Guide

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Material Information

Title:
Guide the United Nations conference on international organization, San Francisco, 1945
Physical Description:
iii, 1, 28 p. : illus. (map, plans) ; 20 cm.
Language:
English
Conference:
United Nations Conference on International Organization, (1945
Publisher:
U.S. Govt. Print. Off.
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
International organization -- Congresses   ( lcsh )
Genre:
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
conference publication   ( marcgt )

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 004823136
oclc - 00927651
lccn - 45035888
sobekcm - AA00005299_00001
Classification:
lcc - JX1976.4.A3 G8
System ID:
AA00005299:00001

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UNITED NATIONS
CONFERENCE ON
INTERNATIONAL
ORGANIZATION


SAN FRANCISCO


1945


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Issued April 12, 1945


UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
WASHINGTON 25, D.C. : 1945


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CONTENTS
Page
PART I: San Francisco. . 1
PART II: Conference Site. . 5
PART III: Conference Organization . 10
PART IV: Special Information for the Delegations. 13
PART V: Administrative Services of the Secretariat. 17
PART VI: Press, Radio, and Photographic Arrange-
ments ... . 24
PART VII: Miscellaneous. .. 26
APPENDIX: Consulates of Participating Governments. 28


























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PART I

SAN FRANCISCO
'.
1. San Francisco Bay Area
San Francisco, the seat of the United Nations Conference
on International Organization, is centrally located on the west
coast of the United States at a point where the coastal range
of mountains is broken to give access to the great central valley
Sof California. The city occupies the tip of the southern thumb
of the twin peninsulas which enclose the great land-locked
harbor of San Francisco Bay. The Golden Gate channel sepa-
rates the two peninsulas and connects the waters of the bay
with the Pacific Ocean.
The hills upon which the city is built form the western rim
of a huge bowl known as the Bay Area. The shores of the
bay are dotted with wharves, warehouses, shipyards, and in-
dustrial areas. Above, on the lower slopes and foothills of
the mountains, are the cities and residential areas of metro-
politan San Francisco, Oakland, Berkeley, Alameda, San
Leandro, Hayward, Sausalito, Petaluma, San Rafael, San An-
selmo, Vallejo, Richmond, San Jose, Santa Clara, Palo Alto,
Redwood City, San Carlos, Belmont, San Mateo, Burlingame,
South San Francisco, and San Bruno.
The city is almost entirely surrounded by water and was
formerly served principally by ferries. In recent years, how-
ever, it has been linked with the mainland on the north by
the Golden Gate Bridge and on the east by the 8-mile stretch
of the Oakland Bridge. The population of the city proper is
only three-fourths of a million persons, but the number in

1






the entire Bay Area is more than double this figure.
whole area now forms one unified metropolitan community..
San Francisco is a great financial, banking, marketing, co
munication, and transportation center of the west coast. Tin
Federal Government and most large commercial and indus:,;
trial concerns have branch offices here. The city is also a
western headquarters for the Army and Navy. The Bay Area '
is a terminus for 3 transcontinental railway systems and in'i
normal times a port of call for 177 steamship lines. The nor- .
mal industrial activities have been tremendously stimulated in :
recent years by defense manufacturing and use as a supply
base for the war in the Pacific.
2. Climate
San Francisco is favored with a mild yet invigorating climate
which is "warm in winter, cool in summer." The average
yearly temperature is 56 degrees with a normal variation of J
only 10 to 20 degrees between winter and summer. The,
climate is so evenly balanced that all types of vegetation, in-
cluding many delicate tropical plants, flourish throughout the
year.
The temperature during late April and May, when the Con-
ference will be in session, averages about 57 degrees. The
nights are cool and a light topcoat will be needed. April is"
normally very clear and there is practically no rain from May 4
to the end of October.
3. Scenic and Other Attractions
The country around San Francisco is extremely varied.-:
Within a few miles of the city are lakes, mountains, seashore,,:
forests and open range land, orchards, vineyards, and rich i
farm land. Only a few hours distant are Yosemite Valley, Mt.
Shasta, Mt. Lassen, Sequoia, and General Grant National Parks, :
the snow-covered peaks of the High Sierras, Lake Tahoe, Mon-'

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Stereo Bay and Peninsula, the Valley of the Moon, the Santa
Clara, San Joaquin, and Sacramento Valleys, and many other
scenic attractions. Separate booklets describing San Francisco
I and the surrounding area are available from the chamber of

Commerce and other local organizations.
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PART II


CONFERENCE SITE

1. Headquarters
The headquarters of the Conference have been established in
the Civic Opera House and the Veterans' War Memorial
Building. These two buildings stand side by side on Van Ness
Avenue, facing the City Hall. Built as a twin memorial to the
soldiers of the first World War, they form part of a group of
municipal, state, and federal office buildings known as the San
Francisco Civic Center.

2. Residence Quarters
The hotels in which the Conference participants will be
housed are located in the center of the city and on Nob Hill at
a distance of about 10 minutes by car from the Conference
headquarters. All available space has been reserved for Con-
ference personnel in the following hotels:


Alexander Hamilton
Bellevue
California
Clift
Drake-Wiltshire
Fairmont
Mark Hopkins


Palace
Plaza
Sir Francis Drake
Stewart
St. Francis
Whitcomb


3. Transportation and Communication Between Buildings
Transportation and communication between buildings will
be assured by means of a motor pool of cars and busses, a
courier service, and a telephone switchboard linking all the
delegation offices. Further details regarding these services


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may be fourid in part V, Administrative Services of the.S
tariat, p. 17.
4. The Opera House
The Civic Opera House will be the seat of the plenary se-
sions of the Conference and some meetings of the commissions',
The building can accommodate some 3,300 persons.
The opening session of the Conference is scheduled for the
afternoon of Wednesday, April 25.
The main entrance to the Opera House is on Van Ness Ave-4:
nue, opposite the City Hall.
Seating arrangements. The orchestra, or ground floor of 1
the Opera House, will be reserved for officials of the delega-:
tions, officers of the Secretariat, and distinguished guests.
Entry to this section will be had through the doors opening
off the main lobby facing the entrance. The boxes opening off .
the Promenade on the next floor and part or all of the Grand
Tier and the upper and lower Dress Circle will be reserved
for the operations of newsreel and other photographers, and .
for radio and press representatives. All remaining space in
the upper balconies will be assigned to other delegation and 4
Secretariat staff and the general public.
The public will be admitted within the limits of seating space
available. Requests for admission may be made in person, but
should preferably be made in writing, several days before the
session, to the Public Admissions Officer in the Veterans' Build-. 'i
ing. Each person applying should supply full identification..
Preference will be given to authorized representatives of groups
or organizations especially interested in the work of the Con- i
ference. Those persons to whom tickets have been assigned
will be notified and their tickets will be issued at the ticket ':;
office of the Opera House or at the Information Desk in the]
lobby of the Veterans' Building.














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5. The Veterans' War Memorial Building
The committee meeting rooms, offices and working facilitii
for the press, and offices and service units of the Secretaria
are all located in this building, which will serve as the head:
quarters of the Conference.
In the lobby of the building are the Conference Information:'
Desk, a desk for messenger, courier, and local transportation :
services, an express office, a telegraph office, a bulletin board.'
for official notices, and a cigarette stand.
The Veterans' Auditorium, seating 700 persons on the main
floor and 400 persons in the balcony, is located in the center of
the building opposite the main entrance on Van Ness Avenue.
Fourteen committee meeting rooms of various sizes which
will be used for business sessions of the Conference are located
on the second and third floors of the building.
Lounges are located on the second and third floors (rooms
201, 205, 206, and 305).
Facilities for private meetings of delegations and other
groups may be reserved by communicating with the Officer
in Charge of the Order of the Day (room 460), who will assign
some of the smaller meeting rooms when they are not being
used for committee sessions.
Offices and service units of the Secretariat occupy the whole
of the fourth floor. The offices of the Secretary General and
the Deputy Secretary General are located on the third floor, in i
room 327.
Accommodations for the press are also provided in this
building. The offices on each side of the Auditorium on the
ground floor are occupied by the various press associations and
radio networks. The Chief Press Relations Officer, Mr.
Michael J. McDermott, is located in room 118. The pressll
room, telephone stations, and the press wire room are in the
basement.

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Ground Floor Plan


VETERANS' WAR MEMORIAL BUILDING
COORDI- PRESS CHIEFS dF PRESS
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OF NATION PRESS RAPHERS
INTER-
AMERICAN
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PART III


CONFERENCE ORGANIZATION


1. Participation
As of April 12, the list
which have accepted the
ference is as follows:
Australia
Belgium
Bolivia
Brazil
Canada
Chile
China
Colombia
Costa Rica
Cuba
Czechoslovakia
Dominican Republic
Ecuador
Egypt
El Salvador
Ethiopia
France
Greece
Guatemala
Haiti
Honduras
India
Iran
Iraq


of sponsoring nations and of nations
invitation to participate in the Con-


Lebanon
Liberia
Luxembourg
Mexico
Netherlands
New Zealand
Nicaragua
Norway
Panama
Paraguay
Peru
Philippine Commonwealth
Saudi Arabia
Syria
Turkey
Union of South Africa
Union of Soviet Socialist
Republics
United Kingdom
United States of America
Uruguay
Venezuela
Yugoslavia


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2. Rules of Procedure
The Conference, as an autonomous body, will establish its
own organization and adopt its own rules of procedure at one
of the early plenary sessions. The provisional rules of pro-
cedure, formulated by the United States after discussion with
the other sponsoring powers, will guide the Conference until
the permanent rules are adopted.
3. The Conference Agenda
The purpose of the Conference, as announced in the invita-
tion to the participating countries, is to discuss the Dumbarton
Oaks Proposals and to develop a Charter for a United Nations
Organization.
4. Officers of the Conference
In accordance with international practice, the United States,
as host Government, designates the Temporary President and
furnishes the Secretariat of the Conference. The President of
the United States has named Secretary of State Edward R.
Stettinius, Jr., as Temporary President and Mr. Alger Hiss as
Secretary General.
Mr. Stettinius will preside until the Permanent President
is elected by the Conference. This election will probably take
place at the second or third plenary session. The Conference
will also elect the chairmen of commissions and of the various
committees.
5. The General Committees
One of the principal items of business at the opening plenary
session is the appointment of certain basic committees which
are essential to the work of the Conference. The committees
set forth in the provisional rules of procedure are: the Steering,
Committee, Executive Committee, Coordination Committee,
and the Credentials Committee.


11


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6. Commissions and Technical Committees
In order to facilitate its deliberations, the Conference w,
organize itself into several commissions and subordinate te
nical committees to consider the principal items of the Dunf
barton Oaks Proposals, which are:
GENERAL PROVISIONS
Preamble, Purposes, and Principles
Membership and General (including
Secretariat and Amendments)
THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY
Structure and Procedures
Political and Security Functions
Economic and Social Cooperation
Trusteeship System
THE SECURITY COUNCIL
Structure and Procedures
Peaceful Settlement
Enforcement Arrangements
Regional Arrangements
JUDICIAL ORGANIZATION
International Court of Justice
Legal Problems
7. Conference Procedure
After the commissions and their respective committees have I
laid down the basic principles on the various subjects of their
agenda and have agreed on draft texts incorporating these prin-
ciples, they will submit their recommendations to the Confer- i
ence. The latter, sitting in plenary session, will then consider
the final text. If the Charter is approved by the Conference, its.l
ratification by a specified number of participating governments
will bring the new international Organization into being.




rvw.


PART IV

SPECIAL INFORMATION FOR
THE DELEGATIONS

1. Credentials
Members of delegations who have not previously deposited
their credentials at the Department of State in Washington,
D. C., are requested to present them to the Office of the Secre-
tary General (room 327, Veterans' Building) as soon as pos-
sible after arrival and preferably before the opening session.

2. Assignment of Hotel Rooms and Delegation Offices
Delegations will, so far as possible, be notified by the Secre-
tariat before their arrival in San Francisco of the hotel reser-
vations which have been made for them. Office space for the
delegations will be reserved in the same hotels in which their
delegates reside. Members of delegations who have been noti-
fied of their reservations in advance should proceed directly
to their hotels to register. Questions concerning residence or
office space which arise after the delegates reach San Francisco
should be referred to representatives of the Secretariat who will
be at the hotels to receive the delegations, or to the Space and
Registration Officer, Mr. Merle K. Wood (room 406, Veterans'
Building).
3. Registration
The Conference Registration Office, located in the lobby of
the Veterans' Building, will be open beginning at 2 p. m.,
April 24, to receive the members of delegations and to issue






to them Conference admission cards and other official doctiJ
ments and information.
4. List of Delegates :'
A provisional list of the delegates and their advisers, ex-:
perts, and secretaries of delegation and other officer personnel
will be prepared before the Conference from information given
to the Department of State by their governments and will be
distributed to the delegations at the time of registration. Dele-
gations are requested to send corrections in the provisional list
as soon as possible to the Registration Officer, main lobby,
Veterans' Building.
5. Committee Assignments
Delegations are asked to forward to the Office of the Execu-
tive Secretary (room 405, Veterans' Building) the names of
their members assigned to committees of the Conference as
soon as the committees are formed.
6. Languages and Translations
The Secretariat will provide a service for interpretations and
translations on the basis of the rules of procedure which are
adopted, and, in particular, will be prepared to assist delega-
tions to the extent possible in interpretations and translations
into English from other languages.
Delegations wishing further information on the interpreta-
tion and translation services available in the Secretariat should
consult the Office of the Executive Secretary (room 405, Vet-
erans' Building).
7. Records and Minutes
The records of plenary sessions of the Conference and of the
commissions will consist of a verbatim report of the proceed-
ings, including authenticated translations of statements made in
languages other than English. Delegates will be asked by the

14



S.... .

.. .






- Secretariat to approve as soon as possible after the end of the
sessions the texts of their remarks. The approved text of the
Sverbatim report .will be distributed to the delegates shortly
thereafter. A summary of the proceedings of plenary sessions
of the Conference and of the commissions will be published in
the Journal on the following day.
The records-of committee meetings will be summaries of the
discussions and records of decisions reached, not verbatim re-
Sports. The records of such meetings, as approved by the
Respective chairmen, will be distributed on the day following
the meetings.
Corrections of the approved record should be forwarded in
writing to the secretary of the committee concerned as soon
as possible after a meeting.
In the case of subcommittees, normally, only their conclu-
sions will be reported, unless other arrangements are made.
8. Receipt and Distribution of Documents
Delegations desiring to have documents introduced as Con-
ference documents should send their material to the Secretary
General, who will act for the President on this matter.
Delegations are asked to inform the Executive Secretary, in
advance, of the number of copies of Conference documents they
wish to receive. Copies of Conference documents will be
available at the Document Distribution Room (room 445,
Veterans' Building), and delegations should arrange to have
their documents called for at this office.
'9. "Journal" of the Conference
The official Journal of the Conference (Mrs. Virginia Angel,
Editor, room 449, Veterans' Building) will be issued each
morning. It will contain the Order of the Day, listing the
scheduled meetings of the Conference and its committees; a
List of documents issued the previous day; special announce-






ments by the President or Secretary General; and other in
formation of interest to members of the Conference. ^

10. "Record" of the Conference :
The Record of the Conference will be published each day.
It will contain summaries of the proceedings of the committees
and their subcommittees during the preceding day.

11. Facilities for Delegations in the Veterans' Building
While space is not available for private offices for delega-
tions in the Veterans' Building, rooms 205, 206, and 305 in
that building have been reserved as lounges for the exclusive
use of delegation members. A limited amount of office work-
ing space and telephone service will be provided in these
lounges. Telephone and other messages left at the Informa-
tion Desk in the lobby will, if possible, be delivered to the
delegates in committee meeting rooms and other parts of the
Veterans' Building or Opera House. Some of the smaller
meeting rooms may be reserved for delegation or group meet-
ings when such rooms are not actually in use for committee
sessions.


12. Liaison Officers
The Secretary General will assign .to the delegations liaison
officers whose duty is to assist the delegations in every way,
to facilitate their contacts with various parts of the Secre-
tariat and with public officials, and to advise them on the pro-
cedures and details of Conference arrangements. Mr. Warren
Kelchner, General Adviser to the Secretary General, will have
general supervision over the work of the liaison officers.








16




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PART V


ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES OF
THE SECRETARIAT


1. Travel Reservations and Special Train Service
A number of special trains from the east coast have been
arranged for the convenience of persons accredited to the
Conference. The services now scheduled are:


Trains for-


- U. S. Delegation
and Conference
Secretariat.
Press and radio
correspondents.
Newsreel, radio,
and press.
Delegations. .....

Delegations .......


- Committee of Ju-
S rists and members
S of diplomatic
missions.


Leaving


Date


Washington. Apr.


Washington. Apr.


New York...

Montreal .

New York...


Washington.


Apr.


Apr. 19

Apr. 20


Apr. 20


Hour


7 p. m. ....


10:30 p. m. .

About 10
p. in.
3:30 p. m.

10 p. m .


10 p. m ..


Arriving
San Francisco


Afternoon
of Apr. 21.

Morning of
Apr. 23.
Morning of
Apr. 23.
Morning of
Apr. 23.
Afternoon
of Apr.
24.
Afternoon
of Apr.
24.


Accredited individuals who find it impossible to travel by
one of the special trains will be assisted in securing train
reservations and air priorities.






2. Hotel Reservations 'K
Space has been reserved in all the larger San Francisc,&t
hotels, and block allocations for the delegations, press, and ::
other groups will be made in Washington and an attempt made .
to inform each group concerned before reaching San Francisco.,
Persons arriving in San Francisco before being notified of--
hotel assignments should inquire at the Conference Information
Desk in the main lobby of the Veterans' Building or telephone i
the Conference Information Desk (dial INT-3300 or ask oper-
ator for "Victory" exchange). Conference personnel are re-
quested not to proceed to the Veterans' Building before
registering at their respective hotels.
3. Conference Registration
Registration for the Conference will take place in the lobby
of the Veterans' Building. Registration for the press will begin
on April 21. Registration for members of the United States
delegation and Secretariat not registered on the train will begin
on April 22. Members of foreign delegations will be registered
beginning on April 24.
Passes, badges, and information concerning the Conference
and the San Francisco area will be issued at the time of
registration.
4. Conference Directory
A directory showing the location and room and telephone
numbers of all offices of the delegations and the Secretariat will
be available in San Francisco before the opening session.
5. Information *
The Information Desk in the lobby of the Veterans' Building
will answer inquiries about the Conference.
An information desk will also be maintained in the lobby
of each of the residence hotels.


18






A schedule showing the time and place of meetings and
other notices will be posted on bulletin boards near the in-
Sformation desks. The Order of the Day and other general
Notices will also be distributed to each of the residence hotels.
Telephone inquiries may be made by dialing INT-3300 or
Asking operator for "Victory" exchange and then asking for
"Conference Information."
6. Transportation
S Rail and air transportation headquarters are in the Laurel
Room of the Fairmont Hotel. A dispatching office for couriers
and local transportation service has been installed in the lobby
; of the Veterans' Building, with a branch office in the Fairmont
Hotel.
(A) Transcontinental
Representatives of the principal transportation companies
serving the San Francisco area will be stationed at the Trans-
portation Office in the Laurel Room of the Fairmont Hotel.
The Transportation Officer will use his good offices to secure
necessary priorities.
Special trains will be run to the east coast at the close of
the Conference and announcements as to the time and method
of reserving accommodations and securing tickets will be made
in due course.
(B) Local Transportation Services
S Because of the distance between the various residence hotels
and the Conference headquarters it has been found necessary
to provide special local transportation and courier facilities
for use by the delegation members and other accredited per-
sonnel. All of the facilities described below will be provided
iby the United States Government as a service to the Conference.
Special cards will identify cars used for Conference purposes.






Busses will be operated on regular schedules between the
Conference headquarters and the various residence hotels.
Trucks will be operated as required between the railroad.
stations and airport and the Conference residence hotels to ::
handle baggage of incoming and outgoing Conference
personnel.
One passenger car with chauffeur will be assigned to each
delegation for its exclusive use during the period of the Con- -
ference, and additional passenger cars will be available if
necessary.
Requests for motor service should be addressed to the Local
Transportation Officer, lobby of the Veterans' Building.
7. Messenger and Local Courier Service
Messenger service will be provided in the Conference head-
quarters and a motor courier service will operate between the
headquarters and the hotels. Requests for such service should
also be addressed to the Local Transportation Officer.

8. Courier Service to Washington
A daily airplane courier and diplomatic pouch service will
be operated between Washington and San Francisco, with
pouch service each way every day.
9. Communications
Telephone Service
A complete switchboard has been installed in the Veterans'
Building which will service all rooms and offices in headquar-
ters buildings. Branches of this exchange will also give direct
service to the telephone switchboards and all delegation offices
in the residence hotels.
To reach the Conference switchboard dial INT-3300 or ask
the operator for the "Victory" exchange.


20






I Radio and Telegraph Messages
A telegraph office will be located in the lobby of the Vet-
Serans' Building and messengers from the Communications
, Center on the fourth floor (room 417) will pick up from, or
Deliver telegraph messages to, any part of the building. Tele-
graph offices have also been located at each of the Conference
hotels and messages will be picked up or delivered in the rooms
and delegation offices.
Censorship
An agreement has been worked out with the U. S. Office of
Censorship whereby coded and plain messages may be sent
by the delegations to their respective capitals provided they
are signed by the chairman of the delegation or one or more
alternates designated by him. Specimen signature cards for
this purpose will be provided at the time of registration.
10. Conference Mail Room
A mail room has been established in room 138 of the Veterans'
Building. Delegates' mail will, however, be distributed directly
to their hotels by the U. S. Post Office as a general rule.
11. Document Distribution
The Document Distribution Room is located near the eleva-
tor on the fourth floor of the Veterans' Building (room 445)
and the members of the delegations and Secretariat should
arrange to pick up their documents at this point. The Execu-
tive Secretary should be notified in advance of the names of the
persons in each delegation who are designated to collect
documents. The person collecting the documents must exhibit a






Conference pass and sign for copies of all restricted documents'
received.
12. Library
The Library of Congress has established a reading room
and library in room 226, Veterans' Building, which is available
to all accredited members of the Conference. Arrangements
have also been made for the use of the facilities of a number
of the libraries in San Francisco and the Bay Area.
13. Treaty Adviser
A technical adviser on treaties and treaty drafting will be
associated with the Secretariat. His services will be available
to the delegations.
14. Geographic Adviser
An adviser on geography, with a small cartographic staff,
will be associated with the Secretariat. His services will be
available to the delegations in room 463 of the Veterans'
Building.
15. Stenographic Services
Services of the Secretarial and Reporting Unit (room 441,
Veterans' Building) are intended primarily for committee re-
porting and the duplicating of Conference documentation.
16. Office Supplies and Equipment
The offices of the delegations are equipped with furniture,
typewriters, and the usual office supplies. Requests for addi-
tional supplies should be addressed to the Stock Room (room
447, Veterans' Building), and the supplies will be delivered
by courier. All nonexpendable items must be charged to
some responsible person and returned at the close of the
Conference.






S17. First Aid and Medical Care
A first-aid post in charge of a registered nurse has been set
up in room 453 of the Veterans' Building, and emergency medi-
cal facilities are available in the basement of the Opera House,
where a doctor and registered nurse will be on duty or on call
at all times. This service will be free to all persons officially
connected with the Conference.
Arrangements are being made with local physicians and
.hospitals for medical and surgical care in case of serious illness.
Inquiries concerning medical facilities in the city should be
made of the doctor in charge of the first-aid room in the
Opera House.
18. Buffet Lunch
A buffet-lunch service, cafeteria style, will be established in the
lounge of the Opera House, located on the basement floor directly
underneath the main lobby. It will be available to all persons
who have passes admitting them to the building.




















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PART VI


PRESS, RADIO, AND PHOTOGRAPHIC
ARRANGEMENTS


Special arrangements have been made to facilitate the work.
of press, photographic, and radio representatives accredited
to the Conference. The services of the Secretariat are also
available to facilitate travel reservations to and from the west
coast and to secure hotel reservations in San Francisco for such
representatives.

1. Method of Accrediting
The names of persons who wish to attend the Conference
must be certified to Mr. McDermott, the Chief Press Relations
Officer, by the head of the newspaper or agency making the
request. These names are then submitted to the Standing
Committee of Correspondents of the House and Senate Press
Galleries, the Periodical Press Gallery, the Radio Gallery, or
the White House Photographers' Association. Persons ap-
proved will be notified, and the press passes which will admit
them to press conferences and to all open sessions of the Con-
ference may be picked up in the Press Office, room 117 of the
Veterans' Building, beginning Saturday, April 21.


2. Offices and Working Space
A press room equipped with typewriters for members of
the press has been established in the basement of the Veterans'
Building. Private offices of the press associations and radio
networks will also be located on this floor.



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3. Press Conference Room
Regularly scheduled press conferences will be held in the
Opera House. Smaller conferences will be held in offices on
Sthe second floor of the Veterans' Building.
4. Telephone Service
A number of telephone booths have been installed outside
the press room in the basement of the Veterans' Building. A
telephone room with an operator in charge is located in a room
directly across the hall from the press room.
5. Telegraph and Radio Service
A wire room staffed by telegraph, cable, and radio com-
munication companies has been set up in the basement of the
Veterans' Building, not far from the press room.
A special service for the collection and dispatch of radio
wireless and cable messages will also be available in each of
the Conference hotels.
6. Press Club Facilities
The San Francisco Press Club, located at Sutter and Powell
Streets opposite the Sir Francis Drake Hotel, has offered its
facilities for the use of accredited members of the visiting
press. The club has available work space, a radio studio, and
a limited number of residence rooms. A ticker service has
been installed and telegraph operators will be on constant duty.
A number of features and attractions are also being planned
Y for the entertainment of visitors representing the press.








PART VII

MISCELLANEOUS

1. Social Activities
During the period of mourning expiring May 13, which has
been proclaimed on the occasion of the death of President
Roosevelt, United States officials will not participate in social
activities of an official nature.
2. Motion Pictures
A small theater for the showing of documentary films will
be established in one of the hotels. This theater will be ;
equipped with both 35- and 16-mm. equipment. 4.
Any delegations desiring to use these facilities for the show- A
ing of documentaries should communicate with the Film Officer
of the Secretariat regarding the use of these facilities.
In addition, for the recreation of those in attendance at the
Conference, the United Nations Theater, 260 O'Farrell Street,
is being operated by the motion picture industry. This theater
will show entertainment programs of feature films, short sub-
jects, and newsreel material every evening.
Admittance to the theater will be extended only to those
carrying and showing their official Conference passes. There
will be no admittance charge.
3. Post-Conference Travel
For the convenience of foreign guests who desire to visit
universities, professional and scientific organizations, or Gov-
ernment agencies following the conclusion of the Conference,


26






' the Division of Cultural Cooperation of the Department of State
has established an office at the Conference. Information may
-be secured there from the Adviser on Cultural Affairs, Mr.
Charles A. Thomson.




































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APPENDIX


CONSULATES OF PARTICIPATING GOVERNMENTS


Country

Belgium ................
B olivia .................
B razil ..................
Chile ................ .
C hina ..................
Colom bia ...............
Costa Rica.............
Cuba ..................
Czechoslovakia ..........
Dominican Republic.....
Ecuador ................
E gypt..................
El Salvador .............
France.................
G reece .................
Guatemala .............
Honduras ..............
Luxembourg............
Mexico ................
Netherlands ............
N icaragua ..............
N orw ay ................
Panam a ................
P eru ...................
Union of Soviet Socialist
Republics.
United Kingdom........
U ruguay ...............
Venezuela .. ...........


Address


369 Pine St..........
Pacific Bldg..........
625 Market St........
24 California St.......
551 Montgomery St...
214 Front St.........
112 M market St........
461 Market St........
690 Market St ........
582 Market St........
681 Market St........
Russ Bldg............
Russ Bldg............
690 Market St........
1182 Market St.......
461 Market St........
461 Market St........
625 Market St........
461 Market St........
M ills Bldg...........
461 Market St .......
244 California St......
461 Market St........
58 Sutter St..........
2563 Divisadero St ....


310
417
821


Sansome St.......
M market St........
M market St........


Telephone No.


SUtter 4724.
SUtter 5481.
DOuglas 3187.
GArfield 7263.
CHina 2250.
DOuglas 0080.
EXbrook 8488.
SUtter 3192.
GArfield 3390.
SUtter 7651.
EXbrook 6422.
EXbrook 3164.
SUtter 7924.
YUkon 0965.
HEmlock 1577.
SUtter 0018.
EXbrook 0076.
EXbrook 0706.
SUtter 0768.
DOuglas 4376.
DOuglas 2276.
DOuglas 5993.
DOuglas 1145.
DOuglas 5185.
WAlnut 9240.

SUtter 4383.
DOuglas 6051.
GArfield 5712.


U S GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1941

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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
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