Summary of U.S. export and import merchandise trade

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Material Information

Title:
Summary of U.S. export and import merchandise trade
Series Title:
FT-900
Physical Description:
v. : ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of the Census
United States -- Bureau of the Census
Publisher:
Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, Foreign Trade Division for sale by the Subscriber Services Section (Publications), Bureau of the Census
Place of Publication:
Washington
Creation Date:
November 1976
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Commerce -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Citation/Reference:
American statistics index
Dates or Sequential Designation:
1974-1976.
General Note:
At head of title: 1977- United States foreign trade.
General Note:
Formerly classed C 56. 210:900 - during the time the Bureau of the Census was subordinate to Social and Economic Statistics Administration.
General Note:
Issues prior to Oct. 1977 were sent to depositories as Item 144.
General Note:
Unnumbered supplements accompany some issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001209840
oclc - 02245761
notis - AFW0105
lccn - 76640395
issn - 0361-0047
sobekcm - AA00005271_00053
Classification:
lcc - HF105 .B73e
ddc - 382/.0973
System ID:
AA00005271:00053

Related Items

Preceded by:
United States foreign trade; export and import merchandise trade
Succeeded by:
United States foreign trade. FT900, Summary of U.S. export and import merchandise trade

Full Text
iW.4a ae r vv I t I


SUMMARY OF U.S. EXPORT AND

IMPORT MERCHANDISE _DE


november 1976 /..- .*

-------". s m :B--

\1.4' For Release
Se* dber 28, 1976
-.e, *.. 10:00 A.M.

ily Adjusted and Unadj bsiDMa


F.A.S. EXPORTS AND F.A.S. IMPORTS

Seasonally Adjiud

The Bureau stated that during November 1976, exports on a
2.a.s. (free alongside ship) U.S. port of exportation
value basis, excluding Department of Defense IDOD) Mili-
tary Aalastance Program Grant-Aid shipments, amounted to
$9,624.6 million and that general imports on a f.a.s.
foreign port of exportation value basis, amounteC to
$10,530.8 million. '

Based on the above export and import figures, the November
merchandise trade balance was in deficit by $906.2 mil-
lion, as compared to a deficit of $695.9 million in
October.

During the first 11 months of 1976 iJanuary-November),
exports were at an annual rate of $113,979 million, a
level about 6 percent higher than the calendar year 1975
total of $107,130 million. Imports for the January-
November 1976 period were at an annual rate of $119,449
million, representing an increase of about 24 percent
over the calendar year 1975 total of $96,116 million.

For the 4-month period, August-November 1976, exports
averaged $9,728.0 million per month, a level about
1 percent above the $9,677.5 million average reported
for the preceding 4-month period, April-July 1976.
Imports on a f.a.s. value basis, averaged $10,512.7 mil-
lion per month for the current 4-month period, about 6
percent higher than the $9,930.2 million average reported
for the preceding 4-month period.


Unadjusted

Exports excluding Military Assistance Program Grant-Aio
shipments decreased from $10.080.7 million in October to
$9,682.3 million in November. With Military Assistance
Program Grant-Aid shipments included, exports decreased
from $10,0R5.1 million in October to $9,687.4 million in
November. General imports increased from $10.039.9 mil-
lion in October to $11,061.6 million in November.


F A.S EXPORTS AND C.I.F IMPORTS

Seasonally Adlusted

The Bureau stated that during INoember 1976, exports on a
f.a.a. Free alongside suipl U.S. port of exportation
value basis, excluding Department of Defense IDODI Mili-
tary Assistance Program Grant-Aid shipments, amounted to
$9,624.6 million and that general imports on a c.i.f.
Cost, insurance, ana freight U.S. port of entry value
basis, amounted to $11,281.9 million. 1 2

Based on the aboc.'e f.a.e. export and c.i.i. import
figures, the November merchandise trade balance was in
deficit by $1,657.3 million, as compared to the deficit
In October of $1,438.4 million.

During the first 11 months of 1976 IJanuary-Novemberl,
exports were at an annual rate of $113,979 million, a level
about 6 percent higher than the calendar year 1975 total of
$107,130 million. imports for the Januaiy-November 1976
period were at an annual rate o 1L128,293 million, a level
about 24 percent nigher than the calendar year 1975 total
of $103,389 million.

For the 4-montr perioo, AuguEt-November 1976, exports
average $9,728.0 million per month, 3 level aoout 1 percent
above the $9,677.5 million average reported for the
preceding 4-month period, April-July 1976. Imports on a
c.i.f. ralue basis averaged $11,278.9 million per month
for the current 1-month period, about 6 percent higher than
the $10,678.3 million average reported for the preceding
4-month period.


Unadusted

Exports excluding Military Aaaistarnc Program Grant-Ali
shipments de.-reaaed from $10,080.7 million in October to
$9,682.3 million in November. tith Military Assistance
Program Grant-Aid shipments Incluoeo, exports decreased
from $10,u85.1 million in Octooer to $9,687.4 million in
November. General imports increase from $10,755.1 million
In October to $11,850.5 million in November.


Rote: Foolnotes 1, 2, and 3 are shown at the bottom of page 4.




Inquiries corning these figures should be addressed to the Chief, Foreign Trade Division, Bureau of the
OF7 Cenus, Washington, D.C. 20233. Tel: Area Code 301, 763-5140.

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE. BUREAU OF THE CENSUS

\ I For sale by the Subscriber Services Section (Publications), Bureau of the Census, Washington, D.C. 20233, or
U.S. Department of Commerce district office. Postage stamps not acceptable; currency submitted at sender's
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em dances rom oregn country
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.JU ^^un^a^,.u.,







EXPLANATION OF STATISTICS


Import Valuation


Coverage

The U.S. import statistics reflect both government and
nongovernment imports of merchandise from foreign coun-
tries into the U.S Customs territory, which includes the 50
States, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. The U.S
import statistics exclude imports into the Virgin Islands,
Guam, American Samoa, and other U.S. possessions, and
shipments between the United States and Puerto Rico.
between the United States and LI S possessions, and
between any of these outlying areas (Data on U.S trade
with Puerto Rico and with U.S. possessions are published
separately in Report FT 800 Additional data on such trade
and on imports into the Virgin Islands from foreign coun-
tnes are presented in reference tabulations.) Data on
imports of petroleum and selected petroleum products,
including shipments into the Virgin Islands from foreign
countries. (previously shown in Report FT 900-Supple-
ment) are included in this report effective with the January
1976 statistics.
The U S. import statistics also exclude American goods
returned to the United States by its Armed Forces. intransit
shipments through the United States: temporary shipments.
transactions not considered to be of statistical significance.
such as shipments of personal and household effects, low-
valued nondutiable imports by mail: issued monetary coins
of all component metals: and gold in the form of ores.
concentrates, waste, scrap, and refined bullion. Imports of
silver in these forms are included in the statistics, unless
otherwise noted. lInformation on gold movements. pre-
viously shown in Report FT 2402. appears in Report FT
990 effective January 1975

General Imporrts Impurls For Consumption

The statistics on U S. imports are presented in terms of
both "General Imports" and "Imports for Consumption."
General imports are a combination of entries for immediate
consumption and entnes into Customs bonded warehouses,
and thus generally reflect total arrivals of merchandise.
Imports for consumption are a combination of entries for
immediate consumption and withdrawals from warehouses
for consumption, and thus generally reflect the total of the
commodities entered into U S consumption channels

Source Of Import Information

The official U.S. import statistics are compiled by the
Bureau of the Census from copies of the import entry and
warehouse withdrawal forms which importers are required
by law to file with Customs officials The information as to
country of origin, net quantity, value, and commodity
classification is verified by Customs officials on entries filed
for transactions valued over $250, which are ordinarily sub-
ject to examination for Customs appraisement purposes.
The statistical cops of the entry is corrected if it does not
accurately reflect the information called for by the statis-
tical requirements


F.a.s. Import Value.-The f.a.s. (free alongside ship) value
represents the transaction value of imports at the foreign
port of exportation It is based on the purchase price, i.e.
the actual transaction value and generally includes all
charges incurred in placing the merchandise alongside the
carrier at the port of exportation in the country of exporta-
tion.

C.i.f. Import Value.-The c.i.f (cost, insurance, and freight)
value represents the value of imports at the first port of
entry in the United States. It is based on the purchase price
and includes all freight, insurance, and other charges
(excluding U.S. import duties) incurred in bringing the
merchandise from the country of exportation and generally
placing it alongside the carrier at the first port of entry in
the United States. If the merchandise was acquired in a
transaction between related parties. the purchase price used
in deriving the c.i.f. value is based on an arm's-length equiv-
alent transaction price, i.e, a price which would exist
between unrelated buyers and sellers.

Import Monthly Carryover

It is the objective of the compiling procedures to include
shipments, insofar as practicable, in the statistics for the
actual month of importation. However, for purposes of the
statistics 11 e month of importation is based on the date of
official acceptance by Customs of the import entry or ware-
house withdrawal document This may not in all cases corre-
spond to the actual month of importation. (For example,
under the Customs "immediate-delivery" procedures,
importers may file the import entry up to 10 workdays
after the actual date of importation.) Also, because of
processing problems (e.g late receipt of a document for an
end-of-month shipment, rejection of a shipment by the
computer because the data fall to meet certain edit criteria
established to protect the accuracy of the statistics, etc.),
there is an overall average carryover of about 7 percent (in
terms of value) of the shipments from the reported month
of importation (based on the date of the import entry or
warehouse withdrawal document) to a subsequent month,
usually the succeeding month. In addition, as a result of the
aforementioned Customs "immediate-delivery" procedures,
there is a further carryover of presently unknown magni-
rude from the actual month of importation to a subsequent
month. These limitations should be borne in mind when
making month-to-month compansons.
Cumulations of data over at least 4-month penods are
desirable to identify underlying trends. Month-to-month
changes in imports. exports, and similar senes often reflect
pnmanly irregular movements, differences in monthly
carryover, etc.

Estimated Data for Imports Valued Under $251

The overall import and Schedule A Section 9 totals
include sample estimates for shipments valued under $251.
Therefore, they are subject to sampling error, estimated at


IMPORT STATISTICS







less than one-tenth of one percent for the unadjusted overall
total and about one percent for the unadjusted Schedule A
Section 9 total. This means that we can have about b7
percent confidence that the published unadjusted overall
totals and the unadjusted Schedule A Section 9 totals differ
by less than one-tenth of a percent and one percent, respec-
tively, from the totals that would have resulted from a com-
plete tabulation. The statistics on imports of petroleum and
petroleum products included in this report reflect fully
compiled data and, therefore, are not subject to sampling
error.


EXPORT STATISTICS

Coverage

The export statistics reflect, in general, both government
and nongovernment exports of domestic and foreign mer-
chandise from the US Customs territory (includes the 50
States, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico) to for-
eign countries, whether the exportation involves a com-
mercial transaction or not. The statistics, therefore, include
Department of Defense Military Assistance Program Grant-
Aid shipments, shipments for economic assistance under the
Foreign Assistance Act and shipments of agricultural com-
modities under P L. 480 (The Agricultural Trade Develop-
ment and Assistance Act of 1954, as amended) and related
laws. The following are excluded from the statistics Ship-
ments to U.S. Armed Forces and diplomatic missions
abroad for their own use. shipments between the United
States and Puerto Rico. between the United States and its
possessions (including the Virgin Islands), and between
these outlying areas, exports from U.S. possessions: intransit
shipments through the United States; transactions not con-
sidered to be of statistical importance, such as personal and
household effects, temporary exports; lovh-valued or non-
commerical exports by mal: issued monetary coins of all
component metals; and gold in the form of ores. concen-
trates, waste, scrap, and refined bullion Exports of silver in
these forms are included in the statistics, unless otherwise
noted. (Information on gold movements, previously shown
in Report FT 2402, appears in Report FT 990 effective
January 1975.)



Definition of Exports of Domestic
and Foreign Merchandise

Exports of domestic merchandise include commodities
which are grown, produced, or manufactured in the United
States, and commodities of foreign origin which have been
changed in the United States from the form in which they
were imported, or which have been enhanced in value by
further manufacture in the United States. Exports of for-
eign merchandise consist of commodities of foreign orgin
which have entered the United States as imports and which.
at the time of exportation, are in substantially the same
condition as when imported.


Source of Export Information

The official U.S. export statistics are compiled b) the
Bureau of the Census primarily from copies of Shipper's
Export Declarations which are required to be filed with
Customs officials. except for Department of Defense Mili-
tary Assistance Program Grant-Aid shipments which are
reported directly to the Bureau of the Census by the
Department of Defense and shipments b5 qualified ex-
porters who have been authorized to submit data in the
form of magnetic tape, punched cards, or monthly Shipper's
Summary Export Declarations directly to the Bureau of the
Census.
Export Valuation

F.a.s. Export Value.-The value reported in Ihe export sta-
tistics generally is equivalent to a f a.s. (free alongside ship)
value at the US port of export, based on the transaction
price, including inland freight. insurance and other charges
incurred in placing the merchandise alongside the carrier at
the U S port of exportation.

Export Monthly Carryover

II is the objective of the compiling procedures to include
shipments. insofar as practicable, in the statistics for the
actual month of exportation. For purposes of the statistics,
the month of exportation is generally based on the date
when the shipment leaves the United States (For %essel or
air shipments it is the date when the earner departs or is
cleared from the port of export Howeser. as indicated
above for imports, because of processing problems (e g., late
receipt of a document for an end-of-month shipment, re-
jection of a shipment by the computer because the data
fall to meet certain edit criteria established to protect the
accuracy of the statistics, etc.). there is an overall average
carr over of about 4 percent (in terms of value) of the
shipments from the actual month of exportation to a
subsequent month, usually the succeeding month. These
limitations should be borne in mind when making month-
to-month comparisons.
Cumulations of data o\er at least 4-month periods are
desirable to identify underlying trends Month-to-month
changes in imports, exports. and similar series often reflect
pnmanly irregular movements, differences in monthly
carr) over. etc
Estimated Data for Export Shipments

The overall export and Schedule B section and division
totals include sample estimates for shipments valued
$251-51,999 to Canada and for shipments valued
$251-5999 to countries other than Canada Data for ship-
ments valued $250 and under to all countries are also esti-
mated, based on established percentages of individual
country totals, and included in the Schedule B Section 9
totals regardless of the commodity) exported. It is estimated
that the unadjusted overall total is subject to a sampling
error of less than one-tenth of one percent, and the unad-
justed Schedule B section or division totals are subject to







sampling errors of about one percent. In addition, the
Schedule B Section 9 total is subject to possible error in the
estimated data for shipments valued $250 and under: and
the overall total, and the individual totals for sections other
than Section 9. to a more limited extent. Such $250 and
under shipments represent about I percent of the total
value of exports, and about 60 percent of the Schedule B
Section 9 total.

SOURCES OF ERROR IN THE STATISTICS

Monthly import and export figures are subject to the
possibility of errors which ma. arise from sources other
than sampling errors, discussed above. Among these are
errors in the reporting andlor processing of information as
to commodity classification, value and other statistical
factors, month of Inclusion (see paragraphs on import and
export carnrover, above) and the undercounting of exports
to Canada due to the non-receipt of Shipper's Export
Declarations For 1974. the undercounting amounted to
about one and one-half billion dollars In the case of im-
ports the information as to value and commodity classifica-
tion (as well as country of origin and net quantity ) is
verified by Customs officials on entries filed for transactions
valued over $250 which are ordinarily subject to examina-
tion for Customs appraisement purposes, thus considerably
reducing the possibility of error. In addition, the procedures
used to compile both the import and export statistics
include clencal and computer processing checks designed to
protect the accuracy of the statistics to the fullest practi-
cable extent


MERCHANDISE TRADE BALANCES


Two trade balances are presented in this report-
I) The balance between exports based on f.a.s values
and imports based on I a.s. values.
2) The balance between exports based on fa s values
and imports based on c i f values with adjustments for im-
ports from affiliated sellers abroad to reflect arms-length
equivalent pnces.
Both balances are useful for certain purposes The first
balance corresponds to a measurement of the international
payments or credit flows resulting from merchandise trade
between the U.S. and foreign countries The second balance
is based on concepts similar to those used by most foreign
countries and therefore provides a reference for comparison
with the trade balances published by those countries


REVISIONS TO THE STATISTICS

Revisions are carried into the statistics on a periodic
basis. Data for 1975 and 1976 appearing in the 1976
Inunthly issues of this report are presented as follows:


1976 Statistics

a. January through November 1976 issues: figures are as
originally issued, except as noted below.
b. December 1976 issue figures reflect revisions for
prior months of the year issued with December 1976
statistics or earlier, as noted below.

1975 Statistics

a January through May 1976 issues- figures reflect re-
visions issued with December 1975 statistics or
earlier.
b. June through December 1976 issues figures reflect
revisions to 1975 data issued with June 1976 statistics
or earlier

In addition to the revisions which are made on a periodic
basis, instances may i, -ur where a significant error in the
statistics for a month ol the current year is discovered after
the statistics for that month are compiled. If the error is of
sufficient importance to require correction prior to the time
that the regular revisions are carried, the correction is made
and so noted in this report.



SOURCES OF FURTHER INFORMATION

Additional foreign trade statistics and information regard-
ing coverage, valuation, sampling, and qualifications which
should be considered by users of the statistics are contained
primanls in the following publications Report FT 990,
Highlights of UIS Export and Import Trade: FT 135, U.S.
General Imports. Schedule A Commodity by Country; FT
410, U.S. Exports. Schedule B Commodity by Country; and
the Guide to Foreign Trade Statistics Information regarding
additional sources of statistics, the methodology used in
seasonally adjusting the data. and other matters relating to
foreign trade statistics may be obtained from the Bureau of
the Census, Washington, D C. 20233.


'Adlusted lor seasonal and aorkiriday vanralion Dut no01 o0 changes in prire level. Faclors used TO adnut 1975 and 1976 data showmin this report reprelant sesonl adlustment Imcto dmld from
monthly data through 1915 and introduced .n January 1976 commned im ithe appropnaT wmorking-day adjuntmenlt Ctor.
'Cumulat.ons ot oabs ove at l asl 4-month periods are desrable to identdy underlying trends Monrh To-monh changeS in naplom. imports, and similar smnt oten reflat pnmanly irgdulr moae
mons. d.terer.ces in monthly carruver err Recent month o-month perrent changes in tre overall seonaliv adjusted export and import nlrs are pieonted in it followng table ewth mnage parnt
monthlo-montn Ise and decline over longer periods lsown for comparison. The average rse and average decline hgures exclude percentage changes Inr ll the period JulylOcenbr 1911 barnu ol
abrormalities the data due to ethects of do k trikes and 121 periods when negligible changes (Iro percent) in the eel of elport/imports occuned. Praltage change f f. .L. import amnl ar ot
available tos periods prior rI Januar, 1914
Month-to-month Average monthly rates of change

Series OcL.-Nov. Sept.-Oct. Aug.-sEpt. Juiy-Aug. Average Average 4 months 12 months
19'b 1Ii7 1976 1976 rise decline July-Nov. Nov. 1975-
1970-1975 1970-1975 1976 Nov. 1976
(Percent) (Percent) (Percent) (PercPerce nt) percent) (Percent) (Percent) (Percent)

F.a.s. export value.. -1.1 -1.5 +1.9 -3. +3.2 -2.8 -1.0 .0.2
F.a.s. Import value.. .1.' -2.1 +.?.) -3.7 (NA) (NA) -0.7 *2.2
C.i.f. Import ralue.. *l.u -2.5 +2.0 -3.7 (NA) (NA) -0.8 +2.2
'See te "Explanation ol Slalumics' lo deslniions ol the export ano Import values and trade balances










Table 1. U.S. Exports (fas. Value Basis). General Imports (fas. and c.i.. Value Basis), and Merchandise Trade

Balance. Adjusted for Seasonal and Working-Day Variation, by Month: January 1975 to November 1976

(In millions of dollars. See Explanation of Statistics ror Information on coverage, delinitions of export ana import values and
trade balances, and sources of error in the data. All data snorn for 1975 and 1976 reflect seasonal adjustment factors intro-
duced in January 1976)

F.a.s. Eiports ind f.a.s. Imports F.ra... Exports anda .l.i. Imports
Ptrioda Trade
Exports' Import bn Tae Eportal Imports b de
balance bIhince

1975

January-November ................. 9'..86..1 B .bt.OI + .) 1. 4,).l Q.'.1.1 9., '5).- t+'3.'2.7

January.......................... ,373.9 9.132.. 2 9,373.o 10.3;74. -1,000.9
February ....................... .. 8.735 7,927.2 b?2.6 8,7 :.. 8 ,50l'u.9 + 254.9
March............... .. ............. 81. 7,466. 1 .211.6 ,68l 1 ,019.2 641.9
April............................ b.64. 8.6 ?,7- 9.1 669.5, ,.648.C6 B,57.1 101.5
May................ .............. 8,221.5 ;,63.3 95 .2 h,27? i *i, 3.i 407.7
June............................. 6.715.5 ;,i .2.5 *1.613.0 *,715.i 7,65i .2 +1,06-1.3

July........................... ... ,87"1.O .,J31.6I .1.03. .4 E,871 .Li 8,4 2.6 458.4
August............................. ,979.9 7.876.: .1 .103 2 8.979.9 6,178.2 501.7
September ................. ...... 9,101 2 8, i96.01 0. 2 9. 104.2 820.. 284.2
October............................ 9.-25.7 169.3 .*l. 05: .l 9,22? .7 ;941.1 431.6
November ........................ 9.40b 9 ,201 .3: l.207.6 9,i)8.9 8,.27.5 + 581.4
December....................... 9,2.;9.9 8,321 .3 ?e..l 9 249 9 161.1 68.

19,6

January-November................ 104 461. 0 109,491.9 .'3. 9 1l. 16l.iu 1i7.60L1.i -13,120.7

January.......... ......... ....... ,0 lO}. 9, 1 6.0 2. Ir .'- 9,8'9.7 77? .3
February.......................... 8,800.1 6,9.0.9 10.8 o.800. 9,592.' '92.6
.March........ .................. 5,9,5.6 9,6. O. 8 9.6 10,300.6 -1,345.0
April............................ 9,93.6 9,,.95.7 20r .1 .J93.6 10,301. 907.9
May............................... 9,5 i.0 9.182.41 3,3.6 .V7s.0 9,672.6 94.6
June............................ 9,7;1 .3 10,093.6 37 .3 9.7t6 3 10,K88 9 -1,172.6

July.............................. 10.022.0 1),849.1 2:. i 10,0?2.. 1 1 ,650.3 -1,628.3
August............................ 9.68 1 10.445 8 ;57.7 9 6hR8.1 ll,?21 .? -1,531.1
September ........................ 9..71.7 1l.65fi.'i 77; .9 9,8.1.. 11,448.3 -1,576.6
October .......................... 9,727.6 1,-,123 5 9 .7:- r. 11,16,6.0 i -1,138.4
November ........................ 9 21.6 I0 r ,3n E 90C;.2 9 ,21 .6 11,.? l. -1.657.3
December......................... I

JRepresents exports of domestic ana foreign merchardie -.cluding Departiern of Derin-e Military As.sirance Progra
Grant-Aid shipments.








6

Table 2. U.S. Exports (f.a.s. Value Basis) of Merchandise Showing Department of Defense (DOD) Military Assistance
Program Grant-Aid Shipments, by Month: January 1975 to November 1976
iln Millnc.- of dollars. See Emplanailon of Statistics ror Iniormstlon on coverage. definition of f.e.e. export value, andsourcesof error la
the data. Unadjusted totals represent sum of unrounded figures and hence may vary slightly from em of rounded amounts)

Exports excluairg DOD Exports including G Al
Grant-Aid DOD Grant-Aid

Do eiec
Perlo a e Dosmestlc Domeslic
and
Srei gn and Domestic, and Domestic, Western Other
sorely loreIler, unaojusted foreign, unadjusted Iotel Europe countries
aoju ted I naajdstea unsajusted


1975

January-Decemb.r ... .. l IO .13u 105.b.l 0 101,591.6 10b.I10; .] 4h! 2 21.7 439.5

Jaruary-Notemr.r...................... 9',A68.1 ) 7,82.0 6....'.3 98,262.9 96.88. 3 .35.9 21.6 414.3

January .. .. .. ,3 .9 .9124.6 8,9.2.' 9 203.4 9.021.5 '8 8 5.2 73.7
Fibruary........ .. .. .. B.'55 6 8.-99 3 8 368.1 8,l..i 0 8.-13 4 5.7 1 3 3 2.6
March. ................... ... .... .. 8,6.1.I 9.-')8.o 9.265.6 9..37.5 9.19..5 28.9 2.2 26.7
April .... ... ... 8.6-8 c 9,0 4 .889.0 9.0'9 7 8.950.8 61 7 3.6 58.1
May ............ ...... .. 8.221.5 .90* b 8. 8..8 8,951. 8.835. 51.0 2.2 48.8
June .. ............. .. o.'15.5 B.t0.1 8 490.2 8.690.. 8.550.5 60 3 0.8 59.5

.11, .. .. .... .. 8.8'1. 4.11 2. a. 2-3. 8. 1-1.8 29.. 1.0 28.4
Augui ... ... ......... ... b.i' 9 8. .5 8.352 I 8.: o.B. 8.3,2 0 9.9 1.b 8.3
Septmber. ..... .... .... .. ... 9,10. 8.153.1 8.233.1 8.318 i 8..258 ; ?5.0 0 24.9
ctotber. ..... .. .... 9,225.' 9, '19.3 9.00 .8 9.730.9 3,63. 31 6 0.2 31.4
rnovemoer..... ........ .... .... .O 9 9.513.3 9.406.. 9,526.- 9.-19.5 13.0 0.8 12.2
Decep ber .. .. 9..9.9 9.30 5 9.193.6 9.328.7 9,218.9 25.2 0.1 25.1

19'6

J.ar.uar-Nowlbe r...................... 1 .48, 1.'J r.7 ..? 102.593.0 i4 2642 .2 102,779.0 186.0 Z.8 1B3.3

J.nuair .. ....... ... 9.11)1 8,160 2 8,658 5 8.769 8 8,668 1 9.6 0.5 9.2
Feoruarv. ... .. .. ..... ... .800 i 8,23'. 8,s2A 1 6.7-2.- 8.613.9 ..8 0.3 6.5
Marcn. .... ... 8.95 e Q.8?.?2 9.608 4 9 "42 I 9..9,.7 7 3 0.3 5.0
April...... .......... 9.393.. .614.l 2 9.7-14.7 9 "13 6 9.711.1 9 1 0.2 9.2
May .. .. ..... 9.1i'A 0 9.977.1 9.854.7 9,988. i 9.PEi: .4 1.7 0.2 10.4
Jun. .. ........ ...... 9.16 i 9.A5u.4 9.717 8 9.663 3 9.73) 7 13.0 0 4 12.6

July .. ....... ..... 1'.'. 2.0 9,325 5 9.184 5 9 330 0 9.189 1 4 6 0 3 4.2
August ...... ... ... l.dA I 6."28 d 8.694 3 8.69A 4 8,'64 5 69.6 0.3 69.2
Septe-Dcr .. .. 9 *-i. 7 9.1L910 .rnn1 3 9.208 7 9.058.0 49 7 'I. 49.6
OcoDer. ....... 9 27 6 in.OO 7 9 9 2i.3 10. 6o.1 9.029 7 4 1 IZ1 4.3
eanmber ... ... ...... ,64.6 9,E 3 9. 529.79..687.4 9,534.9 5.2 0.1 5.0
Dembn r .....

ajU-t. .1 ',r e .orjni *nu -orklr.;-e -a rltl.nn ,av reeonal anlustmqnt iacror' introduced Iv January 1976. See footnote I on front

'Represantl oniv 4p.rt hipm=nti frr. l[h Lnitea tates aroa anllffr from DOD Militar Assistance Program Grant-Aid shipment figures under
tnlt prr.cra, a= fi iir-.- i Tr infir= ri. lhe nnteri.l procurea ouro'lue the Unitea Siates rna transferI from DOD overseas stocks from export
.hlpmernl 'L) i port .l- al f j : -neprta D.iDl 'alu, I. r ot iltance', j if [ b point of origin )ci Data for shipments reported by
the DOD f-r a plren nm.irtlh ir. ielr.u-l tr. bureau of tn Cen.us report- In the seccn] ontn subjsquent to the month reported by the DOD.
'Annuall t 1: rn. t *hc'n ic.r zEa'jnali, alj ten a[ta. LuraI naoj te,] odata houla be used for anru t totals









Table 3. U.S. Imports of Merchandise, by Month: January 1975 to November 1976

(In millions ao dollar. See Explanstion or Stat tltes for Lniormsrtlor, on coverage, definitions of I.a.s. andc.1.f. Import values. and sources
of error in the oats. Unaajuitea totals represent sum of unfounded figures and hence ma) vary slightly from sum of rounded smounta)

1.S. z ports oi merchandise

P.a.s. value C I.i. value
Penna Geaeral Imports Import- General iport.l Imports
for for
Seasc.nally nacor, -u'oapt Ion, leaicor.i lly aconsumplion,
adjusted d)ued unadjusted adjust ed adjusted


1975

January-December....................... i .i ) 0-. i 103,j3.1 102,95-.9

January-November....................... d. aA t ...0 ,23i.6, i9' .' 1-.259.. 93,83'.- 93".6-.9

January............................ .. .3J2.5 9.813 9,').9 10.]'- 10.u9q 6 10,553.6
February... ............................. .,9' 1 .Iri 6i.5 B 50 9 2.B U,...
March................................... l. 2 S Ii 9 60 9 7 2 5',9ll.i
April.................................. .9' 1 1.I19). 6 i13.0 8.5.1' I B. '9 8.R~'
May......................................... 3 : *21. '.'3 2 '.88.3
June................................... -.102 5 .9 ,26 i .*v 1 2 7 1*.0.2

July......................... .......... .. 31.6 i- .890 9 8.-12 b B. 0. 8.--5 9
August ................................. '.. 87 ',518.3 -2 .5 8 5. ? 8.09. 5 ',996.2
September .............................. 8.19v 6 8.152.6 6.131 d 8.80.1] 4 '.]? 3 8.'53 2
October......................... ....... .6.1 9 ) 6.510 8 6.).'.' 6 6.'9- I 9.161 9.185 6
November .............................. 8 201.3 ..9U.5 '.B', ..2 ...B2' 1 a8 512 8.-' 3
December............................... 6.521.5 8.A88 8.Or ; 9.161 9.551 7 9. i70.0

197b

January-November.................. .... 109,149 9 1n),?40.i :,.V, 16.2 117,01.7 117,3;B.6 116,618.2

January................................. 9. 176.0 9,009." ,s..:.9 9.8i9. 9.699. 9. 632.9
February............................... 8.9.0.9 8, 111.; 7?.86.8 1.92.' 6.7 2 5 a.i71.6
Marcb........................ ......... 9,'06 a .I,199 ? 1u,046 1-,3,O 6 lil,936 1 10,779.3
April .................................. 9.95 9..9. I 9.-1t F 10.101 5 1.,?22 10.589.7
ay .................................... 9,182 4 8,913 09.029 I 9.872 6 9,01b 9 9,705 I
June .................. ... ............. 10,093 10,5;8 i IU. J4, 6 0, 1Bi ) I I.ll. 11,22;.6

July................................... 10,8 9 I 10,563 k 1U.614 2 Il.Fjio 3 11,313 9 11,132 1
August ................................. 10,4 i s 10,1 3 I In,31O 11.219.2 11.2 -" I 1 .089 9
September.............................. .10,6:i' 6 1l.32l 4 1'.tli0 1t 3 lI,ii 3 L 3 2 11,19E 2
October................................. 10.4?3 5 10.0'39 9 5.,il.b 11.166.0 10. 6i.l1 10.692 4
November............................... .10. 3:.. 1 1.0 6 11.'66 2 ll,2l. 11. 50.3 11 749.6
December..............................

'Adjusted for seasonal anrd orking-aal onrlatlon using EEa-onai Adiju:l-t.er.t taCLErr Iriroduce3 in lJanuirv 19'b.
'Annual total is not -hown for seasonally adjudate data Linaajustea da[r .rouid be u-'e tor annual [otals.








8

Table 4 U.S. Exports (fas. Value Basis) of Domestic Merchandise, Including Department of Defense (DOD) Military

Assistance Program Grant-Aid Shipments--Schedule B Sections and Selected Divisions, Seasonally Adjusted

and Unadjusted, by Month: January 1975 to November 1976

Iln million of dollars. See Erpianatton of Sialistirs for Infomallon on coverage, definition of f.a.. export value, and sources of error
In the data. Unadjustedl totals represent sum of unrounded figures and hence may vary slightly from ama of rounded amounts)

Schedule B sections and selected dlrislon6


S 1 6 1 7' 1 71 72 2


Seasonally adjusted


73 8 9


1975

Janu.ry- (Orehr. ......

J an .ury ........ ...
February .... ..........
March ...................
Apr I ........ ...
May ..... ..... .....
June. ...................
July ....................
Augu. ..................
September ............ .
October.................
NoveC ber ...............
December .... ...........

19'b

January-cvembe r ...... .


January... .............
February.. .............
Marc .......... .... ..
April...................
may.....................
June......... ..... ...
July ....................
Augu r ..................
September... ..........
October... ....... ..
No-tener.. .... ...
DEc erber. ...............






January-Dec- r.ber. .....

January-Nic ur.,sr .......

Jan- ar ...............
Fr ru. r ..... ... ....
Marcn ................ ..
Apr. ..................
Juy...... ..............
Julyne.................

August....
September. .............
October ......... ......
November.. ............
December................

1i'6

January-Nciar.r. i r......

January ...............
February ...............
March........ .
April..... ... ... ...
May.................. .
June................. .
July...... ............
August ..................
September ..............
October ... ..... ...
November.. ........
December.. ........ ....


1-, 15o.n




I. VO.i
I. i.'- 3
1. 1 yo. 8
1 lJU 3
I 210 i

1, 361 '


1 81.0
I ? i.8







1. r'<.6
1 ,2.
1 367 :.
1.330.5
I 33F I
I 1(9 c




1 .1" 1I


I -. 102.31


3 33 '


1.02B.
,,).9 1





*. 0) .


S1133.1 18-.2 83 8
1,1"9.8 I l | 9..1
L. 14 3 !1 1 9ul 5I
1.35 3 1 I? 7 0

I.? I 3 7 875 a
1.3 :7 9 71,.4 in I I
1 3 6 ; 1 1 I 7 1
.:?1.a 9 13 1 9l a
'1 'I 9 1 1.49
I *" :@ f *: 1. 1 14 ~


tSchedule B section and selected


-,127.3 I

S.21 .
39Q.8

381 .8
.07.

32. 6
346.
JO' i
2?8. 3
Al].'
4-10. '.




3 5ID' ?

12l.r.
201.0
312 7
109 a
5l'. 3

376.9
:76 6
360 1
,.7 7
i"4 4


1,143 9.0.u3.

139 ? I,01-.8
Ill 9
S125.1 4'.6
113.b ~'l 9
102.5 "01 2
1 l3 '0 5
8'.6 907 I
i I : -1 3
99 ij R .9
10" Bi.a.o





11.3t .4 9 896 9
1l1b I Iid 3






-*1 1.o 6 .".',. 7
61;.6 822.7
6.5 .3.

133.1 797 I
96.4 9311
103.3 413 4
92.9 9L0.9
HrF 3 91i 0
132 9 i.109 1
1 7. ? _., ? 2 ,
93.3 1.137.3







I.0d u*. '83

I.1 9.1 4,3j

.12 I 0 ,
Ar 3 836.i
12 ') I "i: 3
101 i 11
98 n ,,5 i
's.8 hn
1 1 3 B -
I ". .. ll.a
1 -.. j.


5 2 6t.-
139.3 619.8


"875.0

'1.O0.

'120 8
"73 ?
'88.9
a'5 9
"Is 3
*"3 9








'56.9


*78.9






'86 I
60.3
'91.5

';9.


9-J.3

675.0

I .0.9
I '). *
1:20.l
S3 '

51.9
to J
3J 9











'8 9
3.9 I
71 a

9. 1
78 3.1



03 I
79 u


?,9'2.2 10.026.-

863 I 31.0
t'4 9 892 9
.'57.2 007 9
101 7 898 *
6he 9 882.0
'12.3 880 4
679 0 913.i
89'... 880.9
03.. i39 -
7'5.? 920.1
7' I 1' 0a
306 I 921 0


9 0137.3

777..
..0.8
ol.l 3
-11 3

All 1
820.3
826 9
A-8 5
:14 7
A66 4


10 1 4 4

930.3
915.2
952 3
923 d
918 B
926 4
931. 1
936
912 1

9561.9
935.7


-1.,97.0

3.87.2
3 630.6
3.431 .6
3.668.0
3.5 l7.9
3.965. 7
.,001.
3 9oj 3
3.927.
-.1 3 2
4.006 8
4.103 8



44.724 0

3. '70.J
3.852..
3.762.7
3.911 1
4 072.3
1.2,8 1
S.361 7
4 ;71 4
4,172 0
4 039.2
4.i97 8


Inadju t ed


8.691.








?02 6









'1L.9
18 .1



'10.
9t6. 3


i83 '9







'ls1.9
863 B


1 i.4



016.3
977' 9


10.91J 2 .5.tb? 6

10.0;2).9 1.I6J9.-


3.1'.s
10.5



q9- 3
649 3
Bol. j



I 91.."
895. 3
8iii 1


3. 312
] 539 b
-.0 2 I
3.910. 1
3,910
3.993 ':
3.93' o
3.569.5
3, 51 1
3 586.1
*.20o.3
3.9-. 7
-.038. 2


1 2..4. 141 70t I

89. .0 i. 589.3
80ii. 5 3 ), 4.
1.019. I .330 9
90'5. 4.?'4 I
9L9 : 4.43 E
749 4.1395
89; f 3. 77 8
9S: 8 ? 7:. 9
91'".') 3.84F 6
9s6 7 4 229 IJ
9r.4J. 4.0 67.


1?,03. 1I

1.b55. I
1.622 1
I.b60.1
. 7.43.9
1 702.2
1.809 i
I.762 5
. '69. I
1.?75.0
1.80'..?
I. R18 0
i, i J.3



":.01' .3

1. 12.8
I. 168.6
1.801 .2
1.779 0
1867 6
62 1
I 196.0
S716 3

I.31 4
1.06: I


6.923.5

bO0 .6
611.3
596.6
b32.8
622.2
621.1

b52. I
625.
662 1
659.6
054 3



8.367 7

655. 3
136.4
738 3
779.5
735 1
765 6
861 4
789 '
8100 2
781 7
7127.3


0,895.1 7. 62.0

19,05..1 6,948.7

I.bl? I I61 5
5.5.9 511 0
I 801 o- .
1,873 8 b- I
1 82.9 b652.7
i..'8.8 0:2 2
.o9.0 i9s 9
1680.9 t2. I
1.04.o. 599.2
1,88j I 06
I 7.9 i F64 2
1.8-0.q 633.3




7i,,72.9 e,312?

, 712.0 665.L
. 213.7 688.
1.997 5 792 2
1 9. 9 I 9S 1
1.951.7 i77 0
1.899 3 769 14
1.8.3 0 M11.?
1.610.1 753.3
1 725 0 766 6
S493 6 k33 3
S707 3 733.7


division descriptions are as follows:


0. Food and live animals 7. Machinery and transport eaulpment
1. Beverages and tobacco 71. Machinery, other lnan electric
2. Crude materials, inedible, except fuels 72. Flectrical machinery, apparatus, and appliances
3. Mineral fuels, lubricants, and related materials 73. Iranaport equipment
4. Animal and vegetable oils and fats 8. Miscell..nou manufacturer articles, n.e.c.
5. Chemicals 9. Commodities ena transactions not classified according to kina
6. Manufactured goods classified chiefly by material
'Seasonally adjusted figures for section 7 may differ slightly from the sum of divisions 71, 72, cad 13 slnce each Is independently ad-
justed.
aAdjusted for seasonal and working-day variation using seasonal adjustment factors introduced in January 1976. See footnote I on front
page. Annual totals are not shown for seasonally adjusted data. Unadjusted data should be usea ior annual totals. The adjusted fectlon
totals in this table and similar overall monthly totals in tables 1, 2, and 3 were adjusted Independently.
4In the absence uf demonstrable seasonal patterns for this section, no seasonal adjustment factors nave been applied to the Oata.


Pern,


0 i0I


S I


15,753 6


2,376.1
1.23 4.
1.302.1
1,333.
1.469 4
1.610 7
1 577 .
1 502 4
1 588 2
J.539.0
1.525



1A,-.3 4

1.368.2
1.,25 .
1.210.6
!.406 2
i 518.?
1.670 2
1 628.9
1.722.2
1.466 2
1.161 .
1. 38. j


1;.I90 5

15,626.7

.08a.. 2
1.,22 9

1.410. 2
1 510 4
1.514.9
1. 80.5
I. &6 1
1 382.2
I 670.8
1.532.8
.563.9




:5 2j2.5

1.212.
1.u1 .0
I 541.1
1.520 1
L 717 1
L.'27 0
1 ?99 9
1 363 6
. 355. 1
S503. 1
1.637 3


5.182.0

468 2
*.56.b6
454.0
458.9
452.9
.73 0
480 5
468.3
4,78 6
496.6
489.4
498 &



5.935.8

.93.2
526.2
552.6
509.0
565 6
539.2
555.B
532.0
564.5
5E9.9
517.6


'.672.1

5,194..2

..56 b


482. .
4.82.3



&;8.5


.8963.0
660 6
530.9
4'I.8
6:8.5




'1.963.7

.77.9
500.
611.8
545.7
576.0
558 0
537.5
506.0
544 B
60.1.4
3.2 1.4


'2.8965

*238.6
*226.6
'237.0
*271.9
'285.0
'241.L
*237.9
'2717
'245 7
2718.2
'353.3
'265 5



'2,481.9

'254.0
'201.6
'216.5
'258.3
*248.5
'244.4
'24B.2
l191.3
4215.7
'212.2
S191.2


3.162.0

2,896.5

235.6
226 6
237.0
274.9
285 0
241.4
137 9
227.8
245.
278.3
353.3
265.5




2,181.9

254.0
201.6
216.5
258 3
246.5
244.4
248.2
191.3
215.7
212.2
191.2


I


1 I T I 1


I -


II


n


*



J


34
3-3 I








5'1
ii 9





















37 91C.
-H1 -.















ifl
-5'..
J:.0 9






-6B .
.81. ?

7Sr. i




3.,
3h7 R
in" ?
37-.1


-










Table. 5. U.S. General Imports (f.a.s. Value Basis) of Merchandise. Schedule A Sections, Seasonally Adjusted and
Unadjusted, by Month: January 1975 to November 1976
(In millions of dollars. See Explanation of Statistics for Informatlor. on coverage, definition of f a.8. Import salua, and sources of error
In the data. Unoajusted totals represent sum of unrounded figures and hence may vary slightly from aum of rounded amounts

Schedule A section'
Period
0 I I 2 3 5 6 7 8 9

Seasonally adjusted'

1975

January-November... ,82b.7 1,296.3 ,051.3 2-,100.2 '502'. 3,3r l.0 13.581.5 21,288.9 8,312.5 '2,287..

January.............. 6'2.8 111.6 -.5.9 3,090.3 '-8.5 .2-.5 1,6b9.9 1,8 .0 '2.6 211.5
February........... 668.9 126.0 .ob.6 1,983.8 3' 12 .7 i,-6.1. L.637.7 ?13.9 '180.0
March................. 675.1 150.9 '.66.7 1,36..? '55.1 329.9 1,356.7 1,986.2 7?2..* 185.-
April ............... 664.1 120.5 .2.0 2,-38.9 '.7 i ~ 1.305.8 1,61-.0 ;2t.3 232.3
May ................ 625.3 11-.3 -2.5 1,99-.9 .1.9 281.3 1, ,1L.8 ,635.- 673.6 '198.3
June ....... ...... '36.2 119.3 .62.b 1,-82.0 '33.2 2.-5 lti.B 1,852.3 I t.2 '219.7
July................. 709.9 109.- 173.3 2,187.6 -s .6 2no .2 1,11.. 1,976.. 771.- '222.8
August. ............ 664;.4 112.; -39.5 2,2.3.- '32.7 282.7 1,053.1 2,101.5 -.- .6 186.6
September............ 90-.1 116.1 -59.6 2.503.7 .-t.1 266.3 1,099.5 1,889.7 '76.9 '216.5
October.... .... .. 7.3.5 111.3 .-0.1 2,-23.0 '.8.A 2'7.5 1,111.7 2,06-.3 613.1 '21 ..
November.............. '62.- 109.2 ,'2.3 2,387.9 'bt..: 10.2 1 12b.9 2,053.6b 1.5 '211.9
December ........ 696.8 127.9 509.1 2,297.1 '- b. 32 1.16-.5 2,21-.1 670.7 '230.3

1976

January-Nosember ..... 9,09.8 1.492 1 6,323.8 30,9Z5..% '1413.9 4,320.1 1 .93..' 2(, 4",.3 11.375.1 '2,311..

January .............. 731.9 1-0.- 326.9 2.666.0 '37.6 353.2 1, lt .0 ._,293.9 Q00.9 '1 8l.6
February............ 701.0 16'.B 512.2 2,3-. .3 3'1.) 3 I0.1 1,2S.' 2,256.1 49.9 1: 9.7
March.. ............. 876. L 176.5 506.1 2,3-2.9 .... 382.2 1,-2J.7 2,- 0.6 i4 6.3 '215.0
April ........... .... 66.5 129.1 576.9 2,877.9 '36.P 371.a I,.b.8 ,-.-... 987.0 '189.9
May ................. 626.6 105.6 528.5 2,201.0 '29.- 36'.3 l,j'6. 2,-*27.5 1.02-.6 '211.2
June................. 936.2 125.5 '.6-.? 2,81-.- 30. .?-.5 ,- .- 1 ,361.5 1,0. 19b.-
July. .. .......... 938.0 130.0 37 .0 31.10..' 3 -.6.8 1,368.2 ?,602.- 1.122.9 '226.5
August............... 86.620 0 12 .- 620.2 3,102.6 '35.6 ; 1,521. 2,518. 1,100.8 '218.9
September ........... 859.6 13-.0 640.8 1.020.0 '.3.2 369.., 1,602.9 2. 90.1 10, 2.. '33.5
October ............ 821.7 121.t 615.3 3,126.- '18.. -98.0 1, 17.1 2,-57.t 1,071 '21 .-
November... .... .... 692.2 119.. 573.7 3.27?.9 '?.' t3 1 '72.' 57.4 1.13.9 ??3 1
December ............

IJ,.aa ji ted


1975

January-December.... 8.503.3 1,'19.5 5,566.2 2.,-'5.6 5]3.9 3,b9.9 1-,702.5 _3.-57.2 9.22..- 2,ll7.s

January- Nonember.... ',791.2 1,262.3 5,0-1.8 23.928.1 510 .0 3,3J- .0 13. 91.. 21,187.7 8,3-5.. 2,287.-

January... ........ 713.6 112.3 w.66.0 3,-21.0 -8.5 -37. 1.;750.u 1,89-. 755.6 21.5
February ............. 62b.8 106.. 9-L.. 1,4.0.1 --.7 30 0. 2 I,2,0.0 1,eB.6 o21.9 180.U
March. .... ........ t57.5 1-3.' b60.. ,-nO.? 55.1 3.0. 1i,313.3 2.079.5 bh;.6 15d.-
April................. 68 .0 119.1 -75.3 2 -- .3 -0.7 351.9 12-3.2 i,894.2 '03.8 232.3
May.................. bOB.- 116.9 -53.6 1,9-5.0 51.9 2;5.3 1,1'-.6 1,93-.5 o2b.3 196.5
June ................. 776.7 129.o 51-.8 1,-3 .l 3-.2 252. 1,230.8 !,901.., 722.7 219.7
July.............. 06.- 103.- 506.- 2, 37.3 --.8 2-7.3 1, Uo.6 1,96... 860.9 2e2.6
August ......... 635.8 95.8 -21.0 2,2-5.6 32.7 270.6 1,005.7 1,8.2.0 800.o 188.6
September............ 896.9 106.9 7 .. 2, I. 6. I '..b 2' .1 ,09i.8 1,765.8 61i.7 216.5
October............. 759.9 128.0 -57.7 2,3-5.5 -6.8 302.- 1,19-.0 2,138.6 916.7 217.'
November........ 725.1 120.' *15.5 .,089.- v6.2 296.i 1,121.2 2.01.6b 6-1.9 .11.9
December............. 712.1 137.2 52-.. 2,5-1.5 -6.0 327.9 1,211. 2,269.- 88.7 j20.3

1976

January-November..... 9,236.0 1.466.3 6,345. 30,661.' 413.9 18.l1 1.?9' 3.1 27,032 5 li,J67. 2,317

January.... ........ 159.7 1-1.5 .-83.7 2,790.- J7.6 350.0 1.190.5 1 :,229.7 83a.7 18 .6
February.............. b9.5 158.3 539.5 2,302.3 51.5 316.t 1. i30 .t 2.10s .9 ?90.2 169.7
March... ... ....... 890.1 167.8 539.6 2,7-8.2 3'.- -10.1 ,-'0.' 2,72-.0 999.2 215.0
April.............. .. 816.6 127.t. 5n3.0 2,797.3 3t.S -1-.3 1.-09. 2 ,606.2 931.' 189.9
May............ ....... 781.6 108.- 539.1 2, U .9 29.. 371.0 1,383.- 2,.59.1 925.* 211.2
June ................. 980.2 136.2 b52.3 2,83-.1 30.1 386.0 1.6.9.h 2,612.5 1.098. 196.-
July..... ........... 903.3 123.0 6.9.8 3,036.8 3-.2 365.9 1.5-7.B 2,-61.8 1,19-.7 22t..5
Au ust ............... 880.7 10-.9 619.5 3,16 .6 35.t 368 3 1,538.0 2,307.2 1.l15.i 218.9
September....... .... 851.2 123.5 '68.n 2,959.o -3.2 368.. 1,358.1 2,-'5.0 1, 12 .1 233.5
October.............. 776.5 139.1 602.- 2,623.1 18.. .71.6 1,520.1 2,35-.- 1,I ?.7 216.-
November ............ 924.3 137.9 378.3 3.069.9 62.2 173.9 1,606.6 2,723.7 1,211.3 '53.1
December............

'Schedule A section description are as rollows:
0. Food and live amnmals 5 Cr.eJical
1. Beverages and tobacco 6 Manufactureo goods classified chiefly by mattrlal
2. Crude materials, Inedible, except fuels 7 Yacninern ard transport equipment
3. Mineral fuels, luoricants, and related materials 6. Atlicellaneous manutfacturea articles, r.e.s.
L. Ailmal and vegetable oils ano fats 9. Commodttle, and transactions not claBsitfed according to Rtnd
'Adjusted for seasonal and orklng-day variation using seasonal adjustment factors Introduced In January 1976. See footnote I on front
pare. Annual totals are not shonn for seasonally adjusted data. Unadjustea data should be used for annual totals. Ine adjusted section
totals in this table and lstlalar overall monthly totals in tables I and .- ere aajustea independently.
'In the absence of demonstrable seasonal patterns lor this section, no seasonal adjustment factors have been applied to the data.










Table 6. U.S. General Imports (c.i.f. Value Basis) of Merchandise, Schedule A Sections. Seasonally Adiusted and
Unadjusted, by Month: January 1975 to November 1976
Iln millions of dollars. See BEplanation of Statistics for Inforlatlon on coverage, definition of c.l.f. Import value, and sourclaof errorll
the data. LInedJusted totals represent sum of unrounded figures and hence may vary slightly from aum of rounded amounts)

Schedule A sections'
Period I I I
0 1 2 3 45 6 7 8 9

Seasonally adjusted'

1975

Janusry- Novehr ..... 8.-89.0 1,.13.1 5,577.0 25,7&8.0 '537.0 3,57..l l1i,65:,.6 22,956.1 8,953.6 '2,342.3

January ........ 7132.9 122 1 549.b 3,306.3 '50.5 .54.0 1,811.1 2,018.0 825.3 '220.8
February.. ..... 726. 135.8 512.9 2,108 1 1.6.8 3.6.6 1,582.0 1.971.' 776.3 '185.1
March. ... ..... 732.6 162.5 507.9 1,&56.B '57.6 349.5 1,.61.5 2,157.7 776.3 '190.9
April....... .'20.3 131.3 520.8 2,594.3 '42.5 333.9 1,-07.2 1,962.0 777.6 '239.3
May.. .. ....... b.8.0 12..0 485.8 2,131.1 '54.6 297.7 1,187.9 1,986.4 728.0 '201.9
Jne............... 793. 129.5 512.9 1,585.6 '35.1 262 9 1,268.1 2,001.8 770.8 '224.3
Jul ................. 770.9 120.2 525.9 2,329.3 '7.7 282.1 1,200.5 2,123.5 831.7 '227.5
Auust ............ 75.6 123 6 -8..1 2,399.6 '34.9 301.3 1,1317. 2,259.3 801.0 '192.9
September ... .. 974.4 127 6 505.7 2,690.1 's... 304.1 1,179 6 2,035.6 8B1.8 '221.4
October .............. 80..3 122.0 485.2 2,597.0 '51.9 313.1 1,198.9 2.226.9 881.6 '222.1
November... ..... 830.3 11-.5 '66.0 2,549.8 '71.2 328 9 1,218.. 2.213.5 943.2 '216.1
December.... ...... '55.7 139.1 561.2 2. 52.3 's.9.6 3....0 1.261.5 2,377.7 951.3 '235.0

1976

lanur ry- .'ovemDr. .... 1 1,. 64.9 6,490.4 33.15.- '5446.4 4,548.2 17,145.1 29,034.9 12,217.6 '2,366.3

January. .......... 7 98.. 152.0 580.2 2,853.0 '.0.7 372.6 1,264.0 2,.73.1 972.8 '191.1
February..... .... 756.6 200.5 55-. 2,507 C, '55.. 347.2 1,376 2..31.4 989.5 '173.6
March. .............. 951 9 190.C 55i.1 ,505i 9 137.1 403.5 1.,2B8.0 2,586 5 1,037.7 '219.9
April ... ... ...... 69 1 140 5 633.' 3.076 3 '39.9 390.1 1.570 6 2,694.6 1,061.5 '193.7
May ....... ...... i8.4 114 571 5 2,33 3 2 '31 i 36-1.7 1,IR7.. 2.621.0 1,101 3 '215.1
June............... 1,i1 n 137 3 611 9 3.009 A '32.5 393 2 1,672 9 2,609 3 1,108I '201.0
July................. I Ori A 111.3 700 C 3,143.; '37.1 153 4 1,697.2 2,785.4 1,203.7 '231.1
August............ 'i. 7 I 135.. E75 6 3,326 4 '38 4 391.3 1,-.44 2 2.702.3 1 182.9 '223.8
September .......... 932 7 117 I 721 1 3,23e 6 '46 4 390.6 1.730.0 2,7M4.0 1.139 4 '238.2
October............. ...5 5 133 1 677 6 3.316.9 '20.0 i22.9 l,632.l 2,619.0 1,149 6 '220.8
November. ............ 916.9 131.1 625.F. 3,493.1 '66.9 198.4 1,592.5 2.738.3 1,270.4 '258.1
December ............

L[r.,ajust ed

1975

January-Deember ..... .2'..- 1.5-'.3 .,l....A 26.28'u. I 66.6 3,928.7 15,d'.: 25.287.9 9,9.2.2 2,5'7.4

January-November ..... .s-0.0 Il39.1 .I ,66.8 25.,6... 537.0 3.581.2 1-.555.6 22.850.8 8,990.9 2,342.3

January.............. i77.o i22.8 527.0 3,660.0 0.4 ..7.6 1,898.1 2.038.2 807.1 220.8
February ........ 680.- Il-.b -33.1 ;,061.7 .6.8 326.8 1.3bO. 1,811.7 666.9 185.1
March................ 713.5 15-.17 01 3 1,560.6 52.6 361.0 1,.1.7 2,259.1 739.0 190.9
April ........... .. 7.2.0 i29.i 542..5 2.596.9 2.5 373 7 1.339 6 2,054.2 753.5 239.3
May................... 29.7 lib.8 .97.9 2,077.6 5..6 301.8 1,23-. 2,093.b 67-.8 201.9
June................ 83'.1 140 ,i'.8 1.536 31l 270.5 1.327.7 2.119 9 777 1 224.3
July................. 7.0 i.6 502.7 2,275.7 47.7 26..1 1,223.3 2,108.7 917.3 227.5
August.... ........ b9 ..- 105.0 -63.9 2,402.0 3-.9 268.3 1,086.2 1,958.8 865.9 192.9
September. ......... 966.6 117.6 523.9 2.626.2 -..- 292.2 1,171.3 1,923.7 883.9 221.4
October....... .... &2 0 1-0 3 50-.t 2.513.9 i1.9 318.7 1,287.6 2,307.0 993.6 222.1
November. ........... 789.6 132.. -S 2,23i.0 71.2 316.- 1,212.3 2,175.9 9L1.1 216.1
December............. 7711.3 1-9.1 578.0 .,719.6 .9.6 47.5 1,312.0 2,371.2 951.3 235.0

1976

January-November..... 9,99A.1 L,599.3 6,i.L1 : 2,a8i4 .6 446.4 4,547.2 17,247.2 29,092.3 12,315.1 2,366.3

January............... 828.8 153.2 532.o ",.98..2 10.7 369.2 1,290.5 2,403.9 905.7 191.1
February........... ?. .5 169.0 .75.5 2,-56.9 55.. 333.0 1,196.1 2,268.5 650.0 173.6
Marc. ... .... ..... 967 1 161 2 5 4 ; 2,939 4 37 4 132.9 1 79 4 2,922 7 1,072 9 219.9
April...... ....... e 139 3 FO ?,, ql. 2 39 9 '31.9 1.512 2,616 2 1 ,02.0 193.7
May. ...... ....... A49 9 il7 y- i.B 2.212 ; 1 8 368., 1,194 7 2,655 0 994 4 215.1
Jne ..... ............ 1 054 2 118.9 707 4 3.030.'. 32 3 109 5 1.783.4 2.F62.4 1,177 6 201.0
July ................. 9"1 4 133 7 :14 0 3.257.7 37 1 106.0 1.675.1 2.635.0 1.280.7 231.1
August. ..... ..... 19 3 i 2 675b 1 3.392' 9 38.4 367.8 1I.62.3 2.475 3 1.305 9 223.8
September......... 973 4 13: 3 I4i0 3,173 8 46 4 359.4 1,681.5 2.628 I 1,203 5 338.8
October. .. ....... ill4 13 2 E5i 3.r,19 3 2,1' 195 1 1.35 4 2,509 0 1.199.0 220.8
November.... ...... 993.1 151.3 630.6 3,?77..5 66.9 498.9 1,737.4 2,916.2 1,321.2 258.1
December............

'Scheaule A section ,escript loans are as flilorE:
0. Food ann live animals 5 Cneilcals
1. Beverages ana tobacco 6. Manufacturer goons classified chiefly by material
2. Crude materials, Inealble, except fuels 7 Msachnery and transport equipment
3. Mlneral fuels, luDricantj, and related materials Mlscellaneous manufactured articles, n.e.s.
4. Animal and vegetnale oils and fats 9. Conmmodltes nao transactlona not classified according to kind
'Adjusted for sesaonal and aorktng-day variatlan using seasonal aajusmnent factors inLroauced In January 1976. See footnote 1 on front
page. Annual totals are not ahoan for eabson.ily adjusted oatd. Unadjusted cata should be usea for annual torala The adjusted section
totals in this table and similar overall monthly totals in tables 2 and -ere adjusted IDdependently.
'In the absence of aoeonstrable seasonal patterns for this section, n seasonal adjustment ractora have been applied to the deta.


* Effective with Jnunary y196 stL.titics








U.S. GENERAL IMPORTS OF PETROLEUM AND SELECTED PETROLEUM

PRODUCTS, UNADJUSTED

Tables 1 A. 1-B, 2-A and 2 B which follow, contain monthly and cumulative-to-date data on U.S. general imports
of petroleum and petroleum products into the U.S. Customs area and into the Virgin Islands for the period January
1975 through current month. Prior to January 1976, these data were presented separately in a Supplement to Report
FT 900. (It should be noted that imports into the Virgin Islands are excluded from the official U.S. import totals
presented in the preceding tables of this report.) The data in these tables are not adjusted for seasonal and working-
day variation.
Beginning with the issue for January 1976. the value figures presented in this report are in thousands of dollars
and the quantity figures in thousands of barrels.


Schedule A and TSUSA Commodity Numbers Used in Compiling the Petroleum
Information Presented in This Report


Energy products


Schedule A. No.


Nonenergy products


TSUSA No.


Schedule A. No.


Crude and partly refined
petroleum
331.0120
331.0140
331.0210
331.0220
331.0230
331.0240

Crude petroleum
331.0120
331.0140

Gasolme
332.1000

Jet fuel
332.2020

Kerosene
332.2040

Distillate fuel oil
332.3020
332.3040

Residual fuel oil
332.4020
332.4040

Propane and butane gas
341.0020

Liquid derivatives of
petroleum, n.e.s.
332.9940 pt.


475.0510
475.1010
475.0520, 475.0540
475.1020, 475.1040
475.3520
475.6520


475.0510
475.1010


475.2520, 475.2560


475.2540


475.3000


475.0530
475.1030


475.0550
475.1050


475.1510, 475.1530


Lubricating oils
332.5000 pt. 475.4500

Lubricating greases
332.5000 pt. 475.5500, 475.6000

Paraffin and other mineral
waxes
332.6220 pt. 494.2200
332.6240 494.2400

Asphalt
332.9800 521.1100

Naphthas not for further
refinement
332.9920 475.3540

All other petroleum products
(pitch of tar coke, non-
liquid hydrocarbon mix-
tures, and calcined petro-
leum and coal coke not for
fuel)
332.9700 pt. 401.6200
332.9940 pt. 475.7000
599.8040 pt. 517.5100


475.6540


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U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
Bureau of the Census
Washington, D.C. 20233
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
FIRST CLASS MAIL


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POSTAG. 3W 1'IJ' il
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
COM-202
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