Summary of U.S. export and import merchandise trade

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Title:
Summary of U.S. export and import merchandise trade
Series Title:
FT-900
Physical Description:
v. : ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of the Census
United States -- Bureau of the Census
Publisher:
Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, Foreign Trade Division for sale by the Subscriber Services Section (Publications), Bureau of the Census
Place of Publication:
Washington
Creation Date:
August 1976
Frequency:
monthly
regular

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Subjects / Keywords:
Commerce -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Citation/Reference:
American statistics index
Dates or Sequential Designation:
1974-1976.
General Note:
At head of title: 1977- United States foreign trade.
General Note:
Formerly classed C 56. 210:900 - during the time the Bureau of the Census was subordinate to Social and Economic Statistics Administration.
General Note:
Issues prior to Oct. 1977 were sent to depositories as Item 144.
General Note:
Unnumbered supplements accompany some issues.

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University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001209840
oclc - 02245761
notis - AFW0105
lccn - 76640395
issn - 0361-0047
sobekcm - AA00005271_00051
Classification:
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ddc - 382/.0973
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Related Items

Preceded by:
United States foreign trade; export and import merchandise trade
Succeeded by:
United States foreign trade. FT900, Summary of U.S. export and import merchandise trade

Full Text
. ., f ~-T,


SUMMARY OF U.S. EXPORT AND

IMPORT MERCHAN P&IEF1 J DE



-AUGUST 1976 -a '

A" S DQ L OCT ,^

9 -76-8 0 .' For Release
i ember 27, 1976

11-'1 10:00 A.M.

h-5ally Adjusted and Unadi1r ,; t ata

(Including Unadjusted Data on Imports of Petroleum and
Petroleum Products)


F.A.S. EXPORTS AND F.A.S. IMPORTS

Seaonally Adjusted

The Bureau stated that during August 1976, exports on a
f.R.B. (iree alongside ship) U.S. port of exportation
value basis, excluding Department of Defense IDOD) Mili-
tary Assistance Program Grant-Aid shipments, amounted to
$9,688.1 million and that general imports on a f.a.s.
foreign port of exportation value basis, amounted to
$10,445.8 million.' a a

Based on the above export and import figures. the
August merchandise trade balance was in deficit by
$757.7 million, as compared to a deficit of $827.1
million in July.

During the first S months of 1976 (January-AuguEt),
exports were at an annual rate of $112,886 million, a
level about 5 percent higher than the calendar year
1975 total of $107,130 million. Imports for the
January-August 1976 period were at an annual rate of
$116,835 million, representing an increase of about 22
percent over the calendar year 1975 total of $96,116
million.

Por the 4-month period, May-August 1976. exports aver-
aged $9,751.1 million per month, a level about 8 percent
above the $9,063.2 million average reported for the pre-
ceding 4-month period, January-April 1976. Imports on a
f.a.s. value basis, averaged $10,142.7 million per month
for the same 4-month period, about 9 percent higher than
the $9,329.8 million average reported for the preceding
4-month period.
Unadjused

Exports excluding Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid
shipments decreased from $9,325.5 million in July to
$8,828.8 million in August. With Military Assistance Pro-
gram Grant-Aid shipments included, exports decreased from
$9,330.0 million in July to $8,898.4 million in August.
General imports decreased from $10,563.8 million in July
to $10,453.1 million in August.
Note: Footnotes 1, 2, and 3 are shown at the bottom of page 4.


F.A S. EXPORTS AND C.I.F. IMPORTS

Seasonally Adjuitad
The Bureau stated that during August 1976. exports on a
f.3.s. free alongside snip) U.S. port of exportation
value basis, excluding Department of Defense IDODI Mili-
tary Assistance Program Grant-Aid shipments, amounted to
$9,688.1 million and that general imports on a c.i.f.
(cost, insurance, and freight) U.S. port of entry value
basis, amounted to $11.219.2 million.' 2

Ba3eo on the above f.3.a. export and c.l.i. import
figures, the Augu-r merchandise trade balance was in
deficit by 31,531.1 million, as compared to the deficit
in July of t1.628.3 million.

During the first 8 months or 1976 (January-August),
exports were at an annual rate of $112,886 million, a
level about 5 percent nigher than the calendar year 1975
total of $107,130 million. Imports for the January-
August 1976 period were at an annual rate ot $125,558
million, a level about 21 percent higner than the cal-
enaar year 1975 total of $103,389 million.

For the 4-month period, May-August 1976, exports
averaged $9.751.1 million per month, a level about 8
percent above the $9,063.2 million average reported for
the preceding 4-month period. January-April 1976.
Imports on a c.i.f. value basis averaged 310.907.8
million per month for the same 4-month period, about 9
percent higher than the $10,018.6 million average
reported for ihe preceding 4-month period.

Unadjusted

Exports excluding Military Assistance Program-Grant-Aid
shipments decreased from $9,325.5 million in July to
$8,828.8 million in August. With Military Assistance Pro-
gram Grant-Aid shipments included, exports decreased from
$9,330.0 million in July to $8,898.4 million in August.
General imports decreased from $11,343.9 million in July
to $11,227.1 million in August.


Inquiries concerning these figures should be addressed to the Chief, Foreign Trade Division, Bureau of the
Census. Washington, D.C. 20233. Tel: Area Code 301. 763-5140.


W"k U.S. Department of Commerce, BUREAU OF THE CENSUS

j For sale by the Subscriber Services Section (Publications), Bureau of the Census, Washington, D.C. 20233, oi
U.S. Department of Commerce District office. Postage stamps not acceptable; currency submitted at sender's


r any
risk.


Remittances from foreign countries must be by international money order ro by a draft on a U.S. bank.
cents per copy. Annual subscription (FT 900, 975, 985, and 986 combined) $14.90.


Iv- I C








EXPLANATION OF STATISTICS


Import Valuation


Coverage

The U.S. import statistics reflect both government and
nongovemment imports of merchandise from foreign coun-
tnes into the U.S. Customs territory, which includes the 50
States, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico The U.S
import statistics exclude imports into the Virgin Islands.
Guam, American Samoa, and other U.S possessions, and
shipments between the United States and Puerto Rico.
between the United States and U.S. possessions, and
between any of these outlying areas (Data on U.S trade
with Puerto Rico and with U.S. possessions are published
separately in Report FT 800. Additional data on such trade
and on imports into the Virgin Islands from foreign coun-
Ines are presented in reference tabulations I Data on
imports of petroleum and selected petroleum products,
including shipments into the Virgin Islands from foreign
counties. previouslyy shown in Report FT 900-Supple-
ment) are included in this report effective with the January
1976 statistics.
The U.S. import statistics also exclude American goods
returned to the United States by its Armed Forces. intransit
shipments through the United States. temporary shipments.
transactions not considered to be of statistical significance.
such as shipments of personal and household effects: low-
valued nonduliable imports by mail, issued monetar, coins
of all component metals, and gold in the form of ores.
concentrates, waste, scrap, and refined bullion Imports of
silver in these forms are included in the statistics. unless
otherwise noted (Information on gold movements. pre-
viously shown in Report FT 2402. appears in Report FT
990 effective January 1975 )

General Imports1 Impurts For Consumption

The statistics on U.S. imports are presented in terms of
both "General Imports" and "Imports for Consumption."
General imports are a combination of entries for immediate
consumption and entries into Customs bonded warehouses,
and thus generally reflect total arrivals of merchandise
Imports for consumption are a combination of entries for
immediate consumption and withdrawals from warehouses
for consumption, and thus generally reflect the total of the
commodities entered into U S. consumption channels.

Source Of Import Information

The official U S. import stijistics are compiled by the
Bureau of the Census from copiess of the import entry and
warehouse withdrawal forms which importers are required
by law to file with Customs officials The information as to
country o ogin, net quantity, value, and commodity
classification is verified by Customs officials on entries filed
for transactions valued over $250. which are ordinarily sub-
ject to examination for Customs appraisement purposes
The statistical copy of the entry is corrected if it does not
accuralel' reflect the information called for by the statis-
tical requirements


F.a.s. Import Value.-The f.a.s. (free alongside ship) value
represents the transaction value of imports at the foreign
port of exportation. It is based on the purchase price, i.e..
the actual transaction value and generally includes all
charges incurred in placing the merchandise alongside the
carrier at the port of exportation in the country of exporta-
tion.

C.i.f. Import Value.-The c.i.f (cost, insurance, and freight)
value represents the value of imports at the first port of
entry in the United States It is based on the purchase price
and includes all freight, insurance, and other charges
(excluding U.S. import duties) incurred in banging the
merchandise from the country of exportation and generally
placing it alongside the carrier at the first port of entry in
the United States. If the merchandise was acquired in a
transaction between related parties. the purchase price used
in deriving the c.i.f value is based on an arm's-length equiv-
alent transaction price, i.e a price which would exist
between unrelated buyers and sellers

Import Mniilhly Carryover

It is the objective of the compiling procedures to include
shipments, insofar as practicable. in the statistics for the
actual month of importation. However, for purposes of the
statistics the month of importation is based on the date of
official acceptance by Customs of the import entry or ware-
house withdrawal document This ma, not in all cases corre-
spond to the actual month of importation. (For example,
under the Customs "immediate-delivery" procedures,
importers may file the import entry up to 10 workdays
after the actual date of importation.) Also, because of
processing problems (e.g late receipt of a document for an
end-of-month shipment, rejection of a shipment by the
computer because the data fail to meet certain edit criteria
established to protect the accuracy of the statistics, etc.),
there is an overall average carryover of about 7 percent (in
terms of value) of the shipments from the reported month
of importation (based on the date of the import entry or
warehouse withdrawal document to a subsequent month,
usually the succeeding month In addition, as a result of the
aforementioned Customs "immediate-delivery" procedures,
there is a further carryover of presently unknown magni-
tude from the actual month of importation to a subsequent
month These limitations should be borne in mind when
making month-to-month comparisons.
Cumulations of data over at least 4-month periods are
desirable to identify underlying trends Month-ro-month
changes in imports, exports, and similar senes often reflect
primarly irregular movements, differences in monthly
carryover, etc

Estimated Data for Imports Valued Under $251

The overall import and Schedule A Section 9 totals
include sample estimates for shipments valued under $251.
Therefore, the) are subject to sampling error, estimated at


IMPORT STATISTICS







less than one-tenth of one percent for the unadjusted overall
total and about one percent for the unadjusted Schedule .
Section 9 total. This means that we can have about 67
percent confidence that the published unadjusted overall
totals and the unadjusted Schedule A Section 9 totals differ
by less than one-tenth of a percent and one percent, respec-
tively, from the totals that would have resulted from a com-
plete tabulation. The statistics on imports of petroleum and
petroleum products included in this report reflect fully
compiled data and. therefore, are not subject to sampling
error.


EXPORT STATISTICS


Coverage

The export statistics reflect, in general, both government
and nongovernment exports of domestic and foreign mer-
chandise from the U.S. Customs terntor, (includes the 50
States, the Distnct of Columbia, and Puerto Rico) to for-
eign countries, whether the exportation inmolhes a com-
mercial transaction or not. The statistics, therefore, include
Department of Defense Mihtar- Assistance Program Grant-
Aid shipments, shipments for economic assistance under the
Foreign Assistance Act and shipments of agricultural com-
modities under P. L. 480 (The Agricultural Trade Develop-
ment and Assistance Act of 1954, as amended) and related
laws. The following are excluded from the statistics Ship-
ments to U.S. Armed Forces and diplomatic missions
abroad for their own use, shipments between the United
States and Puerto Rico. between the United States and its
possessions (including the Virgin Islands), and between
these outl mng areas, exports from U S possessions. transit
shipments through the United States, transactions not con-
sidered to be of statistical importance. such as personal and
household effects, temporary exports: low-valued or non-
commerical exports by mail: issued monetary coins of all
component metals, and gold in the form of ores. concen-
trates, waste, scrap, and refined bullion. Exports of silver in
these forms are included in the statistics, unless otherwise
noted. (Information on gold movements previously shown
in Report FT 2402, appears in Report FT 990 effective
January 1975 '



Definition of Exports of Domestic
and Foreign Merchandise

Exports of domestic merchandise include commodities
which are grown, produced. or manufactured in the United
States, and commodities of foreign ongin which have been
changed in the United States from the form in which they
were imported, or which have been enhanced in value by
further manufacture in the United States Exports of for-
eign merchandise consist of commodities of foreign ongin
which have entered the United States as imports and which.
at the time of exportation, are in substantially. the same
condition as when imported


Source of Export Information

The official U.S export saustlics are compiled b, the
Bureau ot the Census primarily from copies of Shipper's
Export Declarations which are required to be filed with
Customs officials. except for Department of Defense Mili-
tary Assistance Program Grant-Aid shipments which are
reported directly to the Bureau of the Census by the
Department of Defense and shipments b) qualified ex-
porters who have been authorized to submit data in the
form of magnetic tape, punched cards, or monthly Shipper's
Summary Export Declarations directly to the Bureau of the
Census.
Export Valuation

F.a.s Export Value.-The value reported in the export sia-
Instes generally is equivalent to a a s i free alongside ship
value at the U.S port of export. based on the transaction
pnie. including inland freight, insurance and other charges
incurred in placing the merchandise alongside the carrier at
the U.S port of exportation.

Export Monthly Carryover

II is the objective of the compiling procedures to include
shipments, insofar as practicable. in the statistics for the
actual month of exportation For purposes of the statistics.
the month of exportation is generally based on the date
when the shipment leases the United States. iFor vessel or
air shipments it is the date when the carter departs or is
cleared from the port of export.) However, as indicated
aboie for imports, because of processing problems (e g.. late
receipt of a document for an end-of-month shipment, re-
lection of a shipment b\ the computer because the data
fail to meet certain edit criteria established to protect the
accuracy. of the statistics. etc I, there is an overall average
carryover of about 4 percent Iin terms of \alue) of the
shipments from the actual month of exportation to a
subsequent month. usually the succeeding month. These
limitations should be borne in mind when making month-
to-month comparisons
Cumulations of data over at least 4-monih penods are
desirable to idenufi underling trends Month-to-month
changes in imports, exports, and similar series often reflect
pnmanl irregular movements, differences in monthly
carryoter. etc
Estimated Data for Export Shipments

The overall export and Schedule B section and division
totals include sample estimates for shipments valued
$251 -S1.990 to Canada and for shipments valued
$251-$I99 to counties other than Canada. Data for ship-
ments valued $250 and under to all countries are also esti-
mated, based on established percentages of individual
country totals, and included in the Schedule B Section 9
totals regardless of the commodity exported. It is estimated
that the unadjusted overall total is subject to a sampling
error of less than one-tenth of one percent and the unad-
justed Schedule B section or division totals are subject to








sampling errors of about one percent. In addition, the
Schedule B Section 9 total is subject to possible error in the
estimated data for shipments valued $250 and under, and
the overall total, and the individual totals for sections other
than Section 9. to a more limited extent. Such $250 and
under shipments represent about I percent of the total
value of exports, and about 60 percent of the Schedule B
Section 9 total.

SOURCES OF ERROR IN THE STATISTICS

Monthly import and export figures are subject to the
possibility of errors which may arise from sources other
than samplng errors, discussed above. Among these are
errors in the reporting and/or processing of information as
to commodity classification, value and other statistical
factors, month of inclusion (see paragraphs on import and
export carryover, above), and the undercounting of exports
to Canada due to the non-receipt of Shipper's Export
Declarations. For 1974, the undercounting amounted to
about one and one-half billion dollars. In the case of im-
ports the information as to value and commodity classifica-
tion las weU as country of origin and net quantity) is
venfied by Customs officials on entries filed for transactions
valued over $250 wuhch are ordinanly subject to examina-
tion for Customs appraisement purposes, thus considerably
reducing the possibility of error In addition. the procedures
used to compile both the import and export statistics
include clerical and computer processing checks designed to
protect the accuracy of the statistics to the fullest practi-
cable extent.


MERCHANDISE TRADE BALANCES


Two trade balances are presented in this report
I) The balance between exports based on f a s values
and imports based on I a.s. values.
2) The balance between exports based on fa s. valuess
and imports based on c i f values with adjustments for im-
ports from affilated sellers abroad to reflect arms-length
equivalent prices
Both balances are useful for certain purposes The first
balance corresponds to a measurement of the international
payments or credit flows resulting from merchandise trade
between the U.S. and foreign countries. The second balance
is based on concepts similar to those used by most foreign
counties, and therefore provides a reference for comparison
with the trade balances published by those countries.


REVISIONS TO THE STATISTICS

Revisions are cared into the statistics on a periodic
hasis. Data for 1975 and 1976 appearing in the 1976
monthly issues of this report are presented as follows:

1976 Statistics

a. January through November 1976 issues: figures are as
originally issued, except as noted below.
b. December 1976 issue. figures reflect revisions for
prior months of the year issued with December 1976
statistics or earlier, as noted below.

1975 Statistics

a. January through Ma, 1976 issues- figures reflect re-
visions issued with December 1975 statistics or
earlier
b. June through December 1976 issues. figures reflect
revisions to 1975 data issued with June 1976 statistics
or earlier

In addition to the revisions which are made on a periodic
basis, instances may au 'ur where a significant error in the
statistics for a month oi the current year is discovered after
the statistics for that month are compiled. If the error is of
sufficient importance to require correction prior to the time
that the regular revisions are carried, the correction is made
and so noted in this report



SOURCES OF FURTHER INFORMATION

Additional foreign trade statistics and information regard-
ing coverage, valuation, sampling, and qualifications which
should be considered by users of the statistics are contained
primarily in the following publications Report FT 990.
Highlghts of U.S. Export and Import Trade, FT 135, U.S.
General Imports. Schedule A Commodity by Country; FT
410, U.S Exports. Schedule B Commodity by Country, and
the Guide to Foreign Trade Statistics. Information regarding
additional sources of statistics, the methodology used in
seasonally adjusting the data, and other matters relating to
foreign trade statistics may be obtained from the Bureau of
the Census, Washington. D.C. 20233.


Adjusted lor easonal and woarinigdad iar.al.on. but nol fio changes in price level Factrsn ue.n I ad dus 1975 and 1976 dat shown in this rgpon represent leaonal adjustment factors dmnvd from
monlhiV data Inrough 1975 and inuodulEd in Ja.Iuar, 1916 combined Vlnh the appropriate working-dav adlusmenl factors.
Cumulations at data over leant 4-rronnt penaod are desirable to identfr ur.deriving trends. Monlth-lo.onrth changes in exports. import. and similar sees oftn reflect pnmirily irregular monw
mants, difference in mor.thil carryou r etc Recent month ro.month percenI changes en the overall seasonally adjusted report and import series ar presented in the following table wih average percent
manrh-.oa.mant. roe and derl.ne sea longer pernioa shown lor companion The average r.se and average decline figures elrlude percentage changes lot I)I to period Julv-Decemrbe 1911 becaueol
abnormal.l.es -n e data dau to flecs ol dock strikes and 12) penods when negligible changes Irel perrel) .n the level of epportsrilpoartn cured Percentage changes [Il fas. impOn volue are nlo
av..iable for per.oid mir it Janu.rv 1914
Month-to-month Aterage monthly rates of change

Sere uly-Aug. June-Juiv May-June Apr.-May Average Average 4 months 12 months
1976 5976 1976 1976 rise decline Apr.-Aug. Aug. 1975-
19;0-1975 1970-1975 1976 Aug. 1976
IPerr:cr, i iPercenrt IPercent) Percent I fPercent) iPercent) (Percent) (Percent)

F .'. export valu .. -3 3 .1.4 .0 3.2 -2.8 +0.8 +0.7
F.3.s. Import value.. -3.7 7?.5 +9.9 -u.3 (NA) (NA) +2.4 +2.5
C.i.I. import vslue.. -3.7 .7.0 *10.J -.2 INA) (NA) n2.4 +2.5

'See Ih i "Eplanrialon ol Stal.tics lf delndions oa the export and .moor values and trade balances










Table 1. US. Exports (fas. Value Basis), General Imports (fa.s. and c.if. Value Basis), and Merchandise Trade

Balance, Adjusted for Seasonal and Working-Day Variation, by Month: January 1975 to August 1976

(In millions of dollars. See Explanation of Statistics for information on coverage, definitions of export and import values and
trade balances, and sources of error in the data. All data shown for 1975 and 1976 reflect seasonal adjustment factors intro-
duced in January 1976)

F.a.s. Exports and f.a.s. Imports F.a.s. Fxports and c.i.f. Imports
Period
Exports' Imports rrade Exports' Imports Trde
balance I balance


1975

January-August........ ........

January .........................
February.........................
March....... ....................
April ............................
May...............................
June .............................

July .............................
August............................
September.......................
October .........................
November.........................
December.........................

1976

January-August..................

January..........................
February. .................. .....
March............................
April............................
May..............................
June.............................

July.............................
August............................
September........................
October.................... ......
November.........................
December.........................


70,2 7. 3

9,373.9
8,755.8
8,681.1
8,648.6
8,221.5
8,715.5

8,871.0
8,979.9
9,104.2
9,225.7
9,408.9
9,249.9




75,257.1

9,103.
8,800.1
8,955.6
9,393.6
9.57;.0
9.716.3

10,022.0
9.688.1


63,059.4

9,632.5
7,927.2
7,466.5
7,959.1
7,263.3
7,102.5

7,831.6
7,876.7
8,196.0
8,169.3
8,201.3
8,521.5




77,890.0

9,176.0
8,9.0.9
9,606.5
9,595.7
9,182.4
10,093.6

10,849.1
10,445.8


*7,187.9

- 258.6
+ 828.6
+1,214.6
* 689.5
+ 958.2
-1,613.0

-1,039.4
+1,103.2
S908.2
.1,056.4
*i.207.6
+ 728.4




-2,632.9

:2.Bo
- 1-0.8
- 650.9
- ?02.1
* 393.6
- 377 3

- 827.1
- 757.7


70,24:.3

9,373.9
8,755.
8,681.1
8,648.6
8,221.5
8,715.5

8,671.0
8.979.9
9,104.2
9,225.7
9,408.9
9,249.9




75,257.1

9,103..
a,800. I
6.955.6
9,393.6
9.578.0
9,716.3

10.022.0
9,688.1


6 ,817.8

10,374.8
8,500.9
8,039.2
8,547.1
7,813.8
7,651.2

8,41?.6
8,478.2
8,820.0
8,794.1
8,827.5
9,161.4




83,705.5

9,879.2
9,592. 7
10.300.6
10,301.5
9,872.6
10,888 9

11,650.3
11,219.2


*2,-29.5

-1,000.9
- 254.9
* 641.9
* 101.5
* 407.7
+1,064.3

* 458.4
* 501.7
* 284.2
* 431.6
* 581.4
* 88.5




-8,448.4

- 776.3
92.B
-1,341.0
907.9
294.6
-1,172.6

-1,628.3
-1.531.1


'Represents exports oi domestic and
Grant-Aid shipments.


foreiEn rmrcnandias excluding Department of Defense Military Assistance Program









Table 2 U.S. Exports (f.a.s. Value Basis) ol Merchandise Showing Department of Defense (DOD) Military Assistance
Program Grant-Aid Shipments, by Month: January 1975 to August 1976

(it. ralllnns of dollars. See Explanation of Statistics for Inrormation on coverage, definition of f.a.s. export value, and sourceaotferor in
the data. Unadjusted totals represent sum of unrounded figures and hence may vary lightly frol um of rounded amountaj

Exports excluding DOD Exports including DO Grat-A
Grant-Aid DOD Grant-Aid

Period etic Domestic Domestic
and
Sand Domestic, and Domestic. Western Other
foreign, Total
seasonal foreign, unadjusted foreign, unadjusted ourope countriea

adjusted' l dnsdjusted unadjusted

1915

January-December............... .. 97 1071.0.. 1010. 5.641 0 107,591.6 106,102.1 461.2 21.7 439.5

January-August ............... ...... 70,247.3 70,2.1.2 69,205.0 70,606.9 69,570.7 365.7 19.9 345.9

January..... .............. ......... 9.333.9 4,124.6 8,9.2 7 9.203.4 9,021.5 18.8 5.2 13.1
February ........ .... ....... .. ... B. 8.725.8 S.-99. 8B,368.1 8,5.5.0 8. .8 45.7 3.3 42.4
March................................. 8.681.1 9,408.6 9.265.6 9,437.5 9.294.5 28 9 2.2 26.7
April............. ........ .......... 8.b48.b 9,017.9 8,889.0 9.079.7 8,950.8 61.7 3.6 58.1
Ma5 ... ............................... 8.221.5 8,900.6 8. 84 8 8,951.5 8,835. 51.0 2.2 48.8
June................... .. ,715.5 8,630.1 8.490.2 8,690.4 8,550 5 60 3 0.8 59.5

July.......... ....................... .. 8.6 1.0 8.213. 8,112.4 8,243.1 8.141.8 29.4 1.0 28.4
Auvust .. ........................... 8.979 9 8,46.5 8,352 1 6,456.4 8,36f .0 9.9 1.6 8.3
September........ ... .. .......... 9. 104.2 8.353.1 8.233.1 8,378.7 8,258. 25.6 0.7 24.9
October. .... ....................... 9.225.7 9.719.3 9.602.8 9, 50.9 9,b3..- 31.6 0.2 31.4
Nov.eber.. ...... ................... 9... 08.9 9,521.3 9,406.4 9,526.4 9.419.5 13.0 0.8 12.2
December.. ... ............. .9.2-9.9 9,303.5 9.193.6 9,328.7 9,218.9 25.2 0.1 25.1

1976

January-August .. ..................... 75.257.1 75,156 2 74,129 6 75.283.0 74,256.5 126.9 2.5 124.3

January.............................. 9,103.- 8. i0 2 8.058 5 8,769.8 8,668.1 9.6 0.5 9.2
February.. ... ...... ... .... 8.800.1 B. 73 .o ,6b29.1 8, 742.. 8,633.9 4.8 0.3 4.5
March. .............................. 6,9)i.6 96, '? 9,685.- 9,847.. 9,690 5.3 0.3 5.0
April.......... .. ......... .... 9. 93.6 9.83. 2 9.704.7 9,843.6 9,714.1 9.4 0.2 9.2
Mae .................. .............. ..78.0 9,9". 9,85..7 9 988.1 9,865 10.7 0 2 10.4
Jure ..... .. .. 9,716.3 9,.;0.4 9,7i7.B 9,863.3 9,730 7 13.0 0.4 12.6

Jul .. ..... .. ... .. 10,022.1 9,325.5 9,184.5 9,330.0 9,189.1 4.6 0.3 4.2
4ugu.t .......... .... .... 9,his. 1 8.2B .6 6,694. 6,898.4 8,761 5 69.6 0.3 69.2
September ........................
I be r er. ..................
Decemlnerr. ....................

'Anjuttea for wea-nil ana -orking-daV Varlatior, u inr .easonal adjustment factor Introduced in January 1976. See footnote 1 on front
page.
'Repr.-ent; ories export shli.penT rrmn tnre ir.ierJ intte .r. lfier.r from DOD Military As.staance Progran Grant-Aid shipment figure under
this prouran as follo. 431 l7ranrf=r of the material procured out-'de the United States naf transfers frolp DOD overseas stocks from export
:riprr.ents tbl Eport value of i a. -rereas DO .alue. in most instances, IE f D b point of origin. (1c Data for shipments reported by
nc- DOD for a given month are inclua.n in Bureau oi Ire Cen:-u reports in the second month subsequent to the month reported by the DOD.
'Arrnual total I; nrl at.5.n for Eeaonrail ..njuatta ata. Unedjuted data should be used for annual totals










Table 3. U.S. Imports of Merchandise, by Month: January 1975 to August 1976
(In millions of dollars. See FEplanation of Statistlca for informatlIn on coverage, definitions of I.a.s. andc. .i. Import value=, and sources
of error In the data. Unadjusted totals represent sun of unroundea figures and hence may vary eillghtly iron aum. of rounded amounts)

U.S. Import ol merchandise

F.sB.. value C.I.i. value
P.r-d General imports Inports General imnort Imports
for for
-easonally consumption. Fsa.-onallry Un tp consumpt on,
aCjustedi Unadjusted U-d j-e. 'ee
najusedunanju"ted adjusted' unaojusted

1975

Janusry-December........................ 1 9 ] I6 0 95,0. 3 : ) 103,38'. l 102,95..9

January-August............. .. .. hi3,0:9.- 62,659.6 62, "6.9 6;,81'.8 6.,390.i] t,,058.B

January.................... ............ 9,b. 2.3 9.68 .6 '99 A I0. '- 8 10. 569. 10,553.6
February........................... ...... 7.169.. ". dI 8. 00 9 7,.66 .2 ".b5.-
March................................... .. 5 .-0 -.5 '. 3 9 8,039 2 972.5 .9- t
April................................... '.959.1 8,190.' 8.1-3.0 8.5s'.1 0 '9 .u b.'.5 .
May..................................... .,263.3 i. b .. O .321.1 .' 13.i 923.2 .I 7' 3
June ................. .................. i0 .5 -, '.9 ', 5..., '.6i1 2 -0.2'.Bl .

July................................... 7,831., '.9`0.1 ',890. .412.6 50-'. 8 9
August ................................. '.6', .. 7 .26 15 d.-'8 8.092.5 7 9t 9
September............................... 86.196.0 8.152.6 d.i i.n 6. 1.' 0 9 "' b,7i0 .2
October............................... 8 ,169 3. 10.8 8.5J .d 8. -9-.1 9.161 ; 9.185 6
November............................... 8. 201.3 .908. 3 .0 -. 8, B. .5 ,51 .-"
December ............................... .. ,51.5 8.664.5 8.dt 5 9.Lcl .I- .5i 9 1.*0.0

197b

January-Augu.t .................. ...... 7.7.89,.0 77?.;*3.2 77,'116.8 63.705.5 83,4.9.9 83, 09.6

January................................ 9. 11D.0 9.009 0 6.945.9 9,6'9.' 9,699.9 9.632.Q
February.............................. 8.9-0.9 I8.1.2 .96t.8 0. 52. ? 8. '02.5 .5:.8
March ........................ .... .... Q .606.5 I) 119 .2 10,06f..7 10. 300 n 10.9356 I l. "9.
April .................................. 9.595 9 j9j. 9.d.. c 10 30i.5 10.'2.9 10 j36.'
May................. ................. 9.182 9.J. ,t)29 9, 'j2 n 9.t i 9 9..05.-
June ................................... 10,093.6 i0 478 1 10.397. 10,8r1 .e il .4ii.6 11,22,.6

July................................... l0,849. i 10. 63.8 10,64w. 2 11,6 O0.3 11 ,343 i ,11,32. 1
August.................. .............. O.415 8 l0 435 I 10.,e.7 11.219 2 sl 227.1 11.089 9
September..............................
October...............................
November............. ..... ..... ..... ..
December..................... ...... .. ..

1Adjustea for seasonal ana working-day rarlation using i3sonal adjuarment factor. irtroaiceoa in lanuary 19ib.
'Annusl total is not shown for seisonall adju.tea aata. UInaju.-red data snouln no uD o for annual totals.







8

Table 4. U.S. Exports (La.s. Value Basis) of Domestic Merchandise, Including Department of Defense (DOD) Military

Assistance Program Grant-Aid Shipments--Schedule B Sections and Selected Divisions, Seasonally Adjusted
and Unadjusted, by Month: January 1975 to August 1976

tin millions of dollars. See Frplanatlon of Stastistcs for Informalloon n coverage, definition of f.a.e. export value, mad sources of error
in the aats. tlnadjusted totals represent sum of unrounded figures and hence may vay slightly frona su of rounded amounts)

Schedule B sections and selected dlritlonte


Period


1915

Jar. u ryp-August....... ..

J nuary .................
February ...............
March...................
4pr I ...................
May.....................
June ...................
July....................
Au ust .............. .....
Septemb r... ...........
October.................
Nouemner ................
December.................

1976

Ja-r, ary-Augus t..........

January .................
February................
March ..................
April. ..................
Ma ....................
June... .......... ......
July ....................
AI -u st ..................
September. ..............
October.................
Nlo e be r ...............





1973






Januiary..........
D e mberu r ................
J r h. ........ ........
Ja;,udirV Augu m L. .



Spruv ..................
FenruirV ................
March ...................

Aprl ....................
May ....................

.liptri .. ............
lc e r... ........ ......
ANoC be. ................
-pteTmbEr ...... .......
October. ................
November ................
eCr Tb r...............

1976

J .n .ary-AuFalt .........

.l6ri-ary ....... .... ....
Feor ut ry ............. ...
March ...................
April ...................
May. ....... ...........
Jun .............
July. ...................
July t ..................
Eept ember ..............
Oc tober... .............
Noveber ..... ....
DL c.mbe r...............


0 I 2 I I 5 6 1 7' 1 72 73 9

Seasonally adjusted3




10,115.1 878.2 6,5-1.3 3,060.8 'a 96.9 5,768.0 7,193.5 29,;26.2 13,66..9 -,975.7 11,124.0 3,717.4 A 2,019.3

I,583.3 139.2 1,01-.8 421.'. '11-0.9 863.1 931.0 3.487.2 1,655.1 608.6 1,216.6 468.2 '238.6
,-18.9 111.5 805.9 399.8 I10 ..5 699.9 892.9 3,630.6 1,622.1 611.3 1,376.1 456.6 '226.6
1,2I 0.3 125.1 7f6 .6 .15.9 '120.8 '57.2 907.9 3.-31.8 1,620.3 596.6 1.238.4 45-.0 '237.0
1,250.6 113.6 '31.- 1 381.8 '73.: '01.2 898.4 3.668.0 1.743.9 632.8 1,302.1 458.9 '274.9
1,0-2.8 102.5 101.2 402.7 *88.9 66'.9 662.0 3,577.9 1,102.2 622.2 1.333 i 457.9 *285.0
1.090.3 91.3 .00.5 3688.- '5 .9 712.3 886 9 3.9.5.7 L 809 621.1 1.469.4 73].0 '241.4
1.210 3 84.6 861.1 324.6 '66.3 679 0 913.5 4.001.7 1.762.5 631 0 .61, 0.7 .80.5 '237.9
1,266.6 110 932 3 346.2 '43.9 687.- 880.9 3,963.3 1.749 I 652.1 1.577 -68.3 '277.8
1,259.1 99.0 -7i.q 307 5 *.3.5 '03.5 939.4 3.927 8 1,7'5 0 625.5 1.502 428 6 '245.7
1,-02.6 107.1 852.9 2868.3 "56.9 745., 926.1 4,136 2 1.807.2 662.7 1 588.2 '.96.6 '278.2
1,381.8 110.8 801.1 ,50.7 *?1.7 725.5 967.. 4,006.8 1,789.0 659.6 1.539 0 -89., '353.3
1.292.8 116.1 '88 3 36- 4 "68 8 766.1 923.0 4,103.8 1,863.3 65*.3 1.525 7 -98 4 '265.5




LO.,6;3. 1,044,.0 E,773.1 2,"-1.7 '629.5 6,487.7 7,433.7 32,315.0 |4,453.6 6,058.5 11,956 2 4,283.8 1,862.6

1,298.2 211.6h 62 32!.0 "8.9 ?7?.. 930 3 3.770.3 1.712 8 655.3 1.368.2 *93.2 254.0
1.159.8 216.7; '1).5 j0.- *13.9 7.0 915.2 3,852.4 1,768.6 736.4 1.425 7 526.2 '201 6
1,182.6 122.5 :.- 312. "'7.9 810.3 952.3 3,762.' 1,801.2 736.3 1.210.6 562.8 '216 5
Ii38 .2 133.9 797.1 -O,9. *'7.3 81-.3 923.b 3.944.1 1. '9.0 7.9.5 1.06.2 509.0 '258.3
1,330 5 96 3 9'0 5 3.0.3 '96.- 686.to 918.8 4.072. I,81 b'.6 735 1,518.2 565.6 '248.5
1.336.1 103.5 863.4 37 2 '76.3 811.1 926.4 -,280.1 1,8e2.1 7.8.6 1,670.2 539.2 '244.4
1,469.6 92.9 910.9 376.9 .86.1 820.3 931.1 4,361.7 1.896.0 661.6 1,626.9 555.8 '248.2
1.50. 106.3 911 0 2786 8 60.3 82E.9 936.8 4 371.4 1,746.3 768.1 1.726 2 532 0 '191.3






Unadjusted


15.8-.

9,655.9



I.2 t .6
1.219. 3


L. 1 "
I .
1,12.

5''.5
S.57:6.
I,386.0



133. 1.2 2


I 3j 3


I.1 55.J

.2 !.J
1,5.67. ,
I 367 .


1.308 -

'9'. ?



120.1
101.m
96.0
*


I 1-. )
128.1

5 1.


9. 2 3.t,

6, 3i-. 9

S1,02,6.0
8311
S92 3
811.'




693 D
S-. 9
859.-





i.603 3


'9- I
90u.
885.0
4: t
617. 4
tO7.1
Ho' .9


-..69 5

3.016. :





391 .


310.3
_.4. 8



35u.9




2.C94 2

.)6 -

.03.9
.15.
3'3 '5

347.
I "4. _


9-3.8

61J.9

1-0.9
10-. 5
120.8
:3. 3
89.9
5" 9
9, 31
-3.9
-J.4
56 9

"8.6




6296.5

'8.9
3.9
'2.0

rc.-
78.3
cC.-l
60 3


8.691 210.919 2 45,667.o 20,895. 1


5,8-- .0

6 ).8
t66 5
788.
73 7.
'u2.0
S16
69h.
'tI'.
6'1..
'26.8
661.6
','




6.615.7

'-98.
71-.9
863.8
854.2
845. 1
844.4
850.,
n41 .0


:,2-6.6

910.5
8-' -
949 6
9-8 1

691). 3
95-. 3

5o3.3
do]. 3
6'5.6
860. 2
960
91'..2
695 3


29,836b.

3,312.6


3,910.1
3.993 0
3.93'.9
3,569.5
3. 51. 1
3.580.1
4.,2bO 3
3,9-b. '
-.038.2




12.564.6

3,589.3
3.879.3
-.330 9
-, 24. 1
-.-38 8
4,395.7
3.977.1J
35.74.q


]13,B16.B

1.612 I
1.545 9
i.803
1.853 8
1,8:9.9
I. 98.8
1,092.0
I. )80 9
1,60..c
1.68).1
I 7.9..
1.8-0.




4.657.0

1. 12.0
.'I13. 7
1.997.,
I 908 9
1.95t.
1,619.3
1,963.8
1 .I l0. 1


3. 582.0

**,97a. 1

616 5
571.0
64" 1
0.6 I
652
b2-.2
596.9
62- I1
599.2.
;06 *
no0 2
:33 3




6.049.B

665. 1
688.5
792.2
795. 1
710.0
769.4
814.2
7S: 3


li 190 5

11,0-0.8

1.08-. 2
1-22.9
1.571.5
1.'10 2
1.510 .
1.514.9
1,2i0. 5
1.246 I
1.382.2
I 670 8
1.512.9
1. 61.9




11,856 O

1,12.2
1 -'' .0
1.541.1
1.520 I
. 71'.1
S,727.0
1,299.9
1.363.6


5,672. '

3,731.3

45;.6
.26 4
.88.0
482.3
483.5
-ml6 0
454.b
460.8
.bO.-
530 9
471.6
"'d.4




4,317.3
.7'.9
500..
til.8
545. 7
578.0

537.5
508.0


3.162.0

2,019.3

238 6
226.6
237 0
274 9
285.0
241..
237.9
277.8
245 7
278.2
353.3
265.5




1,662.8
254.0
201 6
216.5
256.3
2-8.5
244.4
248.2
191.3


'Schedule B sEcton nrd 'eleric,. divAoon descriptions are as follows
i0. Frca a~. Ilve ant.als 7. Machinery 0na transport equipment
1. Beverages and tobacco L7. Maclinery. other than electric
2. Crude materials, inedible, except iuelor 2. Electrical machiery., apprsatus, and appliances
3. Mineral fuels, lubricants, and relaiea nmaerlal= 73. Transport equipment
A. Animal and ie.;etaoni oils and it.l 8. Miscellan eous manufacturea articles, n.e.c.
C. Chenmcaii 9. C.om'nodlties and transactions not classified according to kind
6. Manufactured goode clssiiitea chtiily ty Material
'Seasonally ojuted f iguresr for section, may atiler slightly from the sum of division 71. 72, and 73 since each Is Independently ad-
j.stea.
'Aajueted for seasonal ana .-rking-day variation uEnlg seaaonal adjustment factors Introduced In January 1976. See footnote 1 on front
page. Annual totals are not .rr,o.n for sea-opelly -adjusted data. linadjusoea data should be useo for annual totals. The adjusted section
totals in this table and similar overall Monthly totals in tables 1, 2, and 3 were adjusted Independently.
lIn tne aesence of demonstrable -easonal patterns for this section, no seasonal adjustment factors have been applied to the dasa.






9

Table 5. U.S. General Imports (f.a.s. Value Basis) of Merchandise, Schedule A Sections. Seasonally Adjusted and
Unadjusted, by Month: January 1975 to August 1976
(In millions or dollars. See Explanation of Statistics for information an coverage, definition of f.s.s. Import value, and sources of error
in the data. Unadjusteo totals represent sum of unrounded figures and hence may vary slightly from um of rounded amounts)

Schedule A sections
Period
0 1 2 3 1. 5 6 7 8 9

Seasonally adjusted'

1975'

January-Auguest....... 5,422.0 964. 7 3,707.1 16,785.6 '351.- 2,.67.9 10,241.2 15,281.3 5,8*9.0 '1,6.7.3

January.............. 672.8 111.6 485.9 3,090.3 '"8.5 '24.5 2.669.3 1,876.0 772.6 '218.0
Pebruary.............. 668.9 126.0 466.7 1.983 B '4..7 32..7 1,.63.9 1,837.7 723.9 '181.0
March................ 675.1 150.9 '66.7 1,36b 7 '55.1 329.9 1,356.7 1,986.2 722.' '185.1
April................ 666.6 120.5 472.0 2.438.9 '-0.7 31-.5 1,305.8 1,811.0 726.3 '231.2
May...... ... .... ... 627.9 11&.3 442.5 1,994.9 "51.9 281. 1,101.8 1.835.4 675.6 '196.5
June................. 719.0 119.3 460.9 1.-82.0 '33.2 245.7 1,175.6 1,852.3 716.2 '219.7
July ............... 709 3 109.. 173.3 2,187.6 '4.8 264.3 1.115.- 1,976.2 771. '1223.8
August............... 66 ..- 112.7 -39.3 2,2 )3 '12.7 282.7 1,052.7 2.101.5 ?-0.6 '189.7
September........... 90-.I 116.1 '59.8 2,503.7 '41.6 286 3 1,099.5 1,897.6 776.9 '217.9
OcTober.............. 741.5 111.3 c,0.1 ',-23 0 '.8.8 297.0 1.111.7 2.06..3 816.1 '217.*
November... ......... 162.. 104.2 &.2.3 2,387 9 66.2 310 2 1,126.9 2,053.6 873.8 '211.9
December ............ 696.8 127.9 509.1 2,297 1 -6.) 324..7 1.16-.5 2.211.1 878.7 '23..6

1976

January-Augus I....... 6,636.1 1,117.3 4,474.0 21.566.3 '249.n 2,979.6 11,342.7 19,375.2 8,057.2 *1,614.2

January.............. 731.9 1-0.- 526.9 2,668 0 '17.6 315 .2 1,166.0 2,293.9 900.9 '166.6
February.. .......... 701.0 17.8 51 2 2.349.J '51.5 330.1 1,275.7 2,256.1 919.9 '169.7
March................ 87'.1 176.5 508.1 2.3'2.9 '3* 382 2 l.'-23.7 2..I0.6 9o6.3 '215 0
April................ 766.5 129.1 576.9 2,877.9 '36.8 3'l.9 i,.63.8 2.-8-.. 968 0 '169.9
May.................. 826.. 105.6 528., 2.201.0 '29.- 367.3 1,36 6 2 -27.5 1.02- 8 '211 2
June................. 936.2 125.5 364 2 2,814 4 '30.1 374.3 1,547.4 2,31 5 L,034.6 '196.4
July................. 938.0 130.0 637.0 3,210.2 '34.2 426.8 1,566.2 2,602.4 1,122.9 '226.5
August............... 860.0 122.1 620.2 3,102.6 '35.6 371.6 1,521.3 2.518.8 1,100.6 '216.9
September...........
October.............
November.. ... .... .
December............

L'naajstlea

1975,

January-December.... 6.506.6 1,-19 5 5.56- J 26..75.6 553.9 3,696... 1.,700.5 ij,-b.6 6 9,227.6 2,529 1

January-August... ... 5,I1-.9 92:.0 I ,69;.6 1',0i .1 351.- 2,-92.5 I0,Oa2.- 15,2- ." 69.- 1,6. 3

January.. ....... 13 112 3 .66.0 3 ,21 0 -8.5 -37.2 1,7-9 5 1,69* 7 '55 0 216 0
February.......... .. ,626.8 106., 39-.9 1,9-0.1 -. ? 306.2 1.259 0 1.686 8 621.9 161 0
March....... ...... 657.5 1-3.7 '60.6 1,-80 7 55.1 3-0.8 1,313 3 2,07v.5 687 6 165..
April.......... ..... 68 .5 119.1 -7 3 2,-.1 3 -0.7 351.9 1,2-3 1 1,699 703.8 231 2
May................ 611.0 116 9 -53 6 1,9-5 0 51.9 285.6 1,.1- 7 1,93- 5 626 196 5
June................. .. .7. 129.6 513.0 1,43B I 33.2 252.6 1,230 8 1.961 b 722.7 219.7
July................. 705.B 10j.' 506 1 ,137. 68 2~7 1.136 6 1.96-.- 650.i 223 8
4ugust ............ 635.6 95.6 -20 9 :,2-5 c 32 7 270 6 1,005 3 1,822.0 600.6 169 7
September .... ....... 896.9 106.9 -76 2,-6.1 -1 c 275.1 1,091.6 1,793.3 815.7 217.9
October........ ..... 759 9 126.0 .57 7 2.3-5 5 -8 6 302.- 1.194 0 2.138.6 919.7 217..
November............ 725.1 120 -15.3 2.089.- 66.2 96.5 1,121.2 2,016 6 8- .1 211.9
December ........... .112.1 137.. 5121.- ..5.7.5 -6.0 327 9 1,211.1 2,269.4 878 7 236.6

1976

January-Augut ....... 6.663.9 1,067.7 4,486.5 21,809.1 269.8 3.1104.2 11,296.2 19,505.4 7,994.0 1,614 2

January.............. 759.2 1-1 5 .83 7 2,790.7 37.8 350.0 1.190.5 2.229.7 8j6 .7 186.6
February............. 669.5 158.3 439.5 .302 3 51.5 316.6 1,108.6 2,10-.9 790.2 169.7
March... .......... 690.1 167.B 539 6 2, 8.2 3').- .10.1 I 0'.0." 2. 2'.0 999 2 215.0
April................ d .16.6 12' 563.0 2 9'.3 36.8 -1-.3 1,409 o 2.606.2 931 7 189.9
May....... .. ..... 1.8 108..* 539.1 2.13 .9 29.- 3'L.u 1.383.- :,.59.1 925.. 211 2
June................ 980.2 136 2 652.3 2,834 1 30.1 386.1 1,649 6 2.612.5 1,096.7 196.4
July.. .............. 903.3 123.0 619 6 3,036.a 34.2 365.9 1,547.6 2,461.6 1l,14.7 226.5
August............... 680.7 104 9 619.5 3,164.6 35 6 366.3 1.,38.0 2.307.2 1,215.3 21e.9
September ...........
October........... ..
November.............
December ..........

5Tbe 1975 data In this table do not reflect rerclar import retslorns puolishea -.th the June 1976 reports ana vhlch are reilectea in the
data presented ln ocher tables Ia thli report. .Tese revisiorns will oe reflected it, tnli taole in subsequent issues of [his report.
'Schedule A section descript aIs are a; follow:
0. Food and live animals 5 Chemclais
1. Beverages and tobacco 6 Manufactured goods classlfied chiefly by material
2. Crude materials, Inedible, except fuels 7. Machinery anc transport equipment
3. Mineral fuels, lubricants, and related materials 6. Miscellaneous manufactured articles, n.e.a.
4. Animal and vegetable oils and fats 9 Commoditles ana transactions not alaaslfled according to kind
'Adjusted for seasonal and working-day variation using seasonal adjustment factors Introduced in January 1976. See footnote 1 on front
page. Annual totals are not shown for seasonally adjusted data. InadJusted data should be used for annual totals. The adjusted section
totals In this table and similar overall monthly totals in tables I and were adjusted Independently.
'In the absence of demonstrable seasonal patterns for this section, no seasonal adjustment factors have been applied to the data.









Table 6. U.S. General Imports (c.i.f. Value Basis) of Merchandise, Schedule A Sections, Seasonally Adjusted and
Unadjusted, by Month: January 1975 to August 1976

(In millions of dollars. See Explanatlon of Btatitics for Information on coverage, definitioa or o.l.f. Import value, and soirLesof erorin
the data. UnadjusTed totals represent Biu of unrounded figures and bence my very slightly Irim Isam of rounded aoIuIts)

Schedule A sectlanas
Period
20 I 2 3 a 5 6 9 9

Seasonally adjusted


1975'

January-August ..,,.

January..............
Pebarys. .............
March................
April .... ..........
May .................
June..... ........
July.... .. .......
August ...............
September............
October .............
November..............
December..............

1976

January-August .......

January...............
February.............
March... ............
April ................
May..................
JUne.................
July.................
August...............
September............
October. ...........
November ............
December ...........




19S15

January-DecEamDer.....

January-August .....

January..............
February.............
March.. ...........
April. .......
May....... ... ....
June..... .........
July .. .. ......
August .... ........ .
September. ........
October.............
November. .... .. .
December....... .....

1976

January-August.......

January ....... ....
February... ........
March................
April...... .....
iM y .. .......
June.... .... ....
July.. .........
August .. ....
September. ......
October .... .....
November. .........
December .......


5,885.2

732.9
726.2
732.6
720.8
680.7
796.3
770.1
725.6
974.4
804.3
830.3
755.7



7.183.3

798.,
758.6
951.9
829.4
898.-
1,010.7
1,008.8
927.1


9,227.7

5,87 .1

777.6
680.
713.5
7u2.i.
662.3
8-0 1
766. 3
69%.'
966 b
822.0
789.6
77 3



7,234.9

828.8
72-.5
467.
88: 8
849.9
1,08.2
971.4
919.3


1,049.0

122.1
135.8
162.5
131.3
124.0
129.5
120.2
123.6
127.6
122.0
114.5
139.1



1,212.5

152.0
200.5
190.6
140.5

137.3
141.3
135.5


4,098.1

549.6
512.9
507.9
520.8
'85.8
511.1
525.9
484 1
505 1
485.2
486.0
561.2



4,870.6

580.2
55w .2
550. L
623.9
514.5
611.9
700.0
675.8


1,.5 7.3 6,142.9

1,007.9 .,080.0

122.8 527.0
11-.6 -33.9
15-.7 501.3
129.7 524.5
126.8 '97.9
1-0.6 568.9
113.6 562.7
105.0 463.8
117.6 523.9
140.3 50-.6
132.- 45o..
149.1 578.0


1.158.9

153.2
169.0
181.2
138.9
117.6
148.9
133.7
116 2


4,883.8

532.6
"75.5
586.2
608.4
586.0
707.1
711.0
675 I


17,911.1

3,306.3
2,108 I
1, 56.8
2.594.
2,131.1
1,585.6
2. 329.3
2,399.6
2,690.1
2.597.0
2,549.8
2,652.3



23,075.3

2,853.0
2.507.0
2,505.9
3,076.3
2.353.2
3,009.8
3,443.7
.326.4


28,284.1

18,191.3

3,660.0
2,061.7
1,560.6
2,596.9
2,077.8
1.536.4
2,275.7
2.-02.0
2,628.2
2,513.9
2,231.0
:.719.6



23,334 9

2,98. :
.'56.9
.,939.-
2,990.2
2,282.b
3,*,30.9
3,257.7
3 392.9


313.2 3.163.8

40.7 369.2
55.4 333.0
37. 432.9
39.9 43.9
31.8 388.5
32.5 109 5
37.1 409.0
38.4 387.8


"The 197i data in this rabic ao root reflect regular iLport revisions published with tIe June 1976 reports ana which are reflected in the
data preser.-d in otner tables of this report. These revisions *11l cc reilectId an this tale r. subaequernt eIsues of this report.
'Scnea.le A section cescriprip...s are as follows:
0. Foon ana live aniais 5 :hemrcal
I Besrages and tobacco 6. Manufactured Foods classified chierly by material
2 Crude materials. Inedible, except ruEla ? Machinery and Transport equipment
3. mineral fuels, lubricants, and related materials 8. M Icellaneous manufactured articles. A.e r.
.. Animal and vegetable oils and fats 9. Commodlties and transactlans not clasaLfled according to kind
'Anjusted for Bseasonal na sorking-day variation using seasonal adjustment factors introduced In January 1976. See footnote I on front
page. Annual totals are not ehown for seasonally adjusted data. Unadjusted daa should be used for annual totals The adjusted lectlon
totals in this talDe and similar overall monthly totals In tables 2 and mere adjusted independently.
'In the absence of demonatrable seasonal patterns for this section, no seasonal adjustment ractora bave been applied to the data.


'369.6

'50.5
's16.8
'57.6
'42.5
'54.6
'35.1
'47.7
'34.9

'51.9
'71.2
'4.9.6



'313.2

'40. 7
'55.4
'3?.4
'39.9
'31 8
a32.5
'37.1
38 .4


2,628.4

454.0
3.6.6
369.5
333.9
297.9
262.9
282.3
301.3
304.1
313.1
328.9
3, .0



3,136.3

372.6
347.2
403.5
390.4
384.7
393.2
453.4
391.3


Unadjustea


11,083.4

1,810.6
1,580.1
1,461.5
1,407.1
1.187.9
1,298.1
1,200.5
1,137.0
1.179.6
1,198.9
1,218.4
1,261.5



12,240.5

1,26.,.0
1,376.4
1,528.0
1,570.6
.487.2
1,672.9
1,697.2
1.644.2


15,865.6

10,882..

1,897.5
1,359.4
1,'1' 7
1,339.6
1,234 2
1.327.
1,223. 3
1.085.9
1,111.3
1,287.6
1.212.3
1,312.0



17.192.9
1.290.5
1,196 1
1.578.4
I 512.4
1.494.i
1,763.4
1,675.1
1.662 3


16,462.1

2,019.0
1,971.4
2,157.7
1,962.0
1,968.4
2,001.8
2.123.5
2.259.1
2,044.5
2,226.9
2.213.5
2.377 7



20,893.6
2,473.1
2,431 4
2,586 5
2,684 6
2.621 0
2,609.3
2,785.4
2.702.3


25,296.4

16,444.2

2,038.2
1,811.7
2,259.1
2,05-.2
2,093 6
2,119 9
2.108 7
1,958.8
1,932. 1
2,307.0
2,175.9
2,437.'




21.039 0
2,403.9
2,268.5
2.922 7
2,816.
2,655.0
2,662 4
2,635.0
2.475 3


6,287.0
825.3
776.3
776.3
777.6
728.0
770.8
831.1
801.0
841.8
882.6
965.5
951.3




6,658.2
972.8
989.
1,037.7
1,061.5
1,101.3
L 108.8
1,203.7
1,182.9


9,945.5

6,202.3

807.1
666.9
739.0
753.5
67..8
777.7
917.3
865.9
883.9
994.6
913.3
951.3




b,569.3
905.7
850.0
1,072.9
1.002 0
994.4
1,177.6
1,280.7
1.305.9


'1.686.3
'224.3
'186.2
'190.9
'238.2
'201.9
'224.3
'228.5
'194.0
'222.9
'222.1
'216.1
'239.4




'1,649.3
'191.1
'173.6
'219.9
'193.7
'215.1
'201.0
'231.7
'223.B


2,588.8

1.688.3
224.3
186.2
190.9
238.2
201.9
224.3
228.5
196.0
222.9
222.1
216.1
239.4




1,649.3
191.1
173.6
219.9
193.7
215.1
201.0
231.1
223.8


3.929. 1

2.65.13

467.6
326.8
361.0
373.1
302 1
270.3
26-.2
288.3
292.2
318.7
316.k
347.5


L L


L









U.S. GENERAL IMPORTS OF PETROLEUM AND SELECTED PETROLEUM

PRODUCTS, UNADJUSTED

Tables 1-A, 1-B, 2-A and 2-B which follow, contain monthly and cumulative-to-date data on U.S. general imports
of petroleum and petroleum products into the U.S. Customs area and into the Virgin Islands for the period January
1975 through current month. Prior to January 1976, these data were presented separately in a Supplement to Report
FT 900. (It should be noted that imports into the Virgin Islands are excluded from the official U.S. import totals
presented in the preceding tables of this report.) The data in these tables are not adjusted for seasonal and working-
day variation.
Beginning with the issue for January 1976, the value figures presented in this report are in thousands of dollars
and the quantity figures in thousands of barrels.


Schedule A and TSUSA Commodity Numbers Used in Compiling the Petroleum
Information Presented in This Report


Energy products


Schedule A. No.


Nonenergy products


TSUSA No.


Schedule A. No.


Crude and partly refined
petroleum
331.0120
331.0140
331.0210
331.0220
331.0230
331.0240

Crude petroleum
331.0120
331.0140

Gasoline
332.1000

Jet fuel
332.2020

Kerosene
332.2040

Distillate fuel oil
332.3020
332.3040

Residual fuel oil
332.4020
332.4040

Propane and butane gas
341.0020

Liquid derivatives of
petroleum, n.e.s.
332.9940 pt.


475.0510
475.1010
475.0520, 475.0540
475.1020, 475.1040
475.3520
475.6520


475.0510
475.1010


475.2520, 475.2560


475.2540


475.3000


475.0530
475.1030


475.0550
475.1050


475.1510, 475.1530


Lubricating oils
332.5000 pt. 475.4500

Lubricating greases
332.5000 pt. 475.5500, 475.6000

Paraffin and other mineral
waxes
332.6220 pt. 494.2200
332.6240 494.2400

Asphalt
332.9800 521.1100

Naphthas not for further
refinement
332.9920 475.3540

All other petroleum products
(pitch of tar coke, non-
liquid hydrocarbon mix-
tures, and calcined petro-
leum and coal coke not for
fuel)
332.9700 pt. 401.6200
332.9940 pt. 475.7000
599.8040 pt. 517.5100


475.6540


TSUSA No.




















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U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
Bureau of the Census
Washington. D.C. 20233

OFFICIAL BUSINESS
FIRST CLASS MAIL


UNWEH(- OF FLODA



U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
COM-202
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