Summary of U.S. export and import merchandise trade

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Material Information

Title:
Summary of U.S. export and import merchandise trade
Series Title:
FT-900
Physical Description:
v. : ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of the Census
United States -- Bureau of the Census
Publisher:
Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, Foreign Trade Division for sale by the Subscriber Services Section (Publications), Bureau of the Census
Place of Publication:
Washington
Creation Date:
May 1976
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Commerce -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Citation/Reference:
American statistics index
Dates or Sequential Designation:
1974-1976.
General Note:
At head of title: 1977- United States foreign trade.
General Note:
Formerly classed C 56. 210:900 - during the time the Bureau of the Census was subordinate to Social and Economic Statistics Administration.
General Note:
Issues prior to Oct. 1977 were sent to depositories as Item 144.
General Note:
Unnumbered supplements accompany some issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001209840
oclc - 02245761
notis - AFW0105
lccn - 76640395
issn - 0361-0047
sobekcm - AA00005271_00048
Classification:
lcc - HF105 .B73e
ddc - 382/.0973
System ID:
AA00005271:00048

Related Items

Preceded by:
United States foreign trade; export and import merchandise trade
Succeeded by:
United States foreign trade. FT900, Summary of U.S. export and import merchandise trade

Full Text
a4 W V H I g-" v a a


SUMMARY OF U.S. EXPORT AND
IMPORT MERCHANDISE TRADE

( May 1976


J.I
.1 *r


Seasonally Adjusted and Unadjusted Data

(Including Unadjusted Data on Imports of Petroleum and Petroleum Products)


The Bureau of the Census, Department of Commerce
'amounced today that during May 1976, seasonally
Aidjuted exports on a f.a.s. (free alongside ship.i U.S.
pt.:... of exportation value basis, excluding Department of
i;; efeaae (DOD) Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid ship-
..nts, were valued at $9,578.0 million 2 and that
i "llasonally adjusted general imports on a f.a.s. foreign
p: rt of exportation value basis, amounted to $9,182.4
i .llion." s a May seasonally adjusted general imports
S..n a c.x.f. boost insurance, and freight value basis
ailounted to 49,872.6 million. Comparable season-
aty adjusted totals for April were $9,393.6 million
1|. "'F exports, $9,595.7 million for imports on a f.a.s.
walue basis, and $10,301.5 million for imports on a
c.i.f. value basis.

The Bureau stated that based on the above seasonally
adjusted f.a.s. export and import figures, the merchandise
trade balance for May was a surplus of $395.6 million, as
i Emopared to the deficit of $202.1 million 2 recorded
in April. Using the c.i.f. Import value and the I.a.s.
frport value, a trade deficit of $294.6 million 1 3
*i a recorded in May. The comparable c.l.f. trade balance
ior April was a deficit of $907.9 million.

During the first 5 months of 1976 (January-May I,
Pi sportss on a seasonally adjusted basis were at an annual
;ata of $109,994 million, a level about 3 percent higher
I: a the calendar year 1975 total of $107,191 million.
Il "peionally adjusted imports on a f.a.s. value basis for
(Ii ::*j January-May 1976 period were at an annual rate of
Il. 11,604 million, about 16 percent above the comparable
n i.-otal for calendar year 1975 of $96,140 million. On a


c.l.f. value basis, imports for the first 5 months of
1976 were at an annual rate of $119,873 million, also at
a le'el anour 16 percent higher than the calendar year
1975 c.i.f. total of $103,414 million.

The Bureau stated that during May, seasonally
adjusted exports were at a record high level, exceeding
the previous record of $9,409.3 million INovember 19751,
by $168.7 million. Seasonally adjusted imports for May
were about $413.3 million less than in April.

During the 4-month perloa, February-May 1976,
seasonally adjusted exports averaged $9,181.8 million
per montn, about 1 percent belo .rne $9,246.8 million
average reported for the preceding 4-month period,
October 1975-January 1976. Imports on a f.a.s value
basis, averaged $9,331.4 million per montn for the
current 4-montn period, about 10 percent higner than
the $8,518.9 million average reported for the preceding
4-month period.

Exports unadjusted for seasonal change and
excluding Militar) Assistance Program Grant-Aid snip-
ments increased trom $9,834.2 million in April to
$9,977.4 million in May 1976. Witn Military Assistance
Program Grant-Aia shipments included, exports increased
from $9,843.6 million in April to $9,988.1 million in
May. Linafjusted general imports (f.a.s. value basis
were valued at $9,895.1 million in April 1976 as com-
pared to $8,943.7 million in May. The comparable
Figures for imports on a c.i.f. value basis were
$10,622.9 million in April and $9,615.9 million in
May.


Miluld far masonal and aorking-day variation, but not Ioi changes in pr;ce level. Factors used to adldun 1975 and 1976 data shown n this report rprensenri waonas l adjustment factors den.ed from
;l .iq ilgl 1r hc gh 1975 and introduced in January 1976 combined wth rhe appiSpriaTP workirng-day adjnss.ent tartios.
'rIljulftit osi at da over a leasi 4-momnh periods are desirable to identity underi.ng Irends Mortrh-lo-month changes in export imports, and similar eies often reflen pnmanl, irregulae move
i Imfl dfllranmes in monthly carryover, itc. Recent irronil to month permnt hangs in the onve erall sleanoaly adjusted eport and Impor series are presented in The folloa*ng table with average percent
ic-11-monlth rile end decline over longer periods shown for rompar.n. The average rile and average decline figures exclude percentage tnanges for (Il the pernod July DOeemb' r 1971 because of
I'tmaoull in the data due to effects of dock trikes and (21 penods wen negligible changes liero percenU in Tne level of exports/iponrt or urred. Percentage changes loI I.a. impon values are not
.ae for periods priot a January 1974

M" onth-co-month Average monthly rates of change

Series Apr.-May Mar.-Apr. Feb.-Mar. Jan.-Feb. Average Averge month 12 months
1976 1076 9; rite decline Jan.-May May 1975-
1976 1976 96 9 19:0-1975 1970-19'5 1976 May 1976
(Percent) (Percent) (Percent) (Percent) (Percentl (Percent) (Percent) (Percent)

.ws. export value.. .2.0 +4.9 +1.8 -3.3 +3.2 -2.8 +1.4 +1.3
k.ia. Import value.. -4.3 -0.1 + 4." -2.6 (NA) (NA) +0.1 +2.1
&.t. Import value.. -4.2 0.0 7.4 -2.9 (NA) (NA) .0.1 +2.1

S|itielthe "EsplanalDon of Stalnsics"for detinitins of the expon and import values and uade balances


Inquiries conmering thee hiures dlould be addresed o thi Chief. Foreign Trade Dinvion, Bureau of the
C-ni. Weshmingn. D.C. 20233. Tel. Area Code 301. 63-5140.

f. U.S. Department of Commerce, BUREAU OF THE CENSUS
For tal b t ih Sub cnue. Serv.c Serion IPubi.cat.onsl Bureau Dl Ine Ceneus Wnasnngion D.C 20233 or .n\
US. Department al CommrrcE aisirlc oltct Ponage namp. noa acceDtaDic cumrrncv .uim.ired at -nd(r a r. k
Rem.iranres thrr lore.gn raunti.e must De 5O .nTr;nar.onal money order or Or a arat on a U S ornk Pr.ca 10
cents on rov Anr.ual iunairein.an I F 900 95 5 5 an 986 tomi.nrdl 13 00


1000







EXPLANATION OF STATISTICS


Import Valuation


Coverage

The U.S. import statistics reflect both government and
nongovernment imports of merchandise from foreign coun-
tries into the U.S. Customs territory, which includes the 50
States. the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico The U.S.
import statistics exclude imports into the Virgin Islands,
Guam, American Samoa, and other U S possessions; and
shipments between the United States and Puerto Rico,
between the United States and U.S. possessions, and
between any of these outlying areas. (Data on U.S. trade
with Puerto Rico and with U.S. possessions are published
separately in Report FT 800. Additional data on such trade
and on imports into the Virgin Islands from foreign coun-
tries are presented in reference tabulations.) Data on
imports of petroleum and selected petroleum products,
including shipments into the Virgin Islands from foreign
countries. (previously shown in Report FT 900-Supple-
ment) are included in this report effective with the January
1976 statistics.
The U.S. import statistics also exclude American goods
returned to the United States b\ its Armed Forces: intransit
shipments through the United States: temporary shipments.
transactions not considered to be of statistical significance.
such as shipments of personal and household effects; low-
valued nondutiable imports by mail, issued monetary coins
of all component metals; and gold in the form of ores.
concentrates, waste, scrap. and refined bullion. Imports of
silver in these forms are included in the statistics, unless
otherwise noted. (Information on gold movements, pre-
viously shown in Report FT 2402. appears in Report FT
990 effective January 1975.)

General Impurts/Imports For Consumption

Thle statistics on U.S. imports are presented in terms of
both "General Imports" and "Imports for Consumption."
General imports are a combination of entries for immediate
consumption and entries into Customs bonded warehouses,
and thus generally reflect total arrivals of merchandise.
Imports for consumption are a combination of entries for
immediate consumption and withdrawals from warehouses
for consumption, and thus generally reflect the total of the
commodities entered into U S. consumption channels.

Source Of Import Information

The official U.S. import statistics arc compiled by the
Bureau of the Census from copies of the import entry and
warehouse withdrawal forms which importers are required
by law to file with Customs officials. The information as to
country of origin, net quantity, value, and commodity
classification is verified by Customs officials on entries filed
for transactions valued over $250, which are ordinarily sub-
ject to examination for Customs appraisement purposes.
The statistical cop) of the entry is corrected if it does not
accurately reflect the information called for by the statis-
tical requirements.


F.a.s. Import Value.-The f.a.s. (free alongside ship) value
represents the transaction value of imports at the foreign
port of exportation. It is based on the purchase price, i.e.,
lie actual transaction value and generally includes all
charges incurred in placing the merchandise alongside the
carrier at the port of exportation in the country of exporta-
tion.

C.i.f. Import Value.-The c.i.f. (cost, insurance, and freight)
value represents the value of imports at the first port of
entry in the United States. It is based on the purchase price
and includes all freight, insurance, and other charges
(excluding U.S. import dues) incurred in bringing the
merchandise from the country of exportation and generally
placing it alongside the carrier at the first port of entry in
the United States. If the merchandise was acquired in a
transaction between related parties, the purchase price used
in deriving the c.i.f. value is based on an arm's-length equiv-
alent transaction price. i.e.. a price which would exist
between unrelated buyers and sellers.

Import Monthly Carryover

It is the objective of the compiling procedures to include
shipments, insofar is practicable, in tle statistics for the
actual month of imptilation. However. for purposes of the
statistics the month ot importation is based on the date of
official acceptance by Customs of the import entry or ware-
house withdrawal document This may not in all cases corre-
spond to the actual month of importation. (For example,
under the Customs "immediate-delivery" procedures,
importers may file the import entry up to 10 workdays
after the actual date of importation.) Also, because of
processing problems (e.g., late receipt of a document for an
end-of-month shipment, rejection of a shipment by the
computer because the data fail to meet certain edit criteria
established to protect the accuracy of the statistics, etc.),
there is an overall average carryover of about 7 percent (in
terms of value) of the shipments from the reported month
of importation (based on the date of the import entry or
warehouse withdrawal document) to a subsequent month,
usually the succeeding month. In addition, as a result of the
aforementioned Customs "immediale-delivery" procedures,
there is a further carryover of presently unknown magni-
tude from the actual month of importation to a subsequent
month. These limitations should be borne in mind when
making month-to-month comparisons.
Cumulations of data over at least 4-month periods are
desirable to identify underlying trends. Month-to-month
changes in imports, exports, and similar series often reflect
primarily irregular movements, differences in monthly
carryover, etc.

Estimated Data for Imports Valued Under 5251

The overall import and Schedule A Section 9 totals
include sample estimates for shipments valued under $251.
Therefore, they are subject to sampling error, estimated at


IMPORT STATISTICS








less than one-tenth of one percent for the unadjusted overall
total and about one percent for the unadjusted Schedule A
Section 9 total. This means that we can have about 67
percent confidence that the published unadjusted overall
totals and the unadjusted Schedule A Section 9 totals differ
by less than one-tenth of a percent and one percent, respec-
tively, from the totals that would have resulted from a com-
plete tabulation. The statistics on imports of petroleum and
petroleum products included in this report reflect fully
compiled data and, therefore, are not subject to sampling
error.


EXPORT STATISTICS

Coverage

The export statistics reflect, in general, both government
and nongovernment exports of domestic and foreign mer-
chandise from the U.S. Customs territory (includes the 50
States, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico) to for-
eign countries, whether the exportation involves a com-
mercial transaction or not. The statistics, therefore, include
Department of Defense Military Assistance Program Grant-
Aid shipments, shipments for economic assistance under the
Foreign Assistance Act and shipments of agricultural com-
modities under P. L. 480 (The Agricultural Trade Develop-
ment and Assistance Act of 1954, as amended) and related
laws. The following are excluded from the statistics Ship-
ments to U.S. Armed Forces and diplomatic missions
abroad for their own use; shipments between the United
States and Puerto Rico, between the United States and its
possessions (including the Virgin Islands), and between
these outlying areas; exports from U.S. possessions, intransit
shipments through the United States: transactions not con-
sidered to be of statistical importance, such as personal and
household effects; temporary exports, low-valued or non-
commerical exports by mail; issued monetary coins of all
component metals; and gold in the form of ores. concen-
trates, waste, scrap, and refined bullion. Exports of silver in
these forms are included in the statistics, unless otherwise
noted. (Information on gold movements, previously shown
in Report FT 2402, appears in Report FT 990 effective
January 1975.)



Definition of Exports of Domestic
and Foreign Merchandise

Exports of domestic merchandise include commodities
which are grown, produced, or manufactured in the United
States, and commodities of foreign orgin which have been
changed in the United States from the form in which they
were imported, or which have been enhanced in value by
further manufacture in the United States. Exports of for-
eign merchandise consist of commodities of foreign origin
which have entered the United States as imports and which,
at the time of exportation, are in substantially the same
condition as when imported.


Source of Export Information

The official U.S. export statistics are compiled by the
Bureau of the Census primarily from copies of Shipper's
Export Declarations which are required to be filed with
Customs officials, except for Department of Defense Mili-
tary Assistance Program Grant-Aid shipments which are
reported directly to the Bureau of the Census by the
Department of Defense and shipments by qualified ex-
porters who have been authorized to submit data in the
form of magnetic tape, punched cards, or monthly Shipper's
Summary Export Declarations directly to the Bureau of the
Census.
Export Valuation

F.a.s. Export Value.-The value reported in the export sta-
tistics generally is equivalent to a 1.a.s. (free alongside ship)
value at the U.S. port of export, based on the transaction
price. including inland freight, insurance and other charges
incurred in placing the merchandise alongside the carrier at
the U.S. port of exportation.

Export Monthly Carryover

It is the objective of the compiling procedures to include
shipments, insofar as practicable, in the statistics for the
actual month of exportation. For purposes of the statistics,
the month of exportation is generally based on the date
when the shipment leaves the United States. (For vessel or
air shipments it is the date when the carrier departs or is
cleared from the port of export.) However, as indicated
above for imports, because of processing problems (e.g., late
receipt of a document for an end-of-month shipment, re-
jection of a shipment by the computer because the data
fail to meet certain edit criteria established to protect the
accuracy of the statistics. etc ), there is an overall average
carryover of about 4 percent (in terms of value) of the
shipments from the actual month of exportation to a
subsequent month, usually the succeeding month. These
limitations should be borne in mind when making month-
to-month comparisons.
Cumulations of data over at least 4-month periods are
desirable to identify underlying trends. Month-to-month
changes in imports, exports, and similar series often reflect
pnmarily irregular movements, differences in monthly
carryover, etc.
Estimated Data for Export Shipments

The overall export and Schedule B section and division
totals include sample estimates for shipments valued
$251-$1,999 to Canada and for shipments valued
$251-5999 to countries other than Canada. Data for ship-
ments valued 5250 and under to all countries are also esti-
mated, based on established percentages of individual
country totals, and included in the Schedule B Section 9
totals regardless of the commodity exported. It is estimated
that the unadjusted overall total is subject to a sampling
error of less than one-tenth of one percent, and the unad-
justed Schedule B section or division totals are subject to








sampling errors of about one percent. In addition, the
Schedule B Section 9 total is subject to possible error in the
estimated data for shipments valued $250 and under; and
the overall total,-and the individual totals for sections other
than Section 9, to a more limited extent. Such $250 and
under shipments represent about I percent of the total
value of exports, and about 60 percent of the Schedule B
Section 9 total.

SOURCES OF ERROR IN THE STATISTICS

Monthly import and export figures are subject to the
possibility of errors which may arise from sources other
than sampling errors, discussed above. Among these are
errors in the reporting and/or processing of information as
to commodity classification, value and other statistical
factors, month of inclusion (see paragraphs on import and
export carryover, above), and the undercounting of exports
to Canada due to the non-receipt of Shipper's Export
Declarations. For 1974. the undercounting amounted to
about one and one-half billion dollars In the case of im-
ports the information as to value and commodity classifica-
tion (as well as country of origin and net quantity) is
venfied by Customs officials on entries filed for transactions
valued over $250 which are ordinarily subject to examina-
tion for Customs appraisement purposes, thus considerably
reducing the possibility of error. In addition, the procedures
used to compile both the import and export statistics
include clencal and computer processing checks designed to
protect the accuracy of the statistics to the fullest practi-
cable extent.


MERCHANDISE TRADE BALANCES


Two trade balances are presented in this report.
1) The balance between exports based on f.a.s. values
and imports based on f.a.s. values.
2) The balance between exports based on f.a.s. values
and imports based on c.i.f. values with adjustments for im-
ports from affiliated sellers abroad to reflect arms-length
equivalent pnces.
Both balances are useful for certain purposes. The first
balance corresponds to a measurement of the international
payments or credit flows resulting from merchandise trade
between the U.S. and foreign countries. The second balance
is based on concepts similar to those used by most foreign
countries, and therefore provides a reference for comparison
with the trade balances published by those countries.


REVISIONS TO THE STATISTICS

Revisions are carried into the statistics on a periodic
basis. Data for 1975 and 1976 appearing in the 1976
monthly issues of this report are presented as follows:

1976 Statistics

a. January through November 1976 issues: figures are as
originally issued, except as noted below.
b. December 1976 issue: figures reflect revisions for
prior months of the year issued with December 1976
statistics or earlier, as noted below.

1975 Statistics

a. January through May 1976 issues: figures reflect re-
visions issued with December 1975 statistics or
earlier.
b. June through December 1976 issues: figures reflect
revisions to 1975 data issued with June 1976 statistics
or earlier.

In addition to the revisions which are made on a periodic
basis, instances may u 'ur where a significant error in the
statistics for a month ot the current year is discovered after
the statistics for that month are compiled. If the error is of
sufficient importance to require correction prior to the time
that the regular revisions are carried, the correction is made
and so noted in this report.


SOURCES OF FURTHER INFORMATION

Additional foreign trade statistics and information regard-
ing coverage, valuation, sampling, and qualifications which
should be considered by users of the statistics are contained
primarily in the following publications' Report FT 990,
Highlights of U.S. Export and Import Trade; FT 135, U.S.
General Imports, Schedule A Commodity by Country; FT
410, U.S. Exports, Schedule B Commodity by Country; and
the Guide to Foreign Trade Statistics. Information regarding
additional sources of statistics, the methodology used in
seasonally adjusting the data, and other matters relating to
foreign trade statistics may be obtained from the Bureau of
the Census, Washington, D.C. 20233.










Table 1. U.S. Exports (f.a.s. Value Basis), General Imports (f.a.s. Value Basis), and Merchandise Trade Balance.
Adjusted for Seasonal and Working-Day Variation, by Month: January 1975 to May 1976
(In millions of dollars. See Explanation of Statistics for Information on coverage, definitions of export and import values and trade bal-
ances, and sources of error in the data. All data sholn for 1975 and 1976 reflect seasonal adjustment factors Introduced in January 1976)

Period and January- Mept m- Oovem- Oe am-
series Mand J y January February March April May June July August eapie- October Nver- Dec-

1975

Exports'.............. 43,682.3 9,313.4 8,754.6 8.685.2 8,6.7.6 8.221.5 8,716.1 8,893.8 8.979.2 9,1.5.7 9,22..6 9..09.3 9,249.9
F.a.a. Import value... 0,25.,.3 9.635.5 7,927.6 7.-66 5 7,958.5 7,266.2 7.103.5 7,832.2 7,877.2 8,205.1 8,170.. 8.203.6 8,525.7
lerchandlse trade
balance............. .3,428.0 -262.1 .827.0 >1,218.7 +689.1 '955.3 *1.612.6 1,061.6 *1,102.0 *940.6 1.054 2 *1,205.7 *724.2

1976

Export a.............. 45,830.7 9.103.- 8,800.1 8,955.6 9,393.6 9, 78.0
F.a.s. import a alue... 46,501.5 9,176.0 8,9-0.9 9.606.5 9,595.,' 9,182.4
Merchandise trade
balance.............. -670.8 -72.6 -140.8 -650.9 -202.1 .395.6

'Represents exports of domestic and foreign merchandise excluding Department of Defense Milltary Assistance Program Grant-Ald shipments.


Table 2. U.S. Exports (f.a.s. Value Basis), General Imports (c.i.f. Value Basis), and Merchandise Trade Balance.
Adjusted for Seasonal and Working-Day Variation, by Month: January 1975 to May 1976
(In millions of dollars. See Explanation of Statistlcs for information on coverage, definitions of report ard ipport valu p and trade bal-
ances, and sources of error In the data. All data shown for 1975 and 1976 reflect seasonal adjustment factors Introouced It Jianuary 1976)

Period .ad January- S.-p'es- October Noe- Oean-
eri nd January- January Feruary March April May Jane July Augu. October o De -
serleE May her ner her

1975

Exports ......... ... 13,682.3 9,373.4. 8,754 6 8,685.2 6.647.6 8.221.5 8,716.1 8,893.8 6.979.; 9,1.5.7 9, -. 6 9,-09.3 9.2-9 9
C.l.f. Import vaJue.. 43,281.3 10.377.7 8.501.2 8.039.2 8,5.6 5 7,816.7 7,65..2 8,-13.0 8,.78.8 8,829.9 8,795.2 8.829 8 9,165.5
Merchandise trade
balance ............. *.01.0 -1,004-.3 .-?53.- .646.0 -101 I -.0- 8 >1,063.9 *-.B 8 -500 l .315 8 *-29.- .579.5 -8-.-

1976

Exportsl............. 45,830.7 9,103... 6,800 1 8,955.6 9,393.6 9,578.0
C.l.f. Import value.. 49,947.1 9,879.7 9.592.7 0,300.6 10.301.5 9,872.6
Merchandise trade
balance ............. -4,116.4 -776.3 -792.6 1,3-5.0 -907.9 -291.6

'Represents exports of domestic and foreign merchandise excluding Department of Defense Military Ar stalance Progrz. Grant-Aid shipenrts











Table 3 U.S. Exports (f.a.s. Value Basis) of Merchandise Showing Department of Defense (DOD) Military Assistance
Program Grant-Aid Shipments, by Month: January 1975 to May 1976

Ifn rullionE of dollars. See Explanation of Statistics for Infornation on coverage, aeflintion of f.a.s. export value, andsourcesof error In
ine dalti Unsjusted totals represent sun of unfounded figures and hence may vary slightly from sun of rounded amounLs)

Exports excluding DOD Exports including DD Grant-Ad
Gr.nt-Ald DOD Grant-Aid Grnt-A


Persoa a se Do.eatl c Domestic
n and Domestlc. and Domestic, Western Other
foreign, Total
seaore foreign, unadjusted foreign, unadjusted Eurpe countries
adju I ed *su.dJuste uradjustea


1973

Janurn-rDceber .. ........ ... '. 107.190.6 105,695.6 107.651.8 106.156 7 461.2 21.7 t49.5

J nuiry- as .............. ..... ...... *. ,682.3 a,952.8 4.,253.5 45,219.0 -.,519. 266.2 16.5 249.6

.ir,.3, ... ......... 9,373 9,12 I 8,9-2.7 9.203 0 9,021 5 78.8 5.2 73.7
Fe ra ry ........ .... ... .......... 8, .5-. 8 9,-96. 1 6.367.3 8,5s.3 8 8, 13.0 .7 3.3 *2.6
March... ... .. .. .. ...... 8,685..2 9,413.0 9,220 1 9,--1.9 9,299.0 28.9 2.2 26.7
April. .... .... ......... 8,6.7 6 9,016.9 8.888.- 9,078 6 8,950.1 61.7 3.6 58.1
la ............. ............. 8..21.5 8,900 6 8,785 1 8.951.6 8.836.1 51.0 2.2 -8.8
June. ........ ... ... ... 6, 16 I ,6,0.' 8.-90.6 6,691 0 o,,51 1 60.3 0.6 59 5

July .. .................. 6,893.6 8,2 6 8,128 5 8.260..2 8,157.8 29.- 1.0 28.4
0Augu0 .. .... .... .... ....... ... a.q79 2 8,- 5 8 8,352.1 8, 55 6 8,362.0 9.9 1 6 8.3
Septe.mber......... .... ...... .. Q. .1-. 7 6.391..2 6.271 b 8,.16.6 8,291.2 i2 6 0.7 ':..9
October .. ... ...... .... .. ... .22ii-.6 9.718.1 9,601 7 9.79. 7 9,b33.2 31.6 0.2 31.4
Noer. nr. .. ......... .... .... 9,-09 3 9.513 7 9,-07.- 9,526 7 9,-20 5 13 0 0.8 12.2
D-cemb r .... ..... .. 9. 9 9 9,303.5 9.190.0 9,328.7 9,215 2 25.2 0.1 25.1

19'0

lJnu r. -m y ...... .................... 4 ,6830.; 47,1 1.6 46, 32.4 47,191.3 46,572.2 39.7 1.5 38.3

.Jnul ... ...... ... 8.760.2 6,658.5 6.769 8 8,666 1 9.6 0.5 9.2
iFe ruarf .. ...... ...... ........ .... a,800.1 8,'37.6 8,629 1 8,742 8,633.9 -.8 0.3 ..5
March .. .. .. ... .. 8,9 .6 9,8'-2 2 9,685.- 9,89'.. 9.690.; 5.3 0.3 5.0
rpri ..... .. ... .. .. ),393 6 9,83-. 9,704.- 9,843.6 9,71? .l 9.- 0.2 9.2
Ma ...... ..... ........... 9,78.o0 9, 7 .4 9.854.7 9,988.1 9.866.4 10.7 0 ? 10.4
une. .................

Jul .... ... .
Augul. ..... ..............
epLte.Der .
rtooer ...............

DOembe r. ..... .............

'aujuoted or reaional rna *.orkin-aa, variation u-ing rsea.nal aajustment factor: Inltrodu.Ce in January i976. See footnote I an front
page.
'epre-s'n onri, erp.:.rt nipmente fr rnE. ij.iter- ratem ardu dliferr I ro DOD 5illtarvy A:i lltance Program Grart-Aia shipment figures under
this prngrO. as folio.,-. la Tr.jnier l I the material procure outltae the Lrsted States ar.a transfer. from DOD oversee. stocks from export
ihp.nenti. iJ Enpcri value .l r 5 ..., -here E..r'ilamlue, in %oEt Instances, l: f o D point of origin fcj Data ior snlrpments reported by
the L)OD for 3 giver: n.or.rre r. lniuuae it. Bure.u of tne Cnr-.sj reports in the secondd month -ubsequent to the month reported by the DOD.
Ar.n-Il l'tajI I: hii' :ho.r. r ean1 rally adjusted jajl.. I.-adjujtca a r, oula be useo for .rnnInal toTal











Table 4. U.S. Imports of Merchandise, by Month: January 1975 to May 1976
fin millions of dollars. S.e Explanation of Staallstcs for ntormation on coverage, u.finlitona of f.a.a. end c.I. import value,. and source
of error in the data. UnrajuSteo totals represent sum of unrounded figures and hence may vary slightly from zumt of rounded amount 5

L1.S. irports of mercr,andise

F.a.a. value C.I.f. salue
Pereroeral Import Ipoor rt General import Import
for for
.e aor, aly nidatd con-umpt on, e r.onr.liy nad jused onsuoit ion.
adjusted' Lr.a rijuce alju-ted un.ad)--tea


19 i

January-December.......................0... i F 9b. ,.. 95, 228.b t ) 103.,1.l-.G 0102,9O .

Jenuary-May........................... 0, 2-.3 J99. .8 39, 8d1.0 .3.281.3 .2.9,5.1 -a. 2 9.

January ................................ 9,63.1.: Q.bL6.o 9.802.8 10, 3 .' 10. i' 8 0,5 6.
Fre ruary............................... 7.92.. 9. .137.9 8. j0 .2 .6h8 .s5 :.o55.6
March.................................. .-66.5 '. ..i 7 3 .9 8,039.2 7 .977 2. i.9.1 b
April .................................. ;.956.5 8.190.1 8. -?. 8 5. -6. 8. 9. 6:-.
May.................................... 7 266.2 3o7.9 ". 1,-.0 .816.' ?.92 L 8861.2
June.................................... 7. 103. ,; 79.0 7, 25.1 7, bW 2.2 7.8-d .2 7,813.5

July......................... .......... 7.83 .2 .920. 691. 8, -1L .0 8 08. 1 8, .76..
August .................................. ..6'i.2 i, '5lB.8 '..27. 8.a- 8.8 8.093.0 ;.996.
September................... ...... .... 8.205. 1 lt.h 8, 1-0.8 8.29.9 8 '8. i 8.'63.1
October........................... .... 1').. 6. 41 .9 6,. 3 .8 8. 9 : ... 9. 162.8 q. 1d .b
November ............... ............... 8.203.O 1,910.' 7 B8B5. ) 8.829.8 B. l-..6 8..89.
D cemner ................. ........... .... 8. 25. B,8888. 8.810.4 9. 16 ; 9, 6.0 9. .7.

197b

January-Miy............................. 4.. 6.50i.l. a6.i5 l 45 ,",3.4 I49,-44 .1 9.577 J 1 ,262.0

January................................ 9, ?6.0 9.009.0 8.9.5.9 9,8a 9.7 9.699.9 9.o32.9
Februar...... .......................... 8...0.9 8,111.2 ;." a '2. 6 '02.5 ; -.
March........................ .......... 9, 06.5 10, 199.2 i ,0. 0 6. 10, 300.6 b 0, 36.1 iO. _1.j
April................................. 9.59 4,89 L 9. o LO.iu3 1 10.622.9 10. i69. -
May ................................. .. 9.,1e2.1 e&,9 3.? ,0"a 4 ,n:? 6 9.Gl68 9." -.
June ........................ .... ..

July..................................
August .................................
S eptem cr ..............................
October .............................
Ihovember .............................
December...............................

'Adjusted for seasonal ar.a orking-a.y varnstlon uiang i-ea-onl jdju:;ment tactor-i rinroouc Ir, Januir. 19'6.
'Annual total is not shoun for -easonialy adjusted aata. Uradjuntea aata rnould be ured for annual tc-is.









8

Table 5. U.S. Exports (f.a.s. Value Basis) of Domestic Merchandise. Including Department of Defense (DOD) Military
Assistance Program Grant-Aid Shipments--Schedule B Sections and Selected Divisions, Seasonally Adjusted
and Unadjusted, by Month: January 1975 to May 1976

in m-illors of dollars. ee Explansaton of Statistics for information on coverage, definition of f.A.s. export value, and sources of error
in the data. Unajiusted total- represent sur. of unrourndd figures and hence may vary lightly from sum of rounded amounts)

Schedule B sections and selected divnlsons'
P~ r ed


I I


S1 61 71


Seasonally adjusted'


71 72 731


8 9


1925

lanurry-Ma .............

S na iry .......... ....
Froruary .... ..........
March..... .............
ApriL ..... .............
Ja .....................
une ....................
Jul, ........ .. .. ..
lu jpt3 ..... ...........
O pt e ber ..............
Oc i ober. ................

flVcembe r..............

19'6

Jainu ar a ... M,

Jauar ...... ............

irlu .r..... ............
ilr) .. ..... ........
Junp ..... .. .. ...
July ..... ..... ... ..
Auiusti. .... ........
September ..............
Oc r.becr.. .. .........

E cm-er ............... .
Dpi/ iiiie .. .. .. I


6.-85.

1. i.922
1.08.-
1.250.3
1.2.8..
1.064.
1.123.2
1. 10.3
I.270.
1.268.-
1. 34.3 ,
I. 81. i
1,292.6


594.3 1 .,0'5.1

139.2 L. ,014.
111.5 805.9
125.1 I i8i.6
113.6 i 1 .0
10-.9 72 .8
91. 3 699. 1
8-.6 57.5
110.1 8908.5


111.1 813.2
111. 726..


c.358 741 1 4.068 2

1.296.2 211.0 822.7
i. l 9.8 i 6.7 '43.
1,LB2.8 122.5 i 7?4..
1.386 .2 | 133.9 91 .1
1.330 5 96 8 930.


January-DEi

.jnk..ary-Ma


I" C,

cnfber ........

^ . .


Januarv. ..........
February ...... .. ..
March ........... ..
Apri1 ...................
M z. ... .... .. .... ...... .. .
Jun- ..... .. ... .
July ................... I
Aufu i .... ........
ep .mbcr ... .......
Octl o : r..... ... .....
ovr-rb.:: r ..... .......
,' r ,' r i .... ... .. ,





J.ru r ......... .....
f obr u r% ...............I
tArch .. .. ... .. .
Apri... ....
pr-. l........ ... ........
J1 r I ....... .. ......
July ....... .
Augis- ......... ........
ept ener .. .... .......
'3ctooner.. .... .......
Nove.D r... .... ........
Dec ibE r... .. .......


I. -66.7 1, 09.N 9. _8-.3 -,.6..9

'.i5 0. 529.0 I4.333 ? 1.922.3

I o37.j 122.9 l.02~.0 35?.-
1.338.3 86.5 838.9 337..
l. .'6. i:0.1 893.3 i99.6
1. l9.o 101.6 610.7 91.4
1.028... 8.1 I 6,.8 )t.5
I.Oon .] I 79.8I 668.- .0b.2
.l 7 I i 310. 3
1.162.6 10 *7 i.9 1 )?9.B
1.2'..] U105.7 693.3 322.8
,1.75.i i78.n I 8.o s.2 318.5
1. o 8 i:u.8 839.5 -i'.9
3. 3.0 i39.. 81'.9 Lb.9



6,3E 1 64j.6 4.35.0 1,642 2

. 331 187.9 35 8 26.8..
I. 8 .6 9-. 3 281.
I, 3 118.1 90-.5 305.9
S1,1 .. 1 ~0. 8 8.0 .15.1
1,253.4 90.3I 929.6 3J.0


9L1.8

526 8

1'0.9
104.5
120.8
73. 7
88.9
)i.9
66. I
-3.9
43.5
56.9
'7.7
68.8



404.

78 9
'1.9

97.3
96.4


3,;16 5

820.0
668.5
788.2
737.1
702. b
:18.7
;0..6
710. 7
68W.2
730.2
661.6
780. 7



4,079.1

748. 7

863.8
85-..
898 I


10.917. 7

.,610.4

910.5
847.4
9.9.6
948.6
95. 2
899.
862.8
875.2
680.1
980..
91-.3
895.2



4,734 2

894.0
890. 5
1,019.0
975.5
359. 2


.5. 709.5

18,. 81.4

3,313 2
3,538.'
4.026.6
3,910. L
3,193.0
3.918.0
1, 77.9
1,550. 7
3,618.9
4.257.8
j.9-6. ;
. 038.2



20,462 4

3. 89.3
3.879.3
.,330.9
4,22-.1
4,438 A


20.889.7

8,6.b--. I

1.561 ..
1, .19 .8
1,803.3
1.851.8
1.829.9
1. 798.9
L,690.i
1,680.5
L. 603.r.
1.881.
i. 7.9.6
1.St0.9



9,283.9

1. 712.0
1, 713. 7
1, 997.4
1,906.9
1,951 7


7,586.5

3.138.1

616.5
571.0
651.8
6'6.1
652.7
62..2
596.9
62..1
5q9.2
70n.&
66'.2
633.3



3,711 0

665.1
688.5
792.2
795.1
770.0


17,233.3

6.999.2

1,084.2
1.422.9
1.571.5
1,10.2
,510.4
1.514.9
!.290.5
'.246. 1
L.416.0
1,669.8
I,532.8
1.561.9



7,467 6

1,212.2
l.17.0
1, 5 1. 1
1,5:0.- 1
1,717.1


5,672.4

2,33..9

554.6
426.4
'88.0
482. 3
L83.5
481.0
454.6
.60.8
.60.0
530.9
471.8
.78.5



2,713.8

477.9
500.6
611.8
545. 7
578.0


3.162.3

1,262.1

238.6
226.6
237.0
274.9
285.0
241.4
217.9
277.8
266.0
278.2
353.3
265.5



1,178.8

254.0
201.6
216.5
258.3
248.5


Ibcr.oaulL B action ind .-L ettd 1 ,iton aes'.rir on. are a toll on
0. Fooc ana I!ve .rm al i. March nery and transport equipment
I. Be-vrar e icd ioo., ii. Machinery. other than electric
Crude mniteral,. ir.ediale, e.cep,1 ul. 2. Electrica. machinery, apparatus. and appliances
3. Mun.ral luEI Lubrsiiante. arns relato.a mascrials 7). Transport equipment
S rnlai nal d .;-rtaol i 1il and rlti 8. bsceellaneous manufactured article, n.e.c.
Cnnic a 9. Commodities and transactions not classified according to kind
ar.ulacturcd goadi ciahiiila chiefly o0 material
:eraonal aju.sti[d I'l.-rea Ior sector, w.ay otnrer slightly iraom the sum o divisions 71, 72. and 73 since each s independently ad-
lust.a.
isdjusTrd I or scr.on.l and -rkl inr-a ay variation uilnc seasonrs adjustment factors Intronuced In Janasry 1976. See footnote I on front
paF.' Annual totalss are ,iot sno,.n for iea-onlly adjusted data. Lnadjusted data should be used for annual totals. The adjusted section
tolji in thi. table and sliiar o.erill monthly total: in tables 1. 2. and 3 were adjusted Independently.
SIn the absence of deronstlrble seasonal patterns ior this section, no seasonal adjustment actors have been applied to the data.


2,021.6

2.021.
399.8
415.9
381.8
402.7
388.4
32&.6
3]6.2
320.9
288.3
450. 7
R.O. a
340.8



1,713.8

321.0
320.4
312. 1
409.4
350 3


*528.8 3,691.2

'1.0.9 859.5
*1Oi.5 699.9
*120.8 757.2
'13.7 706.7
'88.9 667.9
* 7.9 712.3
*66.3 691.5
43.9 687.-
'*..5 707.0
'56.9 742.1
*77.7 725.5
'68.8 766.1



'40M.5 4,D29.4

'78.9 1 I7 .-
'73.9 740.8
* '.9 810.3
-'7., 814.3
'96.41 886 6


4, 50..

931.0
892.9
907.9
900.9
887. 7
891.
906.3
886.8
921.6
922.3
966.5
927.7



4,6-10.4

930. 3
915.2
952.3
923.8
918 8


17,860.1

3.502.3
3.625.7
3,.86.2.
3,668.0
3.57).9
3.914.5
3,98:..3
3.940.8
3.955.1
4,105.8
.,006.8
4.103.B



19,401.

3. '70.3
3.852.&
3, 762.
3,9.4 I1
1,072.3


8,356.6

1.637.0
1.631.2
1.642.3
1. 743.9
1. 702.2
1.800.7
1, 760.9
1. 752.3
I, 76..2
1,817.8
1,789.0
1.863.3



8,949 2

1, 732.8
L, 768.6
1,801.2
1, 79. 0
1,867 6


3,080. 7

608.6
611.3
605.8
632.8
622.2
621.1
631.0
652.1
625.5
662.7
659.6
654.3



3,642.9

655.3
736.4.
'36.3
7"9.5
735.1


6, 66.5

1,216.8
1,176.1
1,238.4
1.302. I
1.333. 1
1.469.4
.613. 1
1.577.4
1.534.2
1,627. 5
1,539.0
1,525. 7



6,928.9

1,368.2
1,".25. 7
1.210.6
1.406. 2
1,518.2


2,295.6

468.2
456.6
1.54.0
458.9
457.9
473.0
.80.5
468.3
479.2
496.6
489.6
498..



2,656.6

-93.2
526.2
562.8
509.0
565.6


*1.262.1

*238.6
'226.6
'237.0
*274.9
'285.0
'241.4
'237.9
'277.8
*246.0
'278.2
*353.3
*265.5



'1,178.8

'254.0
'201.6
'216.5
'258.3
4248.5


S0 1 2












Table 6. U.S. General Imports (f.a.s. Value Basis) of Merchandise, Schedule A Sections, Seasonally Adjusted and
Unadjusted, by Month: January 1975 to May 1976
(In millions of dollars. See Explanation of Statlstlcs for information on coverage. deflnltion of f.a.s. Import value, and sources of error
in the data. Unaajusted totals represent sun or unfounded figures ana hence nay vary slightly from sum of rounded amounts)

Schedule A sections
Period
0 1 2 3 5 6 7 8 9

Seasonally adjusted'

1975

January-may.......... 3,309.3 623.3 2,333.8 10,872.6 '2.0.9 1,6-5.2 6,89'. 9,349.3 3,620.8 '1,014.

January..... ...... 672.8 111.6 -85.9 3,090.3 '.8.5 -2-. 1,669.3 1.876.0 772.6 '218.0
February ............ 668.9 126.0 -66.7 1.983.8 32-.' 1 ,-63.9 1.837 7 723.9 '181.0
March... ........... 675.1 150.9 .66.7 1.36..7 '55.1 329.9 1,356.7 1.986.2 722.. '185.4
April................ 66L.6 120.5 472.0 2.-38.9 '-0.7 31..5 1,305.8 1,81-.0 726.3 '231.2
May.................. 627.9 11 .3 -.2.5 1.99-.9 '51.9 281.6 1.101.8 1,835 4 675.6 '198.5
June................ 719.0 119.3 -60.9 1.-82.0 '33.2 2.5.? 1.175.6 1.852.3 716.2 '219.7
July.............. .. 709 3 109 4 -73.3 2.187.6 '.-.6 26-.3 1.115.. 1,978.2 171 '223.8
August. ............. b66 .'. 112 7 -39.3 2,2-3.- '32 ? 282.7 1.052.7 2.101 5 7-0 6 '189.7
September........... 90..1 116.1 -59.8 ',.503.7 '-1.6 286.3 1,099.5 1.897 6 776.9 '217.9
October .............. 7-3.5 111.3 '.0.1 2.-23.0 '48.8 297.0 1,111.7 2,06-. 3 816.1 '217.4
November............. 762 10' 2 *-2.3 2,387.9 '66.2 310 2 1,126.9 2,053.6 873.8 '211.9
December .............. 696.8 127.9 509.1 2..97.1 '16.0 32..? 1,164.5 2,211. 878.7 '234.6

1976

January-May.......... 3,901.9 739.4 2,652.6 12,439.1 '190.0 1,8e)0.7 6, ?js.b 11,872.5 4,798.9 '972.4

January............ 731.9 1[0.. 526.9 2,668.0 '37 B 353 2 1,166.0 2,293 9 900.9 '186.6
February.. .......... 701.0 187.8 512 2 2.3-9.3 '51.5 330.1 1,275.7 2,256.1 919.9 '169.7
March ............. B'6 1 176.5 508.1 2,3-..9 '3-.4 382.2 1,4-3.7 2 .-10.6 966.3 '215.0
April.... .... ...... 66. 129.1 576.9 2,8';.9 '36.8 3'1.9 [1.63.. :,-8-.- 987.0 '189.9
May.................. 826.4 105.6 528 5 2,201.0 '29.4 367.3 1,376.6 2,427.5 1,024.8 '211.2
June.................
July ...............
August..............
September..........
October.............
November......... ..
December ............

Unaajus.ea


1975

January-December.. 8,508.8 1,-19 5 5,56- 3 2b.-75.6 553.9 3.696.4 1-.700.5 23,46.6 9,227.6 2,529.1

January-May.......... 3,293.6 596.3 2,250.. 11,228.2 e.0.'9 1, 21. 6,'09.6 9,496.8 3,395.3 l,01..I

January.......... ... 713.8 112 3 .66.0 3,-.21.0 '8.5 -37.2 1.7-9.5 1,89-.7 '55.6 218.0
Penruary...... ....... 626.8 106.- J9- 9 1,9'-0 1 -- 306.2 1.259 ,' 1.688 8 621.9 181 '3
March.......... .... 657.5 1- .' -60.6 1.-80 55.1 3.0.8 1,313.3 2,319., 667.8 185.-
April.. ......... ... 684.5 119.1 .75 3 2,- 1.3 .0.7 351.9 1.2-3.1 1.899.2 703.8 231.2
May.................. 611.0 116.9 -53.b 1,9 5.0 51.9 285.6 I 1.. 7 1.91- 5 620 3 198.5
June................. 779. 129.6 513.0 1.-36.1 33.2 2.85 1.230 8 1,961 6 72.2. 219.,
July................ 705.8 103.4 506.4 2,137.3i .8 2- .7 1.136 6 1,964.. 850.9 223.8
August.. .......... b35.8 95.8 420.9 2,2-5.6 32 7 270.6 1,005.3 1,822.0 800.6 189.7
September............. 896 9 106.9 .76 2--.6.1 -1.6 275.1 1.091.8 1.'93 3 815.7 217.9
October........ ...... 7599 128.0 5.7 .3-5.5 -8.8 302.' 1.19- 0 2,138.6 919 7 217
November ............. 25.1 120.* .15.3 2.089.- 66.2 298.5 1,121.2 2,018.6 '..1 211.9
December.. .......... il2.1 137.2 52..' 2.5.7.5 -6.0 327.9 1.211.1 2,269.- 878.7 23-.6

1976

January-May.......... 3,919.8 703.6 2,565.0 12,773.5 190.0 1,862.0 6E,62.8 12,123.8 4,465.2 972.4

January ........ ...... 759.7 11.5 .83.1 2.190.7 37.8 350.0 1.190.5 2,229.7 838.1 186.6
February............. 669.5 158.3 39.5 2,302 3 51 3 316.6 1,108.6 2.10..9 790.2 169.7
March................ 890.1 167.8 539.6 2,'48.2 3-.. 410.1 1,..0. 2,'2 .0 999.2 215.0
April............... 818.6 12'.6 563.0 2, '9.3 36.8 --.3 1..09.6 2,606.2 931.' 189.9
May.................. 781.8 108.4 539.1 2,134.9 29.4 371.0 1,383.4 2,459.1 925 4 211.2
June.................
July ................
August. ..........
September ...........
October..............
November.............
December...........

'Schedule A section description are as follows:
0. Foon and llie animals 5. Chemicals
1. Beverages and tobacco 6 Manufactured goods classifled chiefly by material
2. Crude materials, Inealble. except fuels 7. Macninery ina transport aqulpment
3. Mineral fuels, lubricants, and related materals 8. Miscellaneous manufactured articles, n.e.s.
u. Animal and vegetable alls and fate 9. Commodltie. aca transactions not classlfled according to kind
'Adjusted for seasonal and horklng-day variation using seasonal maju tment factors introduced In January 1976. See footnote I on front
page. Annual totals are not shonn for seasonally adjusted data Unadjusted data should be used for annual totals. The adjusted section
Lotals In this table and similar overall monthly totals in tables I and were anjustea Independently.
1'n the absence of demonstrable seasonal pattern for this sectlon, no seasonal adJustment factors have been applied to the data










Table 7. U.S. General Imports (c.i.f. Value Basis) of Merchandise, Schedule A Sections, Seasonally Adjusted and
Unadjusted, by Month: January 1975 to May 1976

Ir, millions of dollars. See Explanallon of Statistics for Informatlon on coverage, aeflnition of c.l.f. Import value, and sourcesof error In
the data. Unanjuated totals represent sum of unrounded fLgures and hence may vary slightly from aum of roundea amountB)

Schedule A sections'
Period
0 I I 3 I 5 6 7 8 9

Seasonally adjusted'


1915

January-May .. 3.393 2 r .' 2 Si; 0 Ll.5 a.6 ':52.0 1.781.9 ;.-.7.8 10.077. 3,883.5 '1041.

January....... ...... 1.32.9 122.1 5-9.6 3,306.3 '50.5 45-.0 1,810.6 2,018.0 825.3 '224.3
February.. ...... 726.2 135.8 512.9 2,108 1 '.6.8 346.6 1.580.7 1,971.4 776.3 '186.2
March. ............ 732.6 162.5 507.9 1,456.8 '57.6 349.5 1.461.5 2,157.7 776.3 '190.9
April............... 720.8 131.3 520.8 2,591.3 '42.5 333.9 1,307.1 1,962.0 777.6 '238.2
M ..... ....... ... 680.7 12..0 .85.8 2,131.1 15-.6 297.9 1,187.9 1,968.. 728.0 '201.9
June...... .. ... 796.3 139.5 511 1 1,585.6 '35.1 262.9 1,298.1 2,001.8 770.8 '124.3
July...... ... .... 770.1 120.2 525.9 2,329. 3 '7.1 282.3 1.200.5 2.123.5 831.7 '228.5
August ......... 725.6 123 6 *84.1 2,199.6 '34.9 301.3 1,131.0 2,259.3 801.0 '194.0
September. ...... 97..4 127.6 505.7 2,690.1 '.4. 304.1 1,179.6 2,04.5 841.8 '222.9
October.... .. 860.. 122.0 -85.2 2,597.0 '51.9 313.1 1.198.9 2,226.9 682.6 '222.1
November.. ....... 830.3 11,.5 -8 0 2,5.9.8 11.2 328.9 1,218.4 2,213.5 9-5.5 '216.1
December..... ..... 755.7 139.1 561.2 e,452.3 '.9.6 3.4.0 1,261.5 2,317.7 951.1 '239.4

1976

January-Mav......... 4,236.7 798.1 2,882.9 13,295.4 '20..1 1,898.4 7,226.2 12,796.6 5,162.8 '993.4

January. ...... .. 798.4 152.0 580.2 2.853.0 '-0.7 372.6 1,26..0 2,473.1 972.8 '191.1
February. ...... .... 758.6 200.5 55-..2 2,507 0 '55.- 347.2 1,376.. 2,.31 4 989.5 '173.6
March.... .......... 951 9 140 6 550.1 2 505.9 '31.4 -03.5 I 528.0 2 ~86.i 1 037.7 '219.9
April ................ 829.. 1I0.5 B23.9 3.016 3 '39.9 390.. I 1 70.b 2 684.6 1.061.5 '193.7
May.................. 898.4 114.8 574.5 ?.353.2 '31.8 384.7 1,487.2 2,621.0 l,i01.3 '215.1
June ..............
July. ..............
Aguat .. ...........
September...........
October..............
November.............
December ...........

UnadJusted


1975

J .nuj.ry-Deceoer ..... 9,22;.7 '1,5. 6,142.9 28288..1 586.6 3.929.1 15,865.6 25,296.I. 9,945.5 2,588.8

ainu.ry-l.a .... ... 3,576.3 6.8.6 2, 8..6 11,9i.l 252.0 1,831.2 1,2.5.5 10,256.9 3,6'.1 1,041.5

January ............. 777.6 12 8 527 0 3,6o0.0 50.5 '67.6 1,897.5 2,038.2 807.1 224.3
February......... ... 8.0.- 11- 6 433.9 2,061.7 .6.8 326.8 1,359.. 1.811.7 666.9 186.2
MArch... ... .... 713.5 15-.7 501.3 1,580.6 57.6 361.0 1,.1s.7 2,259.1 739.0 190.9
April ................ 7?2.' 129.7 52- 5 2.596.9 u2.5 373.7 1,339.6 2.05-.2 .53.5 238.2
May........ ....... 663.3 126 8 -97.9 2,077.8 5A.o 302.1 1.23..2 2,093.6 67u.8 201.9
June ...... .. .. 8.0. 1 140.6 568.9 1,536.- 35.1 270.5 1,327.7 2,119.9 177 .7 224.3
Jul$ ....... ....... 766.3 113.6 562.7 2,'275.17 7.7 26-.2 I ,223.3 2,108.7 917.3 228.5
August.. .... ....... 69-.' 105 0 ".63 8 2..02.0 34.9 288.3 1,085.9 1,958.8 865.9 19*.0
September. 966.6 11? b 523.9 2,628.2 -.. ;92 2 1,111.3 1,932.1 861.9 222.9
October..... .... 62 .0 I.u.i 50-.6 2,513 9 51.9 318.7 1,287.6 2,307.0 99-.6 222.1
November. .. ..... .... 789.6 132. -56.- 2,231.0 11.2 116.- 1,212.3 2,175.9 913.3 216.1
December 7... .. .72.3 1.9.1 578.0 2,119.6 49.6 361.5 1, 32.0 2.317.2 951.3 239.4

1976

January-Ma .. ....... 4,236.0 760.1 2,787.3 13,653.4 205.1 1,958.5 7,072.1 13,066.2 4,823.1 993.4

J.nuary....... ....... 8:8.8 153 2 532.6 2,984.2 40.7 369 2 1,290.5 2,.03.9 905.7 191.1
February. ....... 72L.5 169.0 .75.5 2,.56.9 55.4 333.0 1.196.1 2,268.5 850.0 173.6
jrcn .. ........ I 96'.1 181.2 58-.2 2 939 3'.4 -32.9 1.578.- 2.922.' 1.012.9 219.9
April.. ..... .. 68. .6 136.9 .06.9 2 990.2 39.9 1.3..9 1.512.- 2.816.2 1,002.0 193.7
May ...... ....... ... 49.9 117.8 586.0 2,282.6 31.6 368. 1,494.7 2,655.0 994.4 215.1
urne .
July .. .........
August .............
SeDItmber .. ......
:ciober ........
November ...... ...
December.............

'Schedule A -ection ascrtpltlr.ns are as follo-s.
0. Food and lit animals 5 ChemlcalE
1 Beveragem and tobacco b. Marnuifcturea goas clae'lfied chiefly by material
Cruae material inealibe. eRcept fuel' 7 Machinery and transport equIpment
J. Mineral fue~i, lubricant', and related materials 6 Miscellalnous manufactured articles, n.e.s.
Anrmal and vegetable oall asra fats 9 ComuodItles and transactions not classified according to kint
'.AaJutea Ior seasonall ana -orklre-day varlatl n using seasonal adjustment reactors Introduced In January 1976. See footnote I on front
iage Annual totals are not shoon for teaaonally adjusted data. Unadjustea anta should be used for annual totals. The adjusted aecilon
toullt in this taibe vna lmilar overall monthly Lotais in tables 2 and 4 -ere adjusted Independently.
Iln the abBeoce of ae.onstrable seasonal pattern; for this section, no seasonal adjustment factors have been applied to the data.









U.S. GENERAL IMPORTS OF PETROLEUM AND SELECTED PETROLEUM

PRODUCTS, UNADJUSTED

Tables 1-A, 1-B, 2-A and 2-B which follow, contain monthly and cumulative-to-date data on U.S. general imports
of petroleum and petroleum products into the U.S. Customs area and into the Virgin Islands for the period January
1975 through current month. Prior to January 1976, these data were presented separately in a Supplement to Report
FT 900. (It should be noted that imports into the Virgin Islands are excluded from the official U.S. import totals
presented in the preceding tables of this report.) The data in these tables are not adjusted for seasonal and working-
day variation.
Beginning with the issue for January 1976, the value figures presented in this report are in thousands of dollars
and the quantity figures in thousands of barrels.


Schedule A and TSUSA Commodity Numbers Used in Compiling the Petroleum
Information Presented in This Report


Energy products


Schedule A. No.


TSUSA No.


Nonenergy products


Schedule A. No.


Crude and partly refined
petroleum
331.0120
331.0140
331.0210
331.0220
331.0230
331.0240

Crude petroleum
331.0120
331.0140

Gasoline
332.1000

Jet fuel
332.2020

Kerosene
332.2040

Distillate fuel oil
332.3020
332.3040

Residual fuel oil
332.4020
332.4040

Propane and butane gas
341.0020

Liquid derivatives of
petroleum, n.e.s.
332.9940 pt.


475.0510
475.1010
475.0520, 475.0540
475.1020, 475.1040
475.3520
475.6520


475.0510
475.1010


475.2520, 475.2560


475.2540


475.3000


475.0530
475.1030


Lubricating oils
332.5000 pt.

Lubricating greases
332.5000 pt.

Paraffin and other mineral
waxes
332.6220 pt.
332.6240

Asphalt
332.9800

Naphthas not for further
refinement
332.9920


475.4500


475.5500, 475.6000



494.2200
494.2400


521.1100


475.3540


All other petroleum products
(pitch of tar coke, non-
liquid hydrocarbon mix-
tures, and calcined petro-
leum and coal coke not for
fuel)


332.9700 pt.
332.9940 pt.
599.8040 pt.


401.6200
475.7000
517.5100


475.0550
475.1050


475.1510, 475.1530


475.6540


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U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
Bureau of the Census
Washington, D.C. 20233

OFFICIAL BUSINESS
FIRST CLASS MAIL


UNIVERBMY FLORp I a


31
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCt
COM-202
IUS.MAIL