Tobacco situation

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Title:
Tobacco situation
Physical Description:
v. : ; 26 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics and Statistics Service
United States -- World Food and Agricultural Outlook and Situation Board
Publisher:
The Service
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Frequency:
four no. a year
quarterly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Tobacco industry -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Citation/Reference:
Predicasts
Citation/Reference:
American statistics index
Statement of Responsibility:
Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
TS-1 (jAN. 1937) - TS-174 (Dec. 1980).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for <March 1938>-1939 called also spring outlook issue.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Sept. issues for 1941-<1961> called also outlook issue for the next year; e.g. Sept. 1943 called 1944 outlook issue.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues TS-67-<TS-71> lack chronological designation.
Issuing Body:
Dec. 1980 issued by the Economics and Statistics Service, USDA.
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Agricultural Marketing Service, 1954-Mar. 1961; U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, June 1961-Dec. 1977; U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service, 1978-<Dec. 1979>; U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Economics and Statistics Service, -Dec. 1980.
General Note:
Previously classed: A 36.94:, A 88.34/2:, and A 93.25:
General Note:
Cover title.
General Note:
"Approved by the World Food and Agricultural Outlook and Situation Board."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001233689
oclc - 04015633
notis - AFY4099
lccn - 78643654 //r81
issn - 0040-8344
sobekcm - AA00005303_00059
Classification:
lcc - HD9134 .A375
ddc - 338.1/7/3710973
System ID:
AA00005303:00063

Related Items

Succeeded by:
Tobacco outlook & situation

Full Text










BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMY ICS
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

8 29 JULY 1944C


ClGARETTES



CHEWING, SMOKING
- AND SNUFF



CIGARS


1 1 1 I I I I


TOBACCO (UNSTEMMED EQUIVALENT) USED IN MANUFACTURE
OF TOBACCO PRODUCTS, UNITED STATES, 1900-1943


POUNDS~






' .1.000


"800


~\\\\\( I
I I''j
r


600


400


):.;:' 200



19


)00


1905 1910 1915 1920 1925 1930 1935 1940 1945


11


1943 ESTIMATED


DATA FRIOM A ANNUAL REPORTS5 OF COMMISSIONER OF INTERNA L REVENUE


~.5. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


NEG. 32738 BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS


The unstgmlnied equivalent of leaf tobacco used in the manufacture of tobacco products in
I'fthis country reached a new all-time high of more than I.2 billion pounds in 1943. The outlook is
for a slight further increase in total consumption in 1944. Total leaf consumption in each year
~i~nce 1982 has shown an increase over the preceding year and since 1936 has established a new
r. recordd high each year.
Consumption of cigarette leaf in 1948 was at the highest level on record, but consumption
of smoking tobacco and cigar leaf was below 1942. Consumption of anuff and chewing tobacco has
alho. increased, partly because of increased incomes and factory employment. There has been a
marked upward trend in the proportion of the total usage represented by cigarette manufacturing
a. dedl~ine i'n thb proportion represented by cigars and manufactured tobacco.


T H.E







FLU E-CU RE D TOBACCO: PRODUCTION BY TYPES.
UNITED STATES. 1919-43


POUNDS
IMILLIGPII


1.000



800



600



400



200 -




19 9 19


U 6 DEPARIMEI OC ASHICYLULIIS


1 PBBLIMFNARY


FIGURE I


ME& 45561 AllREIU DC AGRIICUtrURII rCONOMICS


FLUE-CURED TOBACCO: CROP VALUE BY TYPES.
UNITED STATES. 1919-43


*PR~LIMINARY1

HER 41)6E BUR)EAU DF AGICULFUARIL RCNDWIC9
Flouar 2


u GF DFLuipakr OF 4(LCrcutIursE


Although the production and value of flue-cured tobacco varies greatly from year to year,
the long-term trend, because of the increased popularity of cigarettes, isupward. Over a period
of years there has been an upward trend in the proportion of the total production and value of
flue-cured represented by type iil, produced in Georgia and Florida, and a decline in the propor-
tion of the total represented by Ila, produced in the old Belt of North Carolina and Virginia.
Reflecting the rise and fall of consumer incomes, the total production and value of flue-cured
leaf usually decline during periods of business depression and increase during prosperity.




TS5-29- -


TH EL T 0 B A C 0.0 8 IT U AT IO 0 N -




: In This Issue:
: ..Page : --
-: Summary .. . .
: Flue-cur .. .. .. 5 : eg
i' Burley ....:.......................... 10
I Marylrand.. ............., .......... 12 -:--
~lc';` "' : Dar~k Tobse80ss ....................... 14
SCigar Toba~ccos .............--....... 18 "


Sumary

Despite a lated spring and drought in many tbuthern tobacco areas during

M.'.ay-and June, tthe largest crop of tobacco since 1959 is in prospect this year.

Gr'""io~p' conditions, .as of Jil' 1, point to a 1944 to-oacco production of 1,484

Al;tj~~ion pounds, 6 percent over lasi year's crop of 1, J99 million pounds. The

exceptionally strong demand for leaf tobacco has led farmers to plant the

i~~'lgest aereages since 1 39. The yield per acre is placed at 880 pounds

z' m i~ared "with 966 last yea and 986 pounds for the 5-year period 1939-43.

:'~ ie dombinPdd acreage of all types is placed at 1,686,000 acres, an increase
~.*- 7 : -
'i.4 percent' over last year's harvested acreage of 1,449,000 acres. The

indicated acreage is a $vre last year. for all classes except fire-cured, which

:is'down 4 perent.

The 19 -~45' filue-'ured markceting season was scheduled to begin July 241

1 ~h the opening of' the Georgia-Florida markets. A strong demand and favor-

e rces for t'he leaf are again in prospect. The 1944 crop of flue-cured

hairs been placed under a maximum price regulation which provides for a maximum

`;'~gightideag avrg urcia~se price of 4311/2 cents~ for tied tobacco and ]) cents

:!'''for untie'D obaco.' Crop conditions on 3dtyl 1 indicate 9; 1944 flue-oured crop

of' gj317 A lion pounds'--an inicreate' of 6 pEeien~t Irver 19 3 anda 6.~5 percent


,:I




JzUL 1944 -- k.-

above the 10-ear -(14)}-k2) aIverage production. The ~ac.reege as indicated

by the report is somnew~ha~t-smller than .the allotted RCreseeF for this type,

and the indicrted yeld opf 84j pounds per ecre is below that of logy,

Owine to the high level of domestic man~ufacturing and exports, stocks of

flue-ured on Jul 1 are expected to be lower~then last year by about 181

million n~oi~nds, bit' this decrease in the carry-over .is ~nartly offset by

the indicated inc ease-of.about .45 million.lou2qds 'i9'the..current crook over

196- production. The estimated total supply as of July 1 is below that of

a year ago by about 135 million pounds.

Despiteant large 1944 .production the total. sugnly of.burley is exweeted

to be slightly l~ess in the 1944-45 season then-in the ~pesent..eenson. ..TChe

1944 croT1i~s indicated at about 41~2 million pounds, 22 million Dounds..1areer

"than last year's -crop.. Like flue-cur-edg consua~ntion of burley is expected

to continue--at a relatively hich -level: next season. .

The 190-'Zcrow ofs-Marylardnd,'no being mrkreted, was one.of.the smallest

Son rcord pnd wes-of excertionally poor- quality, ,.Prices of..better gradess

6~f -Marylandl.Rre FLt the establishedd ceiling off.62 cepts p~er cound, but..pwing

Wt~rtly to t~he Ir rge percentPre.-of -oor~quali ty-,leef .he coverage of..10~ cents

so fwr this season .Ls below ledt year' s .averag~e of 56 cents. .

The 194L production of fire-cured as of July 1 .is.n~laced a.4 563mil-

lion mounds, .8 millionbelow last yea3r'. lovn1,evet .ProdwationL of dark

air-cured is exceet.ed to be-aRbout;#}rmpillion ,nounds~comnered with 30.m~il-

lion last year. .'L,7st year's csorom of dark eair-Cured was the smallest.-on record

'Ihe. supply, f-desnest~ic ciegar tobacco~ on Oc.to e~r 1,.19 6, is~e estimated

atlaanroximmielly 399.*2 million ,~rpgands, .2,1.milliona.1ess t h3Pz aYePr: earlier.

-Shocksrahon ct~ber -1., .1991C gre exoectefp: !P.e sliehtly lesPs thapgo:7n the spme

dat'B oF>.194)g:. .Pr~oductio~n for: Sk4,.As..;p)ped at 121,4 million ponqq ,. com-

nared t-rith 108.8 million last year.




TS-29


-5 -


.=' In general, thggp tlook, for tobacco during the' nexttyear or so is

rteggrded ais #r~avitailsk view of the continued strong d8mand for toba co

roq--uets. stocks a qgedd to'oacco held in this country and in Britain are
of~in relation to demand, while the supply of United States grown leaf in

most .qf the countries on the European continent and in the Far East is prob-

b.17.nonexi st enit. It is possible that exports durbxng the next year or so

af~ter the fall of Mfi~ssEurope may increase considerably over present levels.

Chiefly because of the large military personnel abroad, consumption

of,tobacco products in this country has increased little if any over last

:year, but the over-all consumption, including the overseas military, is

abovel~the record level of 1943.

E -- July. 27, 1944

I ,ELUE-CURED, 1TY~PS 11-14

1 Maketing Season Opens J~uly 24
in Georgia-Florida Area; EFavorable
rlrices Expcted

The 1944 flue-cured marketing season was scheduled to begin July 24
with the opening of the Georgia-Florida markets. Indications point to a
p~g~ demand .and favorable prices for flue-cured again this year. In
neral,~l~ the growing season in that area has been reasonably favorable and
arge,,~ crop of; good-quality tobacco has been reported.

Price Ceilings and Different'ials
Established by Office of'
-~~~ice AdminiQtration

,In keeping with the Government's program of economic stabilization,
a 3ri.ffice of A~rice Administration has announced that the 1944 crop of flue-
r t~i~~tobacco, as~was the case last.year, will be subjected to a maximum
price regulation with differentials between tied and untied tobacco. T'he
formal order, effective July 28, provides fof a maximum weighted average

?'lTh22e Uq~ Statss obac~co Association has announced.t'he openingg dates
for the 19 flue-ueare.mIkalets as follows: I,, r t.,
Georgia-Florida, .....................(type 14) July 24~
3B order Belt ................. ........(type..13) ~uet -l
dpl I~ Eastern;North- Carolina ............. (t;ge. 12,!.) :.augc~at..2
:. MiTddle* elt .............(tylP4 14~)., ,.5pgtember 11
.o1d Belt ..;.......... ..y.... r.......e;(type .1]Us ,. ,eptlepber.18g




JULY 1944 -F*-6 -'-?

ourthbte.' rice." r o .f 3-1- 'cent't"Ame) Mu~d' "for!Ytih 'tob9co-dTX'l' jA cents for
untied tobacco. The regulation is similar to the ordeF~in effect last season
in:M~t' th4 Pe uilation i's in- t~itmibf weirrhhied 'aieri~cBid'%:j~~J T be7 price andb~
recopgpnize~s the Drinciple of price differentials between the different~ fluce-
culed-'belth. o~rhelly tylDes 11, 12,-and 13, produ~ed 18; thB Carolid s and
Virginia are tied in hands before being sold, while type 14, wroqueedi.in
Georieta and Fldrida~is sold loose. '

':-Inasmuch as the 1s00-ceilhidfin effect at the beginning of the
Georgia-Florida selling season did not provide for price differentials
between tied-and untied tobabcdr, hom~ e tbhcnadcobrdued in.Sout~i 'Ciirlina
moved to Georeia markets aind sold loose as type 14. An amendment to the
196) regulation, however, proviided fof8cnsfrute oac~ a weighted average nurcha~se price
of 41cents for tied tobacco and 3 et o nidtbco

The differential that will exist under the regulation between
prieds.for tiled and untied tobPeco is th~t recommended by the Elue-Cured
Tobacco Advisory Committee and other representatives of the industry.

In addition to price ceilings at the grower's level, the 1944
regulation provides for control of all sales'of the crop from producer
to manufacturer. The regulation provides mark-ups for resales by depl~ers
based on historical prices charged by dealers to various types of purobasers.
It also sets prices that may be charged for stemming and re-drying
performed by dealers. The Office of Price Administration stated bhat
the new price ceilings will have no immediate effect on retail cigarette
prices. .

Limitations Placed on Purchase of
19844 Crop; Allocated as to
SDomestic and Forelan Usage :

Because of the excceptionally strong demand for flue-cured tobacco
this season and necessity for the establishment of ceiling prices, officials
of the War Food AdministrZation, to insure a fair distribution 6f the crop,
have deemed it advisable to limit the purchases of the 1944 crop of flue-
cured tobacco by manufacturers and dealers..-

Under the order, which is based on the July estimated production'-of
834 million pounds, manufacturers may acquire 1944 flue-cured tobacco up
to.74 percent of the quantity whichh they'used for manufacturing purposes
-in ~the year ended June j0, 1944. Manufacturerd' purchases at auction are
limited to the same proportion of the total- viurchases as was acquired fl'r~mL
tha-croes of 1959 to 1942, inclusive. l

Dealers, on the other hand, may purchase flue-cured tobacco of the.,
1942s crop at auction, for their own account, up to 100 percent of the quaA ity
they were allowed to purchase from the 1943 crop. -'",

The 1944 production has.also been allocated by the War Food Administra-
tion as to.:domestic and foreighause, On the basis of current crop estimated
it was determined thr-t 482 million rounds may-be used domestically,-and 352
million 1oun~ds used to meet the.requirements of the United Kingdom and other



















































:


TS-2q -7 -

Allied and friendly nations. The nercentmee which manufacturers and dealers
adre permitted..to buy this season is'baaed-on't~he toagl earmarked for domestic
co b''~disumntion in-relation to the base-13eriord use,

It was stated off~eally wheni the order was issued July 19, that if
latter estimates of brodastion a~re larger than the 834 million pounds, the
order will be amended accordingly, with most' of th~e increases for domestic
users,

Acreage up 2.] Percent:
'iLareer .Cron) ExnTecteA
";' Des'pite: Low Yields

.;: According to a recent release of the Crop Redosting Bo~ard, the fifth
la peest herieaee of flue-cured tobacco on record is in Drosnect for harvest
5 1.i9'44. The indicated acreage.as of July 1, is 484,0E0 acres, 17.1 ner-
M'd 6ii~ above the 844,800 acres harvested in 1943, March prospective acreage,
asT reported by the Board, was 996, j00 acres. July \*reports indicate a
, ifrle-cured crop of approximately 8)k million pounds, 5.8 percent above the
18~j million-pound crop produced last year.

The indicated increase in this season's crop over last year has resulted
fgogtethe from the considerably larger acreage, since yields in all flue-
o&aesexcept the Border Belt of North.Carolina (tyne 13) are below
ig~~~j i. Th to July 1 the weather was particularly unfavorable in eastern
NrTorth Carolina (kyv~e 12) and in the Old Belt of NTorth Carolina and virginia
tyae 11). The July 1 indicated average yield for all flue-cured is 84)
pounds per acre, compared with 95) last year, and is the lowest since 19j6.
Excessive rain and late frost in some areas interfered with growth of
p~lats in seedbeds and made transolenting difficult. It is possible,
however, that considerable change may take lace in-the size of the crop
-before harvest time, particularly in two areas which have suffered most
f@=~i .drought.

Stocks Below Last Year

', As.a result-of the high level of domestic' manufacturing, -substantial
T~end-lease shipments, and other eXports, stocks 6f flue-cured tobacco declined
ilij~LtherP during the past season. On: July 1, 1944, stocks held by manufacturers
;.tii.a ladealers were estimated at 1,197..) million pounds (farm-sales weight),
181 million nounds below July 1, 1944.. Moreover,. of this total, about 154
million pounds consisted of leaf held by or for the account of the Commodity
Gr Credit Corporation. f the- total estimated stocks of flue-cured, on July 1,
ill 10,'94 more than 1,000 -milion pounds will be available for domestic manufac-
.tuting.

$- e- Witbh'domestic. consumption of tobacco tending to.1evel off and a near


at Ojd crop in prospect foril19r4 it is poslll ;1' IeSO;S Sbaru
i from a long-term point of view, will have improved by July 1,.1.945; Bow- =
ever, in relation to consumption, manufacturers are probably holding smaller
.164Dib~ka of ;aged tobacco, than in manyr.pea~rs. Stocks of-flue-cured leaf now
rebi~es~ent ~more than 18 monthat utiligationi.a~t*be current ra~t~eof .manufac-r
i~t. i~~4~n~ wich.-is "below normal.. .--


il.



''''



ia





JULY 1964 8-

An indicated 1944 cirop of 834 million pounds of flu~e-cured, together
with an estimated carry-over of 1,197 million pounds on July 1, 1944, brought
the total estimated supply of this tobacco to 2,0'31 million pounds, a decline
of about 181 million pounds below that available on July 1, 1947.

Stocks of Foreign-Grown Cigarette
Leaf Near Lowest Level on
Record

Stocks of foreign-grown cigarette tobaccos (generally used along with
flue-cured and burley for blending in cigarettes) held in this country have
declined rather consistently since the beginning of the war, and are now
near the lowest point for any quarter since 1930. Stocks held by manufac-
turers and dealers on April 1, 1944 amounted to a little over 58 million
pounds, 51."percent below the 118 million pounds reported on April 1, 1940.
But stocks were exceptionally large in 1940. It is probable that the large
holdings of foreign-grown cigarette leaf reported as held in this country
durirqg the period 1939-41-were the result of an attempt on the part of manu-
facturers to avert a shortage of leaf owing to shipping difficulties. The
present low level of foreign-grown stocks indicates a substantial utilization
af-.thq large. reserve supply, although shipments of fo'reign-grown leaf,
including Tu~rki'sh, have been arriving in considerable quantities. Although
the decline in stocks of foreign-grown leaf has been greater proportionately
than the decline' in stocks of flue-cured and burley, it does not necessarily
meanrthat manufacturers have placed greater dependence than usual upon'
domestically-grown tobaccos.

Cigarette Consumption Continues
at High Level; Tax-i-aid'
Withdrawals belowr Year Ago

The major factor in the exceptionally strong demand for flue-oured
tobacco during the last two seasons was the high level of domestic manu-
facturing and consumption of tobacco products, particularly cigarettes.
It is estimated that the unstemmed equivalent of leaf tobacco'used in the
manufacture of tobacco products in 1943 amounted to more than'1,2i)0 million
pounds, compared withi 1,100 million in 1942 and 88.5 mFillion' pounds in 1939.
Of the total consumption in 1943, an estimated 800 million pounds were used
in the manufacture of cigarettes, and 150 million pounds were used in smoking
tobacco, the principal .products manufactured from flue-cured leaf.

In the aggregate~ and on a per capital basis, consumption appears to
have reached a peak in 1943. In terns of leaf equivalent (which included
foreign-grown tobaccos) the estimated per capital consumption in the United
States in 194) was 8.7 pounds, compared with 6.6 in 1939. This is by far
the largest consumption of tobacco in the history of the industry. The high
level,of consumption is expected to continue Apripg the remainder of'1944
and in 1945- -.

It is estimated that during the~cal-endar y~edr 1943 the number of tax-
paid withdrawals of cigarettes in this country amoydted to more than 265
billion. This is an increase of more than 10 percent over 1942,. and repre-
sents 8 per capital consumption of almost 1,900 cigarettes, which is nearly
60 times the utilization in 1900. During D~ecember 1943, the 37th consecutive
month to show an increase over the same month a year earlier, 22.8 billion





28". P-29 -9 -

tax-paid cigarettes were withdrawn. But the 37l-month period of continuous
increase camemibo in'end- in.,anary 1944 when withdrawals declined to 20.1
~_Ui~llion, 1.25.percent unner January 1943. Likewise, withdrawa~ls during
5 brary and March Qere belowJ the sam~e m~ont~hs of 194j. Flor the first 11 -
,Iongths of th8 fiscal year:beginning July 1, 194j, approximatelyp 237 billion
ta -paid cigarettes were krithdrawn, 6 percent a~bove the 223 billion with-
d~p 9 during' the same period a _year earlier. The large number of cigarettes
~stgaE~d abroad itp th't._armed .9ore,es are no~t included in' the above figures.
It as probable that carnsumption of cigarettes produced in this country,
including those shipped to the armed forces, is now above the high level
of $lAg~-.

S. i "Domestic consumptionn of smoking tobacco, another outlet for flue-
at &s~d leaf, has'declined rather consistently during the war. Proddoti'in,
as S~fported by the Bureau of.Intfernal Revenue, during the first Ij Bonthh
of $~i44 totaled 36.5 million.pouads, a decline of 30 percent fro6 th& iame
pal:'- ~eod of 1943..

; ~Behind the exceptionally high level of~domestic utilization are two -
orsQT which have been operati'ng-to -increase the over-all consumption' 6f
Il~.;~~;~: eco~~i products. The first of these is the long-time upward trend in the
pat3rpapita ;consumption of tobacco products in this country. Total. conslump-
in.:in ea ~h year since 1932 has shown an increase over the preceding ypar.
I' Abictermore, there has been a marked upward trend in the proportions of the
bDiia~l consumption represented by cigarettes, and a decline in the proportion
represented by cigars and manufactured tobacco. The demand fpo~r ap( consump-
t~i;-Qidh 6f tobacco products is also affected by changes in t'he purchasing power
Fi; f~ consumers. Over a period of years there has been a rather close relation-
194G between Wage payments to nonagricultural workers and per capital
-@dn~f~sumption of tobacco pro gets. During years of low industrial activity
a~d low wage income, sudh? as in 1921 and .the :early 1930as, there wqre
I ..deibreases in the over-al'l consumption of tobacco products, while in.periods
of rising industrial employment there were increases,in the consumption of
tobacco product s.

.Bat changes in the purchasing power of.consumers affect the various
cty~acco product differently. :During periods of rising incomes, the demand
$Ur i~~:ci'gars a nd. cigar-ettes, particularly the latter, expands, while the.
::thWLa~n for smoking tobacco declines. These changes have been .especially
f: i.:'i~d6~anoned during this war. .Sales of .cigars in the higher-priced cl;assles
ha te increased suibstint~ially, whereas sales of lowL-priced, cigars have greatly
dbelied. he-.declinei2B.n the consumption of the low price cigars is!,due
primarily to lowered output of -these types for civ 'lian use. ,


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JULY 1944


-10 c


Table 1s-Flue-cured to'bacco: .DomesY-ld-subnlies"; di8dd#%@hrandi,;''
an .season average aries, averiage I9-35-39; 'anruat3 '194044'1 If '

.a. ..- a .- -. 7 -Dis ta t Average .
: )Stocks. .-Total- pe~ranCe'e,.r C ne
Yea : :r ,-Jutol ~~3ly 1. .: snely -: yeair begin-: nound.
.I: : .0. ning- Jul : -
,, :Mil. lb. M IL l.11. Mil. lb. Mi.1. *Centsr~


Average :
19~5- 39 .:

1900 .......:
1941 .......:
1942 ...,:
1943~ 31---
1964 .....:


e.20.5


881.6


863~.6


1.745.2


7 j2.2

576.7
78 3.0
877.0
970.0


1.409,7 ..
1.59 2-. 9
1.459.5
1. 374.8
5/ 1,197.3


*2,169.6
2,242.4
2,271.2
2,167. ~
2f 2,051:.0


16.4
28.1~;

-40. 2


.759,9--- .
649.5
811.7
7gs,5
4/ s33.7


2/
.. jj


if ~rmsales-weight equivalent.
2} Owilng to a chance in the method of reporting Commodity Credit Cornor~atidn'
holdings, the 1442-43 season disPenearance figue does not agree mathematically
with the difference between the sup~nly as-of July 1, 1942 and stocks as of''
July 1, 194j. For an explanation see the 1945-44 Flue-cured Market Revi~ew i~f
the War Food Administration.
Preliminary.
SIndicated July 1. -
] Estimated.

BURLEY, TIYPE 31


:r
I:


Destoite Lover Yields, July 1
-i~nd~in~ions Point to
Second Largest Cron
on Record


., Crop conditions as of July 1 indicate a burley production of 411
million ounds,..an increase of 5-.4 percent over the relatively large crot
of 1,q4). -Thle ),944 acreage is placed at 469,.500, compared with last y~est's
harvested apr~eage of 391,400 acres. The larger production is altogether
the..resjult of the increase in acreage, as in all major growing areas yields
of burley are reportedd below those obtained in 194j. As of July.1, the
indicated.yield is 877 pounds per acre compared with 966 last year, and
the record yield of 1,024 Bounds in 1940.

Stocks Below Year Aen

As a result of the high level of leaf consumption in the domestic
manufacture of cigarettes and smoking tobacco, stocks of burley are below
those of a year ago. Stocks held by manufacturers and dealers on October 1,
1943 totaled 686 million pounds, 9.2 percent less than on October 1, 1942.
D3isanpearance (largely domestic consumption ) during the 12-month period
ended September j0, 194j, of 412.8 million pounds, materially exceeded the
1942 production. Likewise, disappearance exceeded production by a con-
siderable amount in the preceding year. The substantial excess of estimated


X
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''
;i
I
91
t;i
;1.
I
ri
t;;
::
r

''''


.: iic


-







afga~" mearance .Ley~ r~laon nounasl over Isy*+.rnc~Pamce nes aroouroaxon
,igalnm ~e~duce- st~oclgld ~a~s of the end of 'the season (Seatembe~r JO), nossibly:l.i
M'~li'l:g l~on ounds. ($ni-bctober 1 of last year stocks of burley. were ;p
im~tly 16 -ne d MSfpjiiof estimated disaanearances, or the current season
mpr~er with 181-@ A ent a year earlier. With conditions favoring~ a
c.roo in 1944:an$~dlt aestic consulmation of cigarettes' tending to level
~is vosioi iblee that docksk of burrley leaf on October 1, 1945, will be.':
ghtly Ueibw stocks on the same date of 1944.
lli::i: ;'Becduse o fthe ougook for a larger 19 44 product ion, the s~itua~t in. rtr
~j~i~E r4 to the total Adiply of burley is somewhat more favorable than. Il
lbgi:f~ a nggfacturers' a nd dealers' inventories. Fy the 1943-44 season
yof l'ea~f avail.ab~leffopdomestic m~anufacturgag~e, *export, and-earry-
~re'sentee d r950 -pvenet' of estimated' disaenneagye compared with 266-.:
5 e~i~ier, .and 3355 percent' in the 1946-41' seasqnll~ &rb because of the'~i:~
~939.cropp the suppgyq.af 1.eaf in 1940 wlas exceationa~lly' large in relaC. o~
smt~ion With a 194 ~production of. 412 million pounds and a. car~ry-
milllion pounds, the total supply available fqragomestic aonsumdtiqn. ::l]i
znort ~would be' 1,053 ~million pounds for 1944-45, a decreaSe-of aibout '
lonpounds:below.'19k).

~;I~1'.Largelyi as a result of-~the increased popularity of cigarettes, dom- ~ .i
o~nsunmbtion ofs-burley ha's increased qver a. period of years both in
rgte and-on a per capita basis, Domestic consumption increased
Ii estimated 226 million pounds in 192j to about 410 million 11ounds : in
of6~ on a per capita basis. from slightly less than 2 Dolunds to Ag little
~l~poujds. During the same period the consumption of cigarettel:increased''
po~ unds~per-person~ (o'tdal population) to 5.54 IWounds, Smoking
on th6~le _other ~hand, daecingdd from 1.j9 pounds to 1.10 pounds per
tl~~'hr'thghia' same perilod.-of time, and chewingg tobacco declined from.
nd ~to'0;S2 pounds nep pseronF
i~::thb hgha he ns~ulrption of burley in thi~.s county~ has increased If
D ecent durfug'.the: last two decades, igt.has not increased so rap :
~~Fl~~ilebutd; ~pli~ke flue-cured, burley never has~been important a's .
agisue.,big timr~iy n the domestic manufacture ,of ..d
e ,r'!;' oki~ng to:ba~cep `and, chewing t~objaco. The aercentag~s of-.the
'.d~rop ~~:Q i~stexforte hivedeelined :ctbadly since 19 3), whereas the 1percent-~-4
A.!.. I!idmeis'tioally':a" he ;inte~ased.; Domestic: consumption new accounts: `'"'
~r.~~.~;~ netw'f cent? i5f total di saaceararce, ~wh;it'e mo~re th2an '60 isren t o~f
ad ido' h'emanfa'ture of:cigarettes. Bri~tain normElly 1'
We:~: .bilo~ t'He didatlfl~e~t.ts~.f :.gea 40lf ed from .this~' oonntr~:fy,,; Tradibidnk''
;~;;BritI~~ buyers aepeee tes ald 'V tt'hh6
11y hiis meet to aa~cco' grown 'iniy irginiia byt toada it r~efer to.~:'
tjE 0 ied~ ed tes gner elly.-






Table 2.- 3urley tobacco: Domestic supplies, disappearance, and
average price, average 1935-39, annual. 194o-44 If~i:i

: :: :Disap- :.
: : Stocks, : Total :pearance, : average
Year production pi~ice .per
: : ~Oct. 1 : supply : year begin-: od
: ::ning_ Oc~t. : -~~i
:Mil. lb. Mil. lb. Mil. 1%. Mil. lb. Cent-~~
average:
1935-39 --= 315-9 673.6 989.5 317-5 22.2
1940 .......: 375.3 762.j 1,137.6 339.5. 16
1941 .......: 336. 8 798.1 1.134-9 379-.6 29. 2
1942 .......: Thy. 75. .9-84284
1943 2/ ....: 390.0 686.0 4 1,076.0 4, 435.o 45t5
1944 -.... Z/ 411.9 k/ 641.0 4/1,052-9~

~FarmFe-sae sw ight -
5 preliminary.
IIIndicated July 1.
SEstimated.

MARYfiLAND, TYPE 32

Maximum price Regulation
for 194- Crop Issued
by OFA '

Just before the opening of the southern Maryland auction markets 01k'..
May 9, the Office of P'rice Admipistration announced a maximum price re~:g Any9~
tion on the 1943 crop of Maryland tobacco. This regulation, the first ~i sq
on Maryland leaf, fixed a maximum weighted average purchase price of $2.eb
per pound which all purchasers of Maryland tobacco were required t~o obsq va~~ii~~~ii~~
Soon after the auction markets began selling the 1943 crop it became ie:.
that under the existing circumstances the season average returns to .jEj~
would be substantially less than wras contemplated under the regulation.
Dissatisfaction of growerp and warehousemen with the technique of oer
Sof the ceiling~regulation became apparent. The quality of the leaf 4
exceptionally poor-and it was evident that buyers for cigarettemaua
the largest users of Maryland tobacco, were not interested in purchat
low grades of this crop. It was evident also that cigar manufacturers
.interested~only in the low grades of this tobacco and that theygee
prices-substantially below those paid by cigarette manufacturers..I .
decided that the markets should be closed until further study could p
the matter and an adjustment made in the technique of operation of the '
maximum price regulation. Consequenltly, mnaximrum price regulation No. 532 w
revised, effective May EO, Thle revised regulation established a maximum
ceiling price of 62.cenlts per pound for any sales of Maryland leaf except'
those made by dealers, for Wcim separate provisions were made.

As a result of this actiohi all southern~ Maryland loose-leaf auction~-,
markets and the Batimore market reopened for sale of the,1943 cro~p. The
new regulation allowed flexibility in th-at it permitted buyers to make


'" t:~ a.: r
.rr ;.i;c;i:;+ Ji: .c:',l, i;~ ...l::.::i(".~. ..':` ; :.:.; :.: '..












markts at~ Upper~ Marlbord, ':'Bugh off\
~ I~T~i~*P~~~; ~er3 the revised maximum price rbgiafi~~
ca-:~:~ ;ufl~i,~~~,Z,~ brk dr the opening averaged. sl'~igtipi
hfi:~~e 'ppoiiing sales ~lrst pear, th
~~a~-"il-~ i" ;~~~patii higher, Met the lovei- grades~
~kzi~~t We gradae s of toiacqo whi


~~~~t :-through ~July I have 'total ''
ie~i~ ~_~i~it~:n I:..erage9 'of 8 5 cents pier PPoun .
er~ i t 2~as~ 'a~ppofimatelyg 56 cents ker; itou a~~~l
or ai for MParyl~ nd ea~f.




in h .level o0 .doe~stic .:maiilfbtufact. rin
~i~i~4ir agoand.a, further .re actionon is i;


9 .. .9 ie rl1 9 sok
eii:s j_ inflio pu e(aifsae
ii; e3 sMditoist~eniatrrr
a ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ cl a owbigidretdvu
aiance'.~ ET i bd dd
.4 aning the
S~I~LmCi 19 sipea
~P~:~:.;.:ii ~ i~:: ~i~: '; h:;;-: ...e;.


n a.*r-r~;





the outlook for the new crop is reasonably favorable. But despite favo
crop conditions prevailing at present, and the prospect of a normalha
the. outlook is for a sharply reduced supply of Maryland next season. Th#~j
indicated 1944 crop of 28.1 million pounds, plue, stocks obf 31;.4..illion ;
estimated for January 1, 1945, results in an estimated total supply ofcf 9~
million pounds available for 1945

Although the outlook for exports of tobacco generally is more ~f
now than at any time since the entrance of this country into the war, f''its a
possible that exports of Maryland may not increase to any.great' -extenit
near future. The trend in exports has been downward for a long't~imet
1926 exports of Maryland leaf amounted to more than'i0 million pounday:
i'n 1942 less than 3 million pounds were sent abroad. During that timer
Marylend tobacco has become increasingly popular with domestic cire
facturers. The leaf is now used primarily in the domestic manufacture
cigarettes and its consenmption has increased along with the rise in cp o
of cigarettes. Maryland leaf represents a very small part of all cigar:',!;I
leaf produced in this country, and the percentage of the total has not ed~~~~~i
greatly during the last two de.cades. If the long-term upward trendi
ette consumption continues, thle Apmand for Marylandoshould remain rel~ S~I:at
strong, and' from the standpoints of both the long-term outlook and the y b~i
supply and demand conditions, an expansion in acreage and production in~'a:~
next few years seems desirable. ;:,I

Table 3.- Maryland tobacco: Domestic supplies, disappearance ':';Z:
and season average price, average 1935--19, annual -1940-44 If
Production Stocks, TIotal supply: Disap~pear- :Sedson a~~~
:(sold in the: Jan. 1 of for the : ange during: age rr~ .:i :
Year following following following the fol-: icp
year) I year year ,lowing pobUnd':'~ )

:Mil. lb. Mil. lb. Mil. lb. Ml b
Average .
1935-39 ..: 28.9 j8.4 67.3 27.9

1940 ....-- 32.6 43.2 75.8 ~ 10833i
1941 .......: 31.2 45.o 76.2 28.5 30"~i
1942 .......: 28.1 4i.7 75.8 2 3. 6
194 2 ...: 17.6 43.8 61.4 I 30.p.0 '' 2../ 5
1944 .......: __3/ 28.1 4{ 31. __ ig.
1 F'-arm-sales-we ight equival ent .
2 lFreliminary.
SIndicated July 1.
4/ Estimated.

FIRE-cURE AND DARK~ AIR-GURED, TYl-ES 21-24 ND 35-37


'Indicated: Production ofi.Tital r .:'


:


II
:'
~
:
r.
F:.
i~..
*: .
a:;.
gil~~
i ,
1B, 1 i


-Darkr goba~ccos Below Ldst Year

ii; As- a re.Sult of the high prices-paid grovrers last iseson add the al
:: of control measures, the acreage planted to. the: dark -tosaocous ~has inlcrea 45







syyupaea.g .~n .. Increase acr~eage I. "..ir'tc :gwC -~: novyup aa: u se:
tiOela'P a`n ~incea.i daark air-cured (types. 35$437 4g
ep is qured-t niaed. Total dome.st~ic: oiroulc~t~cion' p0 ;aljl ty
cle o~~p inki now lace at approxinia tf~y' inft' pounds
e dec ~L;~'aas'jsi ft 431: but 36.4 percent below the airetage f .'ti':;ji
~a~i~ 5 39 expected decrease5 in product-Ipt5 ~.Es; oeentire
i~~a pe e aFj~g~~hd. fthe t ,ota areg is wJell above'l .

,,i~i ~ to 11 orop proPfduced last year, bark 'asjr urted
td~Y bb mrilip.n: pounds -- an increase a bd

:ii)e4ijibr~:~ ip4t~.- .if Eilion3; last y~eam. Produ~tiobn pt Grjei'E
ped to 'isph 12 million poun coipre riph 0~ll
~~c~s11'[ o l~aike. i19 This AIR'is: p'roducetion o
:~~P9~:~f~ i ;3%:gxll thii" to be abouait he same 'as hLast ye

Jul 1 a eddhitch is'i~ placedi 44 56.;2 million.~ Pina
Id 6. ililied pounds produced th. ;943,~ .i;~s
af 4 ear r is~plce at 65, soo acres, a' .4,4.h
~-tseoi8:$10 dedO ad lazit in i194).' `ndipalted fire-dy
I~~sar .a e Add. e' acre. as compared~ ri~th' 942 lastt Bekson.~



4CbP'S. '. .

ei-?l' ais F ~~Ult: ~ i bhe s mali 1911. brop .and increased export s,
a It & rk~kk. tobccs .;ar'e, slightly below a, year dgo. -Manu- I
Ill~~i~i~.;dri ~'lari Odtlo6' 'it, '1944~ arere expdete4 :to'.?7
duti ~o op Sed wthf '2i4 ir 19 2 .anc\.20 7 in .19.0..
~~~~~1 ,,il:: 9~7~~ W g~'~.3'iil~ foh; yroundp t-ogether .withl'the e'dit~-~ii.
~!~;~:s~~e~~~~i~ ~ 1111'slo gives' an; Avilatle stbipply for: next~ s easost adBi
~:~~. 3~;~ ~ h~~~o;:11~iompoliicts '6165 ~percent 'be;3 ow the average~ ifdr:
~ish. i~tl~re wa.a -p:i d~ef~in~it~e '~upplus ofslark o'bae
en fIrITPipied An x 't)for .the':194374 seso
itlbnPouds`bd the same~ ks~t. las -sas

8. ~~~ ~": p~ ,e ohk b sti tm

11 o oinmide~ias rep~irt a~ on btoba14.'t
di 6 bill n and.sis iii'dui;tie the ateasls







































































1
-


Domestic Consumption of Snuff and Chewing
Tobacco at Hi~gh L'evel- --

The major domestic use for the dark tobaccos produced in the United .
States is in the manufacture of snuff and plug chewing tobacco, the consump-
tion of which has increased under war conditions. Tax-paid withdrawals of'
snuff, the principal trade outlet for the fire-cured types, have shown ,
substantial increases over pre-war years, byut are now running below the l'~eve
established last year. During the first 10 months of the fiscal year end~g
June 30, 1944, domestic consumption, as indicated by sale of revenue stamp~.
totaled. 35.4 million pounds, slightly less than for the same period a yegg'
Seal ier. withdrawal of 3.7 million pounds during May 1944, was 17.26 p~rer@i
above the' same month of 1943. Production of chewing tobacco (plug and Ed~i i:,
the principal trade outlet for dark air-cured, continues to be relativre~lgt:
hih reduction of plug was 15.4 million pounds for the first 3 months of .
1944, an increase of 5.26 percent over the 14.7 million pounds produced i
the corresponding period of 1943. Furthermore, March showed an increase of.
2.3J percent over the same month of the preceding year. During the first
3 months of the present calendar year, production of twist increased 38,864
pounds, or 2.3 percent. March 1944 also showed an increase over ]Karch 1945.
by a little more than 5 percent. Consumption of tobacco products will proa) y
continue at a relatively high rate for the remainder of the period of.huigh
industrial employment in war plants, but this does not appear to represent; a
reversal of the long-time downward trend in the use of chewing tobacco in
this country.

Supplies No0w in Line with
Reduced Demand

For many years before World War II the trend in demand for the dark.
types of tobacco produced in this country was downward. This was due ia~in~
to a shrinkage of export markets, although reduced domestic consumption aget;
also a factor of considerable importance. In the years imrmediately preedit
the outbreak of this war, an average of about 70 million pounds of d;)rk.
tobacco was exported annually. This was less than one-half the volume of
exports in the early 1920's. Following the outbreaks of war, the stoppage.~:-
trade with countries of continental Europe cut off most of the remaining
exports of fire-cured and dark air-cured leaf from the United States.. DJomres~~;i'
demand for fire-cured leaf has been fairly well maintained owing to the
stability of. snuff -consumption. The demand for dark air-cured, however, izsedeeeeee~~~~
principally in the manufacture of plug chewing, fine-cut chewing, and twisrt.,i ~3`'1
declined drastically before the war because of the declining consumption~ ofi';li
these products.


The low level of production during the last 3 or 4 years,. increased
domestic consumption, and the byproducts diversion program, have combined to*
bring supplies and requirement's more nearly into balance than a~t any time in..
recent years. Even with domestic manufacturing at a relatively high level,
the over-all disappearance of dark leaf during the last two seasons has bedsa!.
only slightly greater than production. Furthermore, the current over-all
supply is considerably larger in relation to disappearance than any of the .i:
other major types of tobacco. However, with the brighter outlook for expojr~D
and continued high level depestic consumption in prospectt, it. appears likeljy;
that somewhat larger crops of dark tobaccos, particularly fire~-cured,_Could
be sold at profitable prices.


C~
*

LI:
i"t'~
L!:'
!';''
i::::











: ~~:Disapear ira
Iti~r: ::: .. ProdneC- : Stocks : :- Tot~fl:a ane-; a rice1
Stiozi Oct. 1 sugpply : beginnl~~ix' :er:::.
.~~ : ai



~~i,'',C:'' .TOIAL .A;I -DARK TOIBACCOS

3%9~i a bo-7 38136 1'57-1 91.9
15 --'-: 2oy.2 .357-3 :99.o .p-p
ia\ 5<- 3594i Ill~ 1.34:

3 1 229.0 r/ 318.3


op6 81.4284.9 12o~ 0.0 djI
7.6 41.6 249.2 `65. 3 .35 .,
T 183-9 253-6 69.o 414.1
i;: 't::,71,.e ~ 5 18. 4.6 256.1 g 76.3 17.1
.8 179.8P 244.6 76.1 23.4 '


g: :.:~r.:~::5 +3 B. .59-3 95-7 37-1 ~ .9
2.5 65.6 108.1 33-7I' 7 7

30a 6 .0 99~2.2 2/ 344.e 19.3 Ir
30Pi3 69.3 9.3.4-.8 yc



51 19-9- 1

3~L:..~ 51~: 9

8o 6L~.6 ;;:::~. ;~j
IV; ;'.~.~E:l3 d :i il~~:~;


?/
ir:.






CIGAR TOBACCOS TYPES 41-62


Larger 1944 Acreage and Production
Indicated; Stocks and Supplies
Lower:-
As of July 1, the 1944 acreage of cigar tobaccos in this countE~~%~
placed at about 86,400 acres, compared with so,5oo in 1943. .By indiir~ l
classes the indicated 1944 acreages are: FiT1er 3j9,800 acres, binder;
acres, and wrapper 10,400 acres. In general, the weather has been fa
and the prospective yield of 1,4o5 pounds per acre is greater by about:
percent than the average of 1,3DS pounds for the 5-year period 1935-319' t

The indicated production of all cigar tobaccos in the continents -
United States is about 121.4 million pounds, 11.5 percent more than thp~
108.8-milliionpound crop grown in 194-j. In 1943, production of cigaf ft
and binder decreased by 11 percent and g percent, respectively, belod-1
while cigar wrappers increased by 6 percent. *'

Stocks of domestic cigar tobaccos in the hands of manufacturers and~t~:
dealers on October 1, 1944 are expected to be about 278 million poundei'l::..;;.
15 million less than on. October 1, -194g Of the separate classes, sthe a:~~:~;!~
expected to b'e smaller for eigar filler and binder, buit in the caser:P of 'e
wrappers, a slight increase in stock's is indicated.

Because of the larger 1944 crop the over-all supply situation is bputi~,
the same as a year ago. .The current production of 121.4 million po~uiAi a 1 ai~i 6
the estimated carry-over of 278 million pounds gives a total supply of Rl;::. I
million for the 1944-45 season.

Stocks of foreign-grown cigar leaf in the possession of manufad~talde;::~
and dealers on October 1, 1944 are not expected to change greatly from. the:^"
25 million pounds (farm-sales weight) reported on October 1, 194'j. de
the proportions of the total represented by the various types will hai e~.',jl'
changed to a considerable extent. Stocks of Cuban (Havana) probably ~il
larger than last year, whereas stocks of Sumatra and P~hilippine leaf
loe.Total holdings of foreign-cigar 'tobaccos in this country on Aj
1944, amountedd to approximately 28 million pounds, an increase of 6 mill:
ove te smedat o 193.This increase is due almost entirely to lar~Fr
imports of Havana ICiller during the first quarter of 19r14. Cuban stpd~si i
.22.7 million were mue~h larger on April 1 of this year than last. Nrml
October stocks are larger .than April stocks, but this probablyy wiTll~ notb;
case this year. Under the trade agreement between the United State~s a Ad,~
a quota of 22 million pound's of Kavana filler may be imported each a m
year into the United States at a 14-cent-per-pound reciprocity treaty ~E~~;llfe
All imports of Havana filler above this quota are subject to the full tarfit~
rate of 28 cents a pound. .FWithdrawal entries fo9.0uaban tobacco preseitted~~
manufacturers at customs bonded.warehouses on J~aiuary-1, 1944, amounted to;
approxiimately 18.5 million pounds. This was about" 85 percent of'the, tot'al
that Imapr enter this country at the low 14 cent rate during 1944. Wihr
entries for the entire 22 million pounds were presented by Ftebruary 1','
It is probable that larger imports..will enter at the full tariff rate thl
year than. last. ~ii








1 4toataled Agg~illio pounds a. i~edUCtiofi of: fe~isy ha 12:milit
irtbgte.prenea~eg gg 5.2 mon~t h perjia. It is ,p#obal he c~ i'r-
of prese d of .SumI~: 89,~ F ~:0~at awould.gi e consider sitab l
cat urpr e der norhedi conditio;2s. S~tock~is At'
~jep a .' pablerketiall xhausted. oldi
0 `i~i;su~ .-c.OmpaLe'd With '739-,ooo ~.a ?r~





h ~si.~1nsrpda. doeti onaino.,. gars as.
no 8 mpeahd bEon, the highl~.nest ince
~ ?~~~6,~S~b 1 on ag 19 g4j: tere B0plercent below 1 j2.-
in4, es ie~dinig .mh ~pilghd~rawal s have b eezi: :.
~i~r~ ~ o of to pre;~c' cedizig year. 'irFing the first i.1.
~~'~ ~ ~ g y;~s.i:;:~~.Jear,, :Triffid avals. toal ed Ii-5 billion, a deaine~: '
0 4110 ekeit ,helow t~he corresponding period of the
~;~t;. ,:~~i~;;;a az-pax; a id withdrawal~s .do not include the large
ax1 e g;;,~::i~_ointo he armed- forces abroad, tax-]ia~id. ith- :
e $:noS:8 an hear a m;~~la~a sue of Cigar: production. The number of .
i d: tax-fra oz!ur se of the a~rmed' forbe~s has reached substabixtil
if` they we a ated to he number consumed in this equntry;, it is
I~daidli b show, dec liP~e consideraibly less than. indicated,
S--~; rawi ~ ~ that :tdtal. oiitput. is;- below the .lev~el of last
flo n e, ralReairie. Iadeof cigar production which
Aprlj il, 19 a:; CLS. bompared-- with;10j a year earlier, .'

~i~(ji~~~ji~~;Xresg in icate that during the last 15. months or ::'
e edto ard: higher priced cigars.. The avail-e
~i~~je~~~:~,i~:~rsddr ~ eas _ae.in d.omestic~ consumption .is .largely .in the~
;.:T" ~ of the :6' mon~ts foqr which comparable data on
~ ~~:cis~~eas A, nd; C hiave shown d~ecl~ines~from the3.sadsi,:
i~~E~i~~li-.~`~ j~ hliting ,Mty '19 4, t~hese.la'ss-es showed' de~l~in a~
n 31(percdt reaflectvely..' dn 'the .o~ther ,
I:~"f~~~]~~!!:al~~ hi:hep ld.er--rsirmd.cia shaxed inreasie s rang :

trdy irtlet. ;lor ialarsinar
be a vbich asks incr~9ea~e~d sgtnilyud
4 s .idgeio =o antg heing .:is:.3?
vb sin~sutew of 4teral aaig


E'
:; ::






Sale of Unharvested 1944 Crop
of Binder and Filler
;:rohibited by WFE~A

The War Food Administration issued an order, effective June 14,
prohibiting future contract purchases of most domestic cig r fill-er-andl~
binder types of tobacco before the crop is harvested. The specific pr5i~
of the new order, as stated by the administrator, is to MiSt the ~y.ip
tive practice of buying tobacco while it is still growing in the f~ieercr:
during the process of curing. Nearly all types of tobacco are us~ua 1~~:
purchased after they are harvested and cured, when their quality anli jai5;:i:
value can be learned with a reasonable degree of accuracy.

Last season, because of the unusually stron demand for cigar Ilei -:,
the practice of'future purchases became so prevalent as to threaten t~o' .."
disrupt the normal distribution of. the crop. The types affected by i
year's order are cigar filler (types 41-44) and cigar binder (types.5i~~4n
These tobaccos are grown in New York, Massachusetts, Connecticut, h
Wisconsin, lennsylvania, and M~innesota.










*r; -










r:~ ~ ~ stok'r : pearan~e ABver~ayg~:
Odt~~al Total ~ yer-pii
on supplyr begin- e
~-r.*.~;. ~::. ning p uu
llion illion Million Million
pouds. oud~.,psnd punds., ~,,. etsrv.,~
... .3.6 154.5g a9. 1 56. 11.0i'":
...... 66, 6~ 151.o r.7.6 o6 1.
....... 71. 1570 as.4 61.7 12.4 :
.* .:....l- 1' 6 ~j 166.7i andS~Q~ 66.7 13.2 :i:~
....:~ .. 7.41536 agI.o 9 53.9- 4.


..t:'- 37c. .~9.1. 136. 7 36.3 12.9: :'
iilFii.;.W 50..1. 10, 6.0 156.1 41.8 1.
.~f~- B .. .i-~ 57.7~ 114.3 172.0 9 49.1'i 13.2 I
.. i~. 416- 122. 9 164. 5 54.9 13.7 :;
,r. ~~~i~~-:;. il. i 39.6 109.6 1492 g 2. 18.6 i
.. .:: .. E Ms.3 loy.1 155.45.
es~ 2 -. r 1. l
.: ... 1'5C 2: .5~ 68.7 19.8 8 5
ij~il. .;.... ...... 165 6 9. 16.4 7.7
... ...... 1 7 427 $ ~6.4 12. 6 -9,3 c
!ii .:.. ~. ki.... 12. 43,8" 55-8 11*8 11.5 .
.. ..... r 7i$ )CLQ 51.8 611.8 18.3
.~~~;: ... 6.8 Mo. 46.8
51-.- 5 60~- 46)
...... `~: .48.9 146.4 195c* 8. 1.
..' ..... 67.9 13.023.9 67.2 14. 5
.. 61.6 136.7: 19813 60.4 16.9
.., .:i:': 550.7 137.8 193.5. 66,9 0.
.;- ....4 g126.6: 178;.o 6f 61 2. 39.2


.....; 1&3; .- 875 398 1 5
il'~~i~-. ..... ." 124 250 36, 100
2 ... ...... 210~.4: a,4 36.(
.5:~ }36. ...... .0.. n
; ... `:.:..`: ...?b it .1 23 6 3
Rt ,ale Eavana e ed s iI -.n:;;
195 5-3 .r.. C -w

pr- -- *- ***




C UVUI I


Table 5.- cigar tobaccos: Domestic supplies, disappearance..and sesson.:'
average price, average _1215:1_annual~ 1900 44_1/ -ontinues
: : : Disap-
: ::pearance:Aveira
: Produ- : Stcks' :Total : year:ri
Type and year Oct. 1 ..~
:tion : } supplyF :. begin- :. Pak.
: : : : ~ning :p
.Oct,
:Million. Million .Million Million *'i
: onspounds pounds pounds 0s~i~
iNew York and Pennsylvania Kavana: ;";
seed, type 53 :
Average 1935-39 ........ .3 2.2 3.5 1.
'1940 ..:.................... 2.0 3.2 5.2 2-;1 1
'1941 .. .... .... .: 2.2 3.1 5.3 2.4 :iFS : '.
12............. 1.9 2,9 4.8 3.0
'1943 1/-........... 1.2 183.0 6} 1.4
1944 .............:/ 1.4 6/ 1.6 6. 3.0 :
Southern Wisconsin, type 54
Average 193 5-39 .........:- 14. 6. 53.1 67.7 20.6 ~;1I~ 1
1940 ...........: 20.4 4).,6 64.0 24.6 ~ a
S1941 ............-..........: 15.4 39.4 54*8 19*2
1942 ......:.....: 13.s 35.6 49.4 13.3
1943 3/ '...........-: 13.4 36.1 49.5 6, 14.9 2~-:~
1944 ..............5 14-1 f 34-6 fl 48*7
Northern Wisconsin, type 55 -Sg~~
Average 1935-39........ 11.2 32.2 43.4 12.3.
1940 ......................: 17.6 36r0 53.6 9.9
194 ...............: 16.9 43.7 So.6 18.6
1942 .;....................,: 16.1 42.o 58. 1 2.
1943 11/............ 14.4 36.3 50.7 6/ 1.6
1944 ............./ 15.4 &/32.1 &/ 47.5
Georgia and Florida sun-grown,:


type 56 k/ ....................:
1940 ......,..........,.....:
1941 ..........:.........,. "
1942 ..........:.........:
1943 1/ ..................:
1944 ..........: ..........e.:g/
Total wrapper, types 61-62 :
Average 1935-39 ...-----------=
i 194o :.........:..........,,:
1941 .,.........:...........:
1,1943 2/ ...................:
51944 ......................: f
C~onnecticut Yalley shade-grown, :
type 61 -:
average 1935-39 ..............:
1940o ................. ......:
[i~ii~1941 '.............,..'.., ..:
1942 ....,..................;
1943 ]! ................~....:
S194 / ...,.....,~


i I
( i
*
i
ji~5:;2*
I
i:
*.:


1.8
.9
.8 .
.2 '
.2

9.2
9.5
10.1
9.2
10.0
10.3


6.5
5.5

5.6

7.1


1.2
1,7
1.6
-1.1
6 5


3.0
2.6
2.4
1.3
*7

19.3
22.4
21.iZ
21.9
22.3
24.2


10.1
12.9
11.7
12.7
-12.3
6/ 13.9


7.3
9.8
.7..9
.8.0
7.6
6. .8.8


13.s
.15.3.
14.3
13.6
13.9'
6)15.9


Continued -










r~S:~\




I




*~..li
"'

~ri


.s.
- 1


*itC1S : Total '-. :~~t ye Igr
.V- ot.. 1 supply : "egin-- 8
:niing :p

1110 illon Million Kjll'ion -
oui~j-,;iside~: hsun<1s punds pounds Cn



-- 3 -1 3.3 70.R9~:
`3~ 5 2. 5 73.0lI;L~
3' f. 3.6 To.o1
8.3

e fg e rit he in all T cases, to those.
;~'!~~;~::ound n ;&..;'~~;* td ithe3i atal for thie class. ~In

~~j ~ ~~ded; Bti~rbT tpk pes ahd.'62: areas as f

d l ft in' .the el~at2.ve 'proportiobn of
gthi~s geffiir the. apr~ximate dis- ,:-
o as va'.s an'itoll ows:



1 3 lP~j G.. O -1-: 1000 ~poU~snd-!

.. 4,000.pounds~
.~~~. .. 00000pone



s ppe dbi an
it e n ppo ver rodao t


to


I i i


j


il: .:.i4:;.;i







Production, stockt~s, supply, and b
id States, 1920-44

: :Disappear-: Seasolf~;
:Disappear-: ance as a : averag~e.`i
Supply :fr.pic l
I ~ance :percentage:ar ip
: : of aggpls go
Million Million :. ~ It:
pounds pounds Percent Centa

584.5 215.3 36.8 ~ ji
582.1 166. as. 6 ;.
588.3 157*8 2 *8
622.7 174.7 28.1
628.1 202.3 32.21
620. 199.9 32. 2 15
56.8 210.6 37.2 19; ;;
952 172-3 34-8- i1*
485.8 163.6 33.7 20.9~
493.o 179.3 36.4 29;F: 4.1ii


Table 6.- Cigar tobacco:
price, Unite


: :r Stocks :
: : Oct. 1 :
beginning, Production.
Oct (farm-sales:
weight)A 1
:Million Million
a pounds pounds

19ao : 223.6 360.9
1921 212.9 369.2
1922 : 1.6 415.7
1923 : 192.2 430.5 -
1924 : 101448.0
1925 : 194,4 425.8
1926 :146.5 420.3
1927 : 139.0 356.2
1988 : 162.9 322.9
1989 : 170.8 322.2


1930
19Q1
1932
1933
1934
1935

1937
1938
1939


27.6`
21.7
28.1C
20.3
22.6
28.2
29.7
28.1
34C.4
26.6


494.5
545.7
577.4
492.1
467.4
453.5
429.8
412.'
410.9
407.1


136.5
118.3
163.7
99.8
105.4
128-1
127.7
116.1
141.5
108.4


180.8
187.7
150.0
.78.4
75.1
91-5
104.4
110.6
114.3
137.7


313.7
358.o
427.4
413-7
392.3
362.0
325.4
302.1
296,6
269.4


1p q;yi~


15.3,
18. 6 ;


1940 : 144.0 298.7 442,7 137.3 31.0 17,4
1941 : 143'.2 305.4 448.6 131.3 29.3 8.
1942 :118.6 317.3 435.9 143.3 32.9 25.4 ~
1943 2/ : los.8 292.5 401.3 k/ 123.5 4/ 30.8 37,0- :
1944 : f 2.4 8 277.8' E 399.2

Compiled from-data of the War Food Administration. Stocks prior to 1929.co~m~
.! from reports of the Bureau of the Census, Department of Commerce. i
IF:;l.: Stodks of continental typed held by dealers and manufacturers. Complete. fil
L1on farm stocks which are significant in some years and for some cigar types.a~
-no t available. Stocks for types 45 and 62 are as of July 1. .
I Preliminary. .;i
July 1 indications.
Estimated. ,


F'.
L


: "i .1;
I-:: .-.'P :.-- ..:?l.;I,r;:..I































:.~i:
"il' .r.
:a:l :;; ;~
:!':
~ \JI: ~
ti.i~i~ijl;*;

..1~,,~


ii~+:i~

::; ;e
r ji



;~d; 'b



~i~k!~ i4,iTr.~ :
::
i:





~~~~:
d~j~~gi:lkl r:?i:


-- Mil, fbl


-6
i
'3

Ic
)*
.1





-~-;
i
-n. ,p:
i:iiz~~* -~!
~:al


?~. fF"1~~'
: ;F


C
1


4. j105>;~
t Ii.16.4
2 117.4
5; 130.1- .T M:

130. 1?.<

tho.3517




10-1.1 o8

149.7 -s s"



138.1 565'
148, 9 .612.~5
S. 157.7 -:459.L'


168. 6 640o0o
1_43. 2 612 .2,
151:.7 .6g : 6 : .I
i5* :i td:. -. -.689.6,
1~~~~ $' 593

...9:' e- -- e s:





P. 1

rp9 10.


115~~ JrRI

126:.5

!:::.:6 :




4 ULY 194- 6- .A



calada~ger -1943:?
Products~ : : -
1942 ., -243 4 cha;e 194i-43 993-44 c
:Milios MllinsPercent Mi111ans MillionsPeBd

small cigarettes ....:25802771 +93-2.1 237, 106 S5 9
Large iaete....: 36j+3.3 9 T
Large eias...... ,0 ,2 58 553 4491r
Small cigrs........: 13 12 -). 11 --15
snuff 2/ ......... 1,6 31o 8.5 *105 ~l ~i
Manufactured tobacco 1/ :~g 28:2 6,56 -6a2576-0-8 .


Rico. Ate anay12 apadihdaa roPhlpneIslandss a bled~~t~i

2/ Based natantrune iue.--


Tabe 9.- rodctin o maufaturd tbaco i th Unted Statesl
caeda eas192an 94,and July-April 1942-43 and 1943-44*;- i.~i

: Calendar year : July-April
Manfacure toacc : 942 194 .'Chage 9424)194}-11@ Ct~



Smoking ................: 174,075 161 ,609 -7.2 139, 164 121, 646-
Plug ...................: 54. 3oo 59,ool + 8.7 48s,130 50, 307 :
Twist ..................: 6,069 6.327 + 4.3 Z 261 5.217 0I
Fine-cut .......... .... 5,os3 -4,533 10.8 4,115- 3565 I+.;
scrap chewing .....:49,60s 51.796 +4.4 42,462-- 4,o50 '
Snuff ..............'.... : 41,oo3 43. 178 5.3 35. 599 35,.164








'";'' c,i Ejre--.aued. Dark air-cured .: .All.
: 2 : cigar
22; 2j 9 37 : 1--62.
IR13l' Tt. Lb. Lb. Lb. Lb. L'o. ;


63 24 ~
678 as .~~
51n~ 5 g2 4




6r 9p: :798
68 806 u~f
69i'~~ `832
5~ 731 '
F'.. 660 816
691 so7


78)-: 73 1
5 611795
79P. 811 765
92795, 'l85
6-ii- 60 998


s55 s26 .856 126 ...l`t
as~o ,819; .796 55
ssrs 899s; 893. :779~ :' 1~~
sas 82a -?gso 7y15 13.L
~~825 782 J3'70 ::o ,~jj


,so5
780
` LE
810
810
795


'850 795; -I
gt51 8 02 1)
649 2 ,
sho sl d


780 -7' :
.776 775
748 6~46
'739 750
sho 850


-:78

81i0
s60p
750 ~


761
751 :
793
s~oo
703
760


8os ~
806
905
722
j60
spo


- 767

753
842


733 282 47 720 812 759 787 .. 811 824 660 1 <
7356 740 6 615 :97i 700' 745~: 782 785' 585( 1;'2. 17
5~i.r: The ye 6k f 77 775 799 25 545 1.14
90"- Wi$ ';6 6 '6g'1~ 8574 7831 7 0~~ 720 112
22- ~. .3 720 ~ ~ 82 9 86875: :93'::f 89 80 .
:'7::. 83.~9. :7C4,9w 81 1796.. 829 shk ~ 838 44 1.30s:lj
79 70 95 to 39 845 900 lc,339;
796~~ -s4.;. p2 ski 7719. :55 '761 5 73 ~-5 loo- 78so 1.385
875 90 790 ij ;16 817lj -so.:~ 320 ~ 90 785 ..,Q II57t~
sao. ~ rgol .26~ :7 s 87.5- 5'80 .870 o r

9 ~&1 89 9,4c~' :989 Ij75 59183
0:ja125:l ~ 4 ; agei1 8~ 55': 925 eri' sg50 92e7 sys75:92 29' 1,3~
987 .775 ; 95 ~950i 929 900~ 978 95sb1
0r~; 81. 740 975 995 62~a 4 900 i 0 b1fo 906
~~,.;193~ -- 9 540 80 eso'979 959 908 1 019 950 780
i 8P 77s~ 3 50. .750 87 896. ~ 5 ,. 5 9126_ sy t71 i.~oo
li~~s::roms int Asal B d *4 on' To1(~~acco Stati~stic 19l~i
~ta~ 4 1942il5 19 fr~om r e~po to .if ''tth Btttt
8 omits, rop eB~poitsZ ing Ba ra..
08,:: ;.. :~





;zX


Table 11.- Tobacco. acreages in the United States, by types,. average 193~
annual 194'2 and 194C3, and' 19WC p~rospectiv~e aoeage as ojf July 1- .'~l


':;:::


: arrested aicrggy .. :. 5 act
Class and type : a average : : 199 : ~Prospec-:
: jY 1261 9!: I : tive :
: ,00 oo1, 000 1,000o 1,000o
:acres acres acres acres

Total flue-cured, types 11-14 ..:954, 8 792.7 844. 8 989.3 ~~
.014and.Mqiddle.e.elt type 11 ....: 353.3 29k.0 g32,o -359.0 'i
pastern N~orth Carolina, type 12 .: 318.6 26'o.0 285;0 331.0
South Carolina, type 13 .........: 177.7 151.o 157.o 187.0 '
Georgia-Florida, type 14 ........: lo5.2 81.7 82.8 1.


Total fire-cured, types 21-24 ...:
,Vrginia, tpe 21 ............,:
YaIp' and Tenn., type .22 .....:
Ky. and TPenn., te23 ..........:
Henderson, type 29 *

Burley, type 31..........:

Maryland, type 32 .....-...:

Total dark air-cured, types 35-37 :
One Sucker, type 35 .............:
Green River, type 36 ............:
Va. sun-cured, type 37 ..........a

Total cigar filler, types 41-~44 4.:
Pa. Seedleaf, type 41...,...:
Miami Valley, types 42-44 .,....:

Total oigar binder, types 51-56 .:
Conn. Valley Broadlea~f, type 51.:
Conn. Valley Havana Seed, type 52=
N. Y. and Pa. Havana Seed, type53:
Southern Visconsin, type 54 *
Northern Wisconsin, type 55 *
Gac and Fla. sun-grown, type 56 :

Total cigar wrypper, types 61-62.:
Conn, Valley Shadegrown, type 61 :
Ga. and Fla. Shadegrown, type 62 :


68.8
12.2
39.0
17.5
..1


65* 8


.1




37*~


13,.5:


33.3 "- "
6.5
3.2..;
7ir)
:.7.3 ;i

1,0.



20.4


71,6


123.1
22.9
68*5
30.1
1,6

387.6

37.7

44.7
22.2
19.1
3.3

43.7
28.5
15.2

3 s.8
s8o
7.o
1.2
12.0
9.4
1.2


72.8
13.6
4o*5
18,5
.2


350.2 3~91.4


32.6

30.9
16.7
11.5
2.7

38.2
31.i


32.7
6.8
.9
.9 4
.3


3.3


1,449.3


16.8
14*5
2.7


33.6
9.8

36.3

7,6
1.3
9,2
10.6
.8


6.1-
3.5


Miscellaneous *........ .5
La. Perique, type 72 ........... *5
Total, all types .;...........*1.641.1


10.1
7.0
3.1


.2
*2
1,377.2


Indicated'May 1, 1944. ff Indicated July 1, I RE.


UN IIIIVRI TYIIII OF1111 F11 111LO ID