Summary of U.S. export and import merchandise trade

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Title:
Summary of U.S. export and import merchandise trade
Series Title:
FT-900
Physical Description:
v. : ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of the Census
United States -- Bureau of the Census
Publisher:
Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, Foreign Trade Division for sale by the Subscriber Services Section (Publications), Bureau of the Census
Place of Publication:
Washington
Creation Date:
February 1976
Frequency:
monthly
regular

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Subjects / Keywords:
Commerce -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Citation/Reference:
American statistics index
Dates or Sequential Designation:
1974-1976.
General Note:
At head of title: 1977- United States foreign trade.
General Note:
Formerly classed C 56. 210:900 - during the time the Bureau of the Census was subordinate to Social and Economic Statistics Administration.
General Note:
Issues prior to Oct. 1977 were sent to depositories as Item 144.
General Note:
Unnumbered supplements accompany some issues.

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University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001209840
oclc - 02245761
notis - AFW0105
lccn - 76640395
issn - 0361-0047
sobekcm - AA00005271_00045
Classification:
lcc - HF105 .B73e
ddc - 382/.0973
System ID:
AA00005271:00045

Related Items

Preceded by:
United States foreign trade; export and import merchandise trade
Succeeded by:
United States foreign trade. FT900, Summary of U.S. export and import merchandise trade

Full Text






SUMMARY OF U.S. EXPORT AND

IMPORT MERCHANDISE TRADE

February 1976 1 UNIV. OF FL LiB. I


FT 900-76-2


K


Seasonally Adjusted and Unadjusted Data
(Including Unadjusted Data on Imports of Petroleum and
Petroleum Products)


The Bureau of the Census, Department of Commerce
announced today that during February 1976, seasonally
adjusted exports on a f.a.s. (free alongside ship) U.S.
port of exportation value basis, excluding Department of
Defense (DUD) Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid ship-
ments, were valued at $8,800.1 million a 1 and that
seasonally adjusted general imports on a f.a.s. foreign
port of exportation value basis, amounted to $8,940.9
million.' a February seasonally adjusted general
imports on a c.i.f. (cost, insurance, and freightJ value
basst amounted to $9,592.7 million.' s2 Comparable
seasonally adjusted totals for January were $9,103.4
si1lion for exports, $9,176.0 million for Imports on a
f.a.a. value basis, and $9,879.7 million for imports on
a nc..f. value basis.

The Bureau stated that based on the above seasonally
adjusted f.a.s. export and import figures, the merchandise
trade balance for February was in deficit by $140.8
million, as compared to the deficit of $72.6 million' 2
recorded in January 1976. Using the c.i.f. import value
and the f.a.s. export value, a trade deficit of $792.6
million' as was recorded in February. The comparable


For Release
larch 26, 1976
10:00 A.M.


c.l.f. trade balance for January was a deficit of $776.3
mullion.

During the 4-month period, November 1975 February
1976, seasonally adjusted exports averaged $9,140.7 million
per month, a level slightly above (about 1 percent) the
$9,060.8 million average reported for the preceding 4-month
period, July-October 1975. Imports on a f.a.s. value
basis, averaged $8,711.6 million per month for the current
4-month period, about 9 percent higher than the $8,021.2
million average reported for the preceding 4-month period.

Exports unadjusted for seasonal change and excluding
Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid shipments decreased
from $8,760.2 million in January to $8,737.6 million in
February. With Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid
shipments included, exports decreased from $8,769.8 million
in January to $8,742.4 million in February. Unadjusted
general imports (f.a.s. value bass) were valued at $9,009.0
million In January as compared to $8,111.2 million in
February. The comparable figures for imports on a c.i.f.
value basis were $9,699.9 million in January and $8,702.5
million in February.


'Alimd for eoenil end wormungtde variation. but noa far changes in price iMl. Factors used to adjust 1915 and 1976 data shon in this repon represent asonal adjustment factors derived Irom
iMnan diab through 1975 and inlrduced in January 1976 Lambined inth the apprornete working-dav adlustmien factors
lm'miomatia ot date over lt 4-laonth periods m desirable to identify unerlying rends Month to month changes in exports. import. and similar erie often reflect primanly irregular movements,
-1mi in monthly urnaiir, etc. Reami moenthto-mondi piecemt changes in ie i uerell araeonaliv adjusted edcporn and moon rems are rented in thdie following able with mvraege percent month.
Iigaih do adi dadiuo avw longer periods shlen for companion The mae noi and erage decline figures exclude percentage cringes lur (1 the period July-ODecemne 1971 because of abnormlnies
illth dail de tio Iffect of dock srikes end 12 periods whies negligible changes (zero percent) in ne level of exportl/importi occurred. Percentage changes fI (a. inmgot values are not available to,
Ii dlprimo to Jitay 19M14

Month-to-month Average monthly rates of change

Series Jan.-Feb. Dec. 1975- Nov.-Dec. Oct.-Nov. Average Average 4 months 12 months
1976 Jan. 1976 1975 1975 rise decline Oct. 1975- Feb. 1975-
1970-1975 1970-1975 Feb. 1976 Feb. 1976
(Percent) (Percent) (Percent) (Percent) (Percent) (Percent) (Percent) (Percent)

F.B.s. export value. -3.3 -1.6 -1.7 .2.0 +3.2 -2.8 -1.2 *0.1

F.R.S. import value. -2.6 +7.6 *3.9 *0.4 (NA) (NA) .2.3 .1.2

tie he'xpimlilnttn a Stlantic" ior delinntions of the expron and impDot vilum and tridalne DB es.


Inquiries concerning theem figures should be addreed to the Chief, Foreign Trade Division. Bureau of the
Canmus, Wfshington, D.C. 20233. Tel: Area Code 301, 763-5140.

. I U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE. BUREAU OF THE CENSUS

For sale by the Subscriber Services Section (Publications), Bureau of the Census, Washington, D.C. 20233, or any
U.S. Department of Commerce District office. Price 10 cents per copy. Annual subscription (FT 900, 975,985, and
966 combined) $3.00.


U.S. DEPO0ITORY


B. I (P4'0*2400- 1 &-a









EXPLANATION OF STATISTICS


IMPORT STATISTICS


Coverage

The U.S. import statistics reflect both government and
nongovernment imports of merchandise from foreign coun-
tries into the U.S. Customs territory, which includes the 50
States, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. The U.S.
import statistics exclude imports into the Virgin Islands,
Guam, American Samoa, and other U.S. possessions; and
shipments between the United States and Puerto Rico,
between the United States and U.S. possessions, and
between any of these outlying areas. (Data on U.S. trade
with Puerto Rico and with U.S. possessions are published
separately in Report FT 800. Additional data on such trade
and on imports into the Virgin Islands from foreign coun-
tries are presented in reference tabulations.) Data on
imports of petroleum and selected petroleum products.
including shipments into the Virgin Islands from foreign
countries. (previously shown in Report FT 900-Supple-
ment) are included in this report effective with the January
1976 statistics.
The U.S. import statistics also exclude American goods
returned to the United States by its Armed Forces; intransit
shipments through the United States; temporary shipments.
transactions not considered to be of statistical significance,
such as shipments of personal and household effects; low-
valued nondutiable imports by mail; issued monetary coins
of all component metals; and gold in the form of ores,
concentrates, waste, scrap, and refined bulbon. Imports of
silver in these forms are included in the statistics, unless
otherwise noted. (Information on gold movements, pre-
viously shown in Report FT 2402, appears in Report FT
990 effective January 1975.)

General Imports/Imports For Consumption

The statistics on U.S imports are presented in terms of
both "General Imports" and "Imports for Consumption."
General imports are a combination of entries for immediate
consumption and entries into Customs bonded warehouses,
and thus generally reflect total arrivals of merchandise.
Imports for consumption are a combination of entries for
immediate consumption and withdrawals from warehouses
for consumption, and thus generally reflect the total of the
commodities entered into U.S. consumption channels.

Source Of Import Information

The official U.S. import statistics are compiled by the
Bureau of the Census from copies of the import entry and
warehouse withdrawal forms which importers are required
by law to file with Customs officials. The information as to
country of origin, net quantity, value, and commodity
classification is verified by Customs officials on entries filed
for transactions valued over $250, which are ordinarily sub-
ject to examination for Customs appraisement purposes.
The statistical copy of the entry is corrected if it does not
accurately reflect the information called for by the statis-
tical requirements


Import Valuation

F.a.s. Import Value.-The f.a.s. (free alongside ship) value
represents the transaction value of imports at the foreign
port of exportation. It is based on the purchase price, i.e.,
(lie actual transaction value and generally includes all
charges incurred in placing the merchandise alongside the
carrier at the port of exportation in the country of exporta-
tion.

C.i.f. Import Value.-The c.i.f. (cost, insurance, and freight)
value represents the value of imports at the first port of
entry in the United States. It is based on the purchase price
and includes all freight, insurance, and other charges
(excluding U.S. import duties) incurred in bringing the
merchandise from the country of exportation and generally
placing it alongside the carrier at the first port of entry in
the United States. If the merchandise was acquired in a
transaction between related parties, the purchase price used
in deriving the c.i.f value is based on an arm's-length equiv-
alent transaction price, i.e., a pnce which would exist
between unrelated buyers and sellers.

Import Monthly Carryover

It is the objective of the compiling procedures to include
shipments, insofar as practicable, in the statistics for the
actual month of impioration. However, for purposes of the
statistics the month ol importation is based on the date of
official acceptance by Customs of the import entry or ware-
house withdrawal document. This may not in all cases corre-
spond to the actual month of importation. (For example,
under the Customs "immediate-delivery" procedures,
importers may file the import entry up to 10 workdays
after the actual date of importation.) Also, because of
processing problems (e.g., late receipt of a document for an
end-of-month shipment, rejection of a shipment by the
computer because the data fail to meet certain edit criteria
established to protect the accuracy of the statistics, etc.),
there is an overall average carryover of about 7 percent (in
terms of value) of the shipments from the reported month
of importation (based on the date of the import entry or
warehouse withdrawal document) to a subsequent month,
usually the succeeding month. In addition, as a result of the
aforementioned Customs "immediate-delivery" procedures,
there is a further carryover of presently unknown magni-
tude from the actual month of importation to a subsequent
month. These limitations should be borne in mind when
making month-to-month comparisons.
Cumulations of data over at least 4-month periods are
desirable to identify underlying trends. Month-to-month
changes in imports, exports, and similar series often reflect
primarily irregular movements, differences in monthly
carryover, etc.

Estimated Data for Imports Valued Under $251

The overall import and Schedule A Section 9 totals
include sample estimates for shipments valued under S251.
Therefore, they are subject to sampling error, estimated at








less than one-tenth of one percent for the unadjusted overall
total and about one percent for the unadjusted Schedule A
Section 9 total. This means that we can have about 67
percent confidence that the published unadjusted overall
totals and the unadjusted Schedule A Section 9 totals differ
by less than one-tenth of a percent and one percent, respec-
tively, from the totals that would have resulted from a com-
plete tabulation. The statistics on imports of petroleum and
petroleum products included in this report reflect fully
compiled data and, therefore, are not subject to sampling
error.


EXPORT STATISTICS

Coverage

The export statistics reflect, in general, both government
and nongovernment exports of domestic and foreign mer-
chandise from the U.S Customs territory (includes the 50
States, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico) to for-
eign countries, whether the exportation involves a com-
mercial transaction or not. The statistics, therefore, include
Department of Defense Military Assistance Program Grant-
Aid shipments, shipments for economic assistance under the
Foreign Assistance Act and shipments of agricultural com-
modities under P. L. 480 (The Agricultural Trade Develop-
ment and Assistance Act of 1954. as amended) and related
laws. The following are excluded from the statistics: Ship-
ments to U.S. Armed Forces and diplomatic missions
abroad for their own use; shipments between the United
States and Puerto Rico. between the United States and its
possessions (including the Virgin Islands), and between
these outlying areas, exports from U.S. possessions; intransit
shipments through the United States, transactions not con-
sidered to be of statistical importance, such as personal and
household effects; temporary exports; low-valued or non-
commerical exports by mail; issued monetary coins of all
component metals; and gold in the form of ores, concen-
trates, waste, scrap, and refined bullion. Exports of silver in
these forms are included in the statistics, unless otherwise
noted. (Information on gold movements, previously shown
in Report FT 2402, appears in Report FT 990 effective
January 1975.)



Definition of Exports of Domestic
and Foreign Merchandise

Exports of domestic merchandise include commodities
which are grown, produced, or manufactured in the United
States, and commodities of foreign origin which have been
changed in the United States from the form in which they
were imported, or which have been enhanced in value by
further manufacture in the United States. Exports of for-
eign merchandise consist of commodities of foreign origin
which have entered the United States as imports and which,
at the time of exportation, are in substantially the same
condition as when imported.


Source of Export Information

The official U.S. export statistics are compiled by the
Bureau of the Census primarily from copies of Shipper's
Export Declarations which are required to be filed with
Customs officials, except for Department of Defense Mili-
tary Assistance Program Grant-Aid shipments which are
reported directly to the Bureau of the Census by the
Department of Defense and shipments by qualified ex-
porters who have been authorized to submit data in the
form of magnetic tape, punched cards, or monthly Shipper's
Summary Export Declarations directly to the Bureau of the
Census.
Export Valuation

F.a.s. Export Value.-The value reported in the export sta-
tistics generally is equivalent to a f.a.s. (free alongside ship)
value at the U.S port of export, based on the transaction
price, including inland freight. insurance and other charges
incurred in placing the merchandise alongside the carter at
the U.S port of exportation.

Export Monthly Carryover

it is the objective of the compiling procedures to include
shipments, insofar as practicable, in the statistics for the
actual month of exportation. For purposes of the statistics,
the month of exportation is generally based on the date
when the shipment leaves the United States. I For vessel or
air shipments it is the date when the carrier departs or is
cleared from the port of export ) However, as indicated
above for imports, because of processing problems (e.g., late
receipt of a document for an end-of-month shipment, re-
jection of a shipment by the computer because the data
fail to meet certain edit criteria established to protect the
accuracy of the statistics. etc.), there is an overall average
carryover of about 4 percent (in terms of value) of the
shipments from the actual month of exportation to a
subsequent month, usually the succeeding month. These
limitations should be borne in mind when making month-
to-month comparisons.
Cumulations of data over at least 4-month periods are
desirable to identify underlying trends. Month-to-month
changes in imports, exports, and similar series often reflect
primarily irregular movements, differences in monthly
carryover, etc.
Estimated Data for Export Shipments

The overall export and Schedule B section and division
totals include sample estimates for shipments valued
$251-$1.999 to Canada and for shipments valued
$251-5999 to countries other than Canada. Data for ship-
ments valued $250 and under to all countries are also esti-
mated, based on established percentages of individual
country totals, and included in the Schedule B Section 9
totals regardless of the commodity exported. It is estimated
that the unadjusted overall total is subject to a sampling
error of less than one-tenth of one percent, and the unad-
justed Schedule B section or division totals are subject to








sampling errors of about one percent. In addition, the
Schedule B Section 9 total is subject to possible error in the
estimated data for shipments valued $250 and under; and
the overall total, and the individual totals for sections other
than Section 9, to a more limited extent. Such $250 and
under shipments represent about 1 percent of the total
value of exports, and about 60 percent of the Schedule B
Section 9 total.

SOURCES OF ERROR IN THE STATISTICS

Monthly import and export figures are subject to the
possibility of errors which may arise from sources other
than sampling errors, discussed above. Among these are
errors in the reporting and/or processing of information as
to commodity classification, value and other statistical
factors, month of inclusion (see paragraphs on import and
export carryover, above), and the undercounting of exports
to Canada due to the non-receipt of Shipper's Export
Declarations. For 1974, the undercounting amounted to
about one and one-half billion dollars. In the case of im-
ports the information as to value and commodity classifica-
tion (as well as country of origin and net quantity) is
verified by Customs officials on entries filed for transactions
valued over $250 which are ordinarily subject to examina-
tion for Customs appraisement purposes, thus considerably
reducing the possibility of error. In addition, the procedures
used to compile both the import and export statistics
include clerical and computer processing checks designed to
protect the accuracy of the statistics to the fullest practi-
cable extent.


MERCHANDISE TRADE BALANCES


Two trade balances are presented in this report.
I) The balance between exports based on f.a.s. values
and imports based on f.a.s. values.
2) The balance between exports based on f.a.s. values
and imports based on c.i.f. values with adjustments for im-
ports from affiliated sellers abroad to reflect arms-length
equivalent prices.
Both balances are useful for certain purposes. The first
balance corresponds to a measurement of the international
payments or credit flows resulting from merchandise trade
between the U.S. and foreign countries. The second balance
is based on concepts similar to those used by most foreign
countries, and therefore provides a reference for comparison
with the trade balances published by those countries


REVISIONS TO THE STATISTICS

Revisions are carried into the statistics on a periodic
basis. Data for 1975 and 1976 appearing in the 1976
monthly issues of this report are presented as follows:

1976 Statistics

a. January through November 1976 issues: figures are as
originally issued, except as noted below.
b. December 1976 issue: figures reflect revisions for
prior months of the year issued with December 1976
statistics or earlier, as noted below.

1975 Statistics

a. January through May 1976 issues: figures reflect re-
visions issued with December 1975 statistics or
earlier.
b. June through December 1976 issues: figures reflect
revisions to 1975 data issued with June 1976 statistics
or earlier.

In addition to the revisions which are made on a periodic
basis, instances may u- cur where a significant error in the
statistics for a month of the current year is discovered after
the statistics for that month are compiled. If the error is of
sufficient importance to require correction prior to the time
that the regular revisions are carried, the correction is made
and so noted in this report.


SOURCES OF FURTHER INFORMATION

Additional foreign trade statistics and information regard-
ing coverage, valuation, sampling, and qualifications which
should be considered by users of the statistics are contained
primarily in the following publications: Report FT 990,
Highlights of U.S. Export and Import Trade; FT 135, U.S.
General Imports, Schedule A Commodity by Country; FT
410, U.S. Exports, Schedule B Commodity by Country; and
the Guide to Foreign Trade Statistics. Information regarding
additional sources of statistics, the methodology used in
seasonally adjusting the data, and other matters relating to
foreign trade statistics may be obtained from the Bureau of
the Census, Washington, D.C. 20233.










Table 1. U.S. Exports (fa.s. Value Basis). General Imports (f.a.s. Value Basis), and Merchandise Trade Balance,
Adjusted for Seasonal and Working-Day Variation, by Month: January 1975 to February 1976

(In millions of dollars. See Explanation or Statistics for InfornIsaion on coverage. derintitoris of export and import values and trade bal-
ances, and source of error in The dSta. All data shoan for 1975 and 1976 reflect seasonal adjustment factors introduced in Janrsy 19761

Period ad Jau ry- January Febuar"y lrch April May June Jula August eptee- Octor Noe- ece
se r ies Febriuar-y ber ber 6cr

1915

Exportst ............. 18,128.0 9,373.4 8,754.6 8,685.2 8,64.7.6 8,221.5 8,16b.1 8,893.8 6l,979.2 9,1.5. ? 9,224.6 9,.*09.3 9,2-9.9
F.a.s. import value.. 17,563.1 9,635.51 ,927.6 7,466.5 7,958.5 7,266.2 ',103.5 7,832.2 2,87?.2 8,205.L 8,170.'. 8,203.6 8,525.7
Merchtandise trade
balance............. +564.9 -262.1 .827.0 .1,218.7 .689.1 .955.3 *1,612.6 .1,061.6 .1,102.0 .9'.0.6 1,05-..2 .1,205.7 .72;..2

1976

Exports' ............. 17,803.5 9,103.4 8,800.1
F.a.S. import value.. 18,116.9 9,176.0 8,940.9
Marcbandlae trade
balance ............. -213.4 -72.6 -140.8

'Represents exports of domestic and foreign merchandtse eacluting Department o' Derense mtlitar$ Atustance Program Grant-Aitd snipments.


Table 2 U.S. Exports (f.a.s. Value Basis), General Imports (c.i.f. Value Basis), and Merchandise Trade Balance,
Adjusted for Seasonal and Working-Day Variation, by Month: January 1975 to February 1976

(In millions of dollars. See Explanalton ot statisrics lor irpurmanI on or. coverage, aoetin ins orr, port anOa LIpot values and trade bal-
ances, and sources of error in the data. All aaoa ;no.n ior 1975 ano 197o r-flect seasonal adjustment Ia LtLa Intr-duced in January 19761

Period Jauary- January Feorar, Maren April Mat Jlne iul% August Septer- October Novem- Decem-
series Februsry 1. 6ber b6r

1975

Exports ............. Ins,128.0 9,373.4 8,7i5..6 8,685.2 8,6b 7.6 6,221.5 8,716.1 8,893.8 8,979.2 9,1.5.1 9,224.6 9,.09.3 9,2-9.9
C.I.f. import value.. 18,878.9 10,377.7 8,501.2 8,039.2 6,5.6.5 .2,81t.7 7,652.2 0,a.13.0 8,.78.6 8,829.9 6,795.2 8,629.8 9,165.5
Merchandise trade
balance............. -750.9 -1,00'..3 .253.. .6't.0 10L.1 .-0-..6 .1,063.9 .-80.8 .500.- .315.8 --29.- .'9.5 .8.-.

1976

Export' ............. 17,903.5 9,103.4 8,600.1
C.I.f. import value.. 19,472.4 9,v79.7 9,592.7
Merchandise trade
balance............. -1,568.9 -776.3 -792.6

'Represents exports of domestic and foreign mercnanntse ectludlnc Departnert ,f Defense MtlltarN Assistance Program Grant-Aid Enipnent-.









6

Table 3. U.S. Exports (f.a.s. Value Basis) of Merchandise Showing Department of Defense (DOD) Military
Assistance Program Grant-Aid Shipments, by Month: January 1975 to February 1976
I Lr millions of doll..rs. See Explanetitn of .3tLtisclcs for Inlormation on coverage, definition of f.a.s. export value, and sources of error Ilm
the oata. L'nadjustid totals represent sum of unrounded figures and hence may vary slightly from san of rounded amounts)

Exports excluding DOD Exports including DOD Grant-Aid"
Grant-Ald DOD Grant-Aid

Period domestic Domestic Domestic
aAl n J Domestic, and DoMiestic, Western Other
toreig foreign, unadjusteo foreign, unadjusted Total Europe countries

saBJla y unadjusrea unadjusted


1915

j-ruary-Decenb r ...................... I t 107,190.6 105,695.6 10',651.8 106,156.2' 61.2 21.7 439.5

January-Februar....... ..... ... 18,128.0 17,622.3 17,310.0 17,746.8 17,434.5 124.5 8.5 116.1

January ............................... 9,373.. 9,12-.l 8,9t2.7 9,203.0 9,021.5 78.8 5.2 73.7
February.............................. 8,754' .6 8,198.1 8,362.3 8,543.8 Blu3.0 45.7 3.3 42.4
March ................................. 8,685.2 9,'13.0 9,270.1 9 4t.1.9 9,299.0 2B.9 2.2 26.7
April................................. 8. ,6'7.6 9,016.9 8,888.- 9,078.6 8,950. 61.7 3.6 58.L
May................................... 8,221.5 8,900.6 8,785. 1 8,951.6 8,836.1 51.0 2.2 .8.8
Jur.e.................................. 8,'16.1 8,630.7 8,490.8 8,691.0 8,551.1 60.3 0.8 59.5

July.................................. 6,693.8 8,23 -.6 8,128.5 8,264.2 8,157.8 29.4 1.0 28.4
Augu t ................................ 8,979.2 8,-.'5.8 8,352.1 8,455.6 8,362.0 9.9 1.6 8.3
Septe,.ber............................. 9,1.5..' 6,391.2 8,271.6 8,.16.6 8,297.2 25.6 0.7 24.9
Octobher............................... 9,22,.6 9,716.1 9,601. 7 9,749.) 9,633.2 31.6 0.2 31.4
Novmber....... ........................ 9,.09.3 9,513.7 9,407.- 9,52b.7 9,420.5 13.0 0.8 12.2
DEcemoer .............................. 9,2.9.9 9,303.5 9,190.0 9,328.7 9,215.2 25.2 0.1 25.1

19-6

Jsr.tar,-teruar ......... .. ..... .. 17,903.. 17,497.d 17,287.6 17,512.2 17,302.0 14.4 0.8 13.4

Jannuar- ................................ 9,103.4 8,760.2 8,658.5 8,768.8 8,668.1 9.6 0.5 9.2
February .............................. 6,800.1 6, 73 .6 8,629.1 8,742.4 8,633.9 4.8 0.3 4.5
Marcn.................................
April.................................
Mus...................................
June .................................

Juil ..................................
Autio ........... .......... ...........
Seprer-oer.............................
O: oser ............................ ..
NOvembe r..............................
Dece Fber ..............................

'Adjurten lor aea'oria ar, -wrwirg-nay varLation uEing EesBmnal adjustment factors introduced In January 19'6. See footnote 1 on front
page.
'Reprtscnt:s nly export shipment, iros the i.natea States baa olifer. f ro DOD Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid shipment figures under
this program as foll.-. 'a) Tras-iler: oi tne imaternal procured outside the United States ana transfer trom DOD overseas stocks irom export
-hjprients. ib) Exprrt value Is f.a.s., *h-rsas. DOD value, in most instances, is f.o.b.. point of origin. (c) Data iorshipmenta reported by
the 0JOD lor a gae'n santh are included in Bureau oi the Census reports in the second montn subsequent to the month reported by the DOD.
Annual .ota] is not shour, for .easoraliy adjusted aaca. Unadjusted datae houia ne used ior annual totals.










Table 4. U.S. Imports of Merchandise, by Month: January 1975 to February 1976
(InAlJllIonfs of dollars. See Explanation of LSatSLtcs fur informa ottonancoserage, definilionu of I..5a. and c.i.f. import values, Iand aurea
of error in the oata. Unadjusted totals represent sum 01 unrounced figures moo nence may tary alighuly ITOm sum of rounded amounita

U.S. Imports of merchandlee

F.sk.b. value C.I.f. value
Perod eerl imports Imports Ueneral imports Importa
for for
Seaasonaly ronsumptorr., Seseonall nadused i consumpt on,
sajusted' isjusted unsajusted adjusled' Unadjusted unadjusted

1975

January-December....................... I'1 96,14.0. 95,728.6 'I 103,'.1'.0 102,98 .]I

JaDuary-Februazy....................... 171,63.1 16,986.3 16,940.7 18,878.9 18,261.3 18,212.2

January........... .................... 9,635.5 9,816.b 9,602.8 10,377.7 10,572.8 10,556.6
February ............................... 7,927.6 7,lo9.7 7,137.9 8,501.2 7,688.5 7,655.6
March....................... .......... .. ,-1t66.5 7,0~.4 5 7,3J .9 8,039.2 7,972.5 7,96.1.6
April.................................. 7,958.5 8,190.1 8,142./I 8,5'.6.5 8,795.2 8, 74t.7
May.................................... 7,266.2 7,361.9 7,32 .0 7,816.7 7,926.1 7,881.2
Juna................................... 71,103.5 7,279.0 7,255.1 7,652.2 7,841.2 7,813.5

July..................... .............. 7,832.; 7,920.7 7,891.5 8,413.0 8,506.1 8,,.76.4
August................................. 1,87'.2 7,518.B 7,'27.1 8,478.8B 8,093.0 7,996.7
September.............................. 8,205.1 8,161.6 8, 1.0.8 8,829.9 8,783.1 8,76'.3
October................................ 8,170.- 8,511.9 68,y 5.8 8,795.2 9,162.8 9,186.6
November ............................... 8,203.6 1,910.7 7,886.5 8,829.8 8,514.6 8,489.5
December............................... 8,i, 2 ;' 8,888.9 8,810.9 9,165.5 9,556.0 9,474.3

1976

January-February. ..................... 18,116.9 17,120.1 16,932.7 19,472.4 18,402.4 18,207.6

January................................ 9.176.0 9,009.0 8.945.9 9,8 79.7 9,699.9 9,632.9
February............................... B.940.9 8,111.2 7,9n6.8 9,592.7 A, 702.5 8,74.8
March.................... .. ...
April ................................
May........... ... .....................
Junte..................................

July .................. ...... .. ....
August.............. .. ... ..... ......
September............................
October. ..........................
November..............................
December..............................

'AdustLed for seasonal snd *orking-d.y variation an Ln aeasoral ajusrtent i ,Cors inltroduc.a tn January 1976.
Annual total is not hour totr sehason&lij Ij.uSLVu asta. Unodju[teo doats r.sold be used ior annual totals.








8

Table 5 U.S. Exports (f.a.s. Value Basis) of Domestic Merchandise. Including Department of Defense (DOD) Military

Assistance Program Grant-Aid Shipments--Schedule B Sections and Selected Divisions, Seasonally Adjusted
and Unadjusted, by Month: January 1975 to February 1976
In n11LOins o[ dollars. See Ewplanation of Statiatics for information on coverage, definition of I.a.s. export value, and sources of error In
th- data. Unadijsted totis represent sum of unrounded figures and hence may vary slightly from sum of rounded amounts)

Schedule B sections and selected divisions
Period
0 I 2 3 4 5 6 7' 71 72 13 8 9

Seasonally adjusted'




January-February........ 2,917.6 250.7 1,820.7 821.2 *245.4 1,559.4 1,823.9 7,128.0 3,268.2 1,219.9 2,592.9 924.8 '465.2

January................. 1,,-49.2 139.2 1,014.8 421.4 '1l.0.9 859.5 931.0 3,502.3 1,637.0 608.6 3,216.8 468.2 '238.6
February................ 1,368.4 111.5 803.9 399.8 '104.5 699.9 892.9 3,625.7 1,631.2 611.3 1,375.1 456.6 '226.6
March ................... 1,250.3 125.1 787.6 415.9 "120.8 757.2 907.9 3,486.2 1,642.3 605.8 1,238.4 454.0 -237.0
pri I .... .............. 1, 18.4 113.6 741.0 381.8 "73.7 706.7 900.9 3,668.0 1,743.9 632.8 1,302.1 458.9 '214.9
Ma/..................... 1,069.0 104.9 725.8 402.7 *8B.9 667.9 887.7 3,577.9 1,702.2 622.2 1,333.1 457.9 "285.0
June.................... 1,123.2 91.3 699.1 388.4 '57.9 712.3 891.2 3,914.5 1,800.7 621.1 1,469.4 473.0 '241.4
July.................... 1,210.3 64.6 857.5 324.6 '66.3 691.5 906.3 3,984.3 1,760.9 631.0 1,613.1 480.5 '237.9
suFusi .................. 1,270.2 110.1 908.3 346.2 '-3.9 687.4 886.8 3,940.8 1,752.3 652.1 1,577.4 468.3 '271.8
Sept rbb. r............... 1,268.4 99.0 877.9 320.9 '43.5 707.0 921,6 3,955.1 1,764.2 625.5 1,534.2 479.2 "246.0
Ocrober................. 1,393.3 107.4 854.0 288.3 156.9 742.1 922.3 4,105.8 1,817.8 662.7 1,627.5 496.6 *278.2
Nloveber.. ............. 1,381.8 111.1 813.2 450.7 '*7.7 725.5 946.5 4,006.8 1,789.0 659.6 1,539.0 489.4 '353.3
Decebher................ 1,292.8 111.3 776.4 340.8 ha8.8 766.1 927.7 4,103.8 1,863.3 654.3 1,525.7 498.4 265.5

1976

January-February........ 2.4.18.0 38A.3 1.566.2 641.4 '152.8 1,518.2 1,845.5 7,622.7 3,501.4 1,391.7 2,793.9 1,019.4 '455.5

January ... .... ... ... 1,298.2 211.6 822.7 321.0 78.9 777.4 930.3 3,770.3 1,732.8 655.3 1,368.2 493.2 e254.0
rebruarv. .............. 1,159.6 176.7 743.5 33u.4 1 73.9 74c0.6 915.2 3,832.4 1,768.6 736.4 1,425.7 526.2 201.6
Ma r ch...................
Apr[l ...... ............
ay .....................
June....................
J,1y ........... .. ......
Auly.................
ept .-mbe r ............
October r.......... ......
Novemb, r ........... .
DJec wm er................

'unajusted

1975

Januar,-r.ec.e.ber.. ... i5,-86.b 1,309.8 9,78..3 w.,4.6..9 943.8 8,705.3 10,917.7 45,709.5 20,889.7 7,586.5 17,233.3 5,672.. 3,162.3

J.'nury-February........ 2,975.8 209.2 1,664.9 F94.8 2415.4 1,488.5 1,757.9 6,651.9 3,157.2 1,167.5 2,507.1 881.0 465.2

Jar..mar,................. 1,631.5 122.9 1,026.0 357.. 1.0.9 820.0 910.5 313.2 1,612.. 616.5 1,0 B..2 454.6 238.6
Febru.r ................ 1,338.3 66.3 838.9 3327. 104.5 668.5 B 7.4 3,538.7 1,54..6 571.0 1,422.9 42b.4 226.6
March....... ........... 1,:'6.6 120.1 892.3 399.6 120.8 788.2 949.6 .,02b.6 1,803.3 651.8 1,571.5 .88.0 237.0
,pr i................... 1,219.6 101.6 810.7 391.- 73.7 732.1 9486.6 3,910.1 1,853.8 6 56. 1,-10.2 -82.3 274.9
May ..................... 1,026.- 96.1 '65.8 .36.5 88.9 702.6 954.2 3,993.0 1,829.9 652.7 1,510. -83.5 285.0
June.................... l,060. 79.6 666.- .06.2 57.9 718.7 899.2 3,938.0 1,296.9 62..2 1, 1..9 -81.0 241.4
July... ................ 1,11-.7 71.5 757.1 310.i 6bb..3 10..6 862.6 3,577.9 1,690.5 596.9 1,290.5 *5,..6 237.9
August .. ............... 1,18-.6 10-.7 ??5.9 339.8 '3.9 710.2 875.2 3,550.2 1,680.5 62-.1 1,2 .6.1 -60.8 277.8
Septe t.er............... 1,2....3 10lO 693.1 322.8 '3.5 682.2 880.1 ,b618.9 1,603.6 S99.2 I,.16.0 460.0 246.0
Ocrob r ................. .,-'7.6 128.t 676.2 318.5 56.9 730.2 980.. -,257.8 1,861.5 706.' 1,669.8 530.9 278.2
November ........... .. 1,526.8 150.6 859.5 -5.9 7;.7 661.6 91,.. 3,946.1 1,749.6 664.2 1,532.8 471.8 353.3
December................ 1,382.0 139.6 619.9 3'.6.9 68.8 780.? 895.2 4,038.2 1,-.0.9 633.3 1,563.9 478.5 265.5

1976

January-Frbruar ........ 2,443.1 325.5 1,629.9 550.1 152.8 1,463.6 1,7?4.5 7,466.E 3,425.7 1,353.6 2,669.3 976.3 455.5

January ..... ........... 1,333.3 187.9 835.9 268.4 78.9 316.7 894.0 3,589.3 1,712.0 665.1 2,212.2 477.9 254.0
February ........... .... I,i"9.6 131.6 794.1 281.1 I 3.9 714.9 890.5 3,879.3 1,713.7 668.3 1,477.0 500.4 201.6
March ...................
April ...................
Kay ............ .........
June...................
Ja1b ............. .....
August ..................
Sept r.ber ...............
October.. ..... .......
Novebe r...............
December ... ............

iSchedaul B section ard ,elec .d uii:ior, descriptions are a3 follow:
0. Food and live animal: 7. Macnrinery and transport equipment
1. Beverages and rcbacco 71. Mar, nary. other than electric
2. rru.d .*at-rsal. i..1.6bl. evcepr Ifu-L 72. Electrical machinery. apparatus, and appliances
3. Mineral fuel:. lubrLc.ntz. and related material: 73. Transport equipment
4. Ari-.al and eetLabl ol,1i and fat. 8. Mjce llaneouas manufactured articles. n.E.c.
5.. 1 ia;i 9. Comenod. ies and [ra.ur-acttons not classitzed according to kind
6. ianua course .oodla cla's ki] cvi'rlv b, -ater.ai
'Seaornally adj.ited tieurs fo.r sEctor. i Jff'r :11thtl. trIam ne sur. or diisuiaon 71. 72, and 73 aince each Al Lndependently ad-
justed.
'Adjated for seasonal .nd Irv.ng-da.d. uriatt.,ron ,,ng seasonal sdju'tment factors introduced in Janury 1976. See footnote I on front
page. Annual totals are r.ot bs .own for seasonalli adjurtel data. urnadjusted data should be used for annual totals. The adjusted section
Etoalhs in ht t able and linilar oaerall monthly total.' in tables 1. 2, and 3 ere adjusted independently.
'In the absence ot deemonstrrale .easonal patterns tor rhia sectLOn, no seasonal adjustment factors have been applied to the data.











Table 6. U.S. General Imports (L.a.s.Value Basis) of Merchandise. Schedule A Sections, Seasonally Adjusted and
Unadjusted, by Month January 1975 to February 1976
( In millions of dollars. See Explanation of Etatiasics for information on coverage, oefintllon of I.a.B. import value, and sources of error
in the data. lnsadjusteo totals represent sud of unfounded figures aro hence may very slightly frao sum of rounded amounts)al

Schedule A section'
Period
0 1 2 3 4 3 6 7 B 9

Sea6sonaly ajuatead'

1975

Januaury-February..... 1,341.7 237.6 952.6 5,074.1 '93.2 749.2 3,133.2 3,713.7 1,496.5 n399.0

January) .............. 672.8 111.6 485.9 3,090.3 "'.8.5 424.5 1,669.3 1,676.0 772.6 '218.0
February............. 668.9 126.0 466.7 1,983.8 .-<..? 324.7 1,463.9 1,837.7 723.9 '181.0
March................ 675.1 150.9 466.7 1,364.7 '55.1 329.9 1,356.7 1,986.2 722.4 '185.4
April................ 664.6 120.5 472.0 2,438.9 '40..- 314.5 1,305.8 1,814.0 726.3 '231.2
May.................. 627.9 114.3 442.5 1,994.9 '51.9 281.6 1,101.8 1,835.4 675.6 198.5
June.... .... ....... 739.0 119.3 460.9 1,482.0 '133.2 245.7 1,175.6 1,852.3 716.2 1219.1
July................. 709.3 109.4 473.3 2,167.6 3.4.8 264.3 1,115.4 1,978.2 7'1.4 '223,8
August.............. 664.4 112.7 439.3 2,243.4 '32.7 282.7 1,052.7 2,101.5 740.6 '189.7
September............ 904.1 116.1 459.8 2,503.7 'l1.6 286.3 1,099.5 1,897.6 776.9 '217.9
October............... 743.5 111.3 440.1 2,423.0 '4B.8 297.0 1,111.7 2,064.3 816.1 '217.
november ... .... .... 762.4 104.2 442.3 2,387.9 '66.2 310.2 1,126.9 2,053.6 873.8 '211.9
December.............. 696.8 127.9 509.1 2,2 ,.. l o.0 324.7 1,164.5 2,214.1 878.7 123-.6

1976

January-February.... 1,432.9 328 2 1,039.1 5,017.3 '19.3 683.3 2,441.7 4,550.0 1,820.8 '356.3

January.............. 731.9 140.4 526.9 2,666.0 '37.8 353.2 1,166.0 2,293.9 900.9 '186.6
February............. 701.0 187.8 512.2 2,349.3 '51.5 330 1 i,275.7 23,256.1 919.9 '169.7
Marco ................
April ................
Ma ..................
June.................
July .................
August ..............
September............
October.............
November... ........
December.............

Unadjusted

1975

January-December ..... 8,c08.8 1,419.5 5,56-.3 2o,-75.6 ;53.9 3,696.4 14,700.5 23,.6-..6 9,227.6 2,529.1

January-February..... 1,340.6 218.6 860.8 5,36i.1 93.2 743.4 3,009.5 3,6b3.5 1,377.5 399.0

January.............. .'13.6 112.3 -66.0 3,.21.0 -8.5 .37.2 1,7-9.5 1,89-..7 755.6 216.0
February............. 626.6 106.4 39-.9 1,9t.0.1 44. 306.2 1,259.0 1,6886.8 621.9 181.0
March................ 657.5 1.3.7 '60.6 1,-60.; 55.1 3-0.8 I,3i3.3 2,079.5 687.8 185.-
April............. ... 681..5 119.1 475.3 4-, t ..j O.' 351.9 1,2-3.1 1,899.2 703.8 231.2
May .................. 611.0 116.9 453.6 1,905.0 51.9 285.6 I,1 ..7 1,934.5 626.3 198.5
Jun ................. 779.7 129.6 513.0 1, 36.1 33.2 52.8 1,230.8 1,961.6 722.7 219.7
July................. 70i.8 103.4 506.- 2,137.3 "4.6 2'.7.. 1,13b.6 1,96 .'. 850.9 223.8
August............... 635.6 95.8 420.9 2,2-5.6 32.7 ;70.6 1,005.3 1,822.0 800.6 189.7
September............ 896.9 106.9 6 76.4 2,"Ub.1 41.6 275.1 1,091.8 1,793.3 815.7 21'.9
October.............. 759.9 128.0 4 7.: 2,345.5 86.8 302.' 1,i9-.0 2,138.6 919.7 2L'.-
November............. 725.1 120.. 415.3 2,089.- o6.2 296.5 1,121.2 2,018.6 844.1 211.9
December............. 712.1 137.2 52'.4 2,15 7.5 46.0 327.9 1,211.1 2,269.- 878.7 23".6

1976

January-February .... 1,429.2 299.9 923.2 5,093.0 69.3 666.6 2,299.1 4,334.6 1,628.9 356.3

January.............. 759.7 141.5 983.7 2,790.7 37.8 350.0 1,190.5 2,229.7 838.7 166.6
February............. 669.5 158.3 439.5 2,302.3 51.5 316.6 1,106.6 2,104.9 790.5 169.7
Marcn...............
April ................
May ..................
June.................
July.................
August ...............
September............
October .......... ...
November.............
December.............

'Schedule 4 section descriptionv are r follsos.
0. Food and iL. animals 5. Lnem-caL.
I. Beverages and tobacco 6. kanulactured goods classlf led chiefly by material
2. Crude materials, inedibli, except fuels 7. Machiner) and transport equipment
3. Mireral fuels, lubricants, and related materials 8. Miscellaneous manufactured articles, n.e.s.
4. animal and vegetable oils anan lat 9. Conodiltles and Lransacttons not clasalfled according to kino
"Adjusteo for seasonal and .orking-day variation using seasonal adjustment lactors introduced in January 1976. See footnote 1 on front
page. Annual totals are not shown for seasonally adjusted aaia. Unadjuasted data should be used for annual totals. Toe adjusted section
totals In this table and simisr overall monthly totals In tables I ann 4 -ere adjusted independently.
In the absence of demonstrable seasonal patterns for this section, no seasonal adjustment factors have been applied to the data.









10

Table 7. U.S. General Imports (c.i.f. Value Basis) of Merchandise, Schedule A Sections, Seasonally Adjusted and
Unadjusted, by Month: January 1975 to February 1976
(fn mIllione of dollars. See Explanation of Statlstlic for InfomatloM on coverage. deflnltion of c.s.f. Lmport value, and sooromE oferrort
the data. Unadjusted totals represent sIu of unrounded figures and hence may vary *lightly ftro sua of rounded amountal

Schedule A ectitonst
p 1 3 4 5 8 7 1 1 1


Seasonally adjusted'

1975

January-February..... 1,459.1 257.9 1,062.5 5,414.4 '97.4 800.6 3,391.3 3,969.4 1,601.6 '410.5

January........ .... 732.9 122.1 549.6 3,306.3 '50.5 454.0 1,810.6 2,018.0 825.3 3224.3
FeDruary.. 726.2 135.8 512.9 9,108.1 '46.8 546.6 1,580.7 1,971.4 776.3 '186.2
March .... ... .... 732.6 162.5 507.9 1,456.8 '57.6 349.5 1,461.5 2,157.7 776.3 '190.9
April........... .... 720.8 131.3 520.8 2,594.3 '42.5 333.9 1,407.1 1,962.0 777.6 '238.2
May.. .... ..... ... 680.7 124.0 485.9 2,131.1 '54.6 297.9 1,1897.9 1,968.4 728.0 '201.9
June .. ...... 796.3 129.5 511.1 1,585.6 '35.1 263.9 1,268.1 2,001.8 770.8 '224.3
July. ............. 770.1 120.2 525.9 2,329.3 547.7 282.3 1,200.5 2,123.5 831.7 3229.5
August. ........ ..... 725.6 123.6 484.1 2,399.6 '34.9 301.3 1,137.0 2,259.3 601.0 '194.0
September............ 974.4 127.6 505.7 2,690.1 '44.4 304.1 1,179.6 2,044.5 841.8 '222.9
October... ........ .. 804.3 122.0 485.2 2,597.0 '51.9 313.1 1,198.9 2,226.9 882.6 1222.
November .. ... 830.3 114.5 486.0 2,549.8 '11.2 328.9 1,218.4 2,213.5 945.5 '216.1
December.. .......... 755.7 139.1 561.2 2,452.3 '*9.6 344.0 1,261.5 2,377.7 951.3 '239.4

1976

January-FeSbrary.... 1,557.0 352.5 1,134.4 5,360.0 '96.0 719.8 2,640.4 4,904.5 1,962.3 '364.7

January. ..... 798.4 152.0 580.2 2,853.0 '40.7 372.6 1,264.0 2,473.1 972.98 191.1
February.. ........ 758.6 200.5 554.2 2,507.0 '55.4 347.2 1I376.4 2,431.4 989.5 a173.6
March ... ...
April .... ...
ay.... ........
June .. ......
July. ... .... ..
August .
September...
Octob r .
November ....... .. .
December.

Uriadjusted

1975

January-Decemter..... 9,222.7 1,542.3 6,142.9 28,289..I 586.6 3,929.1 15,865.6 25,296." 9,9'5.5 2,588.8

January-Pebrusry..... 1,458.0 237.5 960.9 5,721.8 97.4 794.4 3,256.9 3,849.9 1,474.0 410.5

January...... ....... 777.6 122.8 527.0 3,660.0 50.5 .67.6 1,897.5 2,038.2 807.1 224.3
Febr-ary.. ...... ... 680.4 114.6 L33.9 2,061.7 46.8 326.8 1,359.4 1,811.7 666.9 186.2
March .. ....... .... 713.5 15.. 7 501.3 1,580.6 57.6 361.0 1,416.7 2,259.1 739.0 190.9
April ... ........ 742... 129.7 52-.5 2,596.9 42.5 373.2 1,339.6 2,054.2 753.5 238.2
May ...... ... .... 662.3 126.8 '.97.9 2,017.8 54.6 302.1 1,234.2 2,093.6 674.8 201.9
June................. 8840.1 140.6 568.9 1,536.4 35.1 270.5 1,327.7 2,119.9 777.7 224.3
July.............. .. 766.3 113.6 562.7 2,275.7 ,.7.7 264.2 1,223.3 2,108.7 917.3 228.5
August. .......... 694-.. 105.0 463.8 2,402.0 34.9 288.3 1,085.9 1,958.8 865.9 194.0
September.... .. .. 966.6 117.6 523.9 2,628.2 44.4 292.2 1,171.3 1,932.1 883.9 222.9
October ....... .. 822.0 140.3 504.6 2,513.9 51.9 318.7 1,287.6 2,307.0 994.6 222.1
November.. ... ... 789.6 i32.4 456..* 2,231.0 71.2 316.4 1,212.3 2,175.9 913.3 216.1
December ... ..... .. 772.3 1.9.1 578.0 2,719.6 49.6 347.5 1,312.0 2,437.2 951.3 239.4

L976

January-Februar 1,553.2 322.2 1,008.1 5,441.2 96.0 702.2 2,486.6 4,672.4 1,755.7 364.7

January.. 828.8 153.2 532.6 2,984.2 40.7 369.2 1,290.5 2,403.9 905.7 191.1
February .. 724.5 169.0 475.5 2,456.9 55.4 333.0 1,196.1 2,268.5 850.0 173.6
March ....... ... .
4pril ... .....
May......... .. ..
June............. .
July.... ......
August .. .. .. ...
September..
October .........
November...
December.. ...

IScnedule A section aescrIprlone are as follows
0. Food and live animals 5. Chemlcals
1. Beverages and tODacco 6. Manufactured goods classified chiefly by material
2. Crude materials. inealble, except fuels 7. Machinery and transport equipment
3. Mineral fuels, lubricants, and related materials 8. Miscellaneous manufactured articles, n.e.g.
4. Animal and vegetable oils and fIat 9. Caomndltles and transactIons not classified according to kind
Adjusted for seasonal .na su rking-day variation using seasonal adjustment factors Introduced in January 1976. See footnote I on front
page. Annual totals are not shown for seasonally adjusted data. Unadjusted data should be used for annual totals. The adjusted section
totals In this table and similar overall monthly totals In tables 2 and 4 were adjusted independently.
lIn the absence of demonstrable seasonal patterns for this section, no seasonal adjustment factors have been applied to toe daLa.









U.S. GENERAL IMPORTS OF PETROLEUM AND SELECTED PETROLEUM

PRODUCTS, UNADJUSTED

Tables 1-A, 1-B, 2-A and 2-B which follow, contain monthly and cumulative-to-date data on U.S. general imports
of petroleum and petroleum products into the U.S. Customs area and into the Virgin Islands for the period January
1975 through current month. Prior to January 1976, these data were presented separately in a Supplement to Report
FT 900. (It should be noted that imports into the Virgin Islands are excluded from the official U.S. import totals
presented in the preceding tables of this report.) The data in these tables are not adjusted for seasonal and working-
day variation.
Beginning with the issue for January 1976, the value figures presented in this report are in thousands of dollars
and the quantity figures in thousands of barrels.


Schedule A and TSUSA Commodity Numbers Used in Compiling the Petroleum
Information Presented in This Report


Energy products


Schedule A. No.


Nonenergy products


TSUSA No.


Schedule A. No.


Crude and partly refined
petroleum
331.0120
331.0140
331.0210
331.0220
331.0230
331.0240

Crude petroleum
331.0120
331.0140


Gasoline
332.1000

Jet fuel
332.2020

Kerosene
332.2040

Distillate fuel oil
332.3020
332.3040

Residual fuel oil
332.4020
332.4040


Propane and butane gas
341.0020

Liquid derivatives of
petroleum, n.e.s.
332.9940 pt.


475.0510
475.1010
475.0520, 475.0540
475.1020, 475.1040
475.3520
475.6520


475.0510
475.1010


475.2520, 475.2560


475.2540


475.3000


475.0530
475.1030


475.0550
475.1050


475.1510, 475.1530


Lubricating oils
332.5000 pt.

Lubricating greases
332.5000 pt.

Paraffin and other mineral
waxes
332.6220 pt.
332.6240

Asphalt
332.9800


475.4500


475.5500, 475.6000



494.2200
494.2400


521.1100


Naphthas not for further
refinement
332.9920 475.3540

All other petroleum products
(pitch of tar coke, non-
liquid hydrocarbon mix-
tures, and calcined petro-
leum and coal coke not for
fuel)
332.9700 pt. 401.6200
332.9940 pt. 475.7000
599.8040 pt. 517.5100


475.6540


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U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
Bureau of the Census
Washington, D.C. 20233


POSTAGE AND FEES PAID
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
COM-202


OFFICIAL BUSINESS
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