Summary of U.S. export and import merchandise trade

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Title:
Summary of U.S. export and import merchandise trade
Series Title:
FT-900
Physical Description:
v. : ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of the Census
United States -- Bureau of the Census
Publisher:
Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, Foreign Trade Division for sale by the Subscriber Services Section (Publications), Bureau of the Census
Place of Publication:
Washington
Creation Date:
July 1976
Frequency:
monthly
regular

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Subjects / Keywords:
Commerce -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Citation/Reference:
American statistics index
Dates or Sequential Designation:
1974-1976.
General Note:
At head of title: 1977- United States foreign trade.
General Note:
Formerly classed C 56. 210:900 - during the time the Bureau of the Census was subordinate to Social and Economic Statistics Administration.
General Note:
Issues prior to Oct. 1977 were sent to depositories as Item 144.
General Note:
Unnumbered supplements accompany some issues.

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University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001209840
oclc - 02245761
notis - AFW0105
lccn - 76640395
issn - 0361-0047
sobekcm - AA00005271_00050
Classification:
lcc - HF105 .B73e
ddc - 382/.0973
System ID:
AA00005271:00050

Related Items

Preceded by:
United States foreign trade; export and import merchandise trade
Succeeded by:
United States foreign trade. FT900, Summary of U.S. export and import merchandise trade

Full Text
*6:C 3.1L.'t. '00 *f(S ( V


SUMMARY OF U.S. EXPORT AND

IMPORT MERCHANDISE TRADE
At


JULY 1976


RT 90076-7


I JDEP O
U.9. DEPOSITORY


Seasonally Adjusted and Unadjusted Data

(Including Unadjusted Data on Imports of Petroleum and
D-Itrnloiim Products) *


F.A.S. EXPORTS AND F.A.S. IMPORTS


I; Seasonally Adjusted
."ilh Bureau stated that during July 1976, exports on a
lfa.s. (free alongside ship) U.S. port of exportation
value basis, excluding Department of Defense (DOD) Mili-
S ary Assistance Program Grant-Aid shipments, amounted to
$10,022.0 million and that general Imports on a f.a.s.
tareign port of exportation value basis, amounted to
RO8,849.1 million. 1 2 3

I.1ged on the above export and import figures the July
merchandise trade balance was in deficit by .27.1 mal-
lion, as compared to a deficit of $377.3 million in June
,1.h76.

Sslitag the first 7 months of 1976 (January-July),
'i uorts were at an annual rate of $112,404 million, a
I i.l about 5 percent higher than the calendar year 1975
1": t6m of $107,130 million. Imports for the January-July
1-96 period were at an annual rate of $115,619 million,
iteresenting an increase of about 20 percent over the
i. llendlar year 1975 total of $96,116 million.

ior the 4-month period, April-July 1976, exports
averaged $9,677.5 million per month, a level about 7
plke'lt above the $9,027.3 million average reported for
Stil preceding 4-month period, December 1975-March 1976.
l m ports on a f.a.s. value basis, averaged $9,930.2 mil-
illto per month for the same 4-month period, about 10
pftlent higher than the $9,061.2 million average
reported for the preceding 4-month period.


Unadjusted
iE: Bsperts excluding Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid
i" Shipments decreased from $9,850.4 million in June to
9. 3*5.5 million in July. With Military Assistance Pro-
i.; .gl Grant-Aid shipments included, exports decreased from
P0:. B .3 million in June to $9,330.0 million in July.
a tileril imports decreased from $10,578.1 million in June
'o *10,563.8 million in July.

|*ihtet: Footnotes 1, 2, and 3 are shown at the bottom of page 4.


F A.L EXPORTS AND C.I.F. IMPOR1 '. *

Seasonally Adiuusted e ...
The Bureau stated that during July 1976, exporfilpnS
f.a.s. (free alongside ship) U.S. port of exportat lto1Wl
value oasis, excluding Department of Defense (DOD) Mili-
tary Assistance Program Grant-Aid shipments, amounted to
I10,022.0 million and that general imports on a c.i.f.
(cost, insurance, and freight) U.S. port of entry basis,
amounted to $11,650.3 million. 2 '

Based on the above f.a.a. export and c.i.f. import
figures the July merchandise tride balance was in defi-
cit Dy I1,628.3 million, as compared to the June 1976
deficit of .1,172.6 million.

During the tirat 7 months of 1976 (January-July), exports
*ere at an annual rate o! $112,404 million, a levei about
5 percent higher than the calendar year 1975 total of
$107,130 million. Imports for the January-July 1976
period were at an annual rate of $124,252 million, a
level about 20 percent higher than the calendar year 1975
total of $103,389 million.

For the 4-month period, April-July 1976, exports
averaged $9,677.5 million per month, a level about 7
percent above the $9,027.3 million average reported tor
the preceding 4-month period, December 1975-March 1976.
Imports on a c.i.I. value basis averaged $10,678.3 mil-
lion per month for the same 4-month period, about 10
percent higher than the .9,733.6 million average
reported tar the preceding 4-month period.

Unadiustad
Exports excluding Military Assistance Program GranT-Aid
shipments decreased trom $9,850.4 million in June to
$9,325.5 million in July. With Military Assistance Pro-
gram Grant-Aid shipments included, exports decreased from
$9,863.3 million in June to $9,330.0 million in July.
General imports decreased from $11,411.6 million in June
to $11,343.9 million in July.


Inquiries concerning these figures should be addressed to the Chief, Foreign Trade Division, Bureau of the
Census. Washington, D.C. 20233. Tel: Area Code 301. 763-5140.

U.S. Department of Commerce, BUREAU OF THE CENSUS

For sale by the Subscriber Services Section (Publications), Bureau of the Census, Washington, D.C. 20233, or any
SU.S. Department of Commerce District office. Postage stamps not acceptable; currency submitted at sender's risk.
I Remittances from foreign countries must be by international money order or by a draft on a U.S. bank. Price 30
cents per copy. Annual subscription (FT 900, 975, 985, and 986 combined) $14.90.


UNIV. OF FL LIB.
DOCUMENTS DEPT

"L 0-O


I' -' __ _


For Release








EXPLANATION OF STATISTICS


Import Valuation


Coverage

The U.S. import statistics reflect both government and
nongovemment imports of merchandise from foreign coun-
tnes into the U.S Customs territory, which includes the 50
States, the District of Columbia. and Puerto Rico. The U.S.
Import statistics exclude imports into the Virgin Islands,
Guam, Amencan Samoa, and other U.S. possessions; and
shipments between the United States and Puerto Rico,
btLween the United States and U.S. possessions, and
between any of these outlying areas. (Data on U.S. trade
with Puerto Rico and with U.S. possessions are published
separately in -Report FT 800. Additional data on such trade
and on irtports in-to the Virgin Islands from foreign coun-
tries are presented in reference tabulations.) Data on
imports of. petroleum and selected petroleum products,
including -shipments into the Virgin Islands from foreign
,countries,'.(previously shown in Report FT 900-Supple-
ment).are included in this report effective with the January
1976 statistics
The U.S. import statistics also exclude American goods
returned to the United States by its Armed Forces, intransil
shipments through the United States: temporary shipments:
transactions not considered to be of statistical significance,
such as shipments of personal and household effects, low-
valued nondutiable imports by mail; issued monetary coins
of all component metals, and gold in the form of ores,
concentrates, waste, scrap, and refined bullion Imports of
silver in these forms are included in the statistics, unless
otherwise noted. (Information on gold movements, pre-
viously shown in Report FT 2402. appears in Report FT
990 effective January 1975.)

General Imports/Impurls For Consumption

The statistics on U.S. imports are presented in terms of
both "General Imports" and "Imports for Consumption."
General imports are a combination of entries for immediate
consumption and entries into Customs bonded warehouses,
and thus generally reflect total arrivals of merchandise.
Imports for consumption are a combination of entries for
immediate consumption and withdrawals from warehouses
for consumption. and thus generally reflect the total of the
commodities entered into U.S. consumption channels.

Source Of Import Information

The official U S. Import statistics are compiled by the
Bureau of the Census from copies of the import entry and
warehouse withdrawal forms which importers are required
by law to file with Customs officials. The information as to
country of origin, net quantity, \alue, and commodity
classification is verified by Customs officials on entries filed
for transactions valued over $250. which are ordinarily sub-
Ject to examination for Customs appraisement purposes.
The statistical copy of the entry is corrected if it does not
accurately reflect the information called for b', the slatis-
tical requirements


F.a.s. Import Value.-The f.a.s. (free alongside ship) value
represents the transaction value of imports at the foreign
port of exportation. It is based on the purchase price, i.e.,
the actual transaction value and generally includes all
charges incurred in placing the merchandise alongside the
carrier at the port of exportation in the country of exporta-
tion.

C.i.f. Import Value.-The c.i.f. (cost, insurance, and freight)
value represents the value of imports at the first port of
entry in the United States. It is based on the purchase price
and includes all freight, insurance, and other charges
(excluding U S. import duties) incurred in bringing the
merchandise from the country of exportation and generally
placing it alongside the carrier at the first port of entry in
the United States. If the merchandise was acquired in a
transaction between related parties, the purchase price used
in denying the c.i.f. value is based on an arm's-length equiv-
alent transaction price, i e, a price which would exist
between unrelated buyers and sellers.

Import Monthly Carryover

It is the objective of the compilng procedures to include
shipments, insofar as practicable, in the statistics for the
actual month of importation. However, for purposes of the
statistics the month of importation is based on the date of
official acceptance by Customs of the import entry or ware-
house withdrawal document. This may not in all cases corre-
spond to the actual month of importation. (For example,
under the Customs "immediate-delivery" procedures,
importers may file the import entry up to 10 workdays
after the actual date of importation.) Also, because of
processing problems (e.g., late receipt of a document for an
end-of-month shipment, rejection of a shipment by the
computer because the data fail to meet certain edit criteria
established to protect the accuracy of the statistics, etc.),
there is an overall average carryover of about 7 percent (in
terms of value) of the shipments from the reported month
of importation (based on the date of the import entry or
warehouse withdrawal document) to a subsequent month,
usually the succeeding month. In addition, as a result of the
aforementioned Customs "immediate-delivery" procedures,
there is a further carryover of presently unknown magni-
tude from the actual month of importation to a subsequent
month. These limitations should be borne in mind when
making month-to-month comparisons.
Cumulations of data over at least 4-month periods are
desirable to identify underlying trends. Month-to-month
changes in imports. exports, and similar series often reflect
primarily irregular movements, differences in monthly
carryover, etc.

Estimated Data for Imports Valued Under 5251

The overall import and Schedule A Section 9 totals
include sample estimates for shipments valued under $251.
Therefore, they are subject to sampling error, estimated at


IMPORT STATISTICS







less than one-tenth of one percent for the unadjusted overall
total and about one percent for the unadjusted Schedule a.
Section 9 total. This means that we can have about 67
percent confidence that the published unadjusted overall
totals and the unadjusted Schedule A Section 9 totals differ
by less than one-tenth of a percent and one percent, respec-
tively, from the totals that would have resulted from a com-
plete tabulation. The statistics on imports of petroleum and
petroleum products included in this report reflect full
.compiled data and, therefore, are not subject to sampling
error.


EXPORT STATISTICS

Coverage

The export statistics reflect, in general, both government
and nongovernment exports of domestic and foreign mer-
chandise from the U.S. Customs tertory (includes the 50
States, the District of Columbia. and Puerto Rico) to for-
eign countries, whether the exportation involves a com-
mercial transaction or not. The statistics, therefore, include
Department of Defense Military Assistance Program Grant-
Aid shipments, shipments for economic assistance under the
Foreign Assistance Act and shipments of agricultural com-
modities under P. L. 480 (The Agricultural Trade Develop-
ment and Assistance Act of 1954, as amended) and related
laws. The following are excluded from the statistics- Ship-
ments to U.S. Armed Forces and diplomatic missions
abroad for their own use; shipments between the United
States and Puerto Rico, between the United States and its
possessions (including the Virgin Islands), and between
these outlying areas; exports from U.S. possessions, intransit
shipments through the United States, transactions not con-
sidered to be of statistical importance, such as personal and
household effects; temporary exports; low-valued or non-
commerical exports by mail, issued monetary coins of all
component metals; and gold in the form of ores, concen-
trates. waste, scrap, and refined bullion Exports of silver in
these forms are included in the statistics. unless otherwise
noted. (Information on gold movements, previously shown
in Report FT 2402, appears in Report FT 990 effective
January 1975.)



Definition of Exports of Domestic
and Foreign Merchandise

Exports of domestic merchandise include commodities
which are grown, produced, or manufactured in the United
States, and commodities of foreign origin which have been
changed in the United States from the form in which they'
were imported, or which have been enhanced in value by
further manufacture in the United States Exports of for-
eign merchandise consist of commodities of foreign ongin
which have entered the United States as imports and which,
at the time of exportation, are in substantially the same
condition as when imported.


Source of Export Information

The official U S. export statistics are compiled by the
Bureau of the Census primarily% from copies of Shipper's
Export Declarations which are required to be filed with
Customs officials, except for Department of Defense Mih-
tary Assistance Program Grant-Aid shipments which are
reported directly to the Bureau of the Census by the
Department of Defense and shipments by qualified ex-
porters who have been authorized to submit data in the
form of magnetic tape, punched cards, or monthly Shipper's
Summary' Export Declarations directly to the Bureau of the
Census
Export Valuation

F.a.s. Export Value.-The value reported in the export sta-
tistics generally is equivalent to a f.a.s (free alongside ship)
value at the U S. port of export, based on the transaction
price, including inland freight, insurance and other charges
incurred in placing the merchandise alongside the carter at
the U.S. port of exportation.

Export Monthly Carryover

It is the objective of the compiling procedures to include
shipments, insofar as practicable, in the statistics for the
actual month of exportation. For purposes of the statistics,
the month of exportation is generally based on the date
when the slupment leaves the United States. (For vessel or
air shipments it is the dale when the earner departs or is
cleared from the port of export ) However, as indicated
above for imports. because of processing problems te.g late
receipt of a document for an end-of-month shipment. re-
jection of a shipment by the computer because the data
fall to meet certain edit criteria established to protect the
accuracy of the statistics, etc i, there is an overall average
carryover of about 4 percent (in terms of value) of the
shipments from the actual month of exportation to a
subsequent month. usually the succeeding month. These
limitations should be borne in mind when making month-
to-month comparisons
Cumulations of data over at least 4-month periods are
desirable to identify underlying trends Month-to-month
changes in imports, exports, and similar sees often reflect
pnmanly irregular movements, differences in monthly
carryoer, etc.
Estimated Data for Export Shipments

The overall export and Schedule B section and division
totals include sample estimates for shipments valued
$251-11,990 to Canada and for shipments valued
$251-$999 to countries other than Canada Data for ship-
ments valued $250 and under to all countries are also esti-
mated, based on established percentages of individual
country totals, and included in the Schedule B Section 9
totals regardless of the commodity exported. It is estimated
that the unadjusted overall total is subject to a sampling
error of less than one-tenth of one percent. and the unad-
justed Schedule B section or division totals are subject to







samplng errors of about one percent. In addition, the
Schedule B Section 9 total is subject to possible error in the
estimated data for shipments valued $250 and under, and
the overall total, and the individual totals for sections other
than Section 9, to a more limited extent. Such $250 and
under shipments represent about I percent of the total
value of exports, and about 60 percent of the Schedule B
Section 9 total

SOURCES OF ERROR IN THE STATISTICS

Monthly import and export figures are subject to the
possibility of errors which may arise from sources other
than sampling errors, discussed above. Among these are
errors in the reporting and/or processing of information as
to commodity classification, value and other statistical
factors, month of inclusion (see paragraphs on import and
export carryover, above), and the undercounting of exports
to Canada due to the non-receipt of Shipper's Export
Declarations. For 1974, the undercounting amounted to
about one and one-half billion dollars. In the case of im-
ports the information as to value and commodity classifica-
tion (as well as country of origin and net quantity) is
verified by Customs officials on entries filed for transactions
valued over $250 which are ordinarily subject to examina-
tion for Customs appraisement purposes, thus considerably
reducing the possibility of error. In addition, the procedures
used to compile both the import and export statistics
include clerical and computer processing checks designed to
protect the accuracy of the statistics to the fullest practi-
cable extent.


MERCHANDISE TRADE BALANCES


Two trade balances are presented in this report"
11 The balance between exports based on f.a.s. values
and imports based on f.a.s values.
2) The balance between exports based on f.a.s. values
and imports based on c i.f. values with adjustments for im-
ports from affiliated sellers abroad to reflect arms-length
equivalent prices.
Both balances are useful for certain purposes. The first
balance corresponds to a measurement of the international
payments or credit flows resulting from merchandise trade
between the U.S. and foreign countries. The second balance
is based on concepts similar to those used by most foreign
counties, and therefore provides a reference for comparison
with the trade balances published by those countries.


REVISIONS TO THE STATISTICS

Revisions are carried into the statistics on a periodic
basis. Data for 1975 and 1976 appearing in the 1976
monthly issues of this report are presented as follows:

1976 Statistics

a. January through November 1976 issues: figures are as
originally issued, except as noted below.
b. December 1976 issue: figures reflect revisions for
prior months of the year issued with December 1976
statistics or earlier, as noted below.

1975 Statistics

a. January through May 1976 issues: figures reflect re-
visions issued with December 1975 statistics or
earlier.
b. June through December 1976 issues: figures reflect
revisions to 1975 data issued with June 1976 statistics
or earlier.

In addition to the revisions which are made on a periodic
basis, instances may u rur where a significant error in the
statistics for a month ol the current year is discovered after
the statistics for that month are compiled. If the error is of
sufficient importance to require correction prior to the time
that the regular revisions are carried, the correction is made
and so noted in this report.



SOURCES OF FURTHER INFORMATION

Additional foreign trade statistics and information regard-
ing coverage, valuation, sampling, and qualifications which
should be considered by users of the statistics are contained
primarily in the following publications: Report FT 990,
Highlights of U.S. Export and Import Trade, FT 135, U.S.
General Imports, Schedule A Commodity by Country; FT
410, U.S. Exports, Schedule B Commodity by Country; and
the Guide to Foreign Trade Statistics. Information regarding
additional sources of statistics, the methodology used in
seasonally adjusting the data, and other matters relating to
foreign trade statistics may be obtained from the Bureau of
the Census, Washington. D.C. 20233.


Adjumed for seasonal and mrikng-day varinnan, but not for changes in pr.ce level Factors ued to adjust 1975 and 1976 data show n this report represent samonal adjustment factors darired from
monthly date through 1975 and intodui ed in January 1916 combined with the approDriate working-day adusment factors.
Cumulaionis of dria Over at least 4-rronlh periods are desirable o identity underlying trends. Month to month changes in exports, imports, and rlmiler snes often reflect pnmarly anagulr mow-
ments, dtferences in monthly carryom r nec Recent month-to month percent changes in, the overall seasonally adjusted export and imporn mars are presented mi the following table with ave permnl
mont.to month rnse and decline ove longer periods shown lo rompenson. The average rse and average decline figures exclude percentage changes for (11 e period Julv-December 1971 because of
abnormaleies ,r, tre data due to efleni ol dOLk stakes and (2) penods when negligible changes lireo onenil) .n the level of exportsimports occurred. Percentage changes or imporn nvluel m not
available for periods prloI to January 1914.
Month-to-month Average monthly rates of change

Series June-July May-June Apr.-May Mar.-Apr. Average Average 4 months 12 months
rise decline Mar.-July July 1975-
1976 1976 1976 196 1970-1975 1970-1975 1976 July 1976
(Percent) (Percent) (Percent) (Percent) (Percent) (Percent) (Percent) (Percent)

F.a.s. export value.. t3.1 1.4 .2.0 +..9 S3.2 -2.8 +2.9 +1.0
F.a.s. import value.. *7.5 9.9 -4.3 -0.1 (NA) (NA) *3.3 +2.9
C.i.f. import value.. 7.0 .10.3 -4.2 0.0 (NA) (NA) +3.3 +2.8
'Se the "Explmation of Statics" for definitions of the export ad import vales ad trade balanced








Table 1. US. Exports (fa.s. Value Basis), General Imports (fas. and c.i.f. Value Basis), and Merchandise Trade

Balance, Adjusted for Seasonal and Working-Day Variation. by Month: January 1975 to July 1976

(In millions of dollars. See Explanation of Statistics for Information on coverage, definitions of export and import values ana
trade balances, and sources of error In the data. All data sbown for 1975 and 1976 reflect seasonal adjustment factors intro-
duced In January 1976)

E.a.s. Exports and f.a.s. Imports F.a.s. Exports and c.i.f. Imports
Period
Exports' Imports brade Exports' Imports bade
balance balance

1975

January-July...................... 61,267. 55,182.7 .6,08 7 61,267.4 59,339.6 .1,927.8

January .......................... 9,373.9 9,632.5 256.6 9,373.9 10.J74.8 -1,000.9
February........................ 8,755.8 7,927.2 828.6 s,;575'. 8,500.9 254.9
March............................ 8,681.1 7,466.5 -1,214.6 6,681.1 8,039.2 + 641.9
April............................ 8,648.6 7,559.1 689.5 8.648.6 6,547.1 101.5
May............................. 8,221.5 7,263.3 958.2 6,221.5 7,813.6 + 407.7
June.............................. 8,7i5.5 7,102.5 1 ,613.0 8,715.5 7,651.2 .1,064.3

July.............................. 8,871.0 7,831.6 .1,039.4 8,871.u 8,412.6 458.4
August........................ ... 8,979.9 7,676.7 i,103.2 8,979.9 8,478.2 501.7
September........................ 9,104.2 8,196.0 908.2 9,104.2 8,820.0 284.2
October............... .......... 9,225.7 8,169.3 *1,0'6.4 9,225.7 8,794.1 + 431.6
November....................... 9,408.9 8,201.3 .1,207.6 9,408.9 8,827.5 581.4
December....................... 9,249.9 8,5?1.5 728.4 9,249.9 9,161.4 88.5

1976

January-July.................... 65,569.0 67,444.2 -1,875.2 65.569.0 12,486.3

January........................ ..... 9,103.4 9,176.0 2.6 9,103.. 9,879.7 776.3
February......................... 8,800.1 8,9*0.9 1.0.8 8,800. 9.592.7 792.6
March........................... 8,955.6 9,606.5 650.9 6.955.6 10,300.6 -1,345.0
April............................ 9,393.6 9,595.7 202.1 9,393.6 10,301.5 907.9
May.............................. 9,578.0 9,182.4 395.6 9,578.0 9,872.6 294.6
June.............................. 9,716.3 10,093.6 377.3 0,716.3 10,888 9 -1,172.6

July ............................. 10,022.0 10.849.1 827.1 10,022.0 11,650.3 -1,628.3
August ..............,... ........
September........................
October..........................
November.........................
December.........................

IRepresents exports of domestic and foreign merchandise excluding Depanrmenr oni eernse Military Assistance Program
Grant-Aid shipments.









Table 2 U.S. Exports (f.a.s. Value Basis) of Merchandise Showing Department of Defense (DOD) Military Assistance
Program Grant-Aid Shipments, by Month: January 1975 to July 1976
SIn i iltlor- of noll r-. See Explanation of Statistics for Information on coverage, definition of f..s.. export value, and sourcesof error In
the data UInadjunted totals represent sum or unrounded figures and bence may vary slightly from sum of rounded amounts)

Exporti excluding D00i Exports including DO Grrant-AJd'
Grant-Aid DOD Grant-Aid

Period Dom.eic Dn I c DODnestic
n and Dmestlc, and Doaesti, tetesrn Other
foreign and Total
eoeagnI foreign, unarjuslea foreign, unadjusted Europe countries
adJurted' unadjusted unadjusted

19'5

Jar.uar -Decemlber ...... .... ( 'I 10'.130.. 105.61I .0 10",591.6 lut 102.1 tl.'i. 21.i 439.5

Jinuary-Julv....... ... .. .. ... 61,2o). 61.79-. 60,852.9 62,150.5 61,206.7 355.9 18.3 337.6

Janu r) ..... ... ...... ......... 9.3 ].9 9,1 .6 8.9s-2.' 9.203.. 9.021.5 8.8 ?7 13
February ..... .. .. .... .. .'55 8 8.5 '9 3 j.l B. 1 9.5.5.1] B,. 1 .8 -5 3 3 n2.4
March.... .. .......... ............. ,b81.1 9,.08.t, 9.75,.6 9.]97.5 9.296.5 28 9 2 2 26 7
April .. ....... ..... .. .. .. 8 b8..6 ,L' 9 8.889 0 9.0'9 7 8.950.8 h .' b 58.1
May ...... ................. .. 221.5 l,900.6 i. i8L.8 8.951.5 6,835.7 51.) 2 2 48 8
JuJr. .... .. ........... .... 630 490 2 i q90... ,550 5 bU 3 0.8 59 5

Jul .... ...... .... ,8:1. 8. 211.' 8 ,11 .. .-3.1 I ..8 ? .4 1.0 28.4
Augusi ... ... ... ... 8.971 9 8.36.5 8.352.1 B.s56.-. 8.362 0 9.9 1.b 8.3
Sepre.ber. ...... .. ...... ......... 8.10-.2 1 8.33.1 37B.2 8..256 i 6 0 7 24.9
rc,.nler ... .. 9 9..9. 9.i9.3 9.00. .'50.9 9,o-..s 31.h 0 2 31.4
-ovemroer .... .... ..... ... 9.-0.9 9.513.3 9.-06. 9.526.- 9..19.5 13.0 0.8 12 2
Decanber ... .... ... 9,.'9. 9,303.5 1.191.6 9,j28.? 9.18 9 25 ? 0. 1 25.1

1216

Janury-July. ........... .. ... 65 9.0 66 32-.4 6,.431.0 66,384.7 65,492.0 57.3 2.2 55.1

Jinuar, .. ... .. .. 3.- 8, ?U.2 8.n8e .5 8. '69 8 8.6b8.1 9.1 0 5 9.2
February. .. ... .................. ..800 I 8. 37 b 8.629.1 d.':2.' 8.,33.9 -.8 0.3 4.5
March. .. .............. ........ 8,9S b 9.8-e 2 9.665 4 9.8. .- 9,b600.7 5.3 0 3 5.0
4pril ...... ... .... 393J.. 4.8i3 .2 9. 0 ..7 9.863.6 9, 'I-. 9.4 0.2 9 2
Ma. ..... ... ..... '.5'a 0 9.92.- '.S'..? 9.986.1 9.865 10 7 0.2 10.4
Jare. 9.l71.3 9,8.i0 I 3,717 9 9.8a63.3 3,730.7 13.0 0.4 12.6

ul .. ......... 10,022.0 9,325.5 9,184.5 9.330.0 9,183.1 1.6 0.3 4.2
Aufult .......


NDuember. .. .. ..
[,C',Oer.

'Anjatesd I.~r .-F-r.oial in,1 urrislng-ins .irtltion uslinr ;e-,Mnal adujastient actor' introduced ir Jiarnuary 1976. See forotnre 1 on front
pae
'Eepre:e,. nri .l, eixporl il p.t.lr.~rt !r ine LrIl.tic 3ta-. ei d alil'er froI DOD tiliter)y AssEtance ProEram. Crant-Aloa alpment figures under
tri program. s. iaillo-i i. Transiers of tn material procured out:lad tne Iriteoa Ot[alt a na cransfers froi DOD overseas stocks from export
.hpm.eer.ts L I E .cort i.lu of. I a.s., .nc r i sOD ri tue. In most int jnce. lI i o b.. point of origin ici Data for shipments reported by
ir. rU:D frr .a give., .o.nth .ar iar.eludin ir. BSreau rf tne iersu: reports in the second montr, .:ulgequEnt[ to the month report b) the 000.
'Annual total is not shown for seasonally ,djuilea data 'riadjusteoa at; should oe u-ea for rnnual totals.









Table 3. U.S. Imports of Merchandise, by Month: January 1975 to July 1976

(In millions of dollars. See Explanation of Statistics for information on coverage, definitions of F.a.s. and c.I.f. LIport values, and sources
of error In the data. Unadjuste totals rereresent sum of unrounded figures and hence may vary sllghtly from aim oi rounded amounts)

1U.. iLports of merchananse

F.a.s. value C.i.f. value

PerGeneral Imports Imports General Imports imports
for or
Seasonally consumption, Seasonally unadjusted consup on,
adjusted najuse unaajurea aausted I unadjusted


1975

January-December ....................... I 'I 96.11i b 0 95,70..3 (1 3,3j I84. 102,95-.9

January-July.. .. .................. 55,182. i 55,*1. 3 ,92 5~,339.6 59,297.5 59,062.7

January........................... .... 9.b 2.5 9,l61 .6 9. 99.8 101. 3 8 10 569.8 10,553.6
Februar.................................. 1,92'.2 7.169.4 131 8.500 9 ? 686 2 ,5..
March................................... .466.5 7,.-ll.5 i3 8 ,039 2 4 2 '.9- .6
April.................. .................. ;.959.1 8.190 7 1-3.0 E. '. i 8 h.,' ?* .
May.................................... .. 61. 3 3o5.0 '.5 1 1.1 '.513 s ,9. 2 '8.i
June ................................... "'.102.5 ".2 '. ", .0 :. 51 i 6 .812

July................................... .. i31 6 7.92.). '.190.9 k. .I?'. 50 *4' 9
August .................................. -.8d 6 ;.518.3 -.2* 8 -78.2 6.09, '., r..
September.............................. 8.196 0 8,1:2.o 8 111 8 .8 "0.0 6 3 S3 8,)
October............................... .8,169.1 8.510.8 8.53.. 8 8.'9. I 16l 1 9.185.o
November. .............................. 8.201.3 ;. 908 5 v.8.: .8'" 8.l12 6i.-i 3
December........ ....................... 8..521.5 8.46- 5 6.d 8 .5 9, lvl 9.1 0 0

19'6

January-July..... ......... ........... 6-,44 .2 F.7, 30. 1 86,'00.2 72.466.3 72,332.6 7 .919.7

January................................ 9.1.6.0 9.009 0 8 9.5.9 9 ;9,9 99.9 9 632.9
Februar................................. 8.9-0.9 8,111 2 98b.86 9.:.. 8..u2.5 8.5 ..8
March.................................. 9.b06.5 10.199 2 10,304 .7 111 ]1O b lO 9'lit I 1 1 "4
April................................... 9.595 9.895. 1 9 8-..6 LU 301.5 rj.,.22 9 1l 569
May................................... 9.182.- 8.94* .0:s .'2 I. 9 1 ) 9 705 -
June ................................... i0.093.o i0.52s I 1:1.3 7.7 lC'10.av".9 11. 1i.1 I1,22,.6

July................................... 10 d, 49.1 10, 63.8 1 ..649.2 Ll 0. :1 l 3.9 11,432.L
August ................................
September..............................
October ...............................
November .............................
December.............................

'Adjusted for seasonal ana worklng-day variation using seasonal .aJUEtmEnnt factor Lntroouceo in Jarnuary 1976.
1Annual total Is not -horn for seasonally .ajusted data. Unadjusteo data should be used for annual tstals.






8

Table 4. U.S. Exports (f.a.s. Value Basis) of Domestic Merchandise. Including Department of Defense (DOD) Military

Assistance Program Grant-Aid Shipments--Schedule B Sections and Selected Divisions, Seasonally Adjusted
and Unadjusted, by Month: January 1975 to July 1976

iIn milllond of uollarx. See Explanation of Statistics for inforntlon on coverage, definition of f.a.s. export value, and sources of error
In mhe data. Unadjusted totals represent sui or unrounded figures and hence may vary slightly from sum of rounded amounts)


Pe r aid


1975

Jarnuary-July. ......

J nuary ............ ....
February) .............
March...................
April ...................
Ma9 ....................
June ...................
uly. .... ....... ..
Auust .................
SeprE.er .............
October... ............
rt veniber ................
De tmlber .... ...........



January- 1^. .

January................
Feruar. .. .. ...
M. rchs....... .. ........
April l............. .
M .....................
JIn ............ .......
luly .................
ugus ......... .....
eptember. ..............
uctO ber ............ .
bFo .tter. .............







J.nur..y- er.... ........

Jar.u.ry- -iiv.. .

J -a uiry............... .
F- brary. ...............
March ..................
April ........... ... ...
M.y....................
June ............. .......
July ..... ..... ... ... .
August ..................
Leptrster. .......
October.......... ......
Noveruber................
Decen er ..... .... .. .



January-JLI ...

Jinruiry ..... ..........
February ..... ..
Mircr. ....... ..... .
Ipril..... ..... .......
M-y .............. ..... ..
unr .............. ..... .
luly ... .. ..
AuguE ... ..
September ............
other. .. .
No ts. r. .............
Oecer.oer ........ ...


Schedule B sectlor.6 and selected divisionel


O I 2 I 6 1' 71 73 8 9

Seasonally adjusted]




8,b.6 5 20.8 ..,btg9.0 ;,71-.b -"o5.0 5,080.b 0,312.b 25,h2.9 11,915.8 ,323.6 9,5,6.6 63,249.1 ',241.5

1.58 .3 139.2 1.01- 8 21.- t140 9 863.1 931.0 3..8'.2 l.655.1 b06.b 1.216.8 6b8.2 '238.6
.-18. 111.5 805. 9 99 3,630 6 1.622 I 611.3 1376.1 -Sbb 6 226.6
1.50 I3 1 I 187.6 L15.9 '12?.8 75I.2 90' 9 3 431.8 .t,20.3 596.6 I.l23l.. 50.-0 23/.0
1.2i' I13.t '31.9 361.a 7 'Ol.2 898 3 668.0 1. .3.9 63i.8 1.302.1 '.58.9 *27u.9
1.0-2.6 102.5 701.2 0.7 '88 9 66'.9 862.0 3.57'.9 1.702 ; 62 2 1.333.1 4il 9 285.0
I 090 3 91. ;00., 388.. "57 9 ?i2.j 886 9 3.965 2 1.809 7 b21.1 1,69.- '].0 *241.4
1.210 3 8.b 86' I 32- s 66 3 6'9.0 913.5 -,001.' I,62.5 631 0 .610.7 .80 5 '237.9
1. o8 a 110.- 9312.3 31-6.2? .3.9 6A.,.4 B80.9 3.93 3 1.749 1 "52. 1.577 4 468. 3 '21 8
1..- 1.1 49.0 .-'.9 30-.5 "-3 '0i.3. 939 3.92 8 1.7:5.0 t 25.5 1.502 .78 6 '2&5.7
1.-02 107.. 85z 9 788.3 '5b.9 7'5..2 92.1 -.136 2: 1.0.2 o62. 1.588.2 49b '*2;8.2
.l81l.i 110 8 801.' 430.2 ? 1 6 '2.5.5 961. .,006.8 1,289 0 6t9. 1.539 0 *89.. 3153.3
1.292 116.1 868 3 36- 68 4 '66 I 923 0 .103.8 1,863.3 bS-.3 1.525 .98 '265.5




9, n1.2 ,3;.7 5,861.5 2 465.9 's69.2 5,80.8 6,197.9 2,041 .16 2,707.3 3,270.1 10,228.0 3,751.8 b1 671.5

i,298.2 dll 62: 321 0 "'8.9 '' 930 3 3,'70.3 1,732.8 6 5.3 1.368.2 493.2 '254.0
I.15 .S 1'b.' 'L3.5 20.. '3 i9 7-0 B 915.2 3,852 1,768.6 '3i i..25.' 526.2 *"01.6
1,1i8' 122.5 "- 132. "' .9 610. 952.3 i.2o2. L.801 2 jo.3 1.2lCi.b 7h:.6 '21b 5
1,38' 2 133.9 '1' 1 409. 1771.3 816.) 923.8 3,9-..1 1. 1,9.0 2.9.5 I..Ob.2 509 0 '258.3
I.3Su.5 96.6 930.5 3j0.3 "96. 580 6 118.8 -.012.3 1.862.6 735 1.518 2 565.6 '248.5
1.336.1 103.3 663.4 375.2 '78.3 1li.l 926.4 -,280.1 1.662.1 765.6 1,670.2 l39.? 1 244.4
1,469 o 92.9 910.9 3:6.9 '86.4 620.3 931.1 4,361.7 1,896.0 861.6 1,628.9 555.8 '248.2







Unadjusted


15,.-8-. 3

8,.-J 3 '

I, .3 .1
. 338 0
I ..o
1.219 3
1, .'68.

1.11-
1,1682.1


1 o:.6
6..8-'.0






I,I?) .
.3 .L4



1.253 -
S1,2d J
1 ,357.9


1,308 -

660. 3


St 3
120. 1
101 0
98.0


10-.
10. .

I >0.2
0Q 3




822.;




118 I
I ,. .
9)3 3

7L. I


4 '13 6

5, '4.2

I 026 0
836 9
n92. 1


l.8 3

-5 .

8- .9
859.l
819 8




6.4J1.5

o35 6
"9-. 1
n.l. .




807 L


- -t4.5

2,4168.4

357 4
1j"
399.6

3-O. .
.36 5


3'9.8
323.5
31i.5
*5;.9
350. 9




2,393.4

2bi
M8! '
n03.91
215.1
3 3.'
403.6
341. a


5,i133.2

8;0.8
n68.5
'88 2
'31.
'02 6
a18.
i46.
10.
"'6.3
26.8
olt, .5





,71. 7

"--. "
-a0.
'I- 9
o66.8

898. I
6-.14
850.7


6,323.2

10.5

9.9 c

'1-. 3
699. 3
8.3 3
8 5.6
860 2
980. '
91- 2
895.3




6. 9 .s


890.5
I .019.0
9 5.5
959.2

897.6


26,285.2

, 312.8
3.53 86
..022.1
3,910. 1
31,93 0
3.93' 9

3.51. i
3. 5W I
3.586. 1
-..26u .3
3.9-) "
-,038.




8o,635.9

3. 1,9. 3
3.8'9 3
-.330.9

- -38 8
4,95.7
3,977.6


20.895 I

12,135.9

.612 1
I 55 9
I 0 ..
1.853
1.829 9
I., 7H.8
.I 92.0
1 o80.9
, t.o0 0
.883. I
1.'.9 to
3.8-0.9




3,017.7.

1 '12.11
,'13. %
I 997~.5
1.908.9
1.951 7
1 ,6999.;
I ,i63.1,


1 ,353 .7

6bl 5
5'! 0
6.7.3
~*- I
65" '

596.9










5,291.3

oc5. 1
b88.5
'92. 2
795 1
0i.0
269 1
814.2


9,9...6

1.08L.2
I .22 9
1.5'1.5
1.10 2
I 510
I 5l..q
1,280.5
1. 2 6. I
1.382 2
I ..60.8
1.532
1,563.9




10,1941.4

1.212 2
1,.'7 0
1. 5 1. 1
1.520 I
.; 17.1
1,727 0
1,299.9


5.b'2. 7

3,270.5

54. .6
42b .
.88 0
.82 3
483.5
463.5
U.81.0
L54.6
400.8
.00.4
530.9

3'8.g !




3,aU9.3


300 *
611.8
515. .'
518.0
5563.0
537.5


3.162 0

1,741.5

238.6
226 6
237.0
274.9
285.0
241.4
237 9
"27 8
245.

353 3
205.5




1,611.5

254.0
201 6
216.5
:58.3
248 5
241.4
248.2


'iScheule b i;ction ana :elect. idiissior. dn crptionn ire li folloa-

I). Food an live janIial '. Machinery ind transport equipment
L. beverage. fna otooDaco 71. Machinery, other thar electric
rude material. inedible. enctpt fuels 72. Electrical machinery, apparatus, and appliances
3. Mineri fuel, lubricants, and related r.tertals 7j. Transport equipment
-. A.It.al and ect able oiis and fat 8. Kmicellaneous manufactured articles. n.e.c.
5. Cher.lC al 9. Commolttie: ana transactions not classlfled according to kind
0. MarufacltureJ gooi ctla. ifiea ch.rlly tby material
.Sc-.cniily adijute-, fieurc lor section I -.a atifer lightly irom the sum of divisions 71, 72, and 73 since each is independently an-
juslea.
I'diustfd ior E.eaionl ..and -orkLin-day narttion u'Ing eaonal adjuEstent factors introduced In January 19;6. See footnote I on front
page. Annual rotals art not sho.n fIr ea onally adjusted data. Unadjusted data should be used for annual totals. rhe adjusted section
o.'aln in this table ar.al ,i1lar overall monthlyy tolai ji rtable. 1. 2, ana 3 tere adjusted Independently.
"In the anaence o0 a mon nt.raoire eaonl patterns for thin section. no seasonal aajut.-.rt factors have been appllea to the data.









Table 5. U.S. General Imports (f.a.s. Value Basis) of Merchandise, Schedule A Sections, Seasonally Adjusted and
Unadjusted, by Month: January 1975 to July 1976
tIa millions or dollars. See Explanation of Statlatlcs for Information or. coverage, definition of f.a.s. Import value, and sources of error
In sbe aata. Unadjusted totals represent sum of unrounded figures and hence may vary slightly from sum of rounded amounts)

Schedule A sectional
Period
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Seasonally adjusted'

19275

January-July......... ,751.6 852.0 3,268.0 1-,5,i2.2 '316.8 2,185.2 9,186.5 13,179.6 5,108.4 '1,457.b

January.............. 672.8 111.6 -85.9 3,090.3 '.8 5 .4i.5 1,669.3 1.816.0 772.6 '218.0
February ............. 668.9 126.0 -66.7 1,983.8 '.4 7 12-.7 1,'63.9 1.831.7 723.9 '181 0
March................ 675.1 150 9 466 7 1.364..7 '5.1 329.9 1,356.7 1,986.2 722. '185.4
April............. 664.6 120 5 472.0 2.436.9 '-0.1 314.5 1.305 1.81-.0 726.3 '231.2
May.................. 627.9 14. 3 "-..5 1.99-.9 '51 9 281.b 1,101.8 1,835.4 675.6 '198.5
June........ ........ 739.0 119.3 -60.9 1,482.0 33.2 245 7 1,175.6 1.852.3 116.2 '219 7
July.................. 709.3 109. 473 3 2,181 6 ...8 26-.3 1,115.. 1.978.2 771.. '22i.8
August....... .... .. 664.- 112.7 139.3 2.2, 3.. '32.7 282.? 1,052. 2.101.5 i.0.6 '189.7
September ............ 904 I 116.1 -59.8 2,503.7 '-1 6 286.3 1,099.5 1,891.6 '76.9 '217.9
October..... .. ... 7.3.5 111.3 -0.1 2..23.0 '.8 8 297.0 1.111.7 2,06-.3 616.1 '217.-
Novemner... ....... 762 4. 10'.2 -42. 2.36'.9 '66.2 310 2 1,126 9 2,053.6 673.8 '211.9
December. ........ 696 8 127 9 509.1 2.297 1 '-6.. 3-. I,16..i 2.21..1 878.7 '231 6

1976

January-July......... 5,77 .1 994.9 3.953.8 L8.4t3J.7 '- 5.' 2, 608.0 9q.21.4 16,a85 .1 6,956.1 '1,395.3

January........ ... 731 9 1-.).. 526 9 2,668.0 '37.6 35, 1,166.0 2,-93.9 900.9 '186.6
February.. .... ..... 701.0 167 8 51 2 2.3.9 3 '51.5 330 I 1.275.7 2.2i6.1 919.9 '169.7
March .. ........ h.I 1l .5 508.1 2,3.2.9 '3).. 362.2 1 -23 2.-10.. 9-6 3 '215 0
April ................ '06.j 129.1 5'6.9 2,8".9 'j3c.B j7 9 I.*t.3 d 2.-8. .- 981.0 '189.9
May....... .......... 826.- 105.o 528.5 2,201.0 '29., 36'.3 1.376 O 2 .2;.5 1.02' 8 '211 2
June............... 9J36.2. 123.5 364.2 2,811.4 '30.1 374.5 l,,4:.4 2,381.L 1,034.6 '196.4
July................ 938.0 130.0 637 0 3.210.2 '34 2 426.6 1,568.2 2,602.4 1,122.9 '226.5
August ........ ..
September ...........
October .............
November r ............
December............

Unadjus'ea

1975"

January-December ..... 6,508 6 I,19 5 5.56t 3 26.-?5 6 5j3.9 3,096.- 1,'00.5 ;3,..6-.6 9,227.6 2,529 1

January-July..... .... ,''9.1 831.2 3,269.7 1-,801.5 316.8 2,2'1.9 4,0';. 1 13,-22.' -,908.9 1,-5'.6

January ...... ...... .. 1' .8 112 3 .66.0 3..21.0 -.8 -37.2 1.7.9.5 1,89-.. 155.6 218.0
February .... ....... 62e.8 106 39- 9 1.9-0 1 -- .' 3' 2 1.259.0 1,688 6 621 9 181 0
March .... ........ 6'7.5 1.3 : -b0.6 1.-60.' 55 1 30.8 1.313.3 2,079 5 687.6 185.s
April.......... .... 66 .5 119.1 -75 3 2,..1. -0 3571.9 1,2.3 1 1,699.2 703.6 231 2
May................. 611.0 116.9 -53.6 1.9,5.0 51.9 265.6 1.1.. 7 1,93..5 626 3 198.5
June........ .. ..... 7?9.7 129.6 313.0 1,-36 1 33.2 252.8 1,230.8 1.961 6 7272 7 219 7
July.............. ;05.8 103. 506.- 2.137.3 Z..8 2.7 1,136.6 1,96 .- 850.9 223.8
August .............. 635.8 95.8 .20 9 2.2. .6 32.i 270.6 1,005.3 1,622.0 800.6 189.7
September.... ....... 696 9 106.9 '6..- ,- 6.1 -1 6 275.1 1.091 8 1,793 3 815.7 217.9
October............. 759.9 126.0 '-57 7 2.3-5 5 .8 6 302; 1.19..0 2.138 6 919.7 217..
November. .. .... .. 25.1 120.' '15.3 2,089.- 66.2 298.5 1.121.2 2,018 6 8.4.1 211.9
December.. ........... 1.2.1 137.2 52'. 2.547.5 '.6.0 327.9 1,211.1 2,269.. 878.7 234.6

1976

January-July...... .. 5,803.3 962.8 .,667.0 18,641.5 2i4. 2.63 0 9,7601. 17,198.2 6,77A.7 1,395.3

January.............. 79.. 1-1.5 .83.; 2,790 7 37.6 350.0 1,190.i 2,229.7 838.7 186 6
February...... .... ... 669.5 156.3 39.5 2.302 3 51.5 31l 6 1,108.6 2,0-.9 790.2 169 ?
March... ........ .... 890.1 b7.8 539 b 2, '-8.2 3 ..- *10.I -0.' 2, '2. .0 99 2 215 0
April........... .... 6. 18.0 I '.b 563 0 '9 3 36 8 1i-.3 I .*1 9 0 2.600.2 931 19.
May .................. 61.8 106.- 539.1 2,1 .9 79.* 1. .0 I 383 2 -59.1 925.. 211 2
June..... .... .... 180 2 136.2 6i2.3 2,834 1 30.1 3Sr 0 I,- t 2,612.5 1,098.7 196.4
July............... .. 3 3 123.0 649.8 3 303 4.2 3)5.9 1,547 e 2,461.6 1.,14 7 226.5
August. ...........
September............
Octoner.............
November............
December.............

The 1975 data an this tabl6 0o not reflect regular import revisions publi shd a~rih cre June 1976 reports ana -whaic are reflected In she
data presented in other LL.Dle of thjO report. These revisions will be rezlecrea in this table In subsequent Issues on th.bs repol.
'Schedule A seclior, descriptions are as soilows:
0. Food and live animals 5 ChemJcals
1. Beverages and tobacco 6. Manufacturer goods classlfled cnlefly by material
2. Crude materials, Inedible, except fuels 7. Machinery and transport equipment
3. MIneral fuels, lubricants, and related materials 9. Miscellaneous manufactured articles, n.i.s.
4. Animal and vegetable oils and fats 9. Commodilles and transactions not classified accorailn to kind
'Adjusteo for seasonal and uorklng-day vartation using seasonal adjustment factors Introduced In January 1976. See footnote I on front
page. Annual totals are not shown for seasonally adjusted data. Unadjusted data sr.ould be used for annual totals. The adjusted section
totals In this table ann slmllar overall monthly totals In tables 1 and 4 were adjusted Indepenaently.
In the absence of demonstrable seasonal patterns for this section, no seasonal adjustment factors have been applied to the data.






10

Table 6. U.S. General Imports (c.i.f. Value Basis) of Merchandise. Schedule A Sections. Seasonally Adjusted and
Unadiusted, by Month: January 1975 to July 1976

tin millions of dollars. See Explanation of Statistics for nformttlon on coverage. definition of c.l.f. Import value, and aourcesaoferrorn
the data. Unadjusted totals represent aum of unfounded figures and hence may vary slightly rom sum of rounded amounts)

Schedule A sections'
Period
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Seasonally adjusted'


1975W

January-July......... 5,159.6 92D.4 3,614.0 15,511.5 '33..7 2,327.1 9.9,6.4 14,202.8 5,486.0 '1,494.4

January............ 732.9 122.1 5M.9.6 3,306.3 '50.5 454.0 1,810.6 2,018.0 825.3 '224.3
February ....... .. 726.2 135.8 512.9 2,108.1 '46.6 346.6 1,580.7 1,971.'- 776.3 '186.2
March..... .......... 732.6 162 5 507.9 1,.56.8 157.6 3.9.5 1,461.5 2,157.7 776.3 '190.9
April....... ...... 720.8 13l1. 520.8 2,594.3 '42.5 3D3.9 1,407.1 1,962.0 777.6 '238.2
May.. .............. 680.7 124.0 485 8 2,131.1 '54.6 297.9 1.187.9 1,968.4 728.0 '201.9
June. .... .......... 196.3 129.5 511.1 1,585.6 '35.1 262.9 1,298.1 2,001.8 770.8 '224.3
July.... ........ .. 710.1 120.2 525.9 2,329.3 '47.7 282.3 1,200.5 2,123.5 831.7 '228.5
August ............ 7 5.6 123.0 -8-.1 2,399.6 '34.9 301.3 1,137 0 2,259.3 801.0 '194.0
September.......... 97.... 121 6 505 7 2,b90.1 -.4 304.1 1,179 6 2,044.5 841.8 '222.9
October ... ......... 804..3 122.0 485.2 2,597.0 '51.9 313.1 1,198.9 2,226.9 882.6 '222.1
November............. 830.3 114.5 48o.0 2,549.8 '71.2 328.9 1,218.4 2,213.5 945.5 '216.1
December..... ....... 755.1 139.1 561.2 2,452.3 '49.6 344.0 1,261.5 2,177.7 951.3 '239.4

1916

January-July........ 6,26.2 1,077.0 4,1941.8 19,748.9 -274.7 2,713.0 10,596.3 18,191.3 7,475.3 '1 425.5

January. ............. 796.- 142.0 580.2 2,853.0 '.0. 372.6 1,26-..0 2,73.1 912.8 '191.1
February ....... 58 6 200.5 554.2 2,507.0 '55.4 .17.2 1,376.'. 2,431.4 969.5 '173.6
March. ............ 9Si 9 190.1 550.1 2.505.9 37.4 401.5 1,528.0 2.586 5 1,037.1 '219.9
April.............. 829.4 1I0.5 1s2 .9 3,0'6.3 '39.9 390.- 1,570.6 2,68..6 1.061.5 '193.1
Ray.. .. .. ......... 898.. 11-.8 57'.5 2,353 2 '31.8 384.7 I,.87.2 2.621 0 1,101.3 '215.1
June.................. 1010. 137.3 611.9 3,009.f 312.3 393.2 1,672.9 2 609.3 i 108.8 '201.0
July. ............... 1,008.9 141.3 700.0 3,443.7 '37.1 453.4 1,697.2 2,785.4 1, 203.7 '231.7
.ugu t ... ...........
September. .........
October .............
November r............
December ............

Urenadjusted


1975"

Janurry-December..... 9,22'. 2 1,54 .3 6,1-2.9 268,8-.1 586.6 3,929.1 15,865.6 25,296.. 9,945.5 2,588.8

-iruary-July.. .. 5 162.' 902.9 3,616.2 I5l,89.2 33'..' 2,366.0 9.796.5 l u. B5.4 ,336.4 1,494.4

January.... ....... 777.6 122.8 527.0 j,bbO.O 50.5 '.67.6 1,897.5 2.038.2 807.1 22-..3
February ............ 680.- 11-.6 433.9 2,061.? '6.8 326.8 1,359.. 1,811.7 666.9 186.2
Maren. .............. 713.5 15.7 501.3 1.580.o 57.6 361.0 1,-14 7 2.259.1 739.0 190.9
4prlI. ........... %.2. 129.2 52-.5 2,596.9 2.5 373 7 1,339.6 2,054.2 753.5 238.2
May. ... ......... 662.3 126.8 '97 9 2,017.8 5*.6 302.1 123-.2 2,093.6 6714. 201.9
June. .... .. ... 6'0 I 1.0.6 568 9 1,536.- 35.1 270.5 1,327.7 2.119.9 777.7 224.3
Jult .............. 76n.3 113 6 562.7 2,275.7 1.17 264.2 1.223.3 2,108.1 917.3 228.5
Augu t ........ .... 69..- 105.0 .63.6 2,.02.0 3, 9 288.3 1,085.9 1,958.8 865.9 196.0
Septe.er .. 966.6 117 6 523.9 2,628.2 `... 292.; 1,111.3 1,932 1 883.9 222.9
October.............. 8,2.0 '0 .3 504.6 2,513.9 51.9 318.1 1,287.6 2,307.0 99-.6 222.1
l eovemner............... 769.6 132.- .56.- ,31.0 11.2 316.- 1.212.3 2,175.9 913.3 216.1
December ... ........ 7,12.3 149.1 518.0 2,719.6 .9.6 3.1.5 1,312.0 2,437.2 951.3 239.4

1976

January-J.ly..... ... 6,285.6 ..042.7 1,2,.8.7 i9,942.0 274.7 2.776.0 10,530.5 18,563.7 7,283.4 1,425.5

January ............ 628.8 153 5.32.6 2,981 .2 .0.7 369.2 1,290.5 2.-03.9 905.7 191.1
February. ........... 12..5 169.0 .75 5 2.-56.9 55.- 333.0 1,196 I 2,268.5 850.0 173.6
March. ...... ...... 962.1 181.2 58-.2 2,919.4 37.4 432.9 1.578.4 2,922.' 1,072.9 219.9
April...... .. .... 88i.6 138.9 608.9 2, 90.2 39.9 431.9 1,512.'. 2.816.2 1.002.0 193.1
May ...... .... ... 8.9.9 ill.8 386.0 2.281.6 31.8 388 5 1.49-.7 2,655.0 994.. 215.1
June .. ............. 1,058.3 i4F.9 107.4 3. ,30.9 32.5 409.5 1.783.4 2,8E2.4 1,177.6 201.0
Jul .... ........... 9I71.1 133.7 714.0 3,247.7 37.1 108.0 1,615.1 2,635.0 1,280.7 231.1
August .......... ..
September ..........
October..............
Nroveoer ..... .... .
December ........ ..


"Te 197 oaata iar th.s taolc no not reflect regular Import reuasoris publsr.ea wilh the June i976 reporis and whIlc are reflected in the
a.oa preserteo ir, c.tr.Er table, i this report. ihe.i reslsions 4ill be reflected in this table in subsequent issues of this report.
'SC.raojle A secion a ucrlptions &r- as lollous:
0. Fooa ana live animals 5 Cnemicala
1. Beverage: and tobacco 6. Manufacturer goods classified chiefly by material
2. Crude materials, Inenible, except tuels 7. Machinery and transport equipment
3. Mineral fuels, lubricants, ana related materials 8. discellaneous manufactured articles, n.e.s.
-. Animal and vegetable oils and fats 9. Commodities and transactions not classified according to kind
'Adjustea lor seasonal and sorking-d.y variation using seasonal adjustment factors Lntroducea In January 1976. See footnote I on front
page annual totals are not shown for seasonally adjuatea data. Unadjustea data should be used for annual totals. The adjusted section
totals In this table ard simJlar overall monthly total. Ln tables 2 and 4 were adjusted Independently.
'In the absence of dsmongtrable seasonal patterns for thi sec seon seasonal adjustent factor have been applied to the data.








U.S. GENERAL IMPORTS OF PETROLEUM AND SELECTED PETROLEUM

PRODUCTS, UNADJUSTED

Tables 1 A, 1-B, 2-A and 2-B which follow, contain monthly and cumulative-todate data on U.S. general imports
of petroleum and petroleum products into the U.S. Customs area and into the Virgin Islands for the period January
1975 through current month. Prior to January 1976, these data were presented separately in a Supplement to Report
FT 900. (It should be noted that imports into the Virgin Islands are excluded from the official U.S. import totals
presented in the preceding tables of this report.) The data in these tables are not adjusted for seasonal and working-
day variation.
Beginning with the issue for January 1976, the value figures presented in this report are in thousands of dollars
and the quantity figures in thousands of barrels.


Schedule A and TSUSA Commodity Numbers Used in Compiling the Petroleum
Information Presented in This Report


Energy products


Nonenergy products


Schedule A. No.


Crude and partly refined
petroleum
331.0120
331.0140
331.0210
331.0220
331.0230
331.0240

Crude petroleum
331.0120
331.0140

Gasoline
332.1000

Jet fuel
332.2020

Kerosene
332.2040

Distillate fuel oil
332.3020
332.3040

Residual fuel oil
332.4020
332.4040

Propane and butane gas
341.0020

Liquid derivatives of
petroleum, n.e.s.
332.9940 pt.


TSUSA No.


475.0510
475.1010
475.0520, 475.0540
475.1020, 475.1040
475.3520
475.6520


475.0510
475.1010


475.2520, 475.2560


475.2540


475.3000


475.0530
475.1030


475.0550
475.1050


475.1510, 475.1530


Schedule A. No.

Lubricating oils
332.5000 pt.

Lubricating greases
332.5000 pt.

Paraffin and other mineral
waxes
332.6220 pt.
332.6240

Asphalt
332.9800

Naphthas not for further
refinement
332.9920


TSUSA No.


475.4500


475.5500, 475.6000



494.2200
494.2400


521.1100


475.3540


All other petroleum products
(pitch of tar coke, non-
liquid hydrocarbon mix-
tures, and calcined petro-


leum and coal coke not for
fuel)
332.9700 pt.
332.9940 pt.
599.8040 pt.


401.6200
475.7000
517.5100


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U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
Bureau of the Census
Washington, D.C. 20233


POSTsuc nMfL rca rn.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
COM-202


OFFICIAL BUSINESS
FIRST CLASS MAIL
BOOK


1