Summary of U.S. export and import merchandise trade

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Summary of U.S. export and import merchandise trade
Series Title:
FT-900
Physical Description:
v. : ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of the Census
United States -- Bureau of the Census
Publisher:
Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, Foreign Trade Division for sale by the Subscriber Services Section (Publications), Bureau of the Census
Place of Publication:
Washington
Creation Date:
September 1976
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Commerce -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Citation/Reference:
American statistics index
Dates or Sequential Designation:
1974-1976.
General Note:
At head of title: 1977- United States foreign trade.
General Note:
Formerly classed C 56. 210:900 - during the time the Bureau of the Census was subordinate to Social and Economic Statistics Administration.
General Note:
Issues prior to Oct. 1977 were sent to depositories as Item 144.
General Note:
Unnumbered supplements accompany some issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001209840
oclc - 02245761
notis - AFW0105
lccn - 76640395
issn - 0361-0047
sobekcm - AA00005271_00052
Classification:
lcc - HF105 .B73e
ddc - 382/.0973
System ID:
AA00005271:00052

Related Items

Preceded by:
United States foreign trade; export and import merchandise trade
Succeeded by:
United States foreign trade. FT900, Summary of U.S. export and import merchandise trade

Full Text





O-'.












FT 900-76-9





Seaso

(Ir


including Unadjusted Data on
Petroleum Pi


FAS ELPORISADIDFAL IMPORTS

SmLumna AdIalted

Dhce B issou ut-id tha aOrlr.' Sepiao.n-r 19'6, enrti s ir.
a f.a.e. (free alogaldE ntpIl 1.S. prtl of a*porcaloI
aJuo bulalj a excJudiaq LDepAnDlrt.lt Delfee i DLl I[tL-
rarl A.gaIanc.e PrOrma GrUrJ-Ad shlprpwon. a.ounatd to
$9,871.? millarou md nat 1 general a1p1rts oi a I.;..
foreign port of exportatioi value baals, sou,.ntco La
410,65o0.6 ullin.l a
Baed o Line above export ano Impurt Ilsures, theI
Sep l Der eirc.hadls trade balance M. O I0 deiclsa D)
$778.9 alltion, as comparor to a deficit aof 717.5 nI-
lon In l Auscat.
During th1e Ilir 9 itonIts of 1976 IJsnuay--Septrer ,
eiporLa 0,re at am anl rate 1rf Dll3lAc mitlro a
level about 6 percent higher than the Ialenaar Vftr 197N
LOtal of 1012,13I million. [Iports for the Jnua.ry-
September 1976 perold mlre at an pr.ta.l rate ul l I6,Oli
rillton, re.prsenilng an tr reaam of atd,. 23 pecn.nt
over Ine ca endar year 197D Total of Ir, !16 misI r..I
or tbe f-molth period, aJunc-Sept.emnr 1975, eaporta
aceragnd 8,824.0 aillon per month Ivel c bat.
percent above Ihe $,181,8 Billlon itFerige reported for
the precdcing 4--onth parlto, farDarv--Mfty 1931. lIports
on a h.m.a. v.lue brs.lo, sraaged l ,O09.6 irllh.i per
nLth for ota current 4-aaor.th pertoa, balout 13 percent
higher itan ine 89,331.4 million average reported for the
preceding 4-antb period.


faporna enacluaing DLlpcary Aaislta.Len Pronrmn Granl-AlOa
ahlpatenl Inucr.red fom $6,828.8 udllin in AugU LO
$9,159.0 lIIlIon In September. filth ll Igry Asalsilarc
Programn Gran-Ald alipments Intc lred, icapourt Increasor
from $8,980.4 1 lllot tr, Auguil to 19ah>.' 9 ULLIIc I2t
September, Geneiorl Importia .ecreraea from 110 ,4 3.1 l l-
Lson Ln Augual to t20,38j.l miJLlto n fieatLer.
Iote: FooonloEs 1, 2, sad 3 a-e sho-n at the blnl'lE of page 4.


Imports of Petroleum and ''"
products) .I'~\



FAELPORT54ANDlF iWORSA I

Ieuaoniiar Admi

Tie iust 1u lla.aa cr.Dl aunin ;:pir. o-i 1-, ap r,
Sfa .;. TroE .tin61 inspi D.a6. 1 prr 71 1 .
value ba-li, L.l..... so. .. -c .. .. ... r.r... rf,.
Lary 6, ist ir.:e Prupr.A CraDDt-Aid iii,.ge.eD, moan.-c. A
nalb1.7 Billlin an i ,[ ,i:.elit il nprt= On a : 1.' r./ f
L i rt itr..o ?, tod IrerDr U ..-a 1 .-' I e tr, i rta -
aasn ., ;ir,:uDrl3 at ZllD d.3 -ilii .1'
Ba=pLo )U. trl- atl i: f.a. eip.: r nd c.I.f. Imporn IIn u ,'
pnt acpl-mb-.r n.r ChianOlse trDoda. L.lace -'" In aeotil 0
Il~,L76.. ai ll ori, :Anpa.ri a rl the ad liciu r I. .luA. l ir


c. por.t -. rc a.l an p raP. u-ri I.t CI H 1r l ,Li ma r ic n, ; a
Lei.il curi 6 pu.rcei higc. r h.c l r.? :ar-.A .. e.r lii,
arrd .f $lO',130i r alliar.. 1 tc,, te fTer th- Janu..r
bepar.Da r.t 31TE peric -a.rir r ,n ran' ,,[I a f 1 i:t .
tiiiO i ltael u.aL 23 pct r. t In er.. t 'if.c .Irrap r
mcar i, r t a1 c.i fI0t3j.J Ja il Au.e
FOr It" 4-n-taon jrplt, Iu-l.o-ic.YccOr 19'S, eapocrt
i ti a act.. ajilion pr 1rcr., 7 Si. I' ac.uc "
perc it .tocc me D iOhiB.n it II1-.. a.-ra renrccr.,c It


niaoner i than tr.c6 1.3,01r .9 mill ir al., ra : r?iorle] for I
tr, pr .ceilhr 9-aIntr i.erI Da.


ELpaiis endllar. lg t Jllllaer lsi tance roi-w. Lrart-Al]
anipnr.la oaicr-airca fr:n ia,2o.6 1.lior. I A;ugui I -m
9Q,It1 9.i maD i an tI SptiemL br. lttri KI niilstir 4 a .=
ProaEra C an -Ala anpim'ncr.l i,.lu.3to, Zrpror1 I trra.ca
froin V6,6,0.4 ilS tl ii. g..i 0c 711' 1- an .
EaeptemD.r. Onaeral iapOrlS deareaaeo fr'a 11,h3.I lo l-
l1oP in Aui 'st i o ,II:I16..2a nuailcn Iar I oibaer.


L BR4

C'



.3U.
i 6 .'9s


*a I a r aunl i, o 0In< aa lmn to rni 1. intr | nt.n Ioan tr o .a1 u p HI IS n1111 Ii .6 i ....a.S nIh,. r-,n 'o.Ionl .a.. i, a,. .I r. l aal.Dn Hon
ina.id l mud ISa L It gn17n l m riB au0, In". ln rom I 0a.l. ft. u on".n. *rin lu n' vlrs.
OCbJ lllma i ni1 aBn ".al mod l mgolo '0 IdeP. undwfln| BYa na ln ot'on n '1. ftac I 1 rtn a'. dat..I *.ft. 1.n1 aim Ma ..- l ,t "n'
anto., ifb.fh lo I.mn a.npay 1ma na pr'a*i Ini.c.o0 ernl cha c aaeOI mnaDr l ada nd I*dt l. o ma a0 r r.a I IIaa ;n eI .l,'nng ft1 Dlib Io. pe.'i


-lnth--a eontl : ran d IIntrlm ritet of cn-le
.andanao..nm D taIl. "- = n W II. heup nat Ma m a. IHn Decant. o'.qa t III natatad *. so".. .. -,n -1 e. W



Serle. Aug.-SEpL. July-Aug. JJun July f -. Inu Avernae AIerp a I ltClh mannt
19q 197b 1976 li6 rn, .e line M. -'ept. .ept. [lP J
Iq .-19"7 19 J- l7t 196 :i rIc. i i
IPercentI rPerLenl IP rIPeIJn IF eriLpen IPercerl, tP Ipe. en iPrceni I 7.rer,

P.a.a. export v.lue.. 1.9 -.] 3 3.1 -I .3 2 -2 A C-.B 8.1
F..: .11 r = 1 I ".o 1, "A.
P.a.r. DLporl value.. 2.0 -3.? *. 5 9 A9 A I IlAI l l.3

StDe u lm lmoaaln Ii a lll" l aB m -n i MI w id le mpi lui a t Ima MimOe


Inquiries concerning them figures should be addressed to the Chief, Foreign Trade Division, Bureau of the
a Census, Washington. D.C. 20233. Tel: Area Code 301, 763-5140.

Slf s U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE, Social and Economic Statistics Adminlstration. BUREAU OF THE CENSUS

\ For sale by the Subscriber Services Section (Publications), Social and Economic Statistics Administration, Washing-
ton, D.C. 20233, or any U.S. Department of Commerce District office. Price 10 cents per copy. Annual subscription
(FT 900, 975, 985, and 986 combined) 83.00.


SUMMARY OF U.S. EXPORT AND

IMPORT MERCHANDISE TRADE



SEPTEMBER 1976




For Release
October 28, 1976
10:00 A.M.

nally Adjusted and Unadjusted Data








EXPLANATION OF STATISTICS


IMPORT STATISTICS


Coverage

The US import statistics reflect both government and
nongovernment imports of merchandise from foreign coun-
tries into the U S Customs territory, which includes the 50
States, the District of Columbia. and Puerto Rico. The U.S.
import statistics exclude imports into the Virgin Islands,
Guam, Amencan Samoa. and other U S possessions, and
shipments between the United States and Puerto Rico.
between the United States and U.S. possessions, and
between any of these outlying areas (Data on U.S. trade
with Puerto Rico and with U.S. possessions are published
separately in Report FT 800. Additional data on such trade
and on imports into the Virgin Islands from foreign coun-
tries are presented in reference tabulations I Data on
imports of petroleum and selected petroleum products,
including shipments into the Virgin Islands from foreign
countries. (previously shown in Report FT 900-Supple-
ment) are included in this report effective with the January
1976 statistics.
The U.S import statistics also exclude American goods
returned to the United States by its Armed Forces. intransit
shipments through the United States; temporary shipments.
transactions not considered to be of statistical significance.
such as shipments of personal and household effects, low-
valued nondunable imports by mail. issued monetary coins
of all component metals. and gold in the form of ores,
concentrates, waste, scrap. and refined bullion Imports of
silver in these forms are included in the statistics, unless
otherwise noted. (Information on gold movements. pre-
%iously shown in Report FT 2402, appears in Report FT
990 effective January 1975.)

General Imporls!Imporls For Consumption

The statistics on U.S. imports are presented in terms of
both "General Imports" and "Imports for Consumption."
General imports are a combination of entries for immediate
consumption and entries into Customs bonded warehouses.
and thus generally reflect total arrivals of merchandise
Imports for consumption are a combination of entries for
immediate consumption and withdrawals from warehouses
for consumption, and thus generally reflect the total of the
commodities entered into U S consumption channels.

Source Of Import Information

The official U.S. import statistics are compiled by the
Bureau of the Census from copies of the import entry and
warehouse withdrawal forms which importers are required
by law to file with Customs officials The information as to
country of origin, net quantity. value, and commodity
classification is verified by Customs officials on entnes filed
for transactions valued over $250. which are ordinarily sub-
ject to examination for Customs appraisement purposes
The statistical copy of the entry is corrected if it does not
accurately reflect the information called for by the statis-
tical requirements.


Import Valuation

F.a.s. Import Value.-The f.a.s. (free alongside ship) value
represents the transaction value of imports at the foreign
port of exportation. It is based on the purchase pnce, i.e.,
the actual transaction value and generally includes all
charges incurred in placing the merchandise alongside the
carrier at the port of exportation in the country of exporta-
tion.

C.i.f. Import Value.-The c.i.f. (cost, insurance, and freight)
value represents the value of imports at the first port of
entry in the United States It is based on the purchase price
and includes all freight, insurance, and other charges
excludingg U.S. import duties) incurred' in bringing the
merchandise from the country of exportation and generally
placing it alongside the carrier at the first port of entry in
the United States. If the merchandise was acquired in a
transaction between related parties, the purchase price used
in deriving the c.1 f value is based on an arm's-length equiv-
alent transaction price, i e.. a price which would exist
between unrelated buyers and sellers

Import Monthly Carryover

It is the objective of thu compiling procedures to include
shipments, insofar as practicable. in the statistics for the
actual month of importation. However, for purposes of the
statistics the month of importation is based on the date of
official acceptance by Customs of the import entry or ware-
house withdrawal document. This may not in all cases corre-
spond to the actual month of importation. tFor example,
under the Customs "immediate-delivery" procedures,
importers may file the import entry up to 10 workdays
after the actual date of importation.i Also, because of
processing problems (e.g.. late receipt of a document for an
end-of-month shipment, rejection of a shipment by the
computer because the data fail to meet certain edit criteria
established to protect the accuracy of the statistics, etc.).
there is an overall average carryover of about 7 percent (in
terms of value) of the shipments from the reported month
of importation (based on the date of the import entry or
warehouse withdrawal document) to a subsequent month,
usually the succeeding month. In addition, as a result of the
aforementioned Customs "immediate-delivery" procedures,
there is a further carryover of presently unknown magni-
tude from the actual month of importation to a subsequent
month These limitations should be borne in mind when
making month-to-month comparisons.
Cumulations of data over at least 4-month penods are
desirable to identify underlying trends. Month-to-month
changes in imports, exports, and similar series often reflect
primanly irregular movements, differences in monthly
carryover. etc.

Estimated Data for Imports Valued Under S251

The overall import and Schedule A Section 9 totals
include sample estimates for shipments valued under $251.
Therefore, they are subject to sampling error, estimated at








less than one-tenth of one percent for the unadjusted overall
total and about one percent for the unadjusted Schedule A
Section 9 total. This means that we can have about 67
percent confidence that the published unadjusted overall
totals and the unadjusted Schedule A Section 9 totals differ
by less than one-tenth of a percent and one percent, respec-
tively, from the totals that would have resulted from a com-
plete tabulation. The statistics on imports of petroleum and
petroleum products included m this report reflect fully
compiled data and, therefore, are not subject to sampling
error.


EXPORT STATISTICS

Coverage

The export statistics reflect, in general, both government
and nongovernment exports of domestic and foreign mer-
chandise from the U.S. Customs territory (includes the 50
States, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico) to for-
eign countries, whether the exportation involves a com-
mercial transaction or not. The statistics, therefore, include
Department of Defense Military Assistance Program Grant-
Aid shipments, shipments for economic assistance under the
Foreign Assistance Act and shipments of agricultural com-
modities under P. L. 480 (The Agricultural Trade Develop-
ment and Assistance Act of 1954, as amended) and related
laws. The following are excluded from the statistics Ship-
ments to U.S. Armed Forces and diplomatic missions
abroad for their own use; shipments between the United
States and Puerto Rico, between the United States and its
possessions (including the Virgin Islands), and between
these outlying areas; exports from U.S. possessions; intransit
shipments through the United States; transactions not con-
sidered to be of statistical importance, such as personal and
household effects: temporary exports: low-valued or non-
commerical exports by mail; issued monetary coins of all
component metals; and gold in the form of ores, concen-
trates, waste, scrap, and refined bullion. Exports of silver in
these forms are included in the statistics, unless otherwise
noted. (Information on gold movements, previously shown
in Report FT 2402, appears in Report FT 990 effective
January 1975.)



Definition of Exports of Domestic
and Foreign Merchandise

Exports of domestic merchandise include commodities
which are grown, produced, or manufactured in the United
States, and commodities of foreign origin which have been
changed in the United States from the form in which they
were imported, or which have been enhanced in value by
further manufacture in the United States. Exports of for-
eign merchandise consist of commodities of foreign origin
which have entered the United States as imports and which,
at the time of exportation, are in substantially the same
condition as when imported.


Source of Export Information

The official U.S. export statistics are compiled by the
Bureau of the Census primarily from copies of Shipper's
Export Declarations which are required to be filed with
Customs officials, except for Department of Defense Mili-
tary Assistance Program Grant-Aid shipments which are
reported directly to the Bureau of the Census by the
Department of Defense and shipments by qualified ex-
porters who have been authorized to submit data in the
form of magnetic tape, punched cards, or monthly Shipper's
Summary Export Declarations directly[ to the Bureau of the
Census.
Export Valuation

F.a.s. Export Value.-The value reported in the export sta-
tistics generally is equivalent to a f.a.s. (free alongside ship)
value at the U.S. port of export, based on the transaction
price, including inland freight, insurance and other charges
incurred in placing the merchandise alongside the carrier at
the U.S. port of exportation.

Export Monthly Carryover

It is the objective of the compiling procedures to include
shipments, insofar as practicable, in the statistics for the
actual month of exportation. For purposes of the statistics,
the month of exportation is generally based on the date
when the shipment leaves the United States (For vessel or
air shipments it is the date when the carrier departs or is
cleared from the port of export.) However, as indicated
above for imports, because of processing problems (e.g., late
receipt of a document for an end-of-month shipment, re-
jection of a shipment by the computer because the data
fail to meet certain edit criteria established to protect the
accuracy of the statistics, etc.), there is an overall average
carryover of about 4 percent (in terms of value) of the
shipments from the actual month of exportation to a
subsequent month, usually the succeeding month. These
limitations should be borne in mind when making month-
to-month comparisons.
Cumulations of data over at least 4-month periods are
desirable to identify underlying trends. Month-to-month
changes in imports, exports, and similar series often reflect
primarily irregular movements, differences in monthly
carryover, etc.
Estimated Data for Export Shipments

The overall export and Schedule B section and division
totals include sample estimates for shipments valued
$251-$1.999 to Canada and for shipments valued
5251-$999 to countries other than Canada. Data for ship-
ments valued $250 and under to all countries are also esti-
mated, based on estabhshed percentages of individual
country totals, and included in the Schedule B Section 9
totals regardless of the commodity exported. It is estimated
that the unadjusted overall total is subject to a sampling
error of less than one-tenth of one percent, and the unad-
justed Schedule B section or division totals are subject to








sampling errors of about one percent. In addition, the
Schedule B Section 9 total is subject to possible error in the
estimated data for shipments valued $250 and under; and
the overall total, and the individual totals for sections other
than Section 9, to a more limited extent. Such $250 and
under shipments represent about 1 percent of the total
value of exports, and about 60 percent of the Schedule B
Section 9 total.

SOURCES OF ERROR IN THE STATISTICS

Monthly import and export figures are subject to the
possibility of errors which may arise from sources other
than samphng errors, discussed above. Among these are
errors in the reporting and/or processing of information as
to commodity classification, value and other statistical
factors, month of inclusion (see paragraphs on import and
export carryover, above), and the undercounting of exports
to Canada due to the non-receipt of Shipper's Export
Declarations. For 1974. the undercounting amounted to
about one and one-half billion dollars. In the case of im-
ports the information as to value and commodity classifica-
tion (as well as country of origin and net quantity) is
venfied by Customs officials on entries filed for transactions
valued over $250 which are ordinanly subject to examina-
tion for Customs appraisement purposes, thus considerably
reducing the possibility of error In addition, the procedures
used to compile both the import and export statistics
include clerical and computer processing checks designed to
protect the accuracy of the statistics to the fullest practi-
cable extent.


MERCHANDISE TRADE BALANCES


Two trade balances are presented in this report-
I) The balance between exports based on f a.s values
and imports based on f.a.s. values
2) The balance between exports based on f.a.s. values
and imports based on c.i.f. values with adjustments for im-
ports from affiliated sellers abroad to reflect arms-length
equivalent prices.
Both balances are useful for certain purposes. The first
balance corresponds to a measurement of the international
payments or credit flows resulting from merchandise trade
between the U.S. and foreign countries. The second balance
is based on concepts similar to those used by most foreign
countries, and therefore provides a reference for comparison
with the trade balances published by those countries.


REVISIONS TO THE STATISTICS

Revisions are carried into the statistics on a periodic
basis. Data for 1975 and 1976 appearing in the 1976
monthly issues of this report are presented as follows:

1976 Statistics

a. January through November 1976 issues: figures are as
originally issued, except as noted below.
b. December 1976 issue figures reflect revisions for
prior months of the year issued with December 1976
statistics or earlier, as noted below.

1975 Statistics

a. January through May 1976 issues: figures reflect re-
visions issued with December 1975 statistics or
earlier.
b. June through December 1976 issues: figures reflect
revisions to 1975 data issued with June 1976 statistics
or earlier.

In addition to the revisions which are made on a periodic
basis, instances may L -ur where a significant error in the
statistics for a month ot the current year is discovered after
the statistics for that month are compiled If the error is of
sufficient importance to require correction prior to the time
that the regular revisions are carried, the correction is made
and so noted in this report.


SOURCES OF FURTHER INFORMATION

Additional foreign trade statistics and information regard-
ing coverage, valuation, sampling, and qualifications which
should be considered by users of the statistics are contained
primarily in the following publications Report FT 990,
Highlights of U.S. Export and Import Trade: FT 135, U.S.
General Imports, Schedule A Commodity by Country; FT
410. U.S. Exports, Schedule B Commodity by Country; and
the Guide to Foreign Trade Statistics. Information regarding
additional sources of statistics, the methodology used in
seasonally adjusting the data, and other matters relating to
foreign trade statistics may be obtained from the Bureau of
the Census. Washington, D.C. 20233.






5
Table 1. U.S. Exports (fa.s. Value Basis). General Imports (fas. and c.i.f. Value Basis), and Merchandise Trade

Balance, Adjusted for Seasonal and Working-Day Variation, by Month: January 1975 to September 1976

(In millions of dollars. See Explanation of Statzatics for information on coverage, deiinltlons of export and import values and
trade balances, and sources of error In the dita. 411 data shoan for 1975 and 1976 reflect seasonal adjustment factors intro-
duced in January 1976)

F.a.s. Exports and f.a.s. Imports F.a.s. Exports and c.l.f. Imports
Period
Trade Trade
Exports' Imports e Exports' Imports
balance balance

1975

January-SeptLeber................. -9,351.5 .1,255.- 8.,096.1 9,3 1.5 '6,63 .8 .2,:13.'

January.......................... 9,373.9 9,632.5 25e.6 9,373.9 10,374.6 -1,000.9
February........................ B,;is.8 7,927.2 b2b.6 8,755.8 6,500.9 251.9
March............................... 8,681.1 7,466.5 .1,211.6 6,681.1 ,039.2 641.9
April............................ 8,648.6 7,959.1 669.5 6,648.6 8,547.1 e 101.5
May.............................. 8,221.5 7,263.3 958.2 6,221.5 7,813.8 407.7
June............................ .. 8,715.5 7,102.5 ,613.0 6,715.5 7,6-1.2 1 ,064.3

July........................... .. 8,871.0 7,631.6 ,1 039.1 6,671.0 8,412.6 458..
August.......................... 8,979.9 7,676.7 .1,103.2 8,979.9 8,478.2 501.?
September....................... 9,104.2 8,196.0 908H. 9.104.2 8,6?0.0 284.2
October........................... 9,225.7 8,i69.3 *1 .56.4 9,225.7 8,794.1 131.6
November......................... 9,408.9 8,201.3 i.;,07.6 9,406.9 8,827.5 581.4
December....................... 9,249.9 ,521.i5 726.4 9,249.9 9,161.4 88.5

19;6

January-September................. 85,128.8 d88540 6 -3,411.8 15,126.8 95,153.6 -10,025.0

January............... ......... 9.103.~ 9,1b6.0 2.6 9,103.- 9,8:9.7 "o.3
February................ ...... ... ,800.1 8,9*0.9 1.0.8 8,800.1 9.592.7 792.6
March............................ 8,955.6 9,606.5 650.9 8,955.6 10,300.6 -1,345.0
April............................ 9,393.6 9,595.7 202.1 9,393.6 10,301.5 907.9
May........................................ 9,578.0 9,182.4 395.6 9,57 .0 872.6- 294.6
June............................ 9,716.3 10,093.6 37.3 9,716.3 10,888.9 -1,172.6

July.................... ......... ..10,022.0 10,849.i 827.1 10,022.0 11,650.3 -1,628.3
August............................ 9.6 8.1. 10.445.8 757.7 9.688.1 11,219.2 -1.531.1
September ...................... .. 9.871.7 10.650.6 778.9 9,871.7 il,148.3 -1.576.6
October.........................
November........................
December.........................


'Represents exports of domestic
Grant-Aid shipments.


and foreign merchandise excluding Department of Defense Military Asstsanc Progrii










Table 2 U.S. Exports (I.a.s. Value Basis) of Merchandise Showing Department of Defense (DOD) Military Assistance
Program Grant-Aid Shipments, by Month: January 1975 to September 1976

tin millions of dollars. See Explanation of Statlstics for Information on coverage, defLnition of f.a.s. export value, and sourcesof error in
the data. Unadjusted totals represent sul of unrounded figures and hence may vary slightly from Su of rounded amounts)

Export excluding DOD Exports Including DOD Grant-Aid'
Grant-Aid DOD Grant-Aid


Period DoAeatic Domestic Domestic
and
and Domestic, and Domestic, Western Other
foreign, Total
easoniy foreign, unadjusted foreign, unadjusted Europe countries
adjusted1 unadjusted unadjusted


1975

January-December. ..... ........... I 10'.130.- 105.bl..0t 107,591.6 106.102 I 461.2 21.7 439.5

January Septcmber... .. .... 9,351.5 78,59*.3 77,.38.1 78.985.6 71,829.- 391.3 20.6 370.7

January.. .................... ....... 9,3'3.9 9,124.6 8.9.2. 7 9 203.- 9.021.5 78 8 5.2 73.7
February................. ........ 8.755 8 8.-99.3 8.368.1 d.5-5.0 8.'13.8 .5.' 3.3 2.4
March. ............................. 8,61.1 9,-08.6 9.265.6 9.-37.5 9.294.5 28.9 2 2 26 7
April .......... ........ ... ...... 8. ,8.6 9,01' 9 8.889.0 9.079.' 6.950.8 61.i 3.1 58.1
May..... .. ........................ 8,221.5 8,900.6 8.784.8 951. 8,835., it 0 2 2 48.8
June.... ............................. '15.5 6.o30. 8.-90.2 8,690.- 8,550.5 60.3 0.8 59.5

July.. .. .... .................... '8. 1.0 8, 113.7 8, 12... .2-3.1 8,Il .8 29. 1 0 28.6
August ........ ................... 8.99 9 8..-6.5 8.352.1 8.451n. 362.0 9.9 1.6 8.3
September................. ...... .... 9.iN .2 8.353.1 8.233.1 8.3 8.7 8,258. 7 25.6 0 2 .9
October. .. ..... ... .. 9. i2 9. '19.3 9.t,02 8 9.750.9 9,63-.*' 31.6 0.2 31.4
No etnber.. ............ .......... 9.-08.9 9.513.3 9.06.4 9.526.. 9.419.5 11.0 0.8 12.2
December........ .... .... .. 9,249.9 9,j03.5 9.19.t6 9,8.7 9.218 9 25.2 0 1 25.1

19.6

Janurar)-Septcmer.. .............. 8g5,12d8.6 4,3lA.2 83,137. 84,491.7 83,314.4 i7F.5 2.6 173.9

January .. .......... 9,10J.- 8. 'o0.2 8.658.5 8,'69.8 8.,b8. 9.6 0 5 9.2
February.. .. ..................... 8.800. 8.73'.6 8.629.1 ;.2.. 8,633.9 a 8 0.3 -.5
March. ...... .. .. ...... ........ 68.4".6 9.8- 2 9.85.'. 9.8-1 4 9,690.' 5.3 0.3 5.0
April....... .... ................. 9.39i.6 9.83j .2 9,0.. 9.8-3.6 9. 1..l1 9 4 0 2 9 2
Ma ..... ... .......... .. 9 7.5 .0o 9.977.- 9.65,..' 9.968.1 9.665 10 7 0.2 10.4
June.. ............. ..... ....... 9,71c.3 9,850.4 9,717.8 9,663.3 9,730 7 i3.0 0.4 12.6

July ....... .. ............... 10,022.0 9,324.& 9,191., 9,330.0 9,189.1 1.6 0.3 4.2
lug t. .. ... ..... .. .. .9,F8.1 .,828. 8 A.694.4 B.896.1 8.764 5 69.6 0 3 69.2
eptember. .... ........... ......... 9.8-1.7 9,159.n 9.008 9.206.7 9,038.0 19 7 ,iZ 49.6
October....................
Nhremrber .............. .........
December ... .... ................


'Adjilted for seasornal ana -orklng-day
pace.


sariatiorn using sea-oona aajuatient factors Introducea in Jar.ury 1976.


Lee footnote I on front


'Represent. r.ly export srlipments from inE united states and dinter- f roI IK)D Mll'.r) A.slwt.nce Program Crant-Ald shipment figures under
tnl: progr a-s iaiio-s: Isa Trrn ier nrt tne materlai procure outside the United States and tranferr Frrom DOD overseas stocks from export
ihtpmentl. Io Export Lalue of I.a. -hereba DOD lu.e, in mosIt intances, is i o.b point of orilin ici Data for shipments reported by
tne DOD lor gien month are Incluaae- in Buresau of tre Cenaus reports in the second month subsequent to the month reported by the DOD
'Annual total is not sno-n for seasonallv a-]juated d.ta. Lbradjusted &iat should be isea for annual totals.










Table 3. U.S. Imports of Merchandise, by Month: January 1975 to September 1976
(In milll ons of dollars. See Frplar at on of St&IsitIcs tor information on coverage, defiut lona of 1.s.o. and c...I. Import values, and sources
of error in the data. Unadjusted totals represent sum of unrourodea figures and hence may vary lightly rran sur of rounded aMounts)

U.S. imports or merchandise

F.o.-. blue C. .f. value
Peri Ceneral impt port sports General imporrt laports
Slor for
SeaonalIy ncor.dju.tea e.sup'or. Seas on.lly Undjus consumption,
adjusted' n ad ju.te adjusted unadjusiea


19'S

January-December....................... 96.11 .u 9 ,,;0-. 3 i l 1]3,389.1 102,95-.9

January-Septaeber................. .. 71,255.. -0,812.2 0 'o,63:.. '6,163.j 5,812.1

January................................ 9.63-.5 ',i 3. 9, 799 6 10, 3'* d 10.5b9.8 10,553.6
February ............................... '.92'.2 o '. B.500 9 '.688 2 655 *
March.................................... i.lo6.5 ; .. .J .9 8.0 9.2 '. '?.5 7.9-l.
April .................................. .',959.1 8. 190 : 8.1 3.0 8.5 I .'9 .6 8.'45 4
May.................................... '.263.3 '8. .., 1.1 '.81 .8 7.923. 7 8676.3
June................................... '.102.5 -.2 '.9 ,25.u '.651 2 7. 80 2 812.

July............................ ...... 7,831.6 '.423. '. 9:,.9 8.- 2 8.507. 8' a .9
Augual................................. .,8'6 7 '.516.3 ;.-2 5 8 9-?B.2 9.0 2 5 99b 2
Septeaiber .............................. 9 19% .0 s, i .' ) .6 5.820 0 8. 7' 3 8. '53.
October ................................ 8.,b9 3 8.510.8 ,. -.S B. '9-. I 9,161] 9. 185.s
November............................... 8 201. 3 '.908 .8-8 .. 682' 5 8.512 8.L 7 3
Decee.ber ............................... 8.,5 1. 8.88-.. 6.60t 9.lol 9.551.' 9.-'0.0

1976

January-September.......... ........... 11.540.6 08,13b.b 67,6 1. 95,153.8 94,723.0 94,205.8

January ............................... 19, '6.0 9.009 0 68. 5.9 9.3 9 9,699.9 9b3. 2.9
February ................................ 8.9 0. 6, i1 ] ", f 8 8 9. 92. 8. 70)..5 8. 5 -.8
arch.......... ....... ........ .. ...... 9.606.5 11. 99. i0,046. l,) 300.6 10 93n I 10. '79 3
April ....................... ............ 9.5 5. 9,95.' 9.6-- 6 3 0 1030 .5 0 22.9 i0.569.'
May......... ........... ........ 4, 18. .932.- 8,9-3 4,0:9. 1.67' 6 9 615 9 9 7'5...
June ................................... ..,U093.6 I0, i-8. i 10,i9 10,888.9 1 1,41i.6 11 ,2 3..

July....................... .. ........... 1,,8 9.1 10, 563.8 10,619.2 l,6 0.3 11,343.9 11,432.1
Aug st................................... 3 10.114 1 rJ 1 1 1u :316." 11.219 2 II 22".1 11.089.9
September .................... .. .... I 650.6 1C.At 4 B10 41 II 4 4.3 1.16 3. 11.196.2
October......................... .....
November ............................
Decomner ...............................

'Adjutea ior seasoroal and .-orklng-dda lar action using seasonal aojuost.-erit facror- InLrodjued in January 19'6.
'Annual total 1a not ;ho-n for easonally ajutied dala. uLnoaj..ud d data houlId o used for annual totals.










Table 4. U.S. Exports (fa.s. Value Basis) of Domestic Merchandise, Including Department of Defense (DOD) Military

Assistance Program Grant-Aid Shipments--Schedule B Sections and Selected Divisions. Seasonally Adjusted
and Unadjusted, by Month: January 1975 to September 1976

'in millions oi collars. Sec Explanation of Staliltics for information on coverage, definition of f.a.s. export value, and sources of error
in the data. LUndjultea totals represent sum cMf unrounded figures and hence may vary slightly Irao sum of rounded amounts

Schedule B secllone and selected dlvialsons


Pern r


197,

January-Sepre.T.her ...

Jan d. ry .................
February ...............
March...................
April I..................
May.................... .
June...................
July....................
Auust .................
September. ... ..........
October.................
hvembe r................
December................

19'6

Janiury-September...

January.................
Febru ry .. .............
arch. ..................
April ...................
ay. ... ...............
June ...... ... .......
July ..... .............
Au uI s ...... .........
Sep ei ner ..............
October.................
hoer,.ber. ........
Dec ,rrber...............




1975

January-Dec cerbr........

January-September.......

January.................
February ...............
March...................
April....... ...........
Mjy .....................
June...................
July...................
Aut u ... ..............
S.pl rber ..............
October .......... .....
November................
Decemb r ................

1976

January-September.......

January.................
February...............
March...................
'April...................
May......... ...........
June...................
July....................
August.................
September .............
October ...............
November..............
December..............


0 1 2 3 7 5 I 6 7' 71 12 73 8 9

Seasonally adjusted'




1137.2 977.2 7,389.2 3,388.3 174-0.. 6,471.5 8,132.9 33,654.0 15,3]9.9 5,601.2 12,626.. 6,196.0 '2,264.9

1,5 .i.3 139. 1.014.8 -21.4. '1.40.9 863.1 931 0 3..87.2 1.655.1 608.6 1.216 8 468.? '238.6
I.-i8.9 111.5 805.9 399.8 '10..5 699.9 892.9 3.630.0 1.622 611. 3 1. 376,.1 456 6 '226.6
1.25'0.3 1?5 I "87.6 ..1.4 I20.8 757 2 907.9 3..31.8 1,620.3 59b.6 1.218.4 .L5. 0 237.0
1.250.6 113.o 731.9 d381. 8 2'3.. 01.? 898.* 3,668.0 1. 743.9 632.8 1.302.1 458.9 '27..9
1.0-2.8 102.5 '01 2 -2".' '88.1 66'.9 882.0 35; .9 1,702 ? 622.2 .333.1 457.9 "285.0
1.040.3 91.3 '00 5 388.- "i 9 7'12. 88 9 3,9o5. 1.809 621 I 1 *69.4 4 3.0 '241.4
1.210 3 8'. u B '.l 32-.t6 "b 3 6'9 0 913.5 4,001. 7 .762.5 631 0 16.10.7 480.5 '217.9
I.,t8.t 110.' 932.3 3]6.2 "..3.9 68.'.. 660.9 3 9b3.3 1.2-9.1 652.1 1.51... ..09.3 '277 8
1.2 9 I 99.0 8-1.4 30' 5 "'3.5 703.5 939.". 3.92' B I.7'5 0 625 5 1,.02 w ..78 6 '245 7
1.l.i2.h 107.. 852 9 .88.3 '356.9 .'5. 2 92ri..I ..l3 1.807 2 662 I d58 2 .96.6 *'78.2
1.381.0 110 8 80I1. '-50.1 7 25. 96'.- .00'.8 .189.0 659 1.539.0 489... a353.3
i.292 116.1 7 a 3 36- 'd8 8 '66.1 923.0 ,.103 B I,8t3 i 65..3 1.525 98 *265 5




11,316.7 1,166.9 7.822.e 3,105.1 '721.1 7,316.2 9.376.b 36,187.i0 16,3?4.5 ,6,85B.7 13,424.1 4,618.3 '2,078.5

I,298.2 211.0 622.' 321.0 '28 9 '" ,. 930 3 3 '20.3 1.732.8 655.31 .3668. -93.? 'i54.0
1. 15 .8 1'6. '-3.5 320.4 *'3.9 '"0.8 i15. 2 3,852.- 1.'o8.6 '36. l 1.425 520.2 '201.6
1,182.8 122.5 7'I..- 31 7 '77 9 810.3 952. 3,162.7 1.801 .2 3 3 1,210.6 562.8 '216 5
1.38-. 133.9 '92.1 ,09.- '?;.3 8!-.3 923 8 3,9- 1 1. '9 0 779 5 1,.06.2 509 0 '258.3
1,33j.5 96.8 930.5 i30.3 "96.. 88t,.6 918.8 -..012.3 1,867.b 735 1 I518.2 565.b '248.5
1,336.1 103.3 r83.4 3713 2 .3 61.1I 926.4 -,80.I ,862.1 7CE.E 1,670.2 539.2 '344.4
..-09.o 92.9 910.9 3'6.9 'o6.- 820. 931.1 4,361.7 1,896.0 861.6 1,628.9 355.8 '248.2
1.,06.B 106 3 311 271.6 '60 3 621.9 93E.8 I ?71.4 1,746 J 78-.4 I 728 2 532.0 *191.3
1.113." 122.9 I 04 I 360.1 '91I.' 26. 5 1 92 I 4.172.0 1 *70.9 b60 .2 i.168.2 564.5 '215.7




lnadjusted


15.-84. 1

11,099.9

1,i67.1
338.,"
,2'c-.b
1.21..3
L,026.
I.059 8
1.11.








1,182.3 3
1.'5-.-

1.526.
I.i8B.0







1. 159.8
1. --.3

1. ;51.-
i .261. 3
i,2s"l. .
1 .3 7.3
1 -E7 0
I 7?1. .


'Schedule B section and aelecten


I, 3j0 .4

890.3

122.9
do 3
I '0.1
10i .
98,.0


I i'

116.6
I50.2
139. 3







l..
1 .9


1 7 .4

Iri 5
118 I



13l 1


9, 78.ba

',226.5

1 .0 6.0
838 4
o59. i
8il.0




693.6
8"5.9
689..
819.8




.6'6.9

B35.8
q.. I
90. 5
8d8.0

;75 1
80'. 1

'.3 4,


,.-Q9.5

3,.-2.2

35'..-
33'.-
399.6
391 .h
-3, 5
-06.2
310.3
3'9.8
323. 5
318.5

35i0 9




1 1). 9


3.'0 '3
2n6
JU3 9
.115. I

103 e
347.5

30.7 I


9i.i.2 1',919 2

6,,2n.1 8,129.0


45,o6' 6

33,,22..

3.312.8
3.539 8
-.022.1
3.910. 1
3,993 0
3.937 9
3,56,9.5

3 58b. '
S.2b0. 3
3.9-6h.
4.038. 2


7.401.1 8.398.3 ~ 6.4il.


69-.0
90.5
1.019.0
9'5.5
959.2
959.8
897.6
a9? a
9!0 0


3.589.3
3.8'9.3
..330 9
-, .35.1
-.,.38 B
4.393.
3.977.9

3 Al4.6


20 89:.1 ,82 0


15s.21.-

1.612
1 5-5 9
1.803 w
I B53.8
i.829.9
1.98.8
1,692 0'

1.60- 6
1.883.1

1,6..0.9




6. a?'in

I, 712.03
1 13.
1,997.5
i.908.9
1,951..'
1. 899.3
1,663.8
1.610 I
I 775 0


5,578.0

611, 5
52t 0

.)o 1
h'.a I
o52.'
.2- 2
596.9
62 1
599.:
"OD..
6-. 2
633.3




6,816.3

t, 5 I
688. 5
92.2
'95. I
?'0.0
769.4
814.2
755 3
766.6


1 190 5

12,*23.0

1,084..

I 5* 1.
1.*10.2
I 410 4
1.51-.9
1.280.5
I. 246 I
I 382.2
I,670.8
1.532 9
1.5,3.9




13.213.1

I.?212 .'
I. *'?.0
.5.20 1
1. j2O 1
I.'1I .1
k,;727.U
1,299.9
1.363.6
1.35 I


5.h'2?

-,191.6

45'..6
426 4
-86 0
482.3
-83.5
-81.0

'00.
.o0 -
530 9
-' .8
..'8.5




4.862.1

47'.9
500.-
611.8
5-5.7
518 0
558.0
537.5
508.0
544.8


3. 162.0

2,264.9

238.6
226 6
237 0
274 9
285.0
241.4
237.9
277.6
2.-. 7
78. 2
353 3
265.5
285 5




2,078.5
254 0
201.6
216.5
258 3
248 5
244.4
248.2
191.3
215.7


divisiior aerrzption- are as follow.


0. Food and live anL.mal '. Machinery ana transport equipment
1. Beverages and tobacco 71. Machinery, other than electric
2. Crude materials inediale, except iu.ei -2. Electrical machinery, apparatus, and appliances
3, U neral fuels. lubricant', ana related .aterlals 73. Transport equipment
4. Animal and Svce.tabl oil. and ia 8. Miscellaneous manufacturer articles, n.e.c.
5. Chemicals 9. Comnrodities and transactions not classified arcoraing to kind
6. Manufacturer ooa0ls cl3-ifed chieily Dy .at.Ieri.
'Seasonally adjusted figure& (or section 7 may aiiter slightly Irom the sum of divisions 71, 12. and 73 since each Is Independently ad-
justed.
'Adjusted for seasonal and -orkLne-day variation using seasonal adjustment fartora Introduced In January 1976. See footnote I on front
page. Annual tot.lI are rnt shotn Ior iea.-onall adjusted data. ined)usted data should be useo for annual totaLa. The adjusted section
totals In this table anra imnilar overall monthly totals in tables 1. 2. and 3 here sdjutled independently.
4In the absence of demonstrable ieasonel patterns for thib section, no seasonal adjustment factors have been applied to the data.










Table 5. U.S. General Imports (f.a.s. Value Basis) of Merchandise, Schedule A Sections, Seasonally Adjusted and
Unadjusted, by Month: January 1975 to September 1976
(In millions of dollars. See Explanation of Statistics for information on coverage, definition of i.s.a. import value, and sources of error
in tne cata. Unadjusted totals represent sum of unrounoed figures and neuce may vary slightly from sum of rounded amounts)

Schedule A sections'
Period
0 I i | 2 3 5 6 7 8 9

SaEsonally adjusted'

1975

January-September.... 6,320.8 1,080.8 .,l 8.9 19,289.3 '3)3.0 2,753.8 11,342.9 17,171.0 6,625.9 '1,858.2

January. ............ 672.8 111.6 085.9 3,090.3 68.5 ...5 1,669.9 1,876 0 772.6 21-.5
February... ......... 668.9 126.0 466.6 1,983.6 '.7 32-.7 1,-65.1 1,637.7 723 9 189.0
March......... .. 675.1 150 9 .66.7 1,36-.. 45 I 329.9 ,35o.l 1,966.2 122.- 185..
April ............... 66-.1 120.5 -.2.0 2.-38.9 1.0.7 31-. 1,305.8 1,81-.0 726.53 232.3
May .... ........... 625.3 114.3 -2 5 1.99-.9 1.9 261.3 1101.8 1.835 675.6 '196.5
June.................. 736.2 119.3 462.6 1,462.0 33.2 2.5 1175.6 1,852.3 '16.2 219.7
July.................. 709.9 109.- -73.3 2,187 6 .8 264.2 1.115.- 1,918.2 771.- 222.8
Augu t .............. 66-..- 112.7 439.5 .2 3.- 32.7 2 2.7 1,05 .1 2,101.5 7.0.6 1188.6
September ... ....... 90 .1 116.1 -59 8 2,503.7 1.6 266.3 1,099.5 1,889.7 776.9 '216.5
October.............. 7.3.5 111.3 .-0.1 .,-23.0 '- .6. 297 1,111.7 2.06-.3 815.l 217.4
November............... 762 10-.2 ..2.3 ',367.9 'bb.2 310 2 1,126 9 2,053.6 871.5 211.9
December............. 696.6 12 9 509.1 2,297. 1 '-6.0 32- 116- 5 2,21-.I 876.7 '230.3

1976

January-September.... 49..9 1,231.3 5,134.6 24, 5.J '333.i 3,3'9.1 1:.915 e 1,94 .3 9,119.6 'ki,61.8

Jrsuary ..... 7 3.9 1-..- 526 9 ,66860 37.6 353 2 1,166.0 2,293.9 900.9 '166.6
rebruary.. ... ...... 701.0 187.6 512.2 3.9. 3 51. 330.1 1 ,75.' 2,156.1 919.9 169.7
March ................ 8 .1 i'6.5 1b1 I.1 2.3-?.9 3, 36 2 -.23. 2, i0.f 9r..3 '215 0
April ................ '66.5 129 I i'6.9 2,8'.9 '3'.8 3' .9 .-63 6 2.- 98' 0 169.9
May.................. 26.. 105.b 5 .5 N2.OI.0 .- J3 .3 .3't t, 2...2-.5 1.02-.8 ': 1.2
June.... .. .. 9.6.2 125.3 64.2 ,6 4.4 '0.1 394.' 1,642.4 ,361.5 1.034.6 'ias.4
July................. 938.0 130.0 83;.0 3,21n 2 '34.2 426.9 1.j66.2 2.602 4 1,122.9 226.5
August.. .......... 860.0 12?.4 620.2 3.10?.6 '35.6 371 6 521.3 2,51P.8 1. 100.6b '18.9
September............ .. 9 k 134 0 60.8 30,'0. '13 ? 39. 1,602.9 90 i 1.062'.l '233.5
October..............
Novembe r... .........
December............

Unr.uajjred


19-5

January-Decemoer ..... 8,503.3 1..19 5 I,566.2 ..-;5 55.9 ,69.9 I 1 02.5 23,-57.2 9,224.-* ,517.6

January-SepteF.ber.... 6,306.2 1,033.9 .,168.6 19.-93.2 393.0 2,76'.1 11,176.1 17,00.5 6,565.1 1.658.2

January ... 13 8 11 3 -66.0 3.-21 0 -6.5 -37.2 1,750.0 1,89-.i 755.6 211..
rebruary............. 6.6.6 106 39.;7 1,9-0.1 -.7 06. 1 ,2o0 .0 1.686 8 621 9 |I".0
March ... ..... .. o05 .5 1-3 7 -60 c 1,-. 0 i l 3-0.B 1.313.3 2,079.5 667.8 185..
Aprll................ 68-.0 119.1 3 ,-. -09.' 1,2.3.2 1,899.2 '03.6 232.3
May. .... .... 606.*. 11o.9 -.53.o 1,9-j 0 51.9 265.3 1,1-.8 1,93..5 626 3 196 5
June.......... ...... 776.' ?9 r. 31-.. 1, 36. 3b i 3.; :.6 1,230.6 1,961 6 722.7 219.7
Juky................. 706.. 103.. 50o.- .13'.3 -..6 2-7.3 1,136.6 1.96- a50.9 222.8
,ugust. .. 633.6 95.8 .21.0 2.2-5 r. 3.' 270.6 1,005.7 1,822 0 600.6 168.6
September ........... 696.9 106 9 i.6.- .',-.i -1.6 :75.1 1,091 8 1,785.8 B6li. 216.5
October ...... .... 759.9 126.0 -5: 7 2.3-3.5 aB 302.- 1,19- 0 2,136 6 918.7 217..
Novemoer....... ...... ....1 120.. -li.3 2,069.- 06.2 298.5 1,121.; 2.018.6 8.1.9 11.9
December. .......... :12.1 137.2 5... 2.5-7 5 -6.0 3'.9 1,211.1 2,269.- 876.7 230.3

1976

January-September.... 7,53.2 1,191.2 5,14:.:' 2.76v.7 "33.1 3,572.7 12,1'6.3 21,950.4 1 9,1S.l 1.847.8

January............... 759.7 1-1.5 .63. I ,i90.' 37.8 i35 0 1.190.5 2-,29.7 638.7 186.6
February ............. 69 5 156.3 -39.5 2,302.3 Il.' 316.6 1,106.6 2,10. 9 790 2 169 7
March................ 890. 1 i6'. 539 t. 2.'-~ .2 3 .- -10.1 i. 2 '2-.0 399 2 215.0
April l. ....... ...... 81. 8.' 172'. 503.0 2.'9'.3 j o. -1-.3 1.409 o ,6,36. 93i 189.9
May.................. .. 1.6 108.. I 39 I 2, 13-.'v 29.. 37i 0 1.383 a ,-59.1 q25.- 211.2
June.................. 380.2 136.2 652.3 2,835.1 30.1 368 0 1E,49.6 2,612. 1 ..7 i9E.4
July.................. 903.3 123.0 649.8 3,0i6.8 3-.2 395.9 Ii,47.6 2,461. 1,194.? 226.5
August............... 680.7 104 9 619.5 3,tE4.6 3'5 358.3 1, 38. 0 2 307.2 1,2l. .3 718.9
September............ 851.2 123.5 679.6 ? 959.6 43 2 36A.' 1 5'6. 2,445.0 1.12 .1 233.5
October .............
November r............
December ............




'Scnedule A setLonr deaLrlp[orinl are as iollos:
0. Pood and live anisalE 5 Cnemicals
I. Beverages and toba.cc 6 Manufactured gooin classified cbrhely by material
2. Crune materials, Inedlole, except fuels Machinery and transport equipment
3. Mineral fuels, lubricants, and related materials 6. Miscellaneous manufacturea articles, r.e.s.
4. Ansi.al and vegetable oils and fats 9. Commodities and trananctions not clas3silea accoralng to kina
'Adjusted for seasonall and orklng-day variation using seasonal adjustment actors Intronuced in January 1976. See footnote I on tront
page. Annual totals are alt Ehoan lor seasonally adjusted nata. UnanJucted data should be used for annual totals. Tne adjusted section
totals in this table and similar overall monthly total In tables I ana aere adjusted lanependently.
In the absence of demonstrable seasonal pa'terna for tris section, no seasonal anjustment factors have been applied to tr.e oat.










Table 6. U.S. General Imports (c.i.f. Value Basis) of Merchandise. Schedule A Sections. Seasonally Adiusted and
Unadiusted, by Month: January 1975 to September 1976

(In millions of dollars. See Explanation of Statistics for Informatlan on coverage, definition of c.l.f. Import value, and eourcesoferrorln
the data. Unadjusted totals represent sum of unrounded fLgures and hence my vary allghtly from sum of rounded amounts)

Schedule A sections'
Period
0 I 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Seasonally adjusted'


1975

January-September..

January..............
February.............
March.... .. .......
April................
May......... ........
June ................
July.................
August........ ......
September ...........
October ............
November ............
December..............

1976

January-September....

January..............
February.............
March. ...............
April ................
May..................
June ................
July.......... ......
August ...............
September...........
October..............
November ............
December. ............




1975

January-December.....

January- Sept ember....

January..............
February ............
March................
April .. .............
May..................
June ...... .... .....
July ................
August ............. .
September............
October ............
November ............
December ............

1976

January-September....

January ..............
February..............
March ...............
April. ..... ... ......
May .................
June.................
July...............
August ..............
September ...........
October..............
November ..........
Dece ber ............


6,85..4

732.9
726.2
732.6
720.3
678.0
793.5
770.9
725.6
974.4
80.. 3
830.3
755.7



8,116.0

798.4
758.6
951.9
829.4
898.4
1,010.7
1,008.8
927.1
932.7


9,222.4

6,838.4

772.6
680.4
113.5
7.2.0
6E9.7
837.1
767.0
69.. -
966.6
822.0
789.6
772.3



8.158.3

828.8
724.5
96'. I
885.8
849.9
1,056.2
971.4
949.3
923.4


1,176.6

122.1
135.8
162.5
131.3
124.0
129.5
120.2
123.6
127.6
122.0
114.5
139. 1



1,359.9

152.0
200.5
190.6
140.5
11-.8
137.3
141.3
136.5
147.1


122.8
11..6
154.7
129.7
126.8
140.6
113.6
105.0
117.6
140.3
132.'
1-9.1



1,294.7

153 2
169.0
181.2
138.9
117.d
146.9
13J.7
116.2
135.9


4,605.8

549.6
512.9
507.9
520 8
485.8
i12.9
525.9
.8'.3
505.7
485.2
'86.0
561 2



5.592.0

580.2
55-.2
550.1
623.9
57-.5
611.9
700.0
675.8
-21.4


6,1--.8

.,605.7

527.0
'33.7
501.3
52..5
.97.9
570.8
562.7
-63.9
521.9
50-.6
.56.4
578.0



5,624.7

532.6
-7i,5
58..2
o08.9
586.0
707.1
714.0
67).1
740.9


20,601.2

3,306.3
2,108 1
1,456.8
2,594.3
2,131.1
1,585.6
2,329. 3
2,399.6
2,690.1
2,597.0
2,5.9.8
2,452.3



26,313.9

2,853.0
2,507.0
2.505.9
3,07n.3
2.353 2-
3,009.8
3,443.7
3.326.4
3,238.6


28,28 .1I

20,814.5

1,660.0
2,061.7
1,580.6
2,596.9
2,017.8
1,536..
2,275.1
2,402.0
2,628 2
2,513.9
2,231.0
2,719.6



26.408.8

2,986.2
2,56.9
2,939.4
2,990 2
2,282.b
3,030.9
3,257.7
3.393.9
3.173.8


'6414.0

'50.5
'46.8
'57.6
'.2.5
'54.6
'35.1
'.7.7
'34.9

'51.9
'11.2
'.9.6



'359.6

'40.7
'55.-
137.1.
'39.9
'31.8
'32.3
'37.1
'38.4
'46.4


Unadjusted


2,932.1

454.0
346.6
349.5
333.9
297.1
262.9
282.1
301.3
304.1
313. 1
328.9
3 4.0


12,235.3

1,811.1
1,582.0
1,461.5
1,.07.2
1, 61 .9
1.268.1
1,200.5
1,137..
1.179.6
1,198.9
1,218..
1,261.5


3.526.9 13.970.5

372.6 1,264.0
347.2 1,316..
403.5 1,528.0
390.. 1,570.6
384.; I.48'.2
393.2 1,672.9
453.4 1,697.2
391.3 1.644 2
390.6 1.730.0


15,86'.7

12,055.8

1.898.1
1,360.5
1,41-.7
1,339.6
1,23..3
1,327.7
1,223.3
1,086.2
1,171.3
1,287.6
1,212.3
1,312.0


3,926.7

2,9.6.1

.67.0
326.8
361.0
373.7
301.8
270.5
26. L
288. 3
292.2
318.7
316.4
347.5


3,S53.2 I 13.71..4

369 2 1,290.5
333.0 1,196 1
432.9 1,58.4
434.9 1.512 4
388.5 1,.9.'
409.5 1,783.4
108.0 1,675.1
367.8 1,662.3
389.1 1,681.5


18,515.1

2,018.0
1,971.4
2,151.7
1.962.0
L,966..
2,001.8
2,123.5
2,259.3
2,035.6
2,226.9
2,213.5
2,377 7



23.677.

2,473. I
2,431.4
2.586 5
?,68- 6
2.621 0
1,609.3
2,785.4
2,702.3
2.784.0


25,287.9

18,367.9

2,038.2
1,811.7
2,259. 1
2,054.2
2,093.6
2,119.9
2,108.7.
1,958.8
1,923.;
2.307.0
2,175.9
2,.37.2



23,667.1

2,403.9
2,268.5
2.922. ?
2,816.2
2,655.0
2,862.4
2,635.0
2.175.3
7.628.1


7,128.8
825.3
776.3
776.3
777.6
728.0
770.8
831.7
801.0
841.8
881.6
943.2
951.3



9,797.6

972.8
989.5
1.037. 2
1.061.5
1,101.3
1,106.8
1,203.7
1,182.9
1.139.4


9,9.2.2

7,086.2

807.1
666.9
739.0
753.5
674.8
771.1
917.3
865.9
883.9
993.6
911.1
951.3



9,794.8

905.1
850.0
1,012.9
1.002.0
994.4
1,177.6
1,280.7
1.305.9
1.205.5


'1,904.1
'220.8
'185.1
'190.9
'239.3
'201.9
'224.3
'227.5
'192.9
'221.4
'222.1
5216.1
'235.0




'1,887.5

'191.1
'173.6
'219.9
'193. 7
'215.1
'201.0
'231.1
'223.8
'238.2


2,477.4

1,904.1

220.8
185.1
190.9
239.3
201.9
224.3
227.5
192.9
221.4
222.1
216.1
235.0




1,887.5
191.1
173.6
219.9
193.7
215.1
201.0
231.1
223.8
238.2


'Schedue A section descriptions are as Iollows:
0. Food and live animals 5 ChemJcals
1. Beverages and tobacco 6. Manufactured goods classified chiefly by wmterlel
2. Crude materials, Inedible, except fuels 7. Machinery and transport equipment
3. MIneral fuels, lubricants, and related materials 8. Miscellaneous manufactured articles, ..e.s.
.. Animal and vegetable oils and fats 9. Commodltles and transactions not classified according to kind
'Adjusted for seasonal and orklng-day variation using seasonal adjustment factors Introduced in January 1976. See footnote 1 on frc.t
page. Annual totals are not shown for seasonally adjusted data. Unadjusted data should be used for annual totals. The adjusted section
totals In this table ana similar overall monthly totals In tables 2 aa 4 were adjusted independently.
"In the absence of demonstrable seasonal patterns for this section, no seasonal adjustment factors have been applied to the data.









U.S. GENERAL IMPORTS OF PETROLEUM AND SELECTED PETROLEUM

PRODUCTS, UNADJUSTED

Tables 1-A. 1-B, 2-A and 2-B which follow, contain monthly and cumulative-to-date data on U.S. general imports
of petroleum and petroleum products into the U.S. Customs area and into the Virgin Islands for the period January
1975 through current month. Prior to January 1976, these data were presented separately in a Supplement to Report
FT 900. (It should be noted that imports into the Virgin Islands are excluded from the official U.S. import totals
presented in the preceding tables of this report.) The data in these tables are not adjusted for seasonal and working-
day variation.
Beginning with the issue for January 1976, the value figures presented in this report are in thousands of dollars
and the quantity figures in thousands of barrels.


Schedule A and TSUSA Commodity Numbers Used in Compiling the Petroleum
Information Presented in This Report


Energy products


Schedule A. No.


Nonenergy products


TSUSA No.


Schedule A. No.


Crude and partly refined
petroleum
331.0120
331.0140
331.0210
331.0220
331.0230
331.0240

Crude petroleum
331.0120
331.0140

Gasoline
332.1000

Jet fuel
332.2020

Kerosene
332.2040

Distillate fuel oil
332.3020
332.3040

Residual fuel oil
332.4020
332.4040

Propane and butane gas
341.0020

Liquid derivatives of
petroleum, n.e.s.
332.9940 pt.


475.0510
475.1010
475.0520, 475.0540
475.1020, 475.1040
475.3520
475.6520


475.0510
475.1010


475.2520, 475.2560


475.2540


475.3000


475.0530
475.1030


475.0550
475.1050


475.1510, 475.1530


Lubricating oils
332.5000 pt.

Lubricating greases
332.5000 pt.

Paraffin and other mineral
waxes
332.6220 pt.
332.6240


Asphalt
332.9800


Naphthas not for further
refinement
332.9920

All other petroleum products
(pitch of tar coke, non-
liquid hydrocarbon mix-
tures, and calcined petro-
leum and coal coke not for
fuel)
332.9700 pt.
332.9940 pt.
599.8040 pt.


475.4500


475.5500, 475.6000



494.2200
494.2400


521.1100



475.3540







401.6200
475.7000
517.5100


475.6540


TSUSA No.































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