Opportunities for women in the federal civil service

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Material Information

Title:
Opportunities for women in the federal civil service
Series Title:
Pamphlet ;
Physical Description:
26 p. : ill. ; 19 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States Civil Service Commission
Publisher:
The Commission
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Women in the civil service -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
bibliography   ( marcgt )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )

Notes

General Note:
Cover title.
Statement of Responsibility:
United States Civil Service Commission.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 004683584
oclc - 52899246
sobekcm - AA00005292_00001
System ID:
AA00005292:00001

Full Text



OPPORTUNITIES

FOR

OkEMk IN THE FEDERAL
WMEN CIVIL SERVICE


TEACHING 1
LIBRARY SCIENCE
NURSING TYPING
CHEMISTRY DIETETICS
SOCIAL WORK
MAP WORK PHYSICS
STENOGRAPHY
ENGINEERING







UNITED STATES CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION


Pamphlet 35 January 1952






The Federal Jobs

FOR WHICH WOMEN ARE MOST URGENTLY NEEDED ARE-

Stenographer, $2,950 and $3,175 a year.
Typist, $2,750 and $2,950 a year.
Nurse, for general duty in hospitals, $3,410 a year.
Public Health Nurse, Indian Service, $4,205 a year.
Psychiatric Nurse, $3,410 a year.
Librarian, $3,410 a year.
Chemist, $3,410, $4,205, and $5,060 a year.
Physicist, $3,410, $4,205, and $5,060 a year.
Engineer (various branches), $3,410, $4,205, and $5,060
a year.
Elementary Teacher, Indian Service, $3,410 a year.
Social Worker, Veterans Administration, $4,205, $4,620,
and $5,060 a year.
Dietitian, $3,410 and $4,205 a year.
Cartographic Aid, $2,750 and $2,950 a year.
Cartographic Draftsman, $2,750 and $2,950 a year.

INFORMATION ABOUT REQUIREMENTS
and how to apply for these positions
will be found on succeeding pages.







employment of women







EQUALITY OF

? OPPORTUNITY ..




ALMOST every occupation and profession is represented in Federal Gov-
ernment employment. With few exceptions, civil-service examinations are
open to both men and women. Consequently there is hardly a field of work
in the Government service in which women are not engaged.
Women work as medical officers, chemists, patent examiners, clerks,
public relations officers, psychiatrists, economists, and draftsmen. They
are found in positions requiring training in law, public administration,
and social science. They serve in such widely varying capacities as light-
house keepers, park archeologists, and rural carriers.
Government agencies have a legal right, when asking for certifications
from the Civil Service Commission's lists of eligibles, to request the names
of men only or of women only. In the absence of such a request, certifica-
tion is made without regard to sex. The civil-service rules provide that
selections for appointment shall be made solely on the basis of merit and
fitness and without regard to political or religious affiliations, marital status,
or race.












NUMBER OF WOMEN EMPLOYED..

As of December 1950, more than 471,000 women were employed in the
executive branch of the Federal Government in the continental United
States. They were working in all types of jobs, including professional,
scientific, and administrative work. About 102,000, or nearly 22 percent
of the total number of women employees, were in the Washington, D. C.,
metropolitan area. The remainder were in field establishments of Federal
agencies located throughout the United States.
The number of women employed in 1950 was more than twice the
number employed before World War II. In December 1939, there were
172,000 women workers in the executive branch of the Government. As
a direct effect of World War 11, the total had reached 266,000 by June
.1941, an increase of more than 94,000 in 18 months. By June 30, 1943,
there were 961,000 women workers in full-time positions.
While total employment in the executive branch of the Government in
the United Stites reached its wartime peak in June 1943 (3,002,000), the
highest figure ever recorded for the employment of women occurred in
July 1944, when the total number of women employed was 1,106,Q00.
Widespread reductions in force affecting both men and women followed ;
the end of hostilities. In addition, a large number of women voluntarily
withdrew from employment at the end of the war. The trend in the em- :*
ployment of women was downward until June 1950. At that time they
numbered 406,000, a decrease of 63 percent from the wartime peak of
July 1944. Since the beginning of the Korean hostilities the employment i
of women has increased about 65,000. -'
The following table shows the relationship between the employnmerit o
women and total Federal civilian employment in the executive branch in
the continental United States as of December 1939-50.
2
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1939 1--..........-......-.... ....-...................- -
1940 1......................................................
1941.................. .. ............. .. ..... .....
1942 .............- ..........................................
1943 ------........................................................
1944.....-...... ............................. ...........
1945 ....-...-...... ---................................
19 4 6 ........................................................

1948_-.-......-.-..... ................
19 4 9 ........................................................
1950 ---------..........................--------..............................


172,269
227,377
(2)
(2)
3 967,110
1,071,248
820,496
519,551
415,035
437,854
408,627
471,073


Number of women


'Includes employees outside continental United States.
2 Not available.
SFull-time regular employees only.















N


Year


Percentage
of total
employment
19
20


34
37
34
26
24
23
23
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The expansion of defense
of women in the Federal
armed forces, aqd because
urgently needed to fill jobs
described in this pamphlet
needed.


activities has resulted in increased employ
service. Because more men are going ir
of increased employment generally,-wom
in a number of types of positions. The po
are the ones for which women are most ui


STENOGRAPHERS AND TYPISTS


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Almost all Federal agencies have stenographer and typist positions to fill.
No experience is required in order to qualify. The minimum age limit :
is 16, 17, or 18, depending upon the location of the position applied for.
All applicants take a timed copying exercise on the typewriter; in addition, ,
stenographers take dictation given at the rate of 80 words a minute. Ap- I
plicants may also be given an examination consisting of questions to test!
spelling, grammar, and comprehension.

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Almost every Federal agency has a stenographic pool.

Stenographers are assigned to take dictation where needed,

and return to the pool to transcribe the dictated material.











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A shortage of stenographers has existed since before World WV :.i
A person who can pass the stenographer examination can get a job.-si>
Washington, D. C., immediately. Opportunities for appointment to posi-
tions located throughout the country are also good. The entrance salaries
for stenographers are $2,950 and $3,175 a year; for typists, they. are'"..::.
$2,750 and $2,950 a year.
Opportunities for advancement are good. Many Government. officials '
were originally appointed as stenographers, typists, clerks, and messengers.
By doing their jobs well, by learning as much as they could about the next
higher job and about the work of their agencies, they received successive
promotions. Some of them studied in night schools to lay the groundwork :
of a profession and later were transferred to work in their chosen fields, -.?
in the same or a different agency.
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NURSES

Federal nurses are employed mainly in hospitals of the United States Public
Health Service of the Federal Security Agency, the Indian Service of the
Department of the Interior, the Canal Zone Government, and the Veterans
Administration, and in St. Elizabeths Hospital and Freedmen's Hospital in
Washington, D. C. Nurses are recruited by the United States Civil Service
Commission for all positions except those in Veterans Administration
hospitals.
The best opportunities for appointment are as nurse for general duty in
hospitals at $3,410 a year. as psychiatric nurse at $3,410 a year, and as
public health nurse in the Indian Service at $4,205 a year. Few vacancies
exist as emergency-room or first-aid nurse.

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On the Wind River Arapaho-Shoshone reservation, a nurse
prepares a young Indian patient for an X-ray while his mother
looks on.
No written test is required. Applicants must be graduates of a State-
approved school of professional nursing and registered as professional
nurses. Public health nurses, in addition, must have completed at least
30 semester hours in a program of study in public health nursing, and
must have had at least 1 year of experience in a generalized public-health
nursing program in a rural or urban health agency.
Some appointments are made to head nurse and nurse consultant posi-
tions. There are added requirements for these positions and the salaries
are higher. For example, the beginning salary for psychiatric head nurse
is $4,205 and that for ruurei consultant is $5,060.




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LIBRARIANS


The entrance salary of a librarian position is usually $3,410 a year. Oppor-
tunities for promotion are good.


Librarian in a Government agency explains, to a group of
new employees, the sources used by the library in perform-
ing certain types of research.




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: The requirements for the entrance grade, as stated in the announcement
of the most recent examination for this position, are as follows:
Completion of a 4-year college course, including or supplemented by 30
semester hours of study in library science, or 4 years of successful and
progressive experience in library work, or one full year of training in an
accredited library school plus 3 years of qualifying college education or
library experience. Combinations of education and experience, provided
they are substantially equivalent to one of the requirements, are acceptable
also.
Applicants must pass a written examination consisting of a test of gen-
eral abilities, including paragraph reading, vocabulary, English usage, graph
and table interpretation, arithmetic reasoning, and abstract reasoning. No
technical subject-matter examination is given.


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AND ENGINEER .

"Junior Scientist and Engineer" is not a job title; it is an f
examination title only. Although experience may be sub-
stituted for education, this examination is aimed at recent
college graduates who have no vocational experience. ..
S Many professional people enter the Government service :
i through this and other comparable examinations and re-
main to make their careers in the Federal service.

The title "Junior Scientist and Engineer" is descriptive of a number of re-
lated occupational fields. Under this title, applications may be filed for
positions in three fields for which there is a current need. These positions
are chemist, physicist, and engineer, with salaries of $3,410 and $4,205
a year.
The positions to be filled are essentially trainee positions. One of the
objectives of this examination is to attract personnel with potentialities for
advancement to positions of greater responsibility.
Competitors do not take a written test. They are rated on the extent
and quality of their education and experience relevant to the duties of the
positions. The ratings are based upon competitors' statements in their ap-
plications and upon any additional evidence secured by the Civil Service
Commission.
Because of the need for additional personnel during the present emer-
gency, applications for this examination are being accepted and will con-
tinue to be accepted until personnel needs are met. Students who have not
completed all the required courses may apply if they expect to complete
them within 6 months of the date on which they apply.
Civil-service regional offices and boards of examiners also announce
Junior Scientist and Engineer examinations from time to time for positions
located outside Washington, D. C. For information about such examina-
tions, write to the regional office serving the territory in which employment
is desired (see list on back cover).

10
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CHEMISTS

For positions with salaries of $3,410 and $4,205 a year in the Washington,
D. C., metropolitan area, applicants should file applications under the Junior
Scientist and Engineer examination described on page 10.
The requirements for the $3,410-a-year jobs are as follows:
(a) A full 4-year course, in a college or university, leading to a bach-
elor's degree, which must have included courses in chemistry consisting of
lectures, recitations, and appropriate practical laboratory work totaling at
least 30 semester hours; or
(b) Courses in chemistry, in a college or university, consisting of lec-
tures, recitations, and appropriate practical laboratory work totaling at
least 30 semester hours; plus additional appropriate experience or educa-
tion which, when combined with the 30 semester hours in chemistry, will
total 4 years of education and experience and give the applicant a technical
and professional knowledge comparable to that which would have been
acquired through successful completion of the full 4-year college course.
For the $4,205-a-year jobs, one of the following is an additional require-
ment:
(a) One year of professional experience in chemistry, involving the use
of the principles of theoretical or applied chemistry in the solution of scien-
tific problems, or
(b) The completion of, all scholastic requirements for the master's
degree in chemistry.
Women are also needed to fill chemist positions at $5,060 a year. Typ-
ical requirements for -chemists at this level are, in addition to the basic
requirements shown for the $3,410-a-year jobs described above, as follows:
2 years of progressive professional experience in chemistry, including at
least 1 year of research or scientific investigative work in a specialized branch

11




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of chemistry. It is possible to substitute graduate study in an accredited

college or university for this experience.


A chemist in the U. S. Bureau of Standards weighs a chemical
compound as a preliminary step in connection with a research
Problem.


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PHYSICISTS

For positions with salaries of $3,410 and $4,205 a year in the Washington,
D. C., metropolitan area, applicants should file applications under the
Junior Scientist and Engineer examination described on page 10.
The requirements for the $3,410-a-year jobs are as follows:
(a) A full 4-year course, in a college or university, leading to a bach-
elor's degree, which must have included courses in physics consisting of
lectures, recitations, and appropriate practical laboratory work totaling 24
semester hours; or
(b) Courses in physics, in a college or university, consisting of lectures,
recitations, and appropriate practical laboratory work totaling at least 24
semester hours; plus additional appropriate experience or education which,
when combined with the 24 semester hours in physics, will total 4 years
of education and experience and give the applicant a technical and profes-
sional knowledge comparable to that which would have been acquired
through the successful completion of the 4-year college course.
For the $4,205-a-year jobs, one of the following is an additional require-
ment:
(a) One year of professional experience in physics, involving the use
of the principles of theoretical or applied physics in the solution of scien-
tific problems, or
(b) The completion of all scholastic requirements for the master's
degree in physics.
Women are also needed to fill physicist positions at $5,060 a year. Typ-
ical requirements for physicists at this level are, in addition to the basic
requirements shown for the $3,410-a-year jobs described above, at least
2 years of progressive professional experience in physics, including at least
1 year of research or scientific investigative work in a specialized branch of

13


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physics. It is possible to substitute graduate study in an accredited coliI
or university for this experience.


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Two physicists in the Solid State and Optics Research Lab-
oratory of the U. S. Naval Ordnance Laboratory prepare to
measure the frequency of microwaves by making adjustments
on microwave absorption measurement equipment.


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ENGINEERS

For positions with salaries of $3,410 and $4,205 a year in the Washington,
D. C., metropolitan area, applicants should file applications under the Junior
Scientist and Engineer examination described on page 10.
While there are positions to be liled in almost all branches of engineer-


All branches of engineering are represented in the Federal
Government. Here an engineer in the Bureau of Yards and
Docks, Department of the Navy, checks construction plans.


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ing, the need is perhaps more acute for marine and civil engineers and"
for naval architects.
The requirements for the $3,410-a-year jobs are as follows:
(a) A full 4-year professional engineering curriculum leading t6 a "
bachelor's degree in a college or university; or '
(b) Four years of successful and progressive experience in technical
engineering, which must show (1) a thorough knowledge of the funda-
mental physical and mathematical sciences underlying professional engineer-
ing, (2) a good understanding (both theoretical and practical) of the
engineering sciences and techniques, and their applications to the branch
of engineering for which the competitor is rated, and (3) the possession
of an understanding of engineering comparable to that which would have
been acquired through successful completion of a full professional engi-
neering curriculum in an accredited college or university; or
(c) Any time-equivalent combination of (a) and (b), above.
For the $4,205-a-year jobs, one of the following is an additional
requirement:
(a) One year of professional engineering experience in one of the rec-
ognized branches of engineering, or
(b) The completion of all scholastic requirements for the master's
degree in engineering.
Women are also needed to fill engineer positions at $5,060 a year. Typ-
ical requirements for engineers at this level are, in addition to the basic
requirements shown for the $3,410-a-year jobs described above, at least
2 years of progressive professional engineering experience, including at
least 1 year of moderately difficult and important work in one of the
branches of engineering. It is possible to substitute graduate study at
an accredited college or university for this experience.









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TEACHERS

The positions for which applicants are urgently needed pay $3,410 a year
and are in the Indian Service of the Department of the Interior. They are
located in schools on Indian reservations, mostly in the Western States and
in Alaska. Most of the schools are in isolated rural areas, often at some
distance from the nearest white community.
Persons appointed are expected to be not only teachers in the usual
sense, but also to be active participants in the community in which they
work and to exercise educational leadership. In most cases, the Govern-
ment provides furnished quarters.
For these positions, applicants should file for the Elementary Teacher
examination. The requirements are the completion of a full 4-year course
leading to a degree from an accredited college or university, including
at least 24 semester hours in education of which 12 semester hours must
have been in elementary education. No experience is required if the ap-
plicants' courses in education included 2 semester hours in methods of
teaching elementary grades and 2 semester hours in practice teaching of
elementary grades. If they did not, the applicant is required to have had
1 year of successful teaching experience at the elementary level.
There is no written test. Applicants are rated on the information they
furnish about their education and experience in their applications, on the
official transcript of college courses taken which they submit, and on the
information they furnish in response to a number of questions listed in the
examination announcement, including how the applicant handled commu-
nity problems and how she handled problem or disciplinary cases.















SOCIAL WORKERS

The social worker positions which need to be filled exist in hospitals and
regional offices of the Veteran's Administration throughout the United
States and in Puerto Rico. The best opportunities for appointment are to
jobs paying $4,205, $4,620, and $5,060 a year. No written test is re-
quired. Instead, applicants are rated on the basis of their education and
experience.


Trained to deal with human problems, a social worker inter-
views a patient at a veterans' hospital.
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These social workers provide case-work services to veterans in medical
and psychiatric settings such as hospitals and mental-hygiene and 6ther
out-patient clinics.
For the $4,205-a-year jobs, applicants must have successfully completed
graduate study equivalent to all the requirements for the master's degree
or diploma of graduation from the second-year curriculum of a school of
social work accredited by the American Association of Schools of Social
Work. This study must have included courses in case work, and in psychi-
atric and medical information. The applicant must have completed all
the supervised field work required for the second-year curriculum by the
school of social work she attended.
No experience is required if the applicant's courses in case work included
three quarters or two semesters of supervised field work. One year's ex-
perience in case work is required if the applicant lacks these courses.
For the positions with higher salaries, additional experience is required.
Applications will be accepted in some cases from persons who have had
all'the required education but who have not yet completed the thesis required
for a master's degree.









DIETITIANS

Federal dietitian positions are located in Veterans Administration hospitals
and regional offices throughout the country and in Puerto Rico, in United
States Public Health Service hospitals throughout the country, and in a
few other Government hospitals in Washington, D. C. No written test
is required.
For positions paying $3,410 a year in Veterans Administration hospitals,
applicants are required to have completed a 4-year college course which
included .12 semester hours in chemistry, 6 in biology, 6 in foods, 6 in





nutrition and dietetics, 6 in institution management, and 3 in educatiort,.
In addition, they must either have completed a hospital training course for )
student dietitians approved by the American Dietetic Association or have
had at least 3 years of experience as a dietitian in a hospital of at least
50-bed capacity. An additional year of experience will qualify an appli-
cant for positions paying $4,205 a year.























Checking the food trays of patients on special diets is one
of the duties of this dietitian in a Federal hospital.
For positions paying $3,410 a year in other Federal hospitals, applicants
are required to have completed at least 36 semester hours of college or
university study, including 12 semester hours in chemistry, 6 in biology,
6 in foods, 6 in nutrition and diet, and 6 in institution management. A
standard 4-year course leading to a bachelor's degree with major study in
dietetics or institutional management will be accepted as meeting these
educational requirements. In addition, they must either have completed
a 12-month hospital training course for student dietitians or have at least
20


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12 months of experience as a dietitian in a hospital of at least 100-bed
capacity. An additional year of experience will qualify an applicant for
Positions paying $4,205 a year.
Applications are also accepted for positions at higher grades, but the
best opportunities for appointment are in $3,410- and 54,205-a-year posi-
tions. Additional experience is required of competitors for these positions.









MAP MAKERS

Good opportunities exist for appointment as cartographic aid and carto-
graphic draftsman at salaries of $2,750 and $2,950.
These positions are located all over the United States, and the majority
of them are in the f6flowing agencies: The Aeronautical Chart Service,
Department of the Air Force; the Army Map Service, Department of the
Army; the Hydrographic Office, Department of the Navy; the Geological
Survey, Department of the Interior; the Coast and Geodetic Survey, De-
partment of Commerce; and-the Soil Conservation Service, Department of
Agriculture.
Cartographic aids do field survey work and compile data, plot, make
computations, and use photogrammetric techniques in connection with maps
and charts. Cartographic draftsmen do fine-line inking of drawings, trac-
ings, and sketches, and prepare fine-line, freehand lettering and symbols
in connection with maps and charts.
There is no written test. Instead, applicants are rated on their experience
and training.
For cartographic aid at $2,750 a year, applicants must have had 1 year
of experience or 4 years of high school, if certain courses were included.
The required high-school courses are 4 half-year courses in any combination
of the following subjects: Mathematics, physics, drafting, mechanical draw-

21



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ing, surveying, illustrative design, or art. Four years of high school, if
the course included a balf-year specialized course in cartography, is also
acceptable for meeting the requirements. A
For cartographic aid at $2,950 a year, applicants must have had 2 years
of experience or 4 years of high school, if the course included 2 half-year
specialized courses in cartography,
For cartographic draftsman at $2,750 a year, applicants must have had
1 year of experience or 4 years of high school, if certain courses were in-


i


A step in the map-production process at the U. S. Army Map
Service: A cartographic aid determines elevations and con-
tours from aerial stereoscopic photographs.


cluded. The required high-school courses are 4 half-year courses in any
combination of the following subjects: Mathematics, drafting (mechanical
drawing), surveying, illustrative design, or art.

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For cartographic draftsman at $2,950 a year, 2 years of experience are
required. Four years of high school, if the courses listed above were in-
cluded, may be substituted for 6 months of the required experience.
Applicants for all cartographic draftsman positions must submit samples
of their work.
Appropriate resident study at an institution above high-school level may
also be substituted for the required experience for both cartographic aid and
cartographic draftsman.
For higher grade positions, more experience and education are required
of applicants. Applications are also being accepted for these positions, but
the greatest need is to fill positions at the salaries mentioned. Women are
particularly being sought to fill them because of the draft status of the
young men who normally apply for these positions.



























23













general information








LEARNING ABOUT EXAMINATIONS
When Federal civil-service examinations are announced, they are publicized
through such means as (1) notices posted on bulletin boards in first- and
second-class post offices and in other Federal buildings, (2) notices distrib-
uted to colleges and universities, State Employment Service offices, and
professional organizations, and (3) notices distributed to periodicals and
newspapers for publication.
Detailed information concerning an announced examination is made
available in the form of a printed (or processed) bulletin called an "exam-
ination announcement." A copy will be furnished, upon request, by what-
ever office of the Civil Service Commission announced the examination.
Examinations for filling positions in Washington, D. C., and vicinity .
are announced by the Commission's central office (Washington 25, D. C.).
Examinations for filling positions in a civil-service region are announced by '
the Commission's regional offices (see list on back cover). Examinations Ai
are also announced by boards of United States civil-service examiners which
represent the Commission at many Federal field establishments.
24 .





BASIS OF RATING
In all examinations, competitors are rated on a scale of 100. A grade
of 70 is passing. Additional points are added to the ratings of persons who
qualify for veteran preference. The higher the rating made by the appli-
cant, the greater are his chances for early appointment, since eligibles with
the highest ratings are considered for appointment first.

NATURE OF APPOINTMENTS
Most appointments to Federal positions are being made on an indefinite
basis. Probational (permanent) appointments have for the most part been
discontinued. A person receiving an indefinite appointment will not re-
ceive permanent status, nor will he be under the civil-service retirement
system. Most indefinite appointees will be covered by the social-security
system.
Indefinite appointments will be made to all the positions discussed in this
pamphlet with the exception of the following positions, to which proba-
tional appointments may be made: Dietitian; social worker; nurse; public
health nurse; psychiatric nurse; chemist, $3,410 and $4,205; physicist,
$3,410 and $4.205; and engineer, $3,410 and $4,205.

WORKWEEK AND LEAVE
The standard workweek is 40 hours. However, because of the emergency,
some agencies have instituted a 44- or 48-hour week; their employees are
paid for the overtime work.
Employees earn from 13 to 26 days of leave each year for vacation and
other purposes, the exact amount depending upon length of service. In
the event of illness, employees may take up to 13 days of sick leave a year
without losing pay.

PERIODIC PAY INCREASES
Employees are rated on their job performance once a year. They must be
dismissed or reduced in grade if their performance ratings are "Unsatis-
factory." Persons with performance ratings of "Satisfactory" or better
S25



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receive automatic increases in pay at intervals of 1 year in the lower gra:des
and at intervals of 18 months in the higher grades. These automatic -
creases vary from $80 to $250 a year, depending upon the grade of the
position held.

OTHER PUBLICATIONS

Some Commission publications of interest to women who are considering
entering the Federal service are:
Working for the U. S. A. Pamphlet 4.
Occupations in the Federal Civil Service. Pamphlet 3.
The Nurse in the Federal Civil Service. Pamphlet 27.
The Librarian in the Federal Civil Service. Pamphlet 37.
Cartographic Work in the Federal Civil Service. Pamphlet 40.
The Metallurgist in the Federal Civil Service. Pamphlet 42.
Current Federal Examination Announcements. (List of civil-service
examinations currently open throughout the country, issued by the Com-
mission's central office, Washington 25, D. C. Local examinations are
announced by the Commission's regional offices and by boards of United
States civil-service examiners.)

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CIVIL SERVICE REGIONAL OFFICES

First Region.-Post Office and Courthouse Building, Boston 9, Mass.:
Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and
Connecticut.
Second Region.-Federal Building, Christopher Street, New York 14,
N. Y.: New York and New Jersey.
Third Region.-Customhouse, Second and Chestnut Streets, Philadelphia
6, Pa.: Pennsylvania and Delaware.
Fourth Region.-Temporary "R" Building, Fourth Street and Jefferson
Drive SW., Washington 25, D. C.: Maryland, Virginia, West Virginia,
North Carolina, and the District of Columbia.
Fifth Region.-5 Forsythe Street NW., Atlanta 3, Ga.: South Carolina,
Georgia, Alabama, Florida, Tennessee, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands.
Sixth Region.-Post Office and Courthouse Building, Cincinnati 2, Ohio:
Ohio, Indiana, and Kentucky.
Seventh Region.-New Post Office Building, Chicago 7, Ill.: Wisconsin,
Michigan, and Illinois.
Eighth Region.-Post Office and Customhouse Building, St. Paul 1,
Minn.: Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, and Iowa.
Ninth Region.-New Federal Building, St. Louis 1, Mo.: Kansas, Mis-
souri, Oklahoma, and Arkansas.
Tenth Region.-Federal Office Building, 610 South Street, New Orleans
12, La.: Mississippi, Louisiana, and Board of United States Civil Service
Examiners, Balboa Heights, C. Z.
Eleventh Region.-302 Federal Office Building, First Avenue and Madi-
son Street, Seattle 4, Wash.: Montana, Oregon, Idaho, Washington, and
Territory of Alaska.
Twelfth Region.-129 Appraisers Building, 630 Sansome Street, San
Francisco 11, Calif.: California, Nevada, Arizona, and Territory of Hawaii.
Thirteenth Region.-New Customhouse Building, Denver 2, Colo.:
Colorado, New Mexico, Utah, and Wyoming.
Fourteenth Region.-210 South Harwood Street, Dallas 1, Tex.: Texas.





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