Summary of U.S. export and import merchandise trade

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Material Information

Title:
Summary of U.S. export and import merchandise trade
Series Title:
FT-900
Physical Description:
v. : ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of the Census
United States -- Bureau of the Census
Publisher:
Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, Foreign Trade Division for sale by the Subscriber Services Section (Publications), Bureau of the Census
Place of Publication:
Washington
Creation Date:
March 1976
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Commerce -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Citation/Reference:
American statistics index
Dates or Sequential Designation:
1974-1976.
General Note:
At head of title: 1977- United States foreign trade.
General Note:
Formerly classed C 56. 210:900 - during the time the Bureau of the Census was subordinate to Social and Economic Statistics Administration.
General Note:
Issues prior to Oct. 1977 were sent to depositories as Item 144.
General Note:
Unnumbered supplements accompany some issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001209840
oclc - 02245761
notis - AFW0105
lccn - 76640395
issn - 0361-0047
sobekcm - AA00005271_00046
Classification:
lcc - HF105 .B73e
ddc - 382/.0973
System ID:
AA00005271:00046

Related Items

Preceded by:
United States foreign trade; export and import merchandise trade
Succeeded by:
United States foreign trade. FT900, Summary of U.S. export and import merchandise trade

Full Text
















ii .. 900-.. 76-3
V~i. "F .--



1, : *:FT 900-76-3
-L
6~uWST

V.. O


k" SUMMARY OF U.S. EXPORT AND

IMPORT MERCHANT S-TRADE


V March 1976 .


1


S" -. 7WS, For Release
^ $A.l.pr 26,1976
So10:00 A.M.


ally Adjusted and Una pa



(Including Unadjusted Data on Imports of
Petroleum and Petroleum Products)


The Bureau of the Census, Department of Commerce
sanounced today that during March 1976, seasonally adjusted
iagports on a f.a.s. (free alongside ship U.S. port of
exportation value basis, excluding Department of Defense (DOD)
Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid shipments, were valued
at $8,955.6 million 2 and that seasonally adjusted general
imports on a l.a.s. foreign port of exportation value bass,
amounted to $9 606.5 million.' a 3 March seasonally adjusted
general imports on a c.i.f. (cost, insurance and freight)
value basis amounted to $10,300.6 million.' I Comparable
seasonally adjusted totals for February were $8,800.1 million
for exports $8,940.9 million for imports on a f.a.s. value
basis, and 69,592.7 million for imports on a c.i.l. value
basis.
The Bureau stated that based on the above seasonally
adjusted I.a.s. export and import figures, the merchandise
trade balance for March was in deficit by $650.9 million, as
compared to the deficit of $140.8 million recoraeo in
February. Using the c.i.f. import value and the f.a.s. export
value, a trade deficit of $1,345.0 million = 3 was recorded
ln March. The comparable c.i.f. trade balance for February was
a deficit of $792.6 million.
During the first quarter of 1976 (January-March), exports
on a aeasonally adjusted basis were at an annual rate of
$107,436 million or at a level about two-tenths of one percent
higher than the calendar year 1975 total of $107,191 million.


Seasonally adjusted imports on a f.a.a. value basis for the
first quarter of 1976 were at an annual rate of $110,894 mil-
lion, about 15 percent higher than the comparable total for
calendar year 1975 or $96,140 million. On a c.i.t. value basis,
imports for the first quarter of 1976 are at an annual rate of
$119,092 million, about 15 percent higher than the calendar year
1975 c.L. total of $103,414 million.
Burning the 4-month period, December 1975 March 1976,
seasonally adjusted exports averaged $9 027.3 million per
montn, about 2 percent lower than the f9,189.7 mullion
average reported for the preceding 4-month period, August-
November 1975. Imports on a f.a.s. value basis averaged
$9,062.3 million per month for the current 4-mortn period,
about 12 percent higher than the $8,114.1 million average
reported ior tne preceding 4-month period.

Exports unadjusted for seasonal change ana excluding
Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid shipments increased
irom $8,737.6 million rn Fenruary to $9,642.2 million in
March 1976. With Military Asaistance Program Cranr-Aza ship-
ments included, exports increased from $8,742.4 million in
February to $9,847.4 million itr March. Unadjusted general
imports tl.a.s. value basis) were valued at $8,111.2 mul-
lion in February 1976 as compared to $10,199.2 million an
March. The comparable figures for imports on a c.i.l. value
basis were $8,702.5 million In February and $10,936.1 mil-
lion in March.


'MAd a I mned alnd woikinlday vwrition. but eot tr champs in pna lev Ficma unsd m dsums 1975 and 1976 dile sho in nthisept repr msIt imeml adju ntin farten dmred from
aetiy dam *tr 1975 ad induced in Jmuav 1916 comlbned wilh b.e apprpnagla mworingdar adjislnnt lactous.
'Cul iom loni ate me It a 4-onanth periods re des iranila idient i undiryiing trends. Moonl to-moni chianes in apor.s imports. and sim.a mes oateanatelea nimrily nrguinbla mo eniU.
lnm-- in Nnlmhly oceamr. m. eanm mnlh-aniesnith pircrni changes in the ogragl monally allied mpon mna imporn n erie prmw anld m t r follahing ible with nnramge percent mani-
DluaMlni id a id dflim arl gis pleridslhon loie ompemnsr a p e IMn anld aiera dchl figure cudud percentage cane lor Ill the penad hJly-Dcmbnr 1971 bucaM abnonnalins
inI l e io adctm of dock sik* amd (2) periods, Ihn negligible chngh nm pierctl ie n ti le te of erpoartsports occunar Percentage calnl Ir I.l.. rmporn vlues ire net allbl for
puriad prm tU Ju.bu 1974:

Month-to-month Average monthly rates of change
I Average Average L months 12 month
Series Feb.-Mar. Jan.-Feb. Dec. 1975- Nov.-Dec. A e ge N months. M o
197 rise decline Nov. 1975- Mar. 1975-
976 1976 Jan. 1976 15 1970-1975 1970-1975 Mar. 1976 Mar. 1976
(Percent) (Percent) (Percent) (Percent) (Percent) (Percent (Percent) (Percent)


P.a.s. export value. .1.B -3.3 -1.6
F.a.s. Import value. t7.4 -2.6 +7.6
C.1.. import value. 7.4 -2.9 +7.8
'hl ih "Eplgian of Stalio" Itr definition of ae sport an d import lues and Tmade bleanm


Inquiries concerning te figures should be addreed to the Chief, Foreign Trade Division, Bureau of the
Census, Wishington, D.C. 20233. Tel: Area Code 301, 7634140.

q t U.S. Department of Commerce, BUREAU OF THE CENSUS

\ J For sale by the Subscriber Services Section (Publications), Bureau of the Census, Washington, D.C. 20233, o
S U.S. Department of Commerce District office. Price 10 cents per copy. Annual subscription IFT 900, 975, 985
is ne I-LASti *-l rm


rany
,and


-


986 combine .







EXPLANATION OF STATISTICS


IMPORT STATISTICS


Coverage

The U.S. import statistics reflect both government and
nongoverment ynports of merchandise'from foreign coun-
tries into the U.S. Custans territory, which includes the 50
States, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. The U.S.
import statistics exclude imports into the Virgin Islands,
Guam, American Samoa; and other U.S. possessions, and
shipments between the United States and Puerto Rico,
between the United States- and U.S. possessions, and
between any of these outlying areas. (Data on U.S. trade
with Puerto Rico and with U.S. possessions are published
separately in Report FT 800. Additional data on such trade
and on imports into the Virgin Islands from foreign coun-
tries are presented in reference tabulations.) Data on
imports of petroleum and selected petroleum products,
including shipments into the Virgin Islands from foreign
countries, (previously shown in Report FT 900-Supple-
ment) are included in this report effective with the January
1976 statistics.
The U.S. import statistics also exclude American goods
returned to the United States by its Armed Forces; intransit
shipments through the United States; temporary shipments;
transactions not considered to be of statistical significance,
such as shipments of personal and household effects, low-
valued nondutiable imports by mail; issued monetary coins
of all component metals; and gold in the form of ores.
concentrates, waste, scrap, and refined bullion. Imports of
silver in these forms are included in the statistics, unless
otherwise noted. (Information on gold movements, pre-
viously shown in Report FT 2402, appears in Report FT
990 effective January 1975.)

General Imports/Imports For Consumption

The statistics on U.S imports are presented in terms of
both "General Imports" and "Imports for Consumption."
General imports are a combination of entries for immediate
consumption and entries into Customs bonded warehouses,
and thus generally reflect total arrivals of merchandise.
Imports for consumption are a combination of entries for
immediate consumption and withdrawals from warehouses
for consumption, and thus generally reflect the total of the
commodities entered into U S. consumption channels.

Source Of Import Information

The official U.S. import statistics are compiled by the
Bureau of the Census from copies of the import entry and
warehouse withdrawal forms which importers are required
by law to file with Customs officials. The information as to
country of origin, net quantity, value, and commodity
classification is verified by Customs officials on entries filed
for transactions valued over $250, which are ordinarily sub-
ject to examination for Customs appraisement purposes.
The statistical copy of the entry is corrected if it does not
accurately reflect the information called for by the statis-
tical requirements.


Import Valuation

F.a.s. Import Value.-The f.a.s. (free alongside ship) value
represents the transaction value of imports at the foreign
port of exportation. It is based on the purchase price, i.e.,
Ihe actual transaction value and generally includes all
charges incurred in placing the merchandise alongside the
carrier at the port of exportation in the country of exporta-
tion.

C.i.f. Import Value.-The c.i.f. (cost, insurance, and freight)
value represents the value of imports at the first port of
entry in the United States. It is based on the purchase price
and includes all freight, insurance, and other charges
(excluding U.S. import duties) incurred in bringing the
merchandise from the country of exportation and generally
placing it alongside the carrier at the first port of entry in
the United States. If the merchandise was acquired in a
transaction between related parties, the purchase price used
in deriving the c.i.f. value is based on an arm's-length equiv-
alent transaction price, i.e., a price which would exist
between unrelated buyers and sellers.

Import Monthly Carryover

It is the objective of the compiling procedures to include
shipments, insofar as practicable, in the statistics for the
actual month of imp, iation. However, for purposes of the
statistics the month of unportation is based on the date of
official acceptance by Customs of the import entry or ware-
house withdrawal document. This may not in all cases corre-
spond to the actual month of importation. (For example.
under the Customs "immediate-delivery" procedures,
importers may file the import entry up to 10 workdays
after the actual date of importation.) Also, because of
processing problems (e.g., late receipt of a document for an
end-of-month slupment, rejection of a shipment by the
computer because the data fail to meet certain edit criteria
established to protect the accuracy of the statistics, etc.),
there is an overall average carryover of about 7 percent (in
terms of value) of the shipments from the reported month
of importation (based on the date of the import entry or
warehouse withdrawal document) to a subsequent month,
usually the succeeding month. In addition, as a result of the
aforementioned Customs "immediate-delivery" procedures,
there is a further carryover of presently unknown magni-
tude from the actual month of importation to a subsequent
month. These limitations should be bore in mind when
making month-to-month comparisons.
Cumulations of data over at least 4-month periods are
desirable to identify underlying trends. Month-to-month
changes in imports, exports, and similar series often reflect
primarily irregular movements, differences in monthly
carryover, etc.

Estimated Data for Imports Valued Under 5251

The overall import and Schedule A Section 9 totals
include sample estimates for shipments valued under 5251.
Therefore, they are subject to sampling error, estimated at








less than one-tenth of one percent for the unadjusted overall
total and about one percent for the unadjusted Schedule A
Section 9 total. This means that we can have about 67
percent confidence that the published unadjusted overall
totals and the unadjusted Schedule A Section 9 totals differ
by less than one-tenth of a percent and one percent, respec-
tively, from the totals that would have resulted from a com-
plete tabulation. The statistics on imports of petroleum and
petroleum products included in this report reflect full)
compiled data and, therefore, are not subject to sampling
error.


EXPORT STATISTICS

Coverage

The export statistics reflect, in general, both government
and nongovernment exports of domestic and foreign mer-
chandise from the U.S. Customs territory (includes the 50
States, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico) to for-
eign countries, whether the exportation involves a com-
mercial transaction or not. The statistics, therefore, include
Department of Defense Military Assistance Program Grant-
Aid shipments, shipments for economic assistance under the
Foreign Assistance Act and shipments of agricultural com-
modities under P. L. 480 (The Agricultural Trade Develop-
ment and Assistance Act of 1954, as amended) and related
laws The following are excluded from the statistics Ship-
ments to U.S. Armed Forces and diplomatic missions
abroad for their own use; shipments between the United
States and Puerto Rico, between the United States and its
possessions including the Virgin Islands), and between
these outlying areas; exports from U.S. possessions, intransit
shipments through the United States; transactions not con-
sidered to be of statistical importance, such as personal and
household effects: temporary exports; low-valued or non-
commerical exports by mail: issued monetary coins of all
component metals; and gold in the form of ores, concen-
trates, waste, scrap, and refined bullion. Exports of silver in
these forms are included in the statistics, unless otherwise
noted. (Information on gold movements, previously shown
in Report FT 2402, appears in Report FT 990 effective
January 1975.)



Definition of Exports of Domestic
and Foreign Merchandise

Exports of domestic merchandise include commodities
which are grown, produced, or manufactured in the United
States, and commodities of foreign origin which have been
changed in the United States from the form in which they
were imported, or wluch have been enhanced in value by
further manufacture in the United States. Exports of for-
eign merchandise consist of commodities of foreign origin
which have entered the United States as imports and which,
at the time of exportation, are in substantially the same
condition as when imported.


Source of Export Information

The official U.S. export statistics are compiled by the
Bureau of the Census primarily from copies of Shipper's
Export Declarations which are required to be filed with
Customs officials, except for Department of Defense Mili-
tary Assistance Program Grant-Aid shipments which are
reported directly to the Bureau of the Census by the
Department of Defense and shipments by qualified ex-
porters who have been authorized to submit data in the
form of magnetic tape, punched cards, or monthly Shipper's
Summary Export Declarations directly to the Bureau of the
Census.
Export Valuation

F.a s. Export Value.-The value reported in the export sta-
tistics generally is equivalent to a f.a.s. (free alongside ship)
value at the U.S. port of export, based on the transaction
pnce, including inland freight, insurance and other charges
incurred in placing the merchandise alongside the carrier at
the U.S. port of exportation.

Export Monthl) Carryover

It is the objective of the compiling procedures to include
shipments, insofar as practicable, in the statistics for the
actual month of exportation. For purposes of the statistics,
the month of exportation is generally based on the date
when the shipment leaves the United States. (For vessel or
air shipments it is the date when the carrier departs or is
cleared from the port of export.) However, as indicated
above for imports, because of processing problems (e.g late
receipt of a document for an end-of-month shipment, re-
jection of a shipment by the computer because the data
fail to meet certain edit criteria established to protect the
accuracy of the statistics, etc.), there is an overall average
carryover of about 4 percent in terms of value) of the
shipments from the actual month of exportation to a
subsequent month, usually the succeeding month. These
limitations should be borne in mind when making month-
to-month comparisons.
Cumulations of data over at least 4-month periods are
desirable to identify underlying trends Month-to-month
changes in imports, exports, and similar series often reflect
primarily irregular movements, differences in monthly
carryover, etc.
Estimated Data for Export Shipments

The overall export and Schedule B section and division
totals include sample estimates for shipments valued
$251-$1,999 to Canada and for shipments valued
5251-$999 to countries other than Canada. Data for ship-
ments valued S250 and under to all countries are also esti-
mated, based on established percentages of individual
country totals, and included in the Schedule B Section 9
totals regardless of the commodity exported. It is estimated
that the unadjusted overall total is subject to a sampling
error of less than one-tenth of one percent, and the unad-
justed Schedule B section or division totals are subject to








sampling errors of about one percent. In addition, the
Schedule B Section 9 total is subject to possible error in the
estimated data for shipments valued $250 and under, and
the overall total, and the individual totals for sections other
than Section 9, to a more limited extent. Such $250 and
under shipments represent about I percent of the total
value of exports, and about 60 percent of the Schedule B
Section 9 total.

SOURCES OF ERROR IN THE STATISTICS

Monthly import and export figures are subject to the
possibility of errors which may arise from sources other
than sampling errors, discussed above. Among these are
errors in the reporting and/or processing of information as
to commodity classification, value and other statistical
factors, month of inclusion (see paragraphs on import and
export carryover, above), and the undercounting of exports
to Canada due to the non-receipt of Shipper's Export
Declarations. For 1974, the undercounting amounted to
about one and one-half billion dollars. In the case of im-
ports the information as to value and commodity classifica-
tion uas well as country of origin and net quantity) is
venfied by Customs officials on entries filed for transactions
valued over $250 which are ordinarily subject to examina-
tion for Customs appraisement purposes, thus considerably
reducing the possibility of error In addition, the procedures
used to compile both the import and export statistics
include clencal and computer processing checks designed to
protect the accuracy of the statistics to the fullest practi-
cable e tent.


MERCHANDISE TRADE BALANCES


Two trade balances are presented in this report
I) The balance between exports based on fa.s values
and imports based on f.a.s. values.
2) The balance between exports based on f.a.s. values
and imports based on c.i.f. values with adjustments for im-
ports from affiliated sellers abroad to reflect arms-length
equivalent prices.
Both balances are useful for certain purposes. The first
balance corresponds to a measurement of the international
payments or credit flows resulting from merchandise trade
between the U.S. and foreign countries. The second balance
is based on concepts similar to those used by most foreign
countries, and therefore provides a reference for comparison
with the trade balances published by those countries


REVISIONS TO THE STATISTICS

Revisions are carried into the statistics on a periodic
basis. Data for 1975 and 1976 appearing in the 1976
monthly issues of this report are presented as follows:

1976 Statistics

a. January through November 1976 issues: figures are as
originally issued, except as noted below.
b. December 1976 issue. figures reflect revisions for
prior months of the year issued with December 1976
statistics or earlier, as noted below.

1975 Statistics

a January through May 1976 issues: figures reflect re-
visions issued with December 1975 statistics or
earlier.
b. June through December 1976 issues: figures reflect
revisions to 1975 data issued with June 1976 statistics
or earlier.

In addition to the revisions wtuch are made on a periodic
basis, instances may u- "ur where a significant error in the
statistics for a month ot the current year is discovered after
the statistics for that month are compiled. If the error is of
sufficient importance to require correction prior to the time
that the regular revisions are carried, the correction is made
and so noted in this report.


SOURCES OF FURTHER INFORMATION

Additional foreign trade statistics and information regard-
ing coverage, valuation, sampling, and qualifications which
should be considered by users of the statistics are contained
primarily in the following publications: Report FT 990,
Highlights of U.S. Export and Import Trade, FT 135, U.S.
General Imports, Schedule A Commodity by Country; FT
410, U.S. Exports, Schedule B Commodity by Country; and
the Guide to Foreign Trade Statistics. Information regarding
additional sources of statistics, the methodology used in
seasonally adjusting the data, and other matters relating to
foreign trade statistics may be obtained from the Bureau of
the Census, Washington, D.C. 20233.











Table 1. U.S. Exports (f.a.s. Value Basis). General Imports (f.a.s. Value Basis), and Merchandise Trade Balance,
Adjusted for Seasonal and Working-Day Variation, by Month: January 1975 to March 1976
(In millions of dollars. See Explanation of Statlstics for Inrornmalon on coverage, definitions ol export .na Import values anrd trade bal-
wnosa, and sources of error in the data. All data shown for 1975 and 197b reflect seasonal adjusltent factor introduced In January 1976)

Pe od nd January- January February March April May June JIul August S er- Oclober Nor- ecem
series March bee Der ber

1975

Exports .............. 26,813.2 9,,7.*.. 8.75..6 8.685.2 8,6d7.b 8,221.5 6,716 1 8,893.6 8.979.2 9,1.5 7 9,22..6 9,409.3 9.249.9
F.a.s. Import value... 25,029 6 9,635.5 7.927.b 7.,66.5 7,958.5 7.266.2 1.103.5 7,832.2 7,b677 2 8,20o.I 8,170.. 8,20).6 8. 25.7
Marchandlie trade
balance.............. 1,783.6 -262.1 -827 0 1.218 .7 .89.1 *9515. 1 1.612.6 *1.061 -1,102 0 -9.0.6 *1,05'.. *1.205 7 .724.2

1976

ExportBs .............. 26,859 1 9,103.. 8.600.1 6,955 6
F.a.s. Import value... 27,723.4 9,176.0 8,9.0.9 9,606 5
Merchandise trade
balance............. -864 3 -72.6 -1-0 8 50 9

'Represents exports of domestic and foreign merchandise excludirn Departmern or Detense Mllitar Asslstance Prcgrasm Grant-pAa shilpments.


Table 2. U.S. Exports (f.a.s. Value Basis). General Imports (c.i.f. Value Basis), and Merchandise Trade Balance.
Adjusted for Seasonal and Working-Day Variation, by Month: January 1975 to March 1976
(In millions of dollars. See Explanation of Statiatic- for information on coverage. delfInJtIons of report ana import values and trade bal-
ances, and sources of error In the data. All oats ano.n for 1975 bna 1976 reflect seasonsl dj)ustment iacior-: I roducaa In january 197b)
Period and January- rupy A- |o' r,- De he~-
seriea Marcr, Janury' February Mlrcn April ay June July Aucult October r ece-

1975

Exports ............. 26,813.2 9,373). 6,75..6 8,685 2 do A'.. n.221 5 D,'lo I 8.893 6 8.9'9 2 9,1- ? 9.22- 6 Q..09.3 9.2-9.9
C.I.r. Import value.. 26,916.1 10,377.7 8.j501 6,0A9.' 8,5.6.5 7.816.; ..652.2 6.-13.0 8,6;6.8 8,829.9 8.195.2 6.629.6 9.165.5
Merchandise trade
balance............. -104 9 -1,00-.3 -253.. *-6.6.0 *101 1 ..0- 8 1.r.63.9 *.80 6 5.00 *J15.8 *..24 'i9.5 *8-.'.

1976

Exports'............. 26,859 1 9.103.. 8,00 1 a, 55 6
C.L.f. import value.. 29,773.0 9,879.7 9,59'. 10,300 6
Merchandise trade
balance............. -2,913.9 -776.3 -792.6 -1.345 0

'Represents exports of domestic and 'oreifn mererandise excludingg Dep.rtaent of DLfens Military Assist`lce Program Grant-Aid .hlpments.











Table 3. U.S. Exports (La.s. Value Basis) of Merchandise Showing Department of Defense (DOD) Military Assistance
Program Grant-Aid Shipments, by Month: January 1975 to March 1976

tin millions of dollars. See Sxplanation of Statisttcs for information on coverage. defitniton of f.B.s. export value, and sourcesof error in
the data. Unadjusted totals represent sum of unrounded figures and hence may wary slightly from B s of rounded amounts)

Exports excluding DD Exporrts Including Gra-A
Grant-Aid DOD Grant-Atd


Period Doestic Domestic Domestic
ans
fonan and Domestic, and Domestic, Weatern Other
reign foreign, unadjusted foreign, unadjusted tl Burope countries
adjusted' unadjusted unadjusted


19 5

Ja .n.ry-December ..... ... ... .... ( 10;,190.6 105,695.6 107,651.8 106,156.1 461.2 21.7 439.1

January- Maren........................ 26,613.2 27,035.3 26,580.0 27,188.7 26,733.5 153.5 10.7 142.7

January ........ ................ .. 9.373 4 9,124..1 8,94,2.7 9,203.0 9,021.5 78.8 5.2 73.1
february. ... .. ..................... 8,75 .6 8,.98.1 8,367.3 8,543.8 8,413.0 .5.7 3.3 42.4
March ............................ .. 8.685.2 9'.13.0 9,270.1 9,.61.9 9,299.0 28.9 2.2 26.7
4prl .............. ............... 8.6 6 9,016.9 8,888.. 9,078.6 8,950.1 61.7 3.6 58.1
May......... .. ....................... 8.221.5 8,900.6 8,185.1 8,951.6 8,836.1 51.0 2.2 48.8
June ... .............. ........... 8.716.1 8,630.7 8,-90.8 8,691.0 8,551.1 60.3 0.8 59.5

July.... ... .... ...... ..... .. ,893.8 8.2 4.8 8,128.5 8,26,-.2 8,157.8 29.. 1.0 28.4
August...... ... .................... 8.979.2 8,..5.8 8,352.1 8,455.6 8,362.0 9.9 1.6 8.3
Seprte ner ................. ...... ..... 9 '.15.7 8,391.2 8,271 6 8,-16.8 8,297.2 25.6 0.7 24.9
fertober.................... .... ...... 9..22 .6 9,718.1 9,601.7 9,749.7 9,633.2 31.6 0.2 31.4
N.ovemoer............................ 9,-09.3 9,513.7 9.407.. 9,526.7 9,420.5 13.0 0.8 12.2
Decemoer ............... ............. 9.2*9.9 9,303.5 9,190.0 9,328.7 9,215.2 25.2 O.1 25.1

1976

January- March......................... 26,859.1 27,339.9 26,973.1 27,359.6 26,992.8 19 1 1.0 18.4

January ...... ...................... 9.103.' 8,160.2 8,658.5 8.769.8 8,668 I 9.6 0.5 9.2
February............... ........... ... 8.800.1 8,737.6 8,629.1 8,742.6 8,633.9 4.8 0.3 4.5
March...... .. .. .................. 8,955.6 9,942.2 9,688 .4 9,847.4 9,690.7 5.3 0.3 5.0
April. ................................
May................... .......... ..
June ...............................

July................. .........
Aue sst .... ......... ............
Septemner............ ...............
Orc ber .............................
.Novemuer. .... .......................
Deceo er .. ...................

'Aajusted for seasonal ana sorking-day variation using seasonai adjustment factors Introduced in January 1976. See footnote 1 on front
page.
'Represent: only export shipments iron the Untted States and differs from DOD Military A.l lstnce Program Grant-Aid shipment figures under
this program as follows: Ia) Transfera of the naterlal procured outside the United States and transfers from DOD overseas atockas from export
shipments. th) Export value of f.a.s.. whereas DODvalue, in mojt Instances, is f.o.b., point of origin (c) Data for sbipments reported by
the DOD for a given month are Incluaed In Bureau of the Census reports In the second month subsequent to the month reported by the DOD.
lAnnual total is not sh,.n for searsnnally adjusted nots. Unsajusted nata should be usea for annual totals.











Table 4. U.S. Imports of Merchandise, by Month: January 1975 to March 1976
(In millions of dollars. See Fxplanetion of Stactstics for Information on coverage, definitions of .a.s. and c.A.f. import values, and sources
of error in the data. Unadjusted totals represent sum of unrounded figures and hence may vary slightly from sum of rounded amounts)

U.S. Imports of merchandise

F.a.s. value C.i.f. value
Period general imports Imports General imports Imports
for for
Seasonally nadused consumption, Seasonally Unadjusted ronsump on,
adjusted' unsa justed adjusted' Unaju unadjusted


1915

January-Decenber ....................... 1') 96. 4O.. 95,728?.b ('1 103,61*.0 102,979.9

January-a-lch .......................... 25,029.6 24,390.8 24,311.6 26,918 I 26.233.8 26,153.6

January................................ 9,635.c 9.616.6 9,802.8 10.377.? 10,572.8 10,556.6
February............................... 7,927.6 7. 69.7 7,1i7.9 8.501.2 7,668.5 7.655.6
lM rca ............................... ... 7.66.5 7 O.'0.5 7,371 .9 8,039.2 .7972.5 7.941.6
April .................................. 7.958.5 8, 190.1 8.L2.3 8,546.5 8. 795.2 8, 7L.. 2
May.................................... 7,266.2 7, 367.9 7,32..0 7.BLb.7 7.926. 7.881.2
J mu e............................... .... 7.103.5 7. 279.0 7.2j5.1 7,652.2 7.6.1.2 7,813.5

July................................... 7,832.2 7,920. 2 7,891.5 8,413.0 8,508. 1 8. 76..
August................................. 7.877.2 7,518.8 7, .27.1 8.478.8 8.093.0 7.996.7
September............................. 8.205.1 8, 161.6 B. 1i0.8 8,8,9.9 8, 83.L B,763.1
October................................. 8. 70.. 8,jL.9 8.535.8 8.795.2 9,162.8 9,186.6
Noveber................................ 8.203.6 7,910.7 7.886.5 8,829.8 8.51..b 8.489.5
December ............................... 8,525. 8,888.9 8,810.9 9, 65.5 9,556.0 9,'.7..3

1976

January-arch ............................ 27,723.4 27.319.3 26,979 4 29,773 0 29.338.5 28,986.9

Janusry................................ 9. 1'6.0 ,009.0 8.9-5.9 9.879.7 9,699.9 9,632.9
February............................... 8.9..0.9 8 111.2 7.98C .8 9,592.7 8,702.5 8.57-.8
arch.................. .............. 9,606 5 10,199.2 10,016.7 10.300.6 10.936.1 10,779.3
April ..................................
Iay ....................................
June..................................

July........................ ..........
August.................................
September.............................
October. ..............................
November......................... ..........
December...............................

'Adjusted for seasonal and sorklng-day variltion uslng seasonal adjustment factors introduced In January 1976.
'Annual toLl Is not shown for seasonallyy adjusted data. Unsajusted oata should be used for annual totals.








8

Table 5. U.S. Exports (f.a.s. Value Basis) of Domestic Merchandise, Including Department of Defense (DOD) Military
Assistance Program _Grant-Aid Shipments--Schedule B Sections and Selected Divisions, Seasonally Adjusted
and Unadjusted, by Month: January 1975 to March 1976

(Ir, millions of dollars. See Explanation of Statistics for Inforantion on coverage, definition of f.a.s. export value, and sources of error
in the data. Unadjusted totals represent sun of unrounded figures and hence may vary slightly from sun of rounded amounts)

Schedule B sections and selected divlsionas
Period
0 P 1 2 3 J 5 6 7' 71 72 1 7 8 9

Seasonally adjusted'

197,

January- March.......... 1,167.9 375.8 2,608.3 1,237.1 '366.2 2,316.6 2,731.8 10,614.2 4,910.5 1,825.7 3,831.3 1,378.8 1702.2

January................. 1,51.9.2 139.2 1,01s..8 421.4 '40.9 859.5 931.0 3.502.3 1,637.0 608.6 1,216.8 468.2 *238.6
rebruary................ i.368. 111.5 805.9 J99.8 *10,.5 699.9 892.9 3,625.1 1,631.2 611.3 1,376.1 456.6 *226.6
March................... .,20.3 i2i.1 787.6 .15.9 '120.8 757.2 907.9 3,486.2 1,6b.2.3 605.8 1,238.4 454.0 *237.0
Api I .................... 8.. l 13.6 4-1.0 381.8 "73.7 706.7 900.9 3,668.0 1,743.9 632.8 1,302.1 458.9 '274.9
May..................... 1,069.0 10..9 725.8 .02. '88.9 667.9 887.7 3,577.9 1.702.2 622.2 1,333.1 457.9 '285.0
June.................... 1,123.2 91.3 699.1 388. "57.9 712.3 891.2 3,914.5 1.800.7 621.1 1,469. 4713.0 *241.4
July................... 1,210.3 8'..6 857.5 324.6 '66.3 691.5 906.3 3.98..3 1,760.9 631.0 1,613.1 480.5 *237.9
Augul .................. ,270.2 110.1 908.5 346.2 '43.9 681.6 886.8 3.940.8 1,752.3 652.1 1,577.4 468.3 '277.6
September.............. 1,268. 99.0 817.9 320.9 '43.5 707.0 921.6 3,955.1 1.764.2 625.5 1,534.2 .79.2 '246.0
October........................ I 193.3 107... 85..0 288.3 '56.9 7,2.1 922.3 .,105.8 1,811.8 662.7 1.627.5 496.6 *278.2
November................ 1,381.8 111.I 81i.2 450.; "7.7 725.5 946.5 .,006.8 1,789.0 659.6 1,539.0 89.6 '353.3
December................ 1,292.8 111.3 276.4 ilO.8 '68.8 766.1 927.7 4.103.8 1,863.3 654.3 1,525.7 498.4 4265.5

1976

January-March ........... 3,640.8 5iO.8 2,340.6 954.1 4230.8 2,328.5 2,797.8 11,385.4 5,302.6 2,128.0 4,004.5 1,582.2 '672.0

January.................. 1,298.2 211.6 822.7 321.0 '78.9 7?7.. 930.3 3,1770.3 1,732.8 655.3 1.68.2 493.2 *254.0
Febru.ry................ 1.,159.8 176.7 741.5 120. *73.9 740.8 915.2 3.852.. 1.768.6 736.4 1.25.7 526.2 *201.6
March................... 1,182.8 2.5 774.4 312.; '77.9 810.3 952.3 3,762.7 1,801.2 736.3 1,210.6 562.8 '216.5
April ...................
May.....................
June ..................
July....................
August .................
September...............
October ................
No.e.hber...............
December ...............

Unadjusted

1975

January-r-ecmber........ .1486.7 1,309.8 9, 78..3 .,46-..9 93.8 8, 705.3 10,917.7 -5. 709.5 20,889.7 7,586.5 17,233.3 5,672.4 3,162.3

January-Marcn........... 4,252.4 329.j 2,757.3 1,394.4 366.2 2,276.7 2,707.5 10,878 4,960.4 1,839.3 4,078.6 1,369.0 702.2

January................. 1.63'.5 122.9 1,026.0 35?.u 1.0.9 820.0 910.5 3,313.2 1,612.. 616.5 1,084.2 465.6 238.6
Feoruary................ 1.338.3 86.3 838.9 337.. 10..5 668.5 8.'.1. 3,538.7 1,544.8 571.0 1,.22.9 426.4 226.6
March................... 1.?;6.6 120.1 892.3 399.6 130.8 788.2 9.9.6 4,026.6 1.803.3 651.8 1,571.5 488.0 237.0
April ................... 1.219.6 101.6 810. 391.4 73.7 713 .1 9.8.6 3.910.1 1,853.8 646.1 1.410.2 482.3 274.9
MaVy..................... 1,028.. 98.1 765.8 .36. 68.9 702.6 95..2 3.993.0 1.829.9 652.7 1,410.4 483.5 285.0
June.................... 1.060. ;'9. hb68.4 .06.2 57.9 718.7 899.2 3,938.0 1,798.9 62..2 1,514.9 481.0 261.4
Jul).................... 1.11-.?7 2l. 7:,2.. 310.3 66.3 70-.6 862.8 3.5 7.9 1.690.5 596.9 1.290.5 454.6 237.9
August .................. 1,182.6 10.?. '15.9 379.8 6 3.9 7i0.7 875.2 3.550. 1,680.5 62..1 1,2.6.1 60.8 277.8
Septalmnr.............. 1.21-.3 105.7 o93.5 322.8 ..3. 682.2 880.1 3,618.9 1.603.6 599.2 1,416.0 660.0 266.0
October................. .l,.. .6 128.6 816.' 318.1 ;6.9 ;30.2 980.*. .,2 7.8 1.881.5 706.. 1,669 B. 530.9 278.2
Nonvember................ .126.8 150.8 859.5 ..57.9 ;7.7 661.6 91-.. 3.9.-.7 1, 709.6 66..2 1.532.8 471.8 353.3
December............... 1.82. 119.b 819.4 i.6.9 68.8 '80.7 895.2 .,038.2 1,8.0.9 633.3 1,563.9 478.5 265.5

1976

JanuI.ry- Mr'h. .......... 3,737.4 443.E 2,.34.4 671.0 230.@ 2,327.3 2,803.5 11.799.6 5,423.3 2,14.9 4,230.4 1,590.1 672.0

Janoury................. i.333. 187.9 3 83j.8 268.4 18.9 7.8.7 899.0 3,589.3 1,712.0 665.1 1,212.2 .77.9 254.0
Freruary................. 1,149.8 131 6 29-.1 281.i 73.9 '1-.9 890.5 3,819.3 1.713.7 688.5 1,.77.0 500.4 201.6
March ................... 1,244.3 118.1 90-.5 303.9 77.9 863.8 1,019.0 4,330.9 1,997.5 792.2 1,541.1 611.8 216.5
April ........ ........
May. ....................
June...................
July .......... ........
August. ................
September..............
October................
November...............
December...............

'SchedulE D section cna selected di llaon descriptions are as follows
0. food and Ilue anrilals 7. MachJnery and transport equipment
1. Beverages and tobacco 21. Machinery, other than electric
2. Cruae materlarls, inedible, except fuels i2. Electrical machinery, apparatus, and appliances
3. Mineral fu-ls. lubricants, and related sateriala ?3. Transport equlpaent
>. Animal and vegrable oil ar o fatn 8. Mlscellaneo's manufactured articles, n.e.c.
1. Chemicals 9. Commodiiles and transactions not classified according to kind
U. Manufacturer conod crlssiflIa chlelly bt, material
'Seafonall) adjusted ilaJres for -ectlon 7 MI a differ slahtly fromn the sum of divisions 71., 2, and 73 since each Is independently ad-
JuSted.
'Adju'ted for sEajonal and .srltng-day -.arilon using seasonal adjustment factors Introduced In January 1976. See footnote I on Iront
paee. Annual total; a.re nut shown for seasoa.ally adjuted data. Unadjusted data should be used for annual totals. The adjusted sectIon
totals In this tante and t.mllar overall .aonthly rotals In tables 1, 2. ard 3 aere adjusted Lndependently.
"In tn- abserDc of demonstrable eauson1l pattern for this section, no seasonal adjustment factors have been applied to the data.







9

Table 6. U.S. General Imports (f.a.s. Value Basis) of Merchandise, Schedule A Sections, Seasonally Adjusted and
Unadjusted, by Month: January 1975 to March 1976
fin millions of dollars. See Explanation of Statistics for Information on coverage, definition orf a.n. Import value, and sources of error
In the data. Unadjusted totals represent sum of unrounded figures and hence may vary slightly trom sum of rounded amounts)

Schedule A sections'
Period
0 I 2 3 5 6 7 8 9

Seasonally adjuatea'

1975

January- March........ 2,016.8 388.5 1,419.3 6,438.6 '148.3 1,079.1 1,489.9 5,699.9 2,216.9 'S64.5

January.............. 672.8 111.6 483.9 1,090.3 '.8.5 42..5 1.669.3 1.876.0 772.6 '218.0
February..... ...... 668.9 126 0 -66.' 1.983 8 '1..7 32 ..7 1,.63 9 1,837.7 723.9 '181.0
Marc n ............... 675.1 150.9 .66 1.31-..7 '55.1 329. 1, )6.7 1.986.2 722.. '165..
April.............. 66-.6 120.5 .72.0 2*.38.9 .U0 2 31..5 ,10,.6 1,81-.0 726.3 31 2
May............ ... 627.9 11 3 4*2 5 1.994.9 '51.9 B2 1.6 1,101.8 1.815 675.6 '198.5
June. ................ 739.0 119.3 -60.9 1,.82.0 '33.2 2.5.7 lI' .6 1,852.3 716.2 '219.'
July................. 709.3 109.4. 73.3 2,167 6 '.-.6 26-.3 1,115 1,978.2 771.- '223.8
August............ .. 66... 112.' -39.3 2.21.3.-. 32.7 282.' 1L,0; 2,101.5 7-0.6 '189.7
September............ 90-.1 116.1 .59.8 2.503.7 ".1.6 266 3 1,099.5 1,897.6 776.9 '217.9
October..... .... .. 74.3.5 111.3 ..0.1 2,.23 0 .6 297.0 1.111.7 2.06.- 3 16.1 '21.'.
November............. 762.'. 104. 2.3 2.386 9 '66.2 310 2 1.1.o.9 2.053.b 873.8 '211.9
December............. 696.8 127.9 509.1 2.97 1 '"6.0 324.7 1.16-.5 2.21-.1 878.7 ''3..6

1976

January- March........ 2,309.0 504.7 1,.47.2 7,360.2 '123.7 i,065.5 .1,865.4 6,960.6 2,787.1 '57L.3

January.............. 731.9 10.. 526 9 2.6B6.0 '37.8 353.2 1,166.0 2.293.9 900.9 '16a 6
February............. 701.0 187.6 512.2 2.3-9.3 '51.5 330.1 1,275.7 2,256 1 919.9 '169.7
March................ 876.1 176.5 508.1 2,342.9 '34.4 382.2 1,4 3.7 2,110.6 966.3 '215.0
April......... ....
May.................
June.................
July ...............
August..............
September ..........
October .............
November............
December ............

UnrT.JUs ted


1975

January-Decemoer..... 6,508.8 1.419 5 5,56- 3 26.-75 6 553.9 3,696.- 1-,700.5 3.-6. b 9,227.b ,529 1

January-March........ 1,998.1 362.3 1,321.5 6,841.8 146.3 1,084.2 4,321.8 5,663.1 2,065.3 384.-

January............... 7113.b 112 3 66.0 3.-21.0 -..5 -j7.. 1,7-9.5 1.69-.7 755.6 218 0
Fehruary............. 676.6 106.- 39-.9 1.9-0 1 -..7 30o .? 1,259 0 1,68B.8 621.9 181.0
March................ 657.5 1-3.7 .60 6 1.-B0.7 55 1 -.0.8 1,313. 2,079.5 681.8 185.-
April............. ... 08-. .5 119.1 -75 3 2..,1.3 -U 7 J51 9 1,2.3.1 1.899.2 ;03.8 231.2
May................... 611.0 116.9 -53.B 1.9-5.0 51.i 285 6 1,1 -.? 1,93-.5 626.3 198.5
June ................. 779.7 129. 513.) 1,-36.1 33.2 252.B 1,230.6 1.961 6 722.7 219 1
July................ 705.8 103.- 306.. 2.1317.3 -. 8 2" 7 i,16.6 1,96-.* 80.9 723.8
August ........... 635.8 95.8 '.20.9 -.2-5.. 3?.7 270.o 1,005.3 1,822.0 800.6 189.7
September ............ 896.9 106.9 .76.- 2, 6B.I -. 6 2:5 I 1,091.8 1,793 3 815.7 217.9
October.............. 759 9 128.0 *57 7 2.3-5 5 4 8 8 30 .- 1.194.0 .138 6 919.1 217
November. ........... 725.1 120.- -15.3 2,089.- 66.2 298.5 1,121.2 2,018.6 8- .1 211.9
December............. 712.1 137.2 52-.- 25..7.5 '.6.0 327.9 1.211.1 2,269.- 878.7 234..6

1976

January-March........ 2,319.4 467.7 1,462.8 7,841.2 123.7 1,076.7 3,769.8 7,068.6 2,628.1 5l1.J

January.............. 759.7 1-1.5 .8..7 .1790.7 37.8 350.0 1.190.5 2,229.7 838.7 186.o
Fbruary.............. 669.5 158.3 '39.5 2.302 3 51.5 316.t, 1.108.6 2,10..9 790.2 169 7
March ............... 890.1 167.8 539.6 2,748.2 34.4 110.1 1,470.7 2,724.0 999.2 215.0
April ...............
May..................
June ..............
July ................
August...............
September ..........
October..............
November ............
December.............

'Schedule A sectionn descriptions are as follo .s
0. Food and live animals 5. Chemicals
1. Beverages and tobacco 6 an.nulacLureu goods clasltflSd cnlhely by material
?. Crude materials, Inedible, except fuels 7. Machinery and transport equipment
3. Mineral fuels, lubricants, and relayed materials 8. Miscellaneous manufactured articles, n.e.a.
'.. An.lal ana vegetable oils and fats 9 Cnncditlel ana transactions not clasiatfed accorolng to kind
'Adjusted for seasonal and working-day variation using seasonal adjustment factors Introduced in January 1976. See footnote I on front
page. Annual totals are not shoUn for seasonally adjusted data. Unadjusted data should be usea for annual totals. The adjusted section
totals In this table and similar overall monthly totals In table I and sere adjuatea independently.
'In the absence of demonstrable seasonal patterns for this section. no seasonal eajustaient factor& have been applied to The data.










Table 7. U.S. General Imports (c.i.. Value Basis) of Merchandise. Schedule A Sections. Seasonally Adjusted and
Unadjusted, by Month: January 1975 to March 1976

tin millions of dollars. See Explanation of BtatIstlce for Lnformruton on coverage, definition of c.l.f. import value, and sourcesofereorin
the data. Unadjusted totals represent a of unrounded figures and heace may vary slightly fnom m of rounded amounta)

Schedule A sectlonsl
Period
0 i 2 3 4 b 8 9

Seasonally adjusted'


1975

January- Maran........ 2,191.7 420.4 1,570.4 6,871.2 '154.9 1,150.1 4,852.8 6,147.1 2,377.9 '601.4

January............ 732.9 122.1 549.6 3,306.3 '50.5 &5A.0 1,810.6 2,018.0 825.3 '224.3
February. ........ 726.2 135.8 512.9 2,108 1 '46.8 346.6 1,580.7 1,97.14 776.3 )166.2
arch .............. 732.6 162.5 507 9 1.56.8 '57.6 349.5 1.461.5 2.157.7 776.3 190.9
April............... 720.8 131.3 520.8 2,594.3 '12.5 333.9 1,407.1 1,962.0 777.6 '238.2
May.............. 680.7 124 0 485.8 2,131.1 '51.6 297.9 1,187.9 1,968.4 728.0 '201.9
June................. 796.3 129.5 511.1 1,585.6 '35.1 262.9 1.298.1 2,001.8 770.8 '224.3
July............ ... 770.1 120.2 525.9 2,329 3 '47.7 282.3 1.200.5 2,123.5 831.7 '228.5
August.. ....... .... 125.6 123.6 484 1 2.399.6 '34.9 301.3 1,137.0 2,259.1 801.0 '194.0
September........... 974.4 127 6 505.7 2,690.1 '1.4 30L.1 1,179 6 2,046.5 861.8 '222.9
October.............. 804.3 122.0 485.2 2,597.0 '51.9 313.1 1.198.9 2.226.9 882.6 '222.1
November............... 830.3 114.5 486.0 2.549.8 '71.2 328.9 1,218.4 2,213.5 945.5 216.1
December........... 755.7 139.1 561 2 2,452.3 s.9.6 344.0 1,261.5 2,377.7 951.3 239.4

1976

January- Marc ....... 2,508.9 543.1 1,684.5 7,865.9 '133.4 1,123.3 4,168.4 7,491.0 3,000.0 '584.6

January.............. 198.4 152.0 580.2 7,853.0 '40.7 172.6 1,264.0 2,473.1 972.8 3191.1
February ........... 758.6 200.5 554.? 2507.0 '55.4 3.7.2 1,376.4 2,431.6 989.5 1173.6
March.... ............ 951.9 190.6 550.1 2,505.9 '37.4 403.5 1,528.0 2,586.5 1,037.7 '21B.9
April .. .........
May..................
June ................
July .... ......
August...............
September...........
October........... ..
November............
December ............

Unadjusted


1975

January-December..... 9,227. 1,547.3 6,142.9 28,284.1 586.6 3,929.1 15,865.6 25,296.4 9,945.5 2,588.8

January-March........ 2,171.6 392.1 1,462.2 7,302.4 154.9 1,155.4 4,671.7 6,109.0 2,213.1 601.4

January.............. 777.6 122.8 527.0 3,660.0 50.5 461.6 1.897.5 2,038.2 807.1 224.3
February............. 680.4 114.6 433.9 2,061.7 46.8 326.8 1,359.4 1,811.7 666.9 186.2
March... ............ 711.5 154.1 501 1,580.6 57.6 361.0 1.414.7 2,259.1 739.0 190.9
April .. ......... 742. 129.7 524.5 2,596.9 42.5 373.7 1,339.6 2,054.2 753.5 238.2
May.... ............. 662.3 126.8 497.9 2,077.8 54.6 302.1 1,234.2 2,093.6 674.8 201.9
June................. 840 1 1.0 6 568 9 1,536.4 35.1 270.5 1,321.1 2,119.9 111.7 224.3
July .... ........ 766.3 113.6 562.7 2,275.1 17.1 266.2 1,223.3 2,108.7 917.3 228.5
August .............. 694.4. 105.0 463.8 2.402.0 34.9 288.3 1,085.9 1,958.8 865.9 194.0
September............. 906.6 117.6 523.9 2,628.2 4'*. 292.2 1,171.3 1.932.1 883.9 222.9
October .... ........ 822.0 140.3 504~.6 2,513.9 51.9 318.7 1,281.6 2.307.0 994.6 222.1
November ............. 789.6 132.4 456.'. .231.0 71.2 316.4 1,212.3 2,175.9 913.3 216.1
December............. 772.3 149.1 578.0 2,719.6 49.6 347.5 1,312.0 2,437.2 951.3 239.4

1976

January-March ........ 2,520.3 503.5 1,592.4 8,380.6 133.4 1,135.1 4,06.0 7,595.0 2,828.6 584.6

January............... 828.8 153.2 532.6 2,984.2 40.7 369.2 1,290.5 2,403.9 905.7 191.1
February............. 724.5 169.0 '.15.5 2,456.9 55.4 333.0 1,196.1 2,268.5 850.0 173.6
March. ............ 967.1 181.2 584.2 2,939.4 37.4 432.9 1,578.4 2,922.7 1,072.9 219.9
April................
May. .................
June .. .. ..........
July.................
August..............
September............
October. .........
November........ .
December............

'Schedule A section desrrlptions are as follows:
0. Food and live animals 5. Chemicals
1. Beverages and Tobacco 6. Manufactured goods classified chiefly by material
2. Crude material, Inedible, except fuels 7. Machinery and transport equipment
3. Mineral fuels, lubricants, and related materials 8. miscellaneous manufactured articles, n.e.s.
SAnimal and vegetable oils ard rats 9. Caomilries and transacltons not clUassiied according to kind
'AdJusted for seasonal and working-day variation using seasonal adjustment factors Introduced In January 1976. See footnote 1 on front
page. Annual totals are not shown for seasonally adjusted data. UnadJusted data should be used for annual Lotale. The adjusted section
totals In this table and asimlar overall monthly totals In tables 2 ana 6 were adjusLed Independently.
'In the absence of demonstrable seasonal patterns for this section, no seasonal adjustment factors have been applied to the data.









U.S. GENERAL IMPORTS OF PETROLEUM AND SELECTED PETROLEUM

PRODUCTS, UNADJUSTED

Tables 1-A, 1-B, 2-A and 2-B which follow, contain monthly and cumulative-to-date data on U.S. general imports
of petroleum and petroleum products into the U.S. Customs area and into the Virgin Islands for the period January
1975 through current month. Prior to January 1976, these data were presented separately in a Supplement to Report
FT 900. (It should be noted that imports into the Virgin Islands are excluded from the official U.S. import totals
presented in the preceding tables of this report.) The data in these tables are not adjusted for seasonal and working-
day variation.
Beginning with the issue for January 1976. the value figures presented in this report are in thousands of dollars
and the quantity figures in thousands of barrels.


Schedule A and TSUSA Commodity Numbers Used in Compiling the Petroleum
Information Presented in This Report


Energy products


Schedule A. No.


TSUSA No.


Nonenergy products


Schedule A. No.


Crude and partly refined
petroleum
331.0120
331.0140
331.0210
331.0220
331.0230
331.0240

Crude petroleum
331.0120
331.0140

Gasoline
332.1000

Jet fuel
332.2020

Kerosene
332.2040

Distillate fuel oil
332.3020
332.3040

Residual fuel oil
332.4020
332.4040

Propane and butane gas
341.0020

Liquid derivatives of
petroleum, n.e.s.
332.9940 pt.


475.0510
475.1010
475.0520, 475.0540
475.1020, 475.1040
475.3520
475.6520


475.0510
475.1010


475.2520, 475.2560


475.2540


475.3000


475.0530
475.1030


475.0550
475.1050


475.1510, 475.1530


Lubricating oils
332.5000 pt.

Lubricating greases
332.5000 pt.

Paraffin and other mineral
waxes
332.6220 pt.
332.6240

Asphalt
332.9800


475.4500


475.5500, 475.6000



494.2200
494.2400


521.1100


Naphthas not for further
refinement
332.9920 475.3540

All other petroleum products
(pitch of tar coke, non-
liquid hydrocarbon mix-
tures, and calcined petro-
leum and coal coke not for
fuel)
332.9700 pt. 401.6200
332.9940 pt. 475.7000
599.8040 pt. 517.5100


475.6540


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U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
Bureau of the Census
Washington. D.C. 20233

OFFICIAL BUSINESS
FIRST CLASS MAIL


PUSTAatk ANU rCam rCiu
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE |
COM-202 0
=Lam