140 333 502 516 230
1932 : 149 330 520 550 106 99 104 107 237 103
1933 : 122 350 542 559 82 106 104 102 238 100
1934 : 99 298 491 503 81 85 91 90 212 89
1935 : 114 325 481 504 115 109 98 100 226 107
1936 : 110 345 541 570 96 106 112 113 249 110
1937 : 126 324 465 464 115 94 86 81 215 86
1938 : 158 364 509 513 125 112 109 111 242 113
1939 : 167 387 531 534 106 106 104 104 254 105

1940 : 126 323 477 499 75 83 90 93 240 94
1941 : 155 354 513 550 123 110 108 110 278 116
1942 : 185 420 589 611 119 119 115 111 319 115
1943 : 227 472 679 732 123 112 115 120 350 110
1944 : 231 471 616 595 102 100 91 81 301 86
1945 : 207 461 626 661 90 98 102 111 322 107
1946 : 219 462 580 564 106 100 93 85 281 87
1947 : 209 436 572 566 95 94 99 100 278 99
1948 : 158 363 289 492 76 83 85 87 258 93
1949 : 210 424 558 553 133 117 114 112 287 111

1950 : 216 384 483 470 103 91 87 85 264 92
1951 : 201 406 523 508 93 106 108 108 279 106
1952 : 219 384 109 95

Large Marketings of Broilers
Bring Low Prices

Most broilers marketed in May were from the very large place-
ments made in the 4 weeks beginning in mid-February. During that
period placements were at the rate of about 14 million per week in the
11 reporting areas, an all time high record. Marketing during May
probably were in proportion, and prices during part of the month were
the lowest since December, 1950.

Placements tapered off after mid-March, to about 12 million
chicks per week in early May, and 10.8 million in late May. These
levels were lower than the 1951 peak, and at the end of the month
were 11 percent below corresponding 1951 placements. Nevertheless,
the market will be adequately supplied with broilers at least through
July. By that time, substantial marketing will probably be made of
the cockerels from early chicks being raised for laying flock replace-
ment. For these reasons, no early substantial recovery is forseen
for chicken prices.


- 8 -


MAY-JUNE 1992







In early M.y, broiler prices were as low as 13 cents .per pound in
some sections. ('ee tFlle h .) In the ccorgia u"i'ic"-MaIr-Va crpas,
prices at that time wec abo-ut 22 cents per pound compared with 26.6 and.
-. 6,9.reepectivel.tin ea1ly Arnil. There was a very quick recovery in
broiler prices In mid-May, particularly in the Te::-s and Arkansas areas
where the 1r.-cent price- beid *,.evailed, but the recovery did not carry
iavmerage prices. uack to tne Janunry-March levels.

At present levels of costs,the broiler prices of *early May in
--aost ,areas did not return the direct costs of production to most producers.
With broiler rash on the D9l-Mar-Va peninsulaa typically costing "about
5 1,2 cents per pound, the ezti'me.ed 10 .'cunds of feed required to produce
a-.3-pound biLd results in a coast for fee-' alone that is equivalent to
18 cents ,per.peun4. Chick=costs.-typicallyroi.d-.about 5 or 6 cents more
per .pound to these costs. .When prices were "eOlow the.itotal.of these
.. *.osts, nothing was left for fuel, litter, medication, ,labor, and overhead.

The price of ..fa.rvi chickens, which ,at thiu season.still reflects
mostly the price of0 hens, ha,:: declined somewhat alons with the-price:of
trollers. Th!e U. t. average p-.ce of al] chicken.? 'n reported .t mid-
.month was *2h.3 cents per pound .n mid-May.compared. with the revised figure
qf 26.0 cents a month earlier. In mid-May 1951 the comparable (revised)
-%.rice .had been 29,0 cent:: per pound. .. .

During Mry, the BuieT of Agriultural Economircs issued a revised
series of monthlyy poultry prices received I.y fLrmers. These numbers
.indicate separate monthly prices. f--r l'rllers, fena chickens, ,and all
chickens, since Janua-ry 10.'. i. .. .

Teble h Brcilers and fr:-.ers: f.o.'. frrn .prices, per pound, live, ..
in 9-elected area-. s.electe-. ,rte-, ip:1rl 2, 1''92 to date

: Del- : : :Shenan- : :. : : San :


S- bost.on
Se Va area


.. ".' .. ... .' -.
: -3 ibs;
:-Cents

April 2: 27-27 .
....27
16: -26
23: ,-26

a : *;
May 7: '2-23

21: 264--27
23: ?3.T-24


-Frtes

Cents

25-2"7





29-26
22-26'
22-25
23-25


June I: 2r-26 2q-25


jfi.day of-given week.
N/ o-vwelhts speoite4. ...,-
n .: : ,


4- I -


*
North Arkmari


:doeh :
: W'll s ill y.
. velI ht: wai ht -weights
Cents Cent~ Cont

26-7 2-5% 25
26-27 21 -5 25. ;
2P697 241?s 2 2
':26 24;-2c 23
L2'> 23 2 .13-19

2?-23 2 .-2? 19
21-22 2-a5 .. 2""- .
26 26P-28 27
26 24 W-27 ,2."

25 P32 -2 P


S -. -_ I"


'. South : JoEquin: Iowaal/
. Texas Valley:"
: All : FryerTPr ilersend
: wei.hts: 2/ :.fryers 2/
Coant Cents Cents


25 30-32
.d 26 3"-33
25 30-32
2?-?4 29-32
S3T-20) 8-32

f.N 2P-30
27-8:48 .. .-'f9.
Sl7 27-29
..26 28-31

26 9-3I
;t 4- ," "


23-26
* 6-27
-.1 26
2.-,26
S2.5.-!26
.:Q..O-22

20-21

27


25-27


k
, .' '.- I ,


* ...I'
-.4 .
t-, .@


--,ir~.~-r~l~r. -- ----- ---


i





. .. .:: .,




MAY-JUNE 1952


- 10 -


Large Turkey Crop Expected

Recent reports on turkey hatchings indicate that farmers are likely
to exceed their January intentions to produce a turkey crop 11 percent larger
than last year.

Among a sample of hatcheries making comparable reports to the Bureau
of Agricultural Economics for 1951 and 1952, 22 percent more poults were
hatched in February, March, and April 1952 than in the same months of 1951.
On May 1, also on a matched sample basis, there were 10 percent more turkey
eggs in incubators than a year earlier.

Data are not yet available to indicate what proportion of the increase
is among large birds for fall. and winter marketing, and what prop8rtlon
among Beltsville Small Whites, which are marketed on more nearly a year-round
basis. If a large proportion of the increase to date has been among Beltsvilles,
which are ready for marketing at 14 17 weeks as broilers, and in 6 or 7 months
at conventional marketing weights, the supply of turkeys in the fall will be
less sharply affected than otherwise,

In 1951, 8 million more turkeys (19 percent) were raised than in 1950.
Of this increase, 5.6 million (67 percent) was of Beltsville Small Whites. If
the increase in Beltsvillesis as large this year as last, fall marketing of
turkeys will be somewhat smaller than indicated by hatchings.

More Beltsvilles probably are produced in Virginia than ia any other
State. Also, Virginia probably has the largest proportion of Beltsvilles in
its turkey population. The number of poults hatched in this State each month
through April this year exceeded the comparable 1951 output by a larger per-
centage than the gains for the U. S. as a whole.

Table 5. Poult Hatchings: Monthly output as a percentage of
comparable 1951 output, available data January 1952
to date, Virginia and United States

: Output as a percentage of correspond-
Month :Hatchings in Virginia : ing output 1 ear earlier .
-__ ,, : 195 -, 951 : Virginia : United States
Thousands Thousands Percent Percent

January : (70 174 385 -
February : 792 284 279 158
March : 779 497 157 127
April : 1,287 1,080 119 112
May 1,224 9?l 126 i'l

1Eggs in incubators.'-- -- -- -
Bids Invited for Remaining Stocks
Of Government Dried

A Department of Agriculture announcement on May 14 invited )lids, for
export dispositions, against the remaining uncommitted stocks of 5.2 million
pounds of dried whole egg still held in CCC inventory. Disposition of this
quantity would exhaust the CCC's holdings of the product. The last additions
to inventory were made in 1950 when 85 million pounds were purchased for price
support.





PES-159


The announcement said that this would be the last offering of this
stock for expert sale. The dried egg has been continuously available for
domes l.c sale at $1.03 per pound, a price fixed in accord with standards
embodied In current legislation regulating the Government resale of price-
support commodities.

Estimates Made for Value of 1951 Poultry Output

The gross value of total poultry output in the U. S. was a record
in 1951. The grosa income (total value of sales plus home consumption)
from eggs, all chickens "including commercial br'o:lere), and turkeys
totaled 4 billion dollars. The previous high of 3 1/2 billion was attained
in 1948.

*. Although no statistical measure of net profit exists, it is likely
that 1951 will also rank among the more profitable recent years for egg
producerss. Feed costs, were higher than in some other recent years, but
the egg-feed price ratio, ..well above 1950, was the record high of the
postwar period while the chicken-feed price ratio was slightly higher
than in the previous year.

Because of the continuous improvement in the efficiency of producing
eggs and poultry, changes in the product-feed ratios are not a reliable
basis for making profit comparisons over long periods. However, if the
comparisons go back only a few years,.they have some validity. It seems
clear that egg production in 1951, when the average ratio was 12 pounds--
that is 1 dozen eggs was equal in value to 12 pounds of poultry ration--
was probably more profitable than in 4 of the preceding 5 years (see
table 8 ).

Increasing supplies of broilers were probably partly responsible
for the fact that the chicken-feed price ratio (which includes broilers
as well as other chickens) was only slightly more favorable in 1951 than
a year earlier. The unfavorable months in 1951, from the viewpoint of
producers of chicken meat, were those at the beginning and end of the
year. For the months of February through August the ratio averaged 7.2
pounds as against the'6.8 average for 12 months. In the first 5 months
of 1952 the ratio averaged 6.2 pounds compared with 7.2 in the same
period of 1951.

The average turkey-feed-price ratio of 8.9 in 1951 was below the
average of the preceding 5 years. However, the prospective Increase in
the 1952 turkey crop over that of a year before suggests that the income
from the 1951 crop was sufficiently favorable to encourage an expansion
in production. In the mid-season of 1951, It was feared that the 16 per-
cent increase then expected in turkey production would result in need for a
price-support program, which was tentatively announced by the Department of
Agriculture. But by year-end, markets cleared of their own account at
prices generally above a year earlier.

The outlook for poultrymen for 1952 as a whole is clearly leas favor-.
able than the 1951 situation. For eggs and broilers a substantial part of
the annual output has already been sold at relatively low prices. Since the
large numbers of birds already on farms assure a further large output of
these commodities, there are no clear-cut signs o" an immediate sharp change
in these prices. 'Mbst turkey growers have not yet made large volume sales of
L theik products, since most turkey marketing are concentrated Into the last
months of the year. .


- 11 -




MAY-JUNE 1952


Although poultry product prices -in 1952 are expected to average lower
than the.1951 averages, .their effect on gross farm income from poultry will
be largely offset by the increases expectedin the volume of output for eggs,
broilers, and turkeys. As a result, the gross farm income from poultry for
1952.is likely to be almost as high as the 4 billion dollar figure for 1951;
but net incomes will be considerably lower. Changes in feed costs are a partial
measure of the reduction that can be expected in 1952 net incomes of poultrymen,
compared with 1951. Poultrymen are likely to purchase an increased volume of feed,
almost in proportion to the expected aggregate product on increase, and this
feed will be higher priced than in 1951. (See table 6 .)
Table 6.- Prices per cwt. for poultry ration and related items,
with comparisons, quarterly, 1947 to date

Prices paid by : Index numbers of : Index numbers of
Year : Poultry : farmers for: : prices received : wholesale prices
and : ration : : : by ?armers for : of eleven high-
Laying Scratch
quarter: / : msh : feed grains : protein feeds
: mash : feed : (1935-39=100) : (1935-39=100) 2/
: Dol. Dol. Dol.

1947 4.17 4.87 4.69 y75 254
1st : 3.55 4.35 3.96 206 224
2nd : 3.94 4.63 4.49 251 225
3rd : 4.41 5.05 4.94 313 274
4th : 4.77 5.44 5.37 330 293

1948 :4.29 5.14 r 5.77. 273 257
1st : 4.76 5.58 5.44 321 283
2nd : 4.65 5.44 5.30 318 265
3rd : .4.13 4.93 4.79 261 247
4th : 3.63 4.59 4.20 192 231.

1949 : 3.46 4.49 3.90 176 230
1st : 3.51 .50 4.01 181 221
2nd : 3.49 4.51 3.99 179 224
3rd. : 3.46 4.54 3.86 175 252
4th : 3.36 4.42 3.72 167 221

1950 : 3.58 4.53 3.95 198 228
1st : 3.38 4.35 3.73 179 214
2nd : 3.57 4.52 3.95 198 233
3rd : 3.70 4.67 4. 209 241
4th : 3.66 4.60 : .06 207 226

1951 :'4.01 4.96 4.46 237 247
1st : 3.95 4.86 4.38 235 246
2nd 3.99 4.92 4.50 238 238
3rd : 3.97 .92 4.92 45 233 239
4th : 4.13 5.13 4.53 243 263

1952 :
1st : 4.25 5.30 4.63 246 270
2nd* : 4.24 1 5.28 4.70 244 277

*April and May only.
I/ Average prices paid by farmers for commercial feeds and the evaluation of grains
fed alone at prices received by farmers. 2/' Five oilseed meals,- tankage, meat
scraps, fish-meal, gluten feed, and brewers' and distillers' dried grains.


- 12--








Table 7 .- Gross income from poultry and eggs, 1940 to date
: Egg : Farm chickens :Broll- : Turkeys : Thtals 3/ :
: : : : ere n: : : : :
Value : spec- : : Value Value
S of con-: Value :ialized: :of con- of con- : Other
Tear : Value : sump- Value :of con-: enter-: Value : sump- sump-: Value : Gross : poul-
of :tian on: of : sump- : prices: of :t1on on:tion on: of : in- : tr
: sales : farm : ales :tion on:(value : sales : farm : farms : sales : com : 6/
S : / : :farms : of : / 4/ /
S ./ produc-:
ton: : : : : i :

: Mil. Mil. Mil. Mil. Nil. Mil. Mil. il. Mil. Mil. Nil.
: dol. dol. dol. dol. dol. dol. dol. dol. dol. dol. dol.

1940 : 467.6 114.6 199.5 92.3 71.7 78.2 2.6 209.5 817.0 1,026.5 16
1941 : 663.0 144.2 263.8 108.3 103.1 98.4 3.0 255.6 1,128.3 1,383.9 19
1942 ,:1,017.4 179.1 388.7 129.1 154.6 144.8 3.5 311.7 1,705.5 2,017.2 28
1943 :1,445.3 222.2 696.2 166.6 238.3 16o.o 3.8 392.7 2,539.8 2,932.5 46
1914 :1,365.1 205.6 634.9 155.5 227.1 198.7 3.6 364.6 2,425.8 2,790.5 47

19145 81,518 .1 233.3 676.6 175.4 327.1 241.4 4k.o 1.6 2,763.1 3,175.7 57
1916 jl,507.9 235.1 639.2 175.1 288.6 268.5 4.4 414.6 2,704.2 3,118.8 54
1947 /_ll,813.2 264.6 567.8 159.3 302.2 231.5 4.3 428.1 2,914.7 3,342.8 47
1948 ]it1,883.8 261.3 542.7 168.1 405.2 257.4 5.3 434.7 3,089.0 3,523.7 49
1949 j,.1,856.9 246.0 496.6 146.8 442.5 263.1 4.3 397.2 3,059.1 3,456.2 59

190o :1,564.0 201.8 411.0 129.3 530.1 261.6 3.9 335.0 2,766.8 3,101.7 2/
1951 :2,096.2 254.7 472.2 143.6 690.5 339.5 4.3 402.5 3,598.4 4,000.9 2/
I
1/ cOmumd an households of fanm producers. 2/ Inoludes consumption in households of producers
;&loh is less than 1 percent of production. "7 Obtained from unrounded figures. 4/ For eggs,
faam hickens, and turkeys, only. 2/ Value of sales plus home consumption. 6/ SuSject to further
revision, 1945-1949. 1/ Not included in totals shown In previous columns. j/ ReflseA. 2/ 0agas-
bte figures available.

Table 8.- Poultry-produat/feed price ratios and poultry ration cost, 1940-51

SRatio l/ : Average
o a: farm value
Tear : Egg- : Chicken- : Turkey- : of poultry
: feed : feed : feed : ration
: Pounda Poundme ounds Dollars
1940 : 11.5 8.3 8.4 1.68
1941 : 13.5 8.9 .9.2 1.83
1942 : 14.2 8.9 9.8 2.21
1943 : 14.5 9.5 11.1 2.66
1944 : 11.5 8.6 10.8 2.94
1945 : 13.4 9.3 11.5 2.91
1946 11.3 8.2 9.7 3.47
1947 : 11.1 6.8 7.7 4.17
1948 : 11.4 7.6 9.8 4.29
1949 : 13.2 7-9 11.0 3.46

1950 : 10.3 6.9 8.8 3.58
1951 : 12.0 6.8 8.9 4.01
1/ Simple average of monthly ratios.


PES-159


- 13 -







MT-JBE 1952


-1k-

Table 9- Eggs: Production, annual rate per potential layer, and
disposition, by States and divisions, 1951


Eggs produced : Eggs : Average : Value of
State Potential Egg produced consumed : annual :
and : layers : : Per poten- : on farms sold : price, : eggandol
division : Jan. 1 : Total : tial layer : where : : per : on
Jan. 1 : produced dozen :


Thouanand Millions

Maine 3,369 612
New Hampshire 2,586 424
Vermont : 931 156
Maesachusetts 5,541 991
Rhode Island : 614 108
Connecticut : 3,76 633
New York : 14,128 2,168
New Jersey 13,300 2,358
Pennsylvania 21,934 3,330

North Atlantic : 66,149 10,780

Ohio 17,525 2,667
Indiana 16,711 2,590
Illinois: 20,597 2,989
Michigan : 0,403 1,603
Wieconsin : 14,349 2,228

East North Central : 79.55 12.097


Minnesota : 24,547
Iowa : 29,726
Missouri ; 19,169
North Dakota 1 3,938
South Dakota 8,302
Nebraska : 12,314
Kansas ; 12,991

West North Central 110.990


Delavare
Marylandi
Virginia
West Virginia.
North Carolina
South Carolina
Georgia
Florida

South Atlantic

Kentucky
Tennessee
Alabama
Mississippi
Arlansas
Louisiana
Oklahoma
Texas

South Central

Montana
Idaho
Wyoming
Colorado
New Mexico
Arizona
Utah
Nevada
Washington
Oregon
California
Western

United States


: 945
: 3,670
: 8,234
3,575
: 10,606
2 4,224
6,860
3,032

41,146

: 9,562
: 8,804
6,512
: 6,356
: 6,620
3,857
* 8,705
21,277

71,693

S 1,668
1,735
716
2,770
958
619
2,762
191
: 4,486
3,318
21,414

4: 0,637

:410,200


3,842
4,773
2,685
530
1,176
1,781
1,933


132
522
1,144
515
1,233
465
793
357

5,161

1,1914
1,010
719
625
728
378
1,160
2,639

8,453

233
267
108
387
123
81
446
27
715
516
3,242

6,1 5

59,356


1
1
1
j
]
(
1
]



(


]
1


125


118


151


Millions

27
16
19
25
3
20
140
37
206

493

261
208
277
167
215

1,128T

276
328
325
96
100
178
226


number

182
164
168
179
176
169
153
177
152

163

153
155
145
154
155

152

157
161
140
135
142
145
149

151

140
142
139
144
116
110
116
118


1,810

56
45
20
73
29
10
31
7
81
70
157


6,552


Millions

584
407
137
964
105
612
2,026
2,316
3,118

10,269

2,423
2,379
2,708
1,434
2,010

10,95W

3,564
4,439
2,354
433
1,074
1,600
1,704

15, 16

123
474
952
4115
931
336
591
304

4,126

903
729
503
447
542
256
966
2,241


176
221
88
313
94
71
414
20
630
445
3,080

5,552
52,656


Cents

62.8
63.1
61.0
65.1
63.8
63.8
59.8
60.8
56.8



48.1
43.6
41.2
48.0
45.6



40.8
39.7
39.5
35.6
36.6
37.6
39.1

39.3

52.0
52.1
53.1
51.9
53.0
55.0
54.9
58.1



43.8
45.1
49.3
46.9
44.2
48.7
40.7
44.2

44.5

43.9
47.6
45.9
45.5
48.6
61.6
51.0
57.8
55.9
55.6
54.2

53.1
47.8


Th Uand

31,976
22,242
7,930
53,653
5,743
33,601
107,939
119,219
157,336

539,639

107,584
93,994
102,485
64,040
84,550

*52,653

130,560
157,708
88,184
15,69.
35,807
55,710
62,886

546.549

5,720
22,621
50,489
22,231
54,237
21,129
36,005
17,188

229,620

43,362
37,658
29,251
24,036
26, 557
15,137
39,208
96,871



8,488
10,551
4,131
14,636
4,981
4,158
18,913
1,300
33,120
23,861
146,204

270,343

2,350,884


1,529

9
47
189
99
297
125
196
51

1,013

285
273
209
168
179
117
190
389


--


--


--


--


--


--


--





PES-159


Table 1a- Eggs:


15 -
Production, annual rate per potential layer, and


d!iositir,-United States, 1920-to date-


Potential
Year layers
: Jan. 1


:Thousand

1924 : 341,474
1921-,. : 331,632
192- : 353;875
1923, : 371,930
1924'- : 389,626
192t : 390,517
1926 : 393,849
1927-1' : 414,875
1928. .: 427,7139-
1929: : 403,774

1930' : 420,451
1933. : 401,776
19321 : 385,826
1933 : 390,743
1934 *- : 385,341
1935. : 350,407
1936" : 362,619
1937; : 379,754
1938. : 352,964
1939 : 376,141 -


1940o
1941.
1942.
1943
1944 .
1945 'f
1946
1947
1948 4]
1949 _1

1950 1/
1951 2/


392,65'c
381,315
427,911
488,9^ .
523,587
473, 380
472,320
431,446
417,570
399, 380
423,773
410,200


: Sgs produced : Eggs : : Av
: : Per : consumed :Egs : san
:Total :potential: on farms : : pr
: : layer : where : : p
: : Jan. 1 ipro4dced-: d : do
P ,


Millions Number

29,700 67
30,800 93
33,000 93
35,000 90
34.592 8
34,969 90
37,248 95
38i627- 93
a39,659 91
37,921 94

39,067 93
38,532 96
36,298 94
35,514- 91
34.429 89'
33,609 96
34.534 95
37,564 99-
37,356 106
38, 93- "103

39,695 101i
41,373 11i0
48,597 114
54,539. .- 12.
58,530 112
56,221 119
55,962 118
55,384 128
54,899 131
56;154- 141

58,734 139
59,356 145


Millions Millicns


7,100
7,300
7,600-
7,500
7,221
7,086
7,378
7,612
7,'413
7,147

7,519
7,995
7,992
7,922"
7,406
7,205
7,416
7,884
?.2C-h
8,235-

8,235
7,652
7,425
7,349 .
7,711
7,502
7,551
7,333
6,800"
6,685

6,364
6,552


21,556
22,398
24,267
26,392
26,333
26,910
28,845
29,958
30;268
29,779

30,613
29,628
27,415
"26,737
26,266
25,739
26,448
29,162
28,624
30,092

31,224
33,795
40,740
. 6,711
50,455
48,365
48,148
48,029
47,903
49,282

51,705
52,656


Ce


erage :
nual : alue of
ice, : eggs sold
and
zen :consumed
Thousand
nts dollars


43.5
28.3
25.0
26.5
26.7
30.4
28.9
25.1
28.1
29.8

23 ..7
17.6
16.2
13.8
17.0
23.4
21.8
21.3
20.3
17.4

18.0
23.5
30.0
37.1
32.5
37'.7
37.6
45.3
47.2
45.~

36.3
47.8


1.038,780
700,377
663,895
748,447
741,225
856,964
870,254
781 ,600
877,374
911,882

750,603
546,072
[12,335
394,315
473,561
635,834
610,509
651,582
616,528
551,093
582,211
807,261
1,196,475
1,667,518
1,570,670
1,751,381
1,743,016
2,077,719
2,145,041
2,102,955

1,765,793
2,350,884


SRevtsed.
Preliminary.


_ __ __ __


- I





MAY-JUME 1952


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PIS-159


Iable 12.- Chickens: Numbers, raised and sold; numbers consumed on
farms here produced and value of sales plus home consumption,
by States and divisions, 1951


Chickens consumed on :
e chicokens sold : Value of
State Chcke Chicken soldfarms vher produced Average as p o
: raeprice, per he
vision : : Number : Weight : Nuber : Weight : :consumption

Thousand Thousand Thousand


Maine *
New Hampshire
Tenaont
Masesachusetts
Mlods Island
Connecticut
New. York
New Jersey
Pennylvania
North Atlantic

Ohio
Indiana
Illinois
Mi.chigan
Wisconsin

East North Central

Minnesota
Iowa
Missouri
North Dakota
South Dakota
Nebraska
Kansas

West North Central

Delaware
Nkryland
Virginia
West Virginia
North Carolina
South Carolina
Georgia
Florida

South Atlantic

Kentuclk
Tsnnessee
Alabam -





South Central

Montana
Idaho
Wyoming
Colorado
vow Mexico
Arlsona
Utah
Nevada
Washington
Oregon
California
Western

United States


:Thousands Thousands pounds Thousands


: 6,471
" 5,477
S 1,877
: 8,795
S 1,0o46
: 7,&80
: 22,3614
: 16,854
: 38,386
"10,750

27,013
27,442
29,968
: 19,811
21,887

: 126,121

30,726
: 4,805
30,988
7,125
14,547
23,361
22,598

: 17,50
: 1,689
: 5,539
: 11,081
: 4,678
18,251
: 8,606
12,316
: 5,509
S67,669

16,502
: 15,796
: 22,978
a 11,697
S11,898
a 8,005
S14,986
* 31,605
: 123.467

* 3,830
1 3,400
a 1,202
2 5,933
* 1,489
, 944
a 4,5814
: 378
1 9,434
* 5,900
29,215

: 66,309


a 666,466
I


5,137 28,254
4,738 25,111
1,527 8,398
7,466 40,316
880 4,576
6,458 33,582
17,139 87,409
11,735 57,502
28,209 141,045

83,289 2 6.193
16,960 83,104
18,971 89,164
19,439 89,419
14,556 69,869
15,095 67,928
8o,021 399,4854

22,052 99,234
32,562 156,298
20,426 89,874
4,250 19,975
9,967 45,848
15,629 68,768
13,1462 57,887

118,348 537,884

1,191 5,360
3,695 16,997
3,769 18,091
2,457 11,056
5,731 25,790
1,500 5,700
3,257 13,679
3,221 11,596

24,821 108,269

6,552 30,139
7,456 31,315
4,861 18,472
5,101 18,8714
6,529 26,116
2,341 9,364
8,404 32,776 .
15,288 53,508

56,532 220,564
2,346 9,8%54
1,877 7,696
649 2,661
3,855 15,034
728 2,766
598 2,332
3,508 12,629
229 916
6,442 27,056
3,830 17,235
20,182 84,764
44.2"54 M 1i U2


412,255 1,875,336


269
186
193
376
57
307
1,887
873
3,355

7,503

5,258
4,802
6,176
2,921
4,040

23,197


1,345
874
984
1,880
285
1,474
9,624
4,016
17,110
37,592

24,187
19,208
25,939
14,605
18,180


J &,J .7 _


4,576 19,219
6,616 28,449
7,286 26,230
1,749 7,171
2,607 10,689
5,185 19,703
6,115 22,014

34,134 133M,75
247 1,037
1,128 4,738
5,342 18,697
1,644 6,576
8,992 29,674
5,572 18,388
7,024 22,477
1,220 4,148

31.169 105,735
8,236 28,002
6,462 22,617
6,344 17,763
5,087 15,261
4,347 13,041
4,663 16,787
5,142 16,454
10,649 31,947

50,930 161,rS72
1,024 4,096
1,030 4,017
427 1,665
1,457 5,391
560 1,792
251 878
425 1,488
104 385
1,701 6,804
1,081 4,432
2,723 8,986

10,783 39,9312

157,716 580,727


Cents

28.5
28.8
29.8
30.6
30.2
30.1
30.8
31.0
30.0
30.2

26.4
24.9
24.3
28.2
24.4


25.6

19.4
21.0
23.4
20.4
19.3
20.3
19.9

20.7

27.8
29.1
26.3
26.2
25.9
28.1
27.0
29.1

27.2

24.9
23.4
25.2
26.8
23.0
29.1
22.0
23.2

24.0

27.0
25.8
25.1
23.2
22.5
30.0
24.1
29.6
26.5
25.7
26.5

26.0

25.2


dollars

8,435
7,484
2,796
12,912
1,468
10,552
29,886
19,071
47,447
140.051

28,324
26,985
28,032
23,822
21,010

128,173

22,979
38,797
27,169
5,538
10,912
17,960
15,901

139,-56
1,778
6,325
9,675
4,620
14,366
6,769
9,762
4, 581

57,M6
14,477
12,620
9,221
9,148
9,006
7,610
10,831
19,826



3,766
3,022
1,086
4,739
1,025
963
3,403
385
8,973
5,568
24,843


615,768


- 17 -


-- -


r






MAY-J1UE 1952


Table 13,- Farm chickens: Average live weight, sales, farm consumption,
and value, available data, 1930 to date


Average live weight


: Total :Si.agh-:
:consumed: ter, :Weighted:


Value of
I I T ii I


: :


Young : Mature: All
: :
: --


:Pounds


3.3
3.4
3.5
3.5
3.6
3.7
3.7
3.7
3.7
3.8

3.8
3.9


Pounds Pounds


4.9
5.1
5.1
5.1
5.1
5.2
5.2
5.2
5.3
5.3


3.8
3.8
3.8
3.8
3.9
3.9
4.0
3.9
3.9

4.1
4.1
4.2
4.2
4.3
4.3
4.4
4.4
4.5
4.4


: Total
: sold,


: on
: farms
: where


live :produc-
weight: ed,
: live


Year

:*


1,508
1,673
2,046
2,836
2,645
2,616
2,318
2,144
1,804
1,954


5.3 4.5 1,847
5.4 4.5 1,875


: weight
Million
pounds






798
752
787
779


712
699
689
678
644
669
638
598
568
575
586
581


: live : annual :
:weight,:average :
: from : price :
: farm :received:


Sales :
from :


: pro- : per : farms :
:duction: pound :
: I/ : : :
Million Million-'
pounds Cents dollars


2,713
2,506
2,547
2,657
2,383
2,261
2,334
2,169
2,069
2,260

2,220
2,372
2,735
3,514
3,289
3,285
2,956
2,742
2,372
2,529

2,443
2,456


18.4
15.8
11.8
9.5
11.3
14.9
15.8
15.9
15.4
13.5

13.2
15.8
19.0
24.5
24.0
25.9
27.6
26.5
30.1
25.4

23.3
25.2


333
258
189
161
171
207
239
225
195
199

199
264
389
696
635
677
639
568
543
497
411
472


Slaughter is
/ Revised.
Preliminary.


the sum of


sales and consumption on farms


where produced.


Million
pounds






1,536
1,417
1,282
1,481


1930
1931
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936
1937
1938
1939

1940
1941
1942
1943
1944
1945
1946
1947
1948
1949


1950 2/
1951 /


Sales
plus
home.
con-
sump-
tion
Million
dollars

495
390
293
247
259
324
374
354
320
309


292
372
518
863
790
852
814
727
711
643

540
616


- -- --- --


I I I I II


- --- -------


II


--- ---


--


i m i i i i Ii i i i II I IIIII .


- 18 -






PES-159 19 -
Table 14.- Broilers from specialized enterprises: Production, average live
weight, price per pound, and value of production, 1934 to date

: Production : average : Pverage price : Value
:* r o :live weight,: received by .
Year Number : Pound : per : producers, per : producan
: : (live) : bird : pound, live weight :
Thous. Thoua. Pounds Cents Thous. dol.

1934 34,030 96,662 2.84 19.3 18,694

1935 : 42,890 122,884 2.87 20.1 24,651
1936 : 53,155 152,447 2.87 20.7 31,493

1937 : 67,915 195,916 2.88 21.4 41,876
1938 : 82,420 239,508 2.91 19.0 45,609

1939 105,630 306,272 2.90 17.0 52,059

1940 : 142,762 414,074 2.90 17.3 71,729

1941 : 191,502 559,605 2.92 18.4 103,111
1942 : 228,187 674,087 2.95 22.9 154,650

1943 : 285,293 832,837 2.92 28.6 238,262

1944 : 264,999 790,346 2.98 28.8 227,104

1945 1/: 365,572 1,107,174 3.03 29.5 327,059

1946 1/: 292,527 883,855 3.02 32.7 288,603

1947 1/: 310,168 936,442 3.02 32.3 302,170
1948 1/: 370,515 1,126,643 3.04 36.0 405,171
1949 1/c 513,296 1,570,197 3.06 28.2 442,530

1950 1/: 630,?16 1,038,n00 3.07 27.4 530,147

1951 2/: 791,878 2,419,104 3.05 28.5 690,486


1/ Revised.
2/ Preliminary.






MAY-JUU 1952


TabletS .. Broilers from specialized enterprises: Production, average live
wei t rice er ound and valu of d t 1


State
and
division


Maine
New Hampshire
Vermont
Massachusetts
Rhode Island.
Connecticut
New York
Newov Jersey
Pennsylvania
North Atlantic
Ohio
Indiana
Illinois
Michigan
Wisconsin
East North Central
Minnesota
I ova
Missouri
North Dakota
South Dakota
Nebraska
Kansas
West North Central
Delaware
Maryland
Virginia
West Virginia
North Carolina
South Carolina
Georgia
Florida
South Atlantic
Kentucky
Tennessee
Alabama
Mississippi
Arkansas
Louisiana
Oklahoma
Texas
South Central
Montana
Idaho
Wyoming
Colorado
New Mexico
Ari onar
Utah
Nevada
Washington
Oregon
California
Western
United States


: Production

Number Pounds
(live)
: .
:Thousands Thousands

: 21,145 86,694
: 4,841 18,396
: 508 1,880
: 15,526 58,999
: 924 3,511
: 17,198 67,072
: 8,717 31,381
: 8,518 31,517
S 16,546 57,911
93,923 357,361
9,026 29,786
34,014 108,845
18,262 52,960
3,008 10,528
8,589 27,485
72,899 229,60b4
: 3,618 10,854
7,809 23,427
22,004 66,012


6,138 17,800
2,618 7,592
42,187 125,6 5
01,731 245,193
58,418 175,254
46,038 142,718
17,341 55,491
32,606 91,297
11,441 32,035
88,678 248,298
8,911 25,842
3: 45164 1,016,12
2,468 7,404
5,841 16,355
16,655 44,968
23,474 65,727
69,834 195,535
4,507 12,620
5,382 15,070
50,408 141,142
178,5b9 49b,821

1,050 2,940

2,129 6,387

1,100 3,190
1,421 4,405

8,130 26,829
5,854 17,562
39,452 130,192
: 59,136 191,505
791,876 2,419,104


e Aflfl. uc onlU, 99
Average a price Val
Average received by Va l o
live of
:wei producers, :
per bird per pound, duction
: live eight :


Pounds.

4.1
3.8
3.7
3.8
3.8
3.9
3.6
3.7
3.5

3.3
3.2
2.9
3.5
3.2
3.1
3.0
3.0
3.0


2.9
2.9
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.1
3.2
2.8
2.8
2.8
2.9

3.0
2.8
2.7
2.8
2.8
2.8
2.8
2.8
2.8


3.0

2.9
3.1
2.1
3.0
3.3
3.2
3.1


Cents

27.6
28.0
28.8
28.9.
29.1
29.1
32.0
31.0
28.5
29.0
30.5
28.6
30.0
31.0
31.0
29.6
286.8
29.0
28.6


29.0
29.4

27.1
27.1
27.3
28.7
27.9
28.4
27.6
31.0
27.5
29.0
28.9
29.1
29.3
27.6
31.0
28.5
30.0


34.0

31.0

34.0
30.0
31.0
30.0
30.9
30.9
28.5





- 20 -


Thousand
dollars

23,928
5,151
541
17,051
1,022
19,518
10,042
9,770
16,505
103,520
9 oB5.
31,130
15,888
3,264
8.520
67 887

6,794
18,879


5,162
2 232
36 ,193

47,494
38,962
15,926
25,472
9,098
68,530
8,011.
279 9 0
2,147
4,727
13,086
19,258
53,968
3,912
4,295


1,000

1,980

- 1,085
1,322

8,317
5,269
40,229
59,202
690,486







PES-159


21 -

Tablel6- Turkeys: Average live weight, sales, farm consumption, and value,
available data, 1930 to date


Average live weight : Total consumd Total :elged annual Value of;
Yaper turkey sold :Total sold,: on farms, where slaughter, average price : as a
Tear en : A live weight produced, llive live weight received per Sales pus hnte
Has: T : : An : scon- Io
I.b. Lb. b. l.lb. Ml.lb. Mil.lb. Cents Mll.dol. MI1.dol.
1930 13. 46 51
1931 13.6 12 h6
1932 : 13.8 38 41
1933 : 1.0 36 38
1934k 1.1 42 145
1935 : 1'.5 52 56
1936 : 14.7 62 65
1937 : 14.8 63 67
1938 : 14.9 66 69
1939 : 11.9 17.9 14.9 71 74
190O : 12.1 18.1 15.1 509 17 526 15.4 78 81
19a : 12.7 19.1 15.9 496 15 5U11 19.9 98 101
192 : 13.0 19.6 16.3 527 13 540 27.5 145 1.8
1943 : 12.9 19.5 16.2 490 12 502 32.6 165 161
194 : 13.2 20. 1 16.8 585 10 595 34.0 199 202
1945 / : 13.5 21.4 17.4 715 12 727 33.7 241 245
1946 : 13.9 22.2 18.0 740 12 752 36.3 269 273
1947 : 13.8 22.5 18.1 634 12 646 36.5 232 236
1948 : l1.0 22.6 18.3 519 11 561 46.8 257 263
1949 : 11.2 23.3 18.8 748 12 760 35.2 263 267
1950 1/ : 14.1 23.0 18.6 797 11 808 32.8 262 266
1951 / : 13.6 22.2 17.9 908 11 919 37.4 339 344

/ Revised. j/ Preliminary.
Table 17.- Turkeys: Numbers on farms January 1, numbers raised, sold, consumed on farms where produced,
and total slaughter, available data 1930 to date
Numbers on farms Jan. 1 : : : Consumed on Total
Yar : Breeders Others : Raised : Sold : farms where slaughter
produced s
Thousands Thousands Thousands Thousands Thousands Thousands

1930 17,419 15,999 1,70o 17,703
1931 : 18,249 15,746 1,549 17,295
1932 : 22,333 19,393 1,665 21,058
1933 : 23,211 21,733 1,623 23,356
1931 21,702 20,615 1,505 22,120
1935 20,821 18,827 1,428 20,255
1936 27,981 25,530 1,685 27,015
1937 : 3,481 2,877 25,755 24,227 1,425 25,652
1938 : 3,222 2,874 26,887 24,861 1,291 26,152
1939 : 3,911 2,575 33,587 29,821 1,297 31,118
1940 : 4,607 3,962 31,047 33,778 1,170 34,948
1941 : 3,86k 3,329 32,902 31,209 996 32,205
1942 : 4,003 3, 482 32,805 32,420 824 33,244
1943 : 3,984 2,616 32,309 30,278 747 31,025
19A : 4,294 3,135 35,616 34,749 647 35,396

1945 2/ : 4,606 2,597 42,900 40,999 691 41,690
19166 : V,8.1 3,021 40,12 41,030 699 41,729
197 2/ 3,779 2,100 33,975 34,938 675 35,613
1948 / 2,537 l,h22 31,541 30,017 666 30,683
199 : 3,148 1,474 41,266 39,81d 676 40,517

1950 : 3,270 1,854 43,792 42,918 618 43,566
1951 : 3,301 1,790 52,261 50,625 644 51,269
1952 3/ 3,836 1,999
yj Slaughter is the aum of sales and consumption on farms where produced. The difference between raised and slaughtered
is accounted tor by (a) Uf oemee In January 1 inventories, and (b) death louems.
/ avised.
Preliminary.






- 22 -


Table 18. Turkeys: Production, disposition, and related data,
by States and divisions, 1951


: Number : : Sales : Consumed on : : Value of
: n : :Average: : : farms where :Average: : Sales
0ate : Number : live : : produced :price,: : plus
division January': raised :weight.,: Number Weight : : : per : Sales : home
di Janury : per : : :Number: Weight pound : :consump-
: bird : : : : : : : tion
Thous. Thous. Thous. Thous.
Thous. Thous. Lb. Thous. lb. Thous. lb. Cents dol. dol.


Maine : 9
New Hampshire 15
Vermont : 11
Massachusetts : 54
Rhode Island : 5
Connecticut : 27
New York : 116
New Jersey : 49
Pennsylvania : 210

North Atlantic -: 96

Ohio : 171
Indiana : 55
Illinois : 66
Michi an : 114
Wisconsin : 52
East North Central: 458

Minnesota : 208
Ioa : 175
Missouri : 319
North Dakota 30
South Dakota 43
Nebraska 37
Kansas : 155

West North Central: 967

Delaware 13
Maryland 65
Virginia 231
West Virginia : 59
North Carolina : 42
South Carolina : 86
Georgia : 54
Florida : 26

South Atlantic : 576

Kentucky : 56
Tennessee : 23
Alabama : 40
Mississippi 31
Arkansas : 36
Louisiana 18
Oklahoma 83
Texas : 508

South Central : 795

Montana : 17
Idaho : 30
Wyoming : 16
Colorado 50
Nev Mexico : 13
Arizona 15
Utah 60
Nevada : 3
Washington : 160
Oregon : 320
California : 1,115

Western : 1,799

United States : 5,091


133 15.4 123 1,894 1
134 17.8 132 2,350 2
133 18.2 128 2,330 2
514 17.6 507 8,923 5
51 17.3 50 865 1
285 17.6 277 4,875 3
881 17.1 855 14,620 17
359 17.5 340 5,950 6
1,817 17.4 1,751 30,467 36
4,307 17.4 4,163 72,274 73

1,565 17.6 1,568 27,597 14
1,436 18.3 1,426 26,096 11
934 18.8 908 17,070 9
962 18.0 940 16,920 10
1,153 19.0 i,14o 21,660 7
6,050 18.3 5,992 109,343 51

4,644 18.6 4,541 84,463 18
3,104 20.0 3,098 61,960 10
1,849 18.2 1,826 33,233 12
619 16.8 599 10,063 14
352 16.7 337 5,628 10
862 18.6 850 15,810 6
742 18.1 741 13,412 8
12,172 10.7 11,99 24,569 7

143 18.0 138 2,484 2
460 17.6 439 7,726 11
3,670 11.5 3,549 40,814 21
1,064 15.4 1,048 16,139 7
783 17.7 750 13,275 15
1,002 17.5 967 16,922 13
518 18.0 499 8,982 19
151 16.5 138 2,277 10

7,791 14.4 7,521 108,619 981

392 17.5 367 6,422 10
205 16.5 188 3,102 13
175 16.5 152 2,508 24
136 16.0 112 1,792 20
585 16.2 563 9,121 12
106 15.0 81 1,215 20
627 16.6 594 9,860 15
3,220 17.3 3,045 52,678 101

5,446 17.0 5,102 86,698 215

130 16.7 117 1,954 13
222 19.3 215 4,150 5
129 17.5 120 2,100 6
723 19.0 696 13,224 15
64 18.2 57 1,037 7
85 19.4 75 1,455 7
2,075 19.9 2,043 40,656 7
24 19.8 22 436 2
1,154 19.2 1,139 21,869 10
2,382 19.6 2,326 45,590 13
9,507 19.2 9,048 173,722 44


16,495 19.3 15,85 306,193 129
52,261 17.9 50,625 907,696 644


15 40.6 769 775
36 41.2 968 983
36 41.0 955 970
88 42.7 3,810 3,848
17 43.6 377 384
53 43.8 2,135 2,158
291 46.7 6,828 6,964
105 48.4 2,880 2,931
626 45.2 13,771 14,054
1,267 45.0 32,493 33,067

246 37.5 10,349 10,441
201 38.0 9,916 9,992
169 37.8 6,452 6,516
180 38.6 6,531 6,600
133 40.2 8,707 8,760

929 38.4 41,955 42,309

335 36.6 30,913 31,036
200 37.0 22,925 22,999
218 35.1 11,665 11,742
235 38.5 3,874 3,964
167 34.5 1,942 2,000
112 34.8 5,502 5,541
145 33.0 4,426 4,474
1,412 36.2 al,247 dL,756

36 43.6 1,083 1,099
194 43.4 3,353 3,437
242 39.7 16,203 16,299
108 39.4 6,359 6,402
266 39.2 5,204 5,308
228 38.5 6,515 6,603
342 42.3 3,799 3,944
165 42.8 975 1,046

1,581 40.0 43,491 44,138

175 37.0 2,376 2,441
214 35.7 1,107 1,183
396 39.0 978 1,132
320 39.3 704 830
194 34.4 3,138 3,205
300 46.7 567 707
249 33.5 3,303 3,386
1,747 33.3 17,542 18,124

3,595 34.3 29,715 31,008
217 40.2 786 873
96 40.6 1,685 1,724
105 39.4 827 868
285 39.8 5,263 5,376
127 36.7 381 428
136 36.8 535 585
139 34.4 13,986 14,034
40 39.0 170 186
192 35.0 7,654 7,721
255 34.1 15,546 15,633
845 36.7 63,756 64,066
2,437 36.1 110, 589 111,494


11,221 37.4 339,490 343,772


wAY- Ja 1952







Table 19.- Eggs and poultry: Revised average annual civilian
disappearance per capital, 1941 tq date


Year Eggs


: Number

309

: 316

345

: 352
: 1400

377

: 381

: 337

: 381


: 386

397

2/ : 412


Poultry 1/
-
Chickens, :
including Turkeys
* broilers "
Pounds Pounds

20.5 3.5

23.4 3.7

30.5 3.3

27.0 3.3

28.7 4.2

25.7 4.5

23.5 4.4

23.1 3.7

25.1 4.1


1941

1942

1943

1944

1945

1946

1947

1948

1949


1950

1951

1952


4.9

5.2

5.8


SN. Y. dressed eight equivalent.

2/ Estimated on the basis of current


indications.


26.4

28.8.

30.2


: Z.tal
: chickens
: and
: turkeys
Pounds

P'4.0

87.1

33.8

30.3

32.9

30.2

27.9

26,8

29.2


31.3

34.0

36.0


=== = __


- --


_ __ ___ __


PES-159


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U. S. rDpartment-of Agriculture
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