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Tobacco situation

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Material Information

Title:
Tobacco situation
Physical Description:
v. : ; 26 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics and Statistics Service
United States -- World Food and Agricultural Outlook and Situation Board
Publisher:
The Service
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Frequency:
four no. a year
quarterly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Tobacco industry -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Citation/Reference:
Predicasts
Citation/Reference:
American statistics index
Statement of Responsibility:
Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
TS-1 (jAN. 1937) - TS-174 (Dec. 1980).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for <March 1938>-1939 called also spring outlook issue.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Sept. issues for 1941-<1961> called also outlook issue for the next year; e.g. Sept. 1943 called 1944 outlook issue.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues TS-67-<TS-71> lack chronological designation.
Issuing Body:
Dec. 1980 issued by the Economics and Statistics Service, USDA.
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Agricultural Marketing Service, 1954-Mar. 1961; U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, June 1961-Dec. 1977; U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service, 1978-<Dec. 1979>; U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Economics and Statistics Service, -Dec. 1980.
General Note:
Previously classed: A 36.94:, A 88.34/2:, and A 93.25:
General Note:
Cover title.
General Note:
"Approved by the World Food and Agricultural Outlook and Situation Board."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001233689
oclc - 04015633
notis - AFY4099
lccn - 78643654 //r81
issn - 0040-8344
sobekcm - AA00005303_00059
Classification:
lcc - HD9134 .A375
ddc - 338.1/7/3710973
System ID:
AA00005303:00086

Related Items

Succeeded by:
Tobacco outlook & situation

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Tobacco situation
Physical Description:
v. : ; 26 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics and Statistics Service
United States -- World Food and Agricultural Outlook and Situation Board
Publisher:
The Service
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Frequency:
four no. a year
quarterly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Tobacco industry -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Citation/Reference:
Predicasts
Citation/Reference:
American statistics index
Statement of Responsibility:
Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
TS-1 (jAN. 1937) - TS-174 (Dec. 1980).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for <March 1938>-1939 called also spring outlook issue.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Sept. issues for 1941-<1961> called also outlook issue for the next year; e.g. Sept. 1943 called 1944 outlook issue.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues TS-67-<TS-71> lack chronological designation.
Issuing Body:
Dec. 1980 issued by the Economics and Statistics Service, USDA.
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Agricultural Marketing Service, 1954-Mar. 1961; U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, June 1961-Dec. 1977; U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service, 1978-<Dec. 1979>; U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Economics and Statistics Service, -Dec. 1980.
General Note:
Previously classed: A 36.94:, A 88.34/2:, and A 93.25:
General Note:
Cover title.
General Note:
"Approved by the World Food and Agricultural Outlook and Situation Board."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001233689
oclc - 04015633
notis - AFY4099
lccn - 78643654 //r81
issn - 0040-8344
sobekcm - AA00005303_00059
Classification:
lcc - HD9134 .A375
ddc - 338.1/7/3710973
System ID:
AA00005303:00086

Related Items

Succeeded by:
Tobacco outlook & situation

Full Text


-"4; '


-: I


0


BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMIC"-"
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

M____ARCH 1945


BURLEY TOBACCO: SUPPLY AND PRICE
IN THE UNITED STATES, 1920-44 /


1920 1925 1930 1935 1940 1945
YEAR BEGINNING OCTOBER


CENTS
PER
POUND
36


30



24



18



12



6



0


S *SEASON AVERAGE PRICE RECEIVED BY FARMERS

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


A PRELIMINARY


NEG. 26619


Sales of 1944 crop of burley tobacco were in excess of 580 million pounds indi-
cating the largest crop of burley ever produced. Consumption of burley has increased
along with the increase in the manufacture of cigarettes. Although stocks at the be-
ginning of the 1944-45 season were the lowest in several years, the exceptionally large
1944 crop gives an indicated total supply of burley for the current season somewhat
greater than the large supplies of the five preceding seasons. Burley prices were rela-
tively high again this season and gross returns to growers were the largest in history.


I. -


IHE


TS 32


i:r
i;


i

1


POUNDS
(MILLIONS)


1.200


L000



800



600



400



200



0


BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS














Maryland Tobacco: Supply and Price in the

United States, 1920-44


I,"




A.

















4.

L-U





























'I

\


CENTSS
PER
POUND


8 1941 1944
ELIMINARY


*tI. r11 I *ulIAu 2I ASClllIJtfu AL Eior.S


FIGURE I.

Prices of Maryland tobacco have increased sharply during this war having reached
an all-time peak in 1943 when-growers received an average of 56-1/2 cents per pound for
the 1942 crop. Although stocks on January I, 1995 were lowest since 1940, therelatively
large 1944 crop gives a supply of Maryland for the 1945 season somewhat greater than the
supply for the 1944 season and also above the average for the pre-war years 1934-38.



CIGAR TOBACCO: SUPPLY AND PRICE IN THE UNITED STATES. 1920-44


20 1923 1926 1929 1932 1935 1938 1941 1944 19,
YEAR BEGINNING OCTOBER
S C3 HELD BY DEALERS AND MAWUFA'rCTLuRERS SEASON A56 ERAGE PRICE RECEIVED Br FARMERS
a rF FE3 4 AhtO 99 YEA B IRINhG .'UL IPRELIMHINA


CENTS PER
POUND


32


28


24


20


16


12


8


4


0


u S DEPARIMEI or A&RICuCLURE


.NE zoaoS BuLIRAU F ALRICuLTURAL ECONOMIC


FIGURE 2.

Prices of cigar tobacco have increased sharply since 1940, and are now at or near
the highest level in history. Despite a larger 1944 crop, the supply for the 1944-45
season was below the previous season. Total stocks on October I, 1944 were below a year
earlier. Cigar filler and binder stocks are low in relation to present and prospective
requirements, but wrapper stocks appear adequate.


* ... .





I'






. .;:

:: .


SJAN.2 OF YEAR FOLLOWING PRODUCTION
a SEASON AVERAGE PRICE RECEIVED BY FARMERS,


POUNDS
I MILLIONS


800


700


600


500


400


300


200


100


0


j : DEiaular or 4LeILfue.i






--
THE TOBACCO SITUATION





.: .In This Issue
l-^ *Page

: Summary ................................. 3
: Production and Consumption ............... 5
: Flue-cured ............. .... .. .............. 7

: Maryland ................................. 10
: Dark Tobacco ............................. 11
: Cigar Tobacco ........................... 1 4
: Statistical Tables ..................... 16


SUlMMARY

According to a recent report of the Crop Reporting Board of the

United States Department of Agriculture another large planting of tobacco

is in prospect' this year. As of March 1, growers' intentions were to plant

1,782 thousand acres in 1945, an increase of 4.1 percent over the 1944 har-

vested acreage. If this acreage is planted and harvested, it would be

exceeded only by the 1939 acreage, when about 2 million acres were planted.

Indications point to acreage increases for all classes of.tobacco, the largest

being in burley, where an increase of 8 percent is indicated. Flue-cured

would be up 2 percent, dark fire-cured 2 percent, dark air-cured 7 percent,

and cigar.tobacco 5 percent. Should the March 1 intended acreage materialize,

and the 5-year (1939-43) average yield by tyoes be obtained, the 1945 produc-

tion would be about 4 percent lower than 1944, and about 7 percent below the

:- record production of 1939.

With the exception of Maryland (type 32) practically all of the 1944

crop of tobacco has been sold by growers. Throughout most of the marketing

i season demand for tobacco of most all types was strong and prices were at or

near those.;.of a year earlier. Ceiling prices were in effect for all types

AVN













year, and production of cigarette tobacdo -(flue-oaqrd, burley,,.4

was 41 percent over 1443 and the largest'in the histr, of ths o A.

Returns to growers are estimated' at about 817- mitoa do ,: s,

I,' " : "i,: :\" .
510 million for the 19%3 crop, the pireviou.'record high. .

The 1944 crop of flue-cured, estimated at 1i,0.800 million

sold at an average of .42 centd'per pound, 1he .higheat,-pricei, siCe.-l

growers received 44.4 cents per pound. The crop was sold .under a.

price regulation which provided -for a price differtedtial of 4l2 c;.

*tween tied and untied tobacco. Partly as a result of the operatioat
4 4 : ; lf.
feature of the regulation, type 14, produced in Georgia dad i'.l r:4&:

untied, was down 3 cents per pound from 1943, and nearly 7 eeeitit t 'bafr

1944-45 season average of tied flue-cured (types .11-13).k -- *
.. .. ,:.;ii
SAll burley markets have closed for the season. Baad. on. Wva,-.;".

sales reports, the 1944 crop may exceed- 580 millionpoundps. This is ".:iy

Sthe largest burley crop ever. produced. Reflecting the strong, -duae fri.",,

S cigarettes, most all. grades of burley suitable for cigarette .anufatr',

.,. at ceiling prices throughout the season. Gross sales amounted to: 616 I

fi." pounds at an average of 44 cents per pound, compared with ;45.5' aents:: la
: season. The 1944 crop was allocated to, buyers, as in the case! o. flei

and ceiling prices by grades were again in effect on burley, i.

SWith sales of the 1944 crop completed, dark fire-cured' tdbeco I't 0
, -, . .... .. .. ,* :,: ,
averaged slightly above the 1943 level. Preliminary estitates' .ditO ;

market average of approximately 24.4.centS per poud., qt~ omNopari i?

year. The 1944 crop'of dark air-cured averaged appQ o7i'ii^

:,' ..* .' .. . ...
"i ,. ,' / + -. .., . .. : .; .... : i i i i









relatively large consumption of snuff and chewing tobacco, the low level of

I, tocks, and the comparatively short 1944 crop, have contributed to strength

'i^ in prices of dark tobacco this season. There were no grades of dark-tobacco .

1i,..tt;rozen" for diversion into nicotine as was the case last year. A small

i?: quantityiy of dark tobacco was purchased by the Commodity Credit Corporation

S under the price support program, however.

Maryland auction markets are scheduled to open April 17 for sale of

the 1944 crop and in view of the strong demand for cigarette tobacco, demand

for Maryland probably will be relatively strong again this year.

Production of tobacco products, particularly cigarettes, is continuing

at an exceptionally high level. Supplies of cigarettes for use in this country

have declined below the level of last year, but shipments to the armed forces

abroad have .increased.

Stocks of most types of tobacco are low in relation to the present high

rate of consumption, but with the large 1944 crop now in the hands of manu-

rfactaters and dealers, stocks at the end of the present season should be

larger than a year earlier. Production in 1944 was greater than estimated

1944-45 season's disappearance, and cigarette manufacturers were permitted to

buy more tobacco from the 1944 crop than they used-ast season.

March 30, 1945

"PRODUCTION AHD CONSUIIPTION OF TOBACCO PRODUCTS

"The over-all production of tobacco products in this country is continu-
in, g at or near the highest level in the history of the industry. Government
r: qV uiTremenAs for shipment to the armed forces overseas and for use in post
eAfa tiges in this country are being met, although supplies available for distri-
b ion t-hr.ough regular retail channels continue to be inadequate to meet in
.llU the wartime requirements. The industry is still facing difficulties in
S expRading production, and may continue to do so as long as the war continues.
Most of the increase in production of.tobacco products since the beginning of
the. .war is due largely to the increased consumption of cigarettes. Chewing
,r toba'eo and snuff have shown only moderate increases over pre-war years, and
dEi. tima,: uf.acture of smoking, tobacco is at the lowest level in many years.
S. .
: :'rlr;: ,:i .;;. . . -

















pJL-UV.UU yW4 tls cL.A-jPJ.Lu WIjJI LUldCn.V.LD ULLOLLatU LWlt I 1 I.LJ OJUj1.Pc ; L"$.atw- XA-;LAt- *U4'#-^W^
fiscal year (July-February) totaled 157 billion, 'tir ceni 'be-wia
ponding period of a year earlier.. Production of cigSbrettes. s ab e a n"
at or near the highest level on record, and' supplies available fori.iD
use during the next few months may depend primarily. on the .rbqAiu.
the armed forces for overseas shipments. :


Cigars


: .:..,



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t'..






























,t.
.:'












:.".
































:, ,. .
'.." i
,:













;',,
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::,. f -.
-i: *


Domestic consumption of cigars during the. calendar year 1944 '
cated by sales of revenue stamps, amounted to 4.8 billion, a decit:
cent from 1943, and 23 percent from 1942. During .the first 8 no.f;Bt
present fiscal year tax-paid withdrawals totaled 3.2.billion .igsa:,
compared with 3.3 billion during the corresponding period a year eari'
of revenue stamps during February 1945 increased.slightly over FebrueJi
Internal Revenue figures indicate that the trend toward higher priced -.
which began-about 2 years ago was continuing. During the fiirt S 4on
the present fiscal year, classes A, B, ad C showed declines of 56 petc
percent and 45 percent respectively, below the same period a yeat.a eaior
the other hand, classes D, E, F, and G, all higher-priced cigars,, shol'. ..
creases ranging from 40 percent in class E to 423 percent in class G1

Smoking Tobacco, .

Production of smoking tobacco reached an exceptionally low level,
1944, although there was an increase during the last 3 months of the yeat
the corresponding months of 1943. Production during December'19'4, th~,t
month for'which figures are available, totaled almost :14 million. pound.sA
increase of more than 10 percent.from the 12.6 million pounds product'. 5M
December 1943.

Tax-paid withdrawals of chewing and smoking tobacco combined duri
February 1945 totaled almost 22 million pounds, an increase of 19 percent
a year earlier. Inasmuch as smoking tobacco represents a large part of"'p;ti
total production of these two products, it appears that production of s'iS%
tobacco during February was considerably greater than a year earlier.
of inadequate supplies of cigarettes, it is likely that further gains Jit: I.
sumption of smoking tobacco will take place during the next few mbnth.:s M..
other factors which would tend to increase consumption of anoking to agO.M.a
to decrease-consumption of chewing tobacco would be ,a decline in erniO..s..
war plants where consumption of the latter is high.
.. . *. 5
. ." ". *


A'
O N : .- '3. -N.r J A':.


'. '.; ..... ^.,.-...i..:

.. ... . ... ... ...'...... .. I.. 1: .f.,..:::i


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";


*.:;:










pspak e26.6 milio apounds-.in 1917, and in 1916 began a
i. continued with- michor. i-terruptions until the outbreak of this '
**'yi 100 m1.tlionpoundi were taiz-paid, in 1940.- .Production during :
..t" 1i j*... 25! mill-onh po-dnds., an increase of 3 percent over 1943.1 :i
... of.chdwih. t.dbacco will probably decline somewhat from the present
enri7tihere i's &rductibnt. in eemployment.in war plants6

....:.'s a te .aoa- of chewing tobacco, consumption of snuff has increased
i| 3 le e-although there has been some decline in-recent months i
lring 19j3 mere thatn 3 million pounds were manufactured, 5 million more than
i[: 9h0o, and 10 million more than for a corresponding period of World War I,
j -e:13 3 vductdo ion.,of snuff was greatest for any 12-month period on record.
O: i ',p rod.praoition.was-n million less than.the 1943 peak. For the first ':::
a i-the;! pr et:fSe6ar.year (July-February) tax-paid withdrawals of
l^ !-m a:l'ifon~a .ouide werTe: .-1/2 percent below a, year earlier. Figures for
I5' iay: 195.-t cteth .that the oowvwar.d trend is continuing, and some further




rdinent release of the Crop Reporting oard ano er
.ea. As o
^...i. ... ; : ... K... :S:
I:A:L,'-..:" m or::l C inr 3g ;.Jblo":the recent release of the Crop Reporting Board, another : ;m
'" :gre planting Q.fl; -cured tobacco is in prospect in 1945. As of March 1,
.... mm s intent onsa. ere to plant 1,032,200 acres, an increase of about 2 ::
vMsEt fromm the 1,007,300 acres harvested in'1944. Such an acreage with a
vrr4i&lre yield equal to the 5-year average (1939-43) would produce a crop of
1iiwrnion o4i.abput 9. percent less than the estimated 1.080 million-
tcrop. gr(qw~~til 194 when yields per acre were exceptionally large. If
t rti the inditi~H't acreage qr a .normal proportionn of the allotted acreage
Wl'ihtetd this d:yar, and ave'r.ae yields r-e obtained, production will be the
Largest oarecor :'. -
fivg Quotas.ti.. Eff ect in 4.5 6

Ifaotd loae with-an A. ofCongres approved March 1, 1944, the
.S a...: ..e ciiien." has announced that marketing quotas on flue-
U.tobino ''.b in. effeot.during the 1945-46,.marketing year. Under
7 .'A k ting quotas announced for flue-cured, individual farm
OpWi tftaMe -'^r -'t 19% crop will be the. same-ab those. i effect in
to-al S. e,095 000 seres. ( Fr further information on. acreage allot-
rot see the January 1945 Tobacco Situation, page 12.) The
erg 1dasiad for flue-cured tobacco during the past 2 or 3
S . .'i in' in thz highest average prices since 1919, will offer
ar. en ramSemme to .fArmes to plant their full allotments in 1945,
ftier e abor on tobacco farms now than in many years. Last
pil pt epd. adi ha res oed more than 95 percent of their allotments,.

__ ..i.4..:.. ... b. .
2(









Largely beca-st of the exceptionally high.:rite of do:.meg st
disappearance of- fle-cured tobacco is continUiig at the 1igt-F "'"
record. Nevertbhlest somewhat larger stocks, as. .eompated:4 ith V aj..
are expected when the season ends Junes30. Prel.mit ry setiatee 4
manufacturing and ezSlrts of flue-cured during the present 19
approximately 1 billiet pounds, a slight increase -over...the 994a0
in the preceding mal eting year, and 42 percent drer the pre-war.
annual average. UnLess there is a substantial increase in, export ''
remainder of the season, stocks will -be larger on July :1945 *..
earlier. Flue-cured stocks were reduced during the preceding mai*t
by bout 190 million pounds.

Of the total stocks of 1,188 -million pounds on July 1, 19i,"
1 billion pounds were available for domestic use. Commodity CredI t
purchases from the 1944 crop totaled about 337 million pounds, abo
million pounds of which were ear-marked for export, A great deaA'"gl
tobacco already has been exported, although a smaller portion ofp:
season s production has entered export markets than was the case. a.e.

Table 1.- Flue-cured tobacco: Domestic supplies, disappearance; an ..:.l
season average price, average 1934-38, annual 1939-44/ ,
, 1".. i ,i "
Stocks Total : Disappearance
Year : Production: J y : year beginning: pie-l
July 1 supply
: .'." a lU.
Million Million Million Million
: pounds pounds pounds pounds

Average : .
193-38 741.0 sh.9 1,585.9 704.3 22 "

1939 : 1,170.9 946.3 2,117.2 707.5 ir;:i
1940 759.9 1, 09.7 2,169.6 576.7 16.
19l41 649.5 1,592.9 2,242.4 783.0 2.1.
1942 811.7 1.459.5 2,271.2 1877.0 8.
1943 78S.5 1,378.8 2,167.3 978.5 a
1944 : 1,080.0 1,188.8 2,268. . :,.
,*.." ; ": -.. ,,,
I/ Farm-sales-weight equivalent., ,- :
2/ Owing to a change in the method of reporting Commodity. Credit 0orp65
holdings, the 1942-43 season disappearance figure does not agree .athbaN.S
with the difference, between the supply as of July 1, 1942,. and.t tS 4li
July 1, 1943. For an explanation see the 1943-44 Flue-cured Market aevitvi
3,/ Preliminary.




..' hi.:. .."*
.. ..









... , "1: '
'x jeasoEn. otdcks Fofe seek:
r Brealo All Records

: .A1M d6thagh LT6haptearaince of burley tobacco during the 1944-45 season
bji s ei.w e ~ t larger' thin the :previous 12 ;months, socks are expedtdd to
6sWbatpntial Aincreab on October 1, .195., .Salea data of. the Tobacco
a0i| o th i'War Food Adjuinis ration .plAce the..19)4 crop at approximately
| lion pounds,' ihich exceeds the 1943 crop by 190 million pounds Pnd the
1'3 average production by more than 100 percent. This is by far the
:gest crop of burley tobacco ever produced. .The large crop has resulted
l. an .increase of, more than 150 million pounds in this season's supply.
~.&esappearance of burley -exceeded production during the 3-year period 1941-43,
lIwhiqt.o resulted in a decline in stocks of about 147 million pounds. This
eI~, c,. & is more than offset by the excess of the 1944 crop. over the estimated
lsonte1 s: disappearance .. :

A -other jLarge Acreage In
1 1 indicated
,.: , .. ; ':. .. .: . ', -. . . .. . .. -
.. :: Another large planting of burley is in prospect for 1945. Growers'
i: intentions as of March 3 were to plant 509,700 acres, an increase of 8 '
ot:; pecent over the 472,700 acres harvested in 1944. If the expected acreage
%I.:tS-$a-planted and harvested and if the 5-year average yield (1939-43) is
i obtained, total production would be about 503 million. pounds, 13 percent less
-at;; the eat'imated.i944 production. A crop this size would likely result in
a 9uiP ther increase in the supplies of burley tobacco. Burley growers should
inot: lose sight of the fact1 that inasmuch as burley is not an export type and
:ti etfbte may notparticipate to any great extent in post-war export trade,-any
."ittfion in domestic, dons'aption would probably affect burley to a greater
QAi t-'t thal flu9-cured, and with the anti.aipated reduction in cigarette produc-
,j: .l.tj.roa ,the .present wartime.: level burley supplies could pile up rapidly.
e i rice 1944 Cror Below
Sletturns to Burlevy
I' producerss at. Record High ,

,.." Saesl of ..the 1944 erop.of burley began December 6 .with strong-demand
:or ,praeticall allh grades of .leaf .J hn the se ling season ended March 30-
I 'Osa. sales aUmbnted to approximately 616 million pounds at an average of 44
1.4.: pr~; .p un Although the average- price.-was below' last yePar' s record high
..5."*:,t: sp pound,.burley groters-received the largest gross income in
e frqm thie season's crop, an income considerably in excess of the 178
: receei ~t for the. 193 crop... The 1944-45 price ceilings-were in .;
ni f.~i al rades end the decline in orice.-below last year is in-part
alE. o the .fact .that a smaller proportion of the crop this season
u:a tcuters .and flyaings-:.tn 'l~t year,. and a larger percentage.
.tr gre s. Jt is.apparent..that greater than usual emphasis will .
e f seaon upon tbacqp of superior quality,.
.: .. . ... .-.. .

;.;;! ,::+ j., :." ..,,.:. :;. ,..; ..... ; .








:.': and average .rice, average .19.438, ana .-


t: : ocks c Total : Dlisap*parance r
S Year : Production : Obu. 1 : supply : year beginning
S: October
: Mil. lb. Mil, b. Mil.. lb Mil. lb.

SAverage .. : .."
-19 34-3 : 287.2 700.9 988.1 314.5 2

1939 395.4 684.1 1,079.5 3117.2
1940 : '75.3 762.3 1,137.6 39.6 A :.6
1941 336.8 798.1 1,134.9 379.6
1942 : 34 .5 755.3 1,098.8 .412.8
1943 390.0 686.0 1,o.6.0 424,8
1944 2/ : /580.0 651.2 1,231.2 .

n Farm-sales weight. 2 Treliminary. Based onarehouse sales Eata


MARYLAD,.. TYPE 32 .

Auction Markets Open April 17: ^
Strong Demand Anticipated

Auction markets in Southern-Maryland are scheduled to open April. 17"
: for sale of the 1944 crop of Maryland tobacco. In contrast with thq pTere
season, the 1944 crop of Maryland is of good aver-ge quality and a fairlyA
proportion of the leaf is suitable for the manufacture of cigarette. Inaa
.as stockss of cigarette tobacco are relatively low and flue-cured and builety
S bold at high prices this season, the demand for Maryland probably will be st

1944 Disappearance Below 1943; ''
January 1 Stocks- Down; Supply Larger
-;..::4
Preliminary estimates place the disappearance of Maryland tobacco- dutii:
the calendar year 1944 at 27 million pounds. This w.s 5 million below 1943; e:A.:
about the same as the pre-war (1934-38) average, when cigarette manufaqtturing'g
S.was only about -/5 of the 1944 output. A considerable ouantity of the 1943 cstI
of Maryland did not enter stocks for the mahnfacture of cigarettes because at :!i
S poor quality. The supply of Maryland on January 1, 1945 was larger than alye
';\ earlier, because of reduced consumption last year and a 1944 crop-which was
i substantially larger than those of.the 3 previous year.s. However, supplies if
Maryland are still low in relation to requirements.. Consumption of Maryl.4 :
.;: tobacco has not increased to any great extent during this war, zainly. ecause of
Inadequate supplies. Supplies of Maryland are now somewhat;greater than the
average for the pre-war years 1934-38,,but in-relation to cigarette manufacturers
S they arF the lowest on record. Several years of above-average production woa ul:
be required to bring Maryland supplies up to pre-war ratios. As of March 1 .
: growers' intentions were to plant 40,200 acres which is the same as in 194,4 '-0
71, ,
t. :: F ...







: Table 3j- Maryland tobacco: Domestic supplies, disappearance,
an,. season average price, average 1934-38, annual 1939-44 1/

S: Stocks : : Disappearance : Season
Year Production : Jan. 1 of : Total : January 1 : average
Following : supply : of following : farm price
;._j__ : .._ear : : year : per .ound
Mil. lb. Mil b. il. il. l. M. b i. il. Ib.

I.. 3 27,5 38.4 65.9 27.5 19.7

.::. 1939 32.- 36,3. 69-1 25.9 21.1-
19 0. : 32.6 43.2 75-8 30.8 33.0
S..19 31.2 45.0 76.2 28.5 30.1
1942 28.1 47.7 75.8 32.0 56.5
S-1943 20.8 43.8 64.6 _/ 27.0 2/ 45.1
1 944 2 : 32.2 37.6 69.8

I L arm-sales weight. Preliminary.

.DARK TOBACCO
(Fire-cured, types 21-24 and dark air-cured, types 35-37)
jPrices of Fire-cured Above Last Year;
Dark Air-cured Lower

II 9 Demand for dagk tobacco of all types was well sustained throughout the
1944-45 selling season, which ended March 8. Preliminary estimates place the
Season average price paid growers for fire-cured at approximately 24.4 cents
Super pound, compared with 23.4 last year. Dark .ir-cured averaged about 23.4
Scents compared with' the season average of 27.2 cents for the 19)13 crop.

o greads of dark tobacco were "frozen" this season for diversion into
.::' th... e.. exiufactre. of insecticides. However, the Commodity Credit Corporation
_' offered to purchase certain .grades of Green River, One Sucker and Eastern and
:. eflern fire-cured tobacco. t fixed prices. Any tobacco acquired under. this
iL offer was to be diverted into the production of nicotine. Market prices gener-
e ally were well above the loan rates, and also above the Commodity Credit
Corporation's prices. Consequently, comparatively small quantities of tobacco
Were pledged to ,the Cooperative Associations under the loan program, and only
Small amounts were acquired by the.Commodity Credit Corporation under the offer
a:: ptirehase.
.ireas ales of fire-cured this season amounted to approximately'
1 9iuillio6 pinds, compared with 57 million last year. The 1944 crop of
V:irginia fjre-cured (type-21) was much' lrgek than that produced in 1943, and
.the volume of sales was the largest since the 1940-41 season. Gross sales
r wneili k e ed :to :approximately. 11 million pounds at an average of 25 cents per pound..
.. eof thd1943,crop of type 21 totaled 9.8 million pounds at an averp.ge of
2 .9 cents *er pound.
"b e 1944 crop of ESstern District fire-cured (type 22) is somewhat
"t er ha in 1943, but the quality was the best in several years. The
A Ii~keting mounted to 33 million pounds at an average of 25 cents
S:i,-:: ou:2.4 "bets above last season. The season's gross sales of
~jj a -"firq-cured (type 23) totaled about 12 million pounds at an
S of 22 cents per pound. Total sales reported this year for
LZ,















S season. Of the three types, Virginia su.n-ouied, following ge4 :
f sold.at the highest.price, followed by Greeni River. and .e.. . I IIII
season price was 234 'cents per pound, compared with-.27T .Ip ti aS j
,preliminary Ostimate of the value pf the 1944 crop of da Wr-~ip
is about 11 million,'dollars. .
The 1944 crop of One ?uckr' was one, of the. lar.ges.: in sekikjg
pt:: returns to growers were the highest.-since 1920. TOtal. 461oee 'mo&
lion pounds at en average of 21.7 cents..per pound. In a.it'ion.itC
1944 crop, the quality was below nbrmal., The decline in price e ha.i
last season was general for most .l grades, part clearly the, 3,&,c
: some grades down as much as 7 cents below"last season. Th onn i :i!zi~
||'; season over last were shown for low quality grades end nondescript,1'1
S. increases up to 5 cents per pound. ... -. ,.
The 1944 crop of Green River (type 36) was the-l.rges) di66ne i9
had the highest 'crop velub since 1924,. The 1943 'grop.w.ws onei of':.th: i
since systematic records have been kept., and 'total. Sales amduntede':'i
S million- pounds. This season's sales totaled ar.0uinid. llioi p0Wi
S average of about' 24-1/2 cents per pound. :
Ti: Prices paid growers for moat' all grades of Vitginia sul- tIr.d', :e
were lower this year than last. Gross sales. totaled. pproXtime .el'% '
'pounds at an average of about 31.3 cents per pound. 'T he. 19.43 -cro:"fi
sun-cured was about 1/3 smaller thae the 1944 crop an 'the 'i.e"-aonr ..
of 34.9 cents per pound was the..hi.-est in-history.. T7.e Val9 of':f.' -.A91
S is placed at about 870 thousand dollars. .>'"
i ,. :.
,.. Production at Low Level; .. .C
Stocks. Lower .
Largely as a result of the drastic decline which has t.kee P..-
.i, ... 'production of'dark tobacco- since the beginning of the at, V'stekocs f
types except'type 37 were lower on October 1, 19441 than a year e:ac gr :i o
bined stocks of types 21-24 and 35-37 totaledA .2s milito:i' j poW"i .os.a.i:" W
245 million on October 1, 1943.. The supply of dark tdbahde'o i.s:,-"
.;' -a.bout the same as last, inasmuch as the decline .in the.. oe'ry' e' i.
offset by an increase in the 1944 crop over 1:943 'Di appear-n .o a-6fa si
'.:: during the 12-month period endad-.September, 30, -1944 tol0ed .O~ mi'n' fls
i., which was somewhat greater thin the 1944 production. Some, $ t.i:,b
total stocks this season appears likely. ::,
-rY
To a great extent the decline in .stdcks"of dak 0o~ bi
~ by the decline in production of fire-cured (typ es 21a2)i ',a;s'''w''ii .6
.ance-of dark tobacco, is still at. P.relatively low, eveLr m.r;lSi
,, air-cured hF.s been fairly well mainita ted. The tr i d ii ttp i
has been downward for many years,ndis n now ne.' 6.th e O '.
atic records ha4e been kept. 'The decline ,T. rao i 5, ..i
U. "=-






Styles of- fire-cured- ips bte:I'drasti-vally reduced in recent years. As pre-
"I.ously stated, Henderson Stemming was at one time an important type of tobacco
In this country, but only a small Quantity has been sold this season as type 24.
:t is probable that a substantial increase in. acreage of fire-cured tobacco will
t e necessary to meet domestic and export requirements during the next year or so.

I Production of dark' a.r-cure- (-types 35-37) at the,194. level of 41-1/2
imiion pound' appears adequate to.meet. requirements. Although production has
.'eclined under war: conditions, .the,1944 production, stimulated by the high
6p prices, was substantially above the previous year.

:i Intentions to Plant Indicate Only
.A Slight Increase in 195 Acreage

Growges' intentions as of March 1 were to increase slightly the acreages
of all types of dark tobacco in 1945. The indicated acreage of fire-cured is
65,800 acres, compared with 64,800 acres in"1944, an increase of. about 2 percent.
The indicated dark.air-cred acreage is 43,100 acres, an increase of about 7 per-
cent over the 40,100 acres harvested in 1944.

Table 4.- Dark tobaccos: Domestic supplies, disappearance, and season
average price, average 1931-38, annual 1939-44 1/

:: :Disappear- : Average
S:Produ : Stocks : Total :ance, year : price
*Production -
: : Oct. 1 : supply : beginning : per
S: : : Oct. 1 :pound
: Mil. b. Mil. 1b, Mil. lb. Mil. lb. .Cents
Fire-cured types 21-24, and': TOTAL ALL DARK TOBACCOS


dark air-cured types 35-37 : -
Average 1934-38 ............: 145.7
1939 ----s ............: 143.6
1940 ...................: 150.1
1-941 ............. 101.2
1943 ................: 94.8
1944 2 .:.............: 106.8
Iotal, types 21-24 '
Average 1934-38 ...... .....: .102
1939 ............ .. .It : 99.4
1940 .................3.: 107.6
1941 ...... ......sa a3 ..: 69.7
1942 ... ... .....,.- 71.5
1943 .. ........... ..: 64.8

total types 35-37 :__
Average 1934-38 ............: 35d5
1939 .............. :..: :44.2
S1940 ................: 42.5
1941 ..................: 31.5
1942 ........ .........: 35.2
1943 **...... 3 .... a: 30.0
944 2/ ............... 41.4


257.0 402.7
192.3 335.9
207.2 357-3
258.3 359.6
248.6 355.3
245.1 339.9
231.2_ 338.0
Fire-cured
194.2 304.4
136.2 235.5
141.6 249.2
183-9 253.6
184.6 .256.1
179.8 244.6
1735_ 238.9
Dark air-cired
2. 98.3
56.1 .. 160.3
65.6 10is.1
74.4 106.o
64.0 99.2
65.3 95.3
57.7 99.1


162.0'
128,7
99.0..
111.0
110.2
108.7


123.0
93.9
65.3
69.0
76.3
71.1


39.0
34.7
33.7
42.0
-71.

10.0
9.5
9.0
13.4
16.4
24.6


10.2
10.6
9.5
14.1
17.1
23.4


9.14
--97-4
7.3
7-7
12.0
,r fl<"


7.aU L:J C
37.6 27.2


k a1 -sales-weight equivalent. Preliminary.


.












Sales of practicality all of the 1944 crop *ha0 keen/ tp1tst
S and average prices have misen t or 'near the eskabllf .n.
most instances the maxima prices for thl914h.cro. .w ..i ;
for the 1943 crop.

Because of the anticipated strong. -emmand.- o. 6c 914.- WA,
cigar tobacco, and at thA., request of the industry s .igrow &ts .8. TIa, !
War Food Admtiistration.ftund it desirable .last uawe 'r to fee:I
future-contract purchase .of most cigar filler an .bin~clea'tobac0co :
Consequently, in June 194, purchases of filler typ es., 14.- an
i binder (types51-55) were prohibited by Order 4*6, A ih reaine
in effect until removed by WF' during the marketing esn. .e-.:..-

Before the crop was sold, .the Office of Price Administrati.n;
established ceiling prices on practically all types' o:f cigar t ~ aI,
grown in 1944. Effective September 8, Revised Regulation 3. W *':b :,
placed ceiling prices on the 1944 and succeeding crops, f Georgi:an'" ''ii
S lorida Shade-grown (type.62). Maximum Price Regulation No. 494:- :1:
established maximum prices of domestic cigar filler and binder (types
41-44 and 51-55) of the 1943 crop. A revision of this order,
S effective December 16, 1944, extended control tb sales :of the 1904 ""Wt i~
Scrop by growers, and established markl-up factors for sales'by b pakeri :'t..;
dealers, and manufacturers.

S Maximum Prices Re-established.for ':'::
194. Crop of Connecticut Shade .. .
-- --- :;.. 4 *. .. :,:.
Effective March 5. 1945; Revised k.aximum'Plice Reguliatdn.)o 5I5 <
established grade ceiling prices on Connectic t' headeAgrom. tob ao 6', :.5:
(type 61) of the 1944 crop, at the same leve1 as' thj 19.3 crop.: As ,
; was the case last year, the. prices cover the 25' %ra&.esm, -fwtoaat ily .. '
: recognized' by the 'industry for this tobacco.- The order was desi ged.
to produce a weighted average selling price (to6 :gtwerpa ers and
packers) of $2.40 per pounds (packed weight) which is-the sam as
S that reflected in the ceiling prices for the 1941 cr6p; I.TrpTibionrl "':
I':. is made in this order for extending.the ceiling.'prices to future Bcrop
years to eliminate a break in price control betwe':arkstiengieaeSonaS
: The revised regulation also provides that padkers' :iobing pr icesashfl
apply to manufacturers' sales of tobacco they. pck'. If th e mufactAwte ;
resells tobacco which he purchased already packed, th resale price i e:..
limited to the ndt delivered cost of the tobacco.',: '
*,- ... . .. .:: I* :


"s,
"*. . .. ....... ......
S" "'. . .. *... . :* :'i



.. :'; /7fi
*. ." . .
*. ..







Table.5.- Romestic Cigar Tobacco: production stocks,
Supply, and price, average 193L-38, annual 1939-44
Stocks : : :
S : Puc : ocks : Total Disappearance Average
ning P tin : o 1 s year beginning : price per
S: (farm-sales upp Oct. 1ound
: weight 1 :
Million Million Million Million
:-pounds pounds pounds pounds Cents
l rage .:
S9-38 2/ 99.2 335.7 h..9 123.8 17.1-

jI 39. 137.7 269.4. 4o7.1 108.4 18.6
: 144.0 298.7. 442.7 137.3 17.4
l 143.2 305.4 L48g.6 131.3 20.4
I42 : 118.6 317.3 455.9 143.4 25.8
i I943 108; 6 292.5. 4ol.1 132.9 3 37.8
1944 /: 124.7 268.2. 392.9

:!.: I 'Stocks for-tynes 45 and 62 areas of July.l. 2 Production was usually
low during this period. 3/ Preliminary

S Stocks and Supplies Lower

Total supplies of domestical.y-grown cigar tobacco on October 1, 1944,
were reported as 268.2 million pounds, 24 million below a year earlier.
',. Of the separate classes, stocks of filler an,d binder' ,;ere' smaller but wran-
Sper stocks were larger than on October 1, 1943. Because of the larger 1944
'. product-ion, the total 1944-45 season sunply of.'cigar tobacco is not materially
d- .... different from last season, even though the carry-over was 'down from the
. same date of the -revious year.

i.... ~is'appearanQe of cigAr tobacco during 1944-45 season may reach 140
million pounds. This would leave total domestic stocks on October 1, 1945,
S at a little more .than 253 million pounds, the lowest level for that date
S since 1913 The supply situation is somewhat different as to the individual
S'"classes. Over a perio-d of several years,disappearance'of filler and binder
'. :" .has been greater than production, and the present 'suonly is lower in rela-
tion to probable disanmaearance-than in nre-war'years. The'suD ly of w.ran-
per tobacco on the other hand, has increased, and'oresent stocks appear
adequate e. In relation to usage the supply of bin'der tobacco is lower than
the supply of filler. Some increase in production' of bbth filler-and binder
tobacco is needed to maintain the present level of stocks. A slirtt in-
crease ip 1945 acreage is indicated as of i4arch 1.

Stocks of -foreign-grow cigar tobacco held in the United States totaled
almos-t. 30 million pounds on January 1, 1945, ,.h'ich was a subst-antial increase
,over year, earlier, and the largest since aea'rat e records "ere begun in
1930;. ..The increase in stocks is to a jreat extent accounted for by the
increase -:n Cuban. Cuban stocks on January 1, 1945 totaled 25.6 -million
pounds, obmnared..th 20.9. on January 1, 1944. Sumatra stocks were further
red'ced during the last quarter of 194h,. while stocks of Philippine tobacco
~t:i:.s.:,. t country-are practicallyy exhausted. Holdings on January 1, 19l5
a, ttedto 122,000 nounds,'comnared with 185,000 pounds on October 1, 1944. ':













.
** -


S -pond s
...".on..
t "o.i-.


I'Ttal filler, types 4-44-
iiAvera"e 1934-38 ...... ......:
': ..... .
Sq19g ............ .........
IM 9" .. ,.. . . . . . -..,.-. .
194r ...................,.:
1942 ................. ...
1944 _/ .... ...............:
ennsylvania seedleaf, tyne 41-: .
Ayerage 1934-38 ............6.:
1939 ........... .........:
1940 .....................:
1941 ............
'' 1942O ......................
1943 5555 s. S
194 3 ................
19~44.3/
SMiami Yalley, types 42-44, -:
' Average 1934-38 ..............r
S1939 .................... :
S1940 ......................
S1941 .................
1942 .....................:
A194... ........ .... ...... .
Cl: i 194 /.......o ...........
.4
ITtal binder, types 51-56
Average 1934-38 ..............:
1939 ................. .. :
1940
I 1941 .... ................:
I 19)43 . ... ..
1942 ...................
1943 ................. ..
1944 3/...................
: Connecticut Valley broadleaf,
.;pe 51-
Average 1934-38 ............:
19 ........... ... ....

194 .......... ..........
1942 ....................:
1942 ........ ............w:
: 1944 j/ ..................:
I" 1
'" *


48.2
62.3
66.6
71 4
53.6
47.4
56.7

53.2
45.0
50.1
57.7
41.6
39.6
50.4

15.0
17.3
16.5
13.7
12.0
7.8


Mitli
pound

158.
1 *

157.
166.
153.
145


100.
97.
106.
114,
122.
109.
if6.


58.
42?
42
42.

44


...- .; .







0 228.4 """ .....
7 220.3 66#,
S201.0 ...
4 2 .....

4 133.6 34,
4g
:-7 215.2 **::: iiJ






,5 1428.5. 6
.5 l42 -* **** ; .*:!..
0 156.1 f4
93 17260 ..
.9 164t.5 .
.6 149.2 425
.8 157.2 .
:. ::
4 73-4"' 19. -
.o 15...16, :'
.6 59.3 16
.7 56.4 i6 i
.g' 55.8 11.
.0 518 13.2
,O 1,,+ s,


6.3 38.6 44,9

4i,s 165.1 206.9 60o,
63.2 116.6. .179.8 45i -
67.9 136.0 203,9 .- 67 2
.61.6 130.7 1983
55.7 137.8 193.5 66,9
51.2 126.6 ..177.8 69 '.3- i '
56.8 108.6 165.4
*: :
4 .6.

11.1 35.5 46.6 13.5
12.5, 27.0 40.3 1,5 .
12.3 27.5 39.8 16.5
12.8 23.3 36. .10.
10.4 26.1 365 1 r
11.0 22.3 ,: :
13.1- 2- .33-
'. t... '. ' . .'. *

., ,*:." :.' i1*,m" ,*'mm:,. ,.
,, + % < ~~ ~ ~ ~~~.- ';,,. ";.:. ',; mm:mi.:mma: ."i+.**, ';






jali=ble b.- Cigar tobaccos: Domestic supplies, disappearance, and season
average price, average 1931-38, annual 1939-44 1/ -Continued


i l': ..".
SProduc-
1..'p e and year tion


: Million


cticut Valley Havana seed,:

Awek-age 1934 38 .............:
1939 ....................
19 ....................

1942 ... .................
S* 9 3 ....................,:
19 ..............
York and Pennsylvania
tRav.xa seed type 53-
|4Average 1934-38 ..............
I194o ...... ................
l.... 9 iO ... .....S0**
i '1941 ........ ................
1942 ............... .... .:*
1943 ......................
1944 j/ ...................:
B utrn Wisconsin, type 54-
pAverage 1934-38 .............
-939 - -- - "- - =
1 9394 .................... ...
1941 ....... ..... .......
i: 1942 .. .. .. .............
1943 -- -- -- -- -- -.. .:
9. i1 ...................:
ern Wisconsin, type 55- :
kIAverage 1934-38 .... ........:
1939 -.......- - .
gL 19340 ....... ....... .. .....:
1.41 ........................:
S1942 .....................
.: 1942 ............ .....
19th 3/...........
o^rgia and Florida sun-grown,. :
1itzp 56-- s
_i Average 1936-38 / ...........:
-199 ......................:

S1941 ../.......... .........S
.. i ........ .... ....... ... :

.... ............
. .- -- -- -


. 1' '
V. ji.


pounds


8.1
13.9
13.8
13.4
12.7
11.0
11.7


1.0
1.9
2.0
.2
1.9
1.2
1.4

12.3
18.8
20.4
15.4
13.8
.13.4
14.9

.9.1
15.6
S17.6.
-16.9
16.1
14.4
15.6


.4
.6
1.8
.9
.8
.2
.1


*
:Stocks
SOct. 1
S 2/ :
* /

Million
pounds


28.8
22.9
24.5
25.5
29.6
29.0
22.9


2.3
2.8
3.2
3.1
2.9
1.8
2.1

62.5
34.3
43.6
39.4
35.6
36.1
32.2

36.0
28.7
36.0
43.7
42.0
36.3
29.9




1.2
1.7
1.6
1.1
.8


: Disan-
: pearance : Average
Total : year : price
supply : begin- : per
: ning : pound
: Odt. 1
Million Million
pounds pounds Cents


36.9
36.8
38.3
38.9
42.3
40.0
34.6


33
* 4.7
5.2
5.3
4.8
3.0
3.5

74..8
53.1
64.0
54.8
49.4
49.5
S47.1

45.1
44.3
53.6
60.6
58.1
50.7
45.5


.4
.6
30O
2.6
2.4
1.3
.9


16.5
24.0
21.7
24.0
26.4
37.7



10.4
10,9
12,0
12.9
13.8
19.8


11.1
12.3
12.8
9.3.
13.3
17.1



1.1
1,5
2.1
2.4
3.0
.9


21.6
9.5
24.6
19.,2
13.3
17-3 ..


12.9
8.3
9.9
18.6
21.8
20.8



.4
.6
1,3
1.0
1.3
.5


7.8
10,8
8.5
9.6
16.2
22j5


9-7
13,8

14.6
16.4
25"5
-

13.3
11.9
13.4
14.5
17.4
22.0


- Continued


S .. ....















. "- p. - :..__.. *...: :.
P : Million -Million Million :A- iou
S pounds .o po und n-.j
i Total wrapper, ty es 61-62 .. ; :: .
Average 1934-38 ....... .. 8.4 10.7 7 i I :
1939 ... ............. -: 11.4 10,8 22.2
S94o .....................: -9.5 19 22.4
1941 ................. 10.1 11.7 21. "
S1942 ............... ... 9.2 12,7 21e9
13 1943 ......-............ .".: 10.0 .3 -22.3
1944 / .......... ......: 1.225.4 ..
S Conneoticut Valley sh-de-grown,: '
i type 61-
Average 1934-38 .............: 5.9 7.8 13 7 6.3
1939 ............7.......: 8.7 16.3 :
1940 ........... .......: 5.5 9.8 15.3 -
1941 ....................; 6,4 7.9 L3 6 .
1942 .. ........ 9 .6 8.0 1.136 '
1943 ....... ............ ...: -, 76. 13. 5
1944 3/ ...:.............: .7 8.7 16.
Georgia.-lorida shade-grown, : ':'
type 62 7 ..
Average 193L-8 ...........:. 2.5 2.9 5.4 .
S19.9 ........ .. 2.8 3.1 5.9 2 .
4 ..... ........ .....: 4.0 3.1 74 .: .
S1941 .......;5.......... 3.7 3. .
., :o"'.
S1a42 ..... .... 3.6 .7 P : ; : '-
S194 ...... 3. 4.7 .
S1.944 /,................... 3.5 .5 ,.
.: . ... . . . .. -
S 7prm-sales weight. Rounded tyoe figures do not check, in. a:l aees,
previously publi-shed because of rdinding to add to'th' tottl for ab i cla%41,
Sno case is the difference more than one point. '.
2/ Stocks for types 56 and- 62 are as of July 1 ...... ..
S:Preliminary. :.;*
4/Prior to 1936-,- calss 45,
/i '*; ::% '+i
.' "
S. ,. .

"" :. -. :



:... .. : ... .. ,


;-,* . .. . : +,= ,:,
. .."."."
. t '!d
..~ . .=. -.:.
'" =" ." i '. ;









^:,[p ....- ......... t. : Harv dtec gereen, : l .acreae 2/
1 as.. and t pe : average .: `9 "944 :Prospec- : Change
-.: g ,: 1/ ,: tive .: from 1944f
: : .. 1,000 1,000- :-1,00 1,000
Acres acres arces acres Percent

n..e..ufi red, types 11-14-...... 863.2 g44.g 1007. 1,032.2 + 2
itmnd Middle Belt type 11 .....: 327.1 320.0 -'366.0 377.0 + 3
Tn x o.rth Carolina, type/12, ..: 296.6 285.0 339.0 346.0 + 2
tfar 1ina, type 13 .......... 155.7 157.0 190.0 197.0 + 4
27i a-". lolda, type 14 ,.........: 83.8 82.8 112.3 112,2 0

,fire-cure. types 21-24 .....: 135.2 68.8 64.8 65.8 + 2
:!.nia, type 21 ............. 231 2.2 14.0 1.3 + 2
nl Tenn., type 22 ............ 76.7 39.0 35.0. 36.2 +3
I. and Tenn., type 23 ........... 32.4 17.5 15.7 15.2 3
,jieraon, type 24 ............... 3.0 .1 .1 .1 0

e ty, tpe,31 ................... ,: 347.3 391.4 472.7 509.7 + 8
... ... .....:.
."~ 1p type 32 .............. : 36.7 35.3 40.2 40.2 0

r dark air-cured., types 35-37 ..: 42.0 30.9 40o.+ 43.1 + 7
p':ke, ..type 35 ....-........: 19.9 16.7 22.1 24.8 + 12
:Qa'.. 1ver, type -36 .. ........... 18 11.5 15.0 15.0 0
: sun-curedl, type 37 3.......... 3.3 2.7 3,0 3.3 + 10

cgar filler, teyes 41-44 ... 38.0 38.2 39.9 40o. + 2
,'S edi:eaf, type l...... .....: 23.4. 31.4 33.6 35.3 + 5
iaA Valley,, types *44 ........: 14.6 6.8 6.3 5.5 -13
2, ., ./ ,
isit cigai binder;, types 51-56 ....: 28.9 32.6 36.2 .39.1 + 8
bi,4 a.l.ey.Broadleaf, type51...: 7.2' 6.6 8.0 8.5 + 6
S 1y- Havna Seed, type 5 5.4 6.5 6.6 6.9. + 5
:',T. ani Pa. IHavana Seed., type 53 :- .7 .9- 1.0 '1.1 + 10
htB hf e typq .4 ....... 8,9 8.. 9.9. 10.9 + 10 :
j- m ter WiViesnsih, type 55 ....... 6.7 9. 50 11.4 + 9
r..4..' and. Pa. sun-grown, type 56 ... 4 .4 .3 .2 .3 +-50

,i:ta.l. $:gar wrawer,, types.61,-6p ... 8.9 9.6 10.4 10.7 + 3
:Oodm; Valley Sha1le rovn,type 61 ,.. 6.3 6.3 7.3 7.8 + 7.
*.Ga; an&.7a. Shadegrown, type? ..: 2.6 3,3. 3.1 2.9 6..itI
spellaneIous .....................: .3 .3 .4 .3 5."
.3 .3 .,4 .3
: :~rg3ueire,.. typo 72 ............. : 3 .3 2 '
'196l:" all t:es 345 13 .+4.,3
S' t a ts ..............:k0.5 1,51,9 1,712.0 3781.9 +

Sia"Debe*1, in a f Indicated March 1, 1945. 3/ 3-year average.'g"
-@. .ed in-.total for binder types, /Does not include type 45-56. 1

m ... ,.,... .. ,..,, : :i :; ,. V' . .;










calendar year Ju Jan
Products .
S1943 .3 194 Change .1943-44 194-45:
:Millions Millions Percaat Millions Millions

Small cigarettes ....... 257,741 239,285 7.2 159,882 140,857
Large cigarettes ........: 6 27 .2/?361.8 5 28
Larze cigars .............: 5,228 4,786 S.5 2',915 2, 43
Small cigars ........... : 128 140 + 9.4 72 70
Snuff 3/ ................: 41,180 42,035 2.7 24,694 23,900
Manufrictured tobacco / ..: 262,456 251,787 4.1- 157,752 162,e80. i

i7 Tax-paid withdrawals include products from 1hilippine Islands and Pnerte
After January 1942 tax-paid withdrawals from 1hillippine Islands are not .i.
Based on actual, not rounded figures.- -:
Thousand pounds.


Table 9.- production of manufactured' tobacco in the United States,
calendar years 1943 and 1944, and July-December 1943 and 1944

: Calendar year : July-Dceb
Manufactured tobacco : 1943 : 1944' Change : 1943 : 1941 4 :a.


1,000


1,000


: pounds pounds Percent


Smbking ...... .......... :
Plug ................ ... :
Twist ............ ...... :
Fine-cut ................ :
Scrap chewing ..........,:
nuff ; ..................:


162,209
59,001
6,327
4,534
51,796
43,179


- -


139,874
61,656
6,467
4,094
52,883
41,960


-13.8
+ 4.5
+ 2.2
- 9.7
+ 2.1
- 2.8


1, ------- --
i, 00oo i0ooo .:.


pounds

85,051
q0,170
3,106
2,277
27,581
S20,993


pounds

82,724
30,897
3,264
2,071
27,.583
20,500


-2. "

+2..
+5. !
-94
+ "A
--2
*3 *^


- -


" .S!: i
. ..'.. '

".. '.'-


i:







Change
S: tet : 19142 1943 d 194 1/ (q 4-44)
&OOL0 Adliars 1.000 dolla 1 1 000 dollars Fercent


... -,...: 2,576"
.. 7 9146
V.s ..., .: 219
,i. ...... .7,9428
P o*..... 5,074
a .. ...: 2,566
,:iVs. .....: 3,912
nn. ....: 80
b. 9.....: 1,542
lI:. ans. ....: 65.
ha.. ...... : 9,401
....... 38503
V,. Va. ..: 686
1. G. .... : 224,005
S5.. a .....; 35,798
...: ......: 18,439
:, a. .....: 6,655
:. ,......: = 86,430
Tenn. ....:. 23,0114
Ala ..59
4. S. ..: 473,598
Is


4,562
18,033
204
5,783
7.846
3,819
4,738
92
2,290
72
15,888
42,692
997
22,950
33,641
25,180
,8593
lo6.939
35.838
o14
540,261


1, 86 59.2
5,489 69.6
115 43.6
7,432 + 28.5
5,185 33.9
4,165 + 9.1
6,363 + 3 .3
149 + 62.0
2.,591 + 13.1
86 + 19.4
9,435 40.6
65,647 + 53.8
1,011 + 1.4
334,250 + 49.9
54,113 + 60.9
39,656 + 57.5
6,392 25.6
136,021 + 27.2
37,170 + 3.7
31 70.2
717,163 + 32.7


:,,. Subject to revision.




Table 11.- Tobacco: Cash incoe, by classes and types
. United States, 1942-44

: Flue- : Light air-cured : Tire- :Dark air-: Cigar
Burley..Maryland cure types
fc Calendar: cuted, : Rnrmw II:,.1 : cured : cured : leaf, Total
1ear : .tpes,: : types : types : types : typ
I ." : 111 "tpe.31 type __ 2 : *21-2 : 35--37 .: 41-62 : 1
1, 00 1,000 1,000 1,00 1,000 1,000 1,000
a;:. :-dollars dollllars dlars dollars dollars dollars dollars

:9 3,31, 336 112,514 9,401 9,942 4,072 26,333 473.598
r l / O 36,7914 149,433 15,8t8 12,094 5.125 40,927 540,261
tiii14 :;.,4891P 174, 67 9.435 15,320 9,.883 23307 717.163

B U et. to revision.




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