Summary of U.S. export and import merchandise trade

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Material Information

Title:
Summary of U.S. export and import merchandise trade
Series Title:
FT-900
Physical Description:
v. : ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of the Census
United States -- Bureau of the Census
Publisher:
Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, Foreign Trade Division for sale by the Subscriber Services Section (Publications), Bureau of the Census
Place of Publication:
Washington
Creation Date:
October 1975
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Commerce -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Citation/Reference:
American statistics index
Dates or Sequential Designation:
1974-1976.
General Note:
At head of title: 1977- United States foreign trade.
General Note:
Formerly classed C 56. 210:900 - during the time the Bureau of the Census was subordinate to Social and Economic Statistics Administration.
General Note:
Issues prior to Oct. 1977 were sent to depositories as Item 144.
General Note:
Unnumbered supplements accompany some issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001209840
oclc - 02245761
notis - AFW0105
lccn - 76640395
issn - 0361-0047
sobekcm - AA00005271_00039
Classification:
lcc - HF105 .B73e
ddc - 382/.0973
System ID:
AA00005271:00039

Related Items

Preceded by:
United States foreign trade; export and import merchandise trade
Succeeded by:
United States foreign trade. FT900, Summary of U.S. export and import merchandise trade

Full Text
L'(LZ 10 7Lu u 'j 10


UN






U.S


SUMMARY OF U.S. EXI

IMPORT MERCHANOD,

October 1975 /


FT 900-75-10


a 9. Q ** RELEASE
in,,. wy ber 26, 1975
17 10:00 A.M.

Seasonally Adjusted and Unadjusite' tta


The Bureau of the Census, Department of Commerce
announced today that during October 1975, seasonally
adjusted exports on a f.a.s. I free alongside ship) U.S.
port of exportation value basis, excluding Department of
Defense (DOD1 Military Assiatance Program Grant-And ship-
ments, were valued at $9,288.1 million and that
seasonally adjusted general imports on a f.a.s. foreign
port of exportation value basis, amounted to $8,212.2
million.' s October seasonally adjusted general
imports on a c.i.f. (cost, insurance, and freight value
basis amounted to $8,840.1 million.' 0 a Comparable
seasonally adjusted totals for September were $9,165.0
million for exports, $8,188.6 million for Imports on a
f.a.s. value basis, and $8,812.2 million for imports on a
c.s.f. value basis.

The Bureau stated that based on the above seasonally
adjusted f.a.s. export and import figures, a merchandise
trade surplus of $1,075.9 million was recorded in October
1975. For the period January-October 1975, the surplus on
a f.a.s. value basis amounted to $9,497.2 million. Using
c.l.f. import values and f.a.s. export values, a trade
surplus of $448.0 million s a was recorded for October
1975, and a $3,321.0 million surplus for the January-
October 1975 period.

During January-October 1975 exports on a seasonally
adjusted basis were at an annual rate of $106,388 million.
or about 9 percent higher than the calendar year 1974
total of $97,908 million. Seasonally adjusted imports for
the January-October 1975 period were at an annual rate of


$94,992 million, a level about 5 percent below the calendar
year 1974 total of $100,251 million. (These figures are on
a f.a.s. value basis.)

The Bureau also stated that both the seasonally
adjusted export and import totals for October are the second
highest of the year, being exceeded only by the record high
January 1975 totals of $9,411.9 million for exports and
$9,622.4 million for Imports, respectively.

During the 4-montr period, July-October 1975,
seasonally adjusted exports averaged $9,083.5 million per
month, a level about 6 percent above the $8,530.5 million
average reported for the preceding 4-month period, March-
June 1975. Imports if.a.s. value bassl I averaged $8,067.3
million per month for the current 4-month period, about 10
percent above the $7,349.0 million average reported for the
preceding 4 months.

Exports unadjusted for seasonal change and excluding
Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid shipments increased
from $8,398.8 million in September to $9,718.1 million in
October. With MIlitary Assistance Program Grant-Aid ship-
ments included, exports Increased from $8,124.4 million in
September to $9,749.7 million in October. Unadjusted
general imports lf.a.s. value basis) were valued at .$8.161.6
million in September as compared to $8,511.9 million in
October. The comparable c.i.f. figures for imports were
$8,783.1 million in September and $9,162.8 million in
October.


'Adjusted for seasonal and working-day varialion. but ne loi changes in price level Factors ud io adjust 1974 and 1975 data srown in thsn report represent seasonal adjustment laclor derived from
monthly data through 1974 and introduced in January 1915 combined with the appropriate orking-day adjustment factors
'Cmolatiani of data over at least 4-month peiods are desirable to identify underlying trends Month lomonth changes in exports, impons, and similar senes ohen reflect primarily irregular moiements,
diffarenmes in monthly cearawr. etc. Recent month.ro-month percent changes in the overall seasonally adjusted axpan and import sees are presented in the following table wim average percent montn
to-month nme and decline aer longer penods shown for comparison. The average rise and average decline figures exclude percentage changes for I(1 the paerods Januar Marcn 1969 and July December
1971 became e of bnormntithm in the data due effects ol dock strikes arid (2) periods when negligible changes inero percent in the level of piportslnports occurred Percentage changes for f.a.s import
value are not available for periods prior 10 January 1974.

Month-to-month Average monthly rates of change

Series SepL.-Oct. Aug.-Sept. July-Aug. June-July Average Average 4 months 12 months
rise decline June-Oct. Oct. 1974-
1975 1975 1975 1975 1969-1974 1969-1974 1975 Oct. 1975
(Percent) (Percent) (Percent (Percent) (Percent) (Percent) (Percent1 (Percent)

F.a.s. export value. +1.3 .1.9 +1.3 .2.2 +3.2 -2.6 +1.7 .0.7

F.a.s. import value. +0.3 .2.9 ,0.7 .13.7 (HA) (NA) +4.4 -0.2

Effective whh January 1975 issue of this report, the Custaoms import value ms replaced by Ihe f. import value. Reports have historically been shown on a 1.a.S. alue basis See "EXplnealon
Sf Statisth" lor definitions of export and import values and trade balances.


Inquiries concerning these figures should be addressed to the Chief, Foreign Trade Division. Bureau of the
Census, Washington, D.C. 20233. Tel: Area Code 301, 763-5140.

. B U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE, BUREAU OF THE CENSUS

\ For sale by the Subscriber Services Section (Publications), Bureau of the Census, Washington, D.C. 20233, or
U.S. Department of Commerce District office. Price 10 cents per copy. Annual subscription (FT 900, 975,


any
985.


and combined) $ 0.








EXPLANATION OF STATISTICS


rl 9Q -ta ttics

'.Coverage '
The U.S. mnp 't statistics reflect I oth government and
nongovernmiC'lpiports' of. merchadtits% from foreign
countries int6 the. 'U.S. Cuslins teri*tor which includes
the 50 States, TW.ll District of-Columbia, and Puerto Rico.
The U.S. import statistics exclude imjbrts into the Virgin
Islands, Guam, Anmercaen Siuno.afd other U.S. posses-
sions; and shipments bt`*een the United States and Puerto
Rico, between the United States and U.S. possessions, and
between any of these outlying areas. (Data on U.S. trade
with Puerto Rico and with U.S. possessions are published
separately in Report FT 800. Additional data on such trade
and on imports into the Virgin Islands from foreign
countries are presented in reference tabulations.)

The U.S. import statistics also exclude American goods
returned to the United States by its Armed Forces; intransit
shipments through the United States; temporary shipments;
transactions not considered to be of statistical significance,
such as shipments of personal and household effects;
low-valued nondutiable imports by mail, issued monetary
coins of all component metals; and gold in the form of ores,
concentrates, waste, scrap, and refined bullion. Imports of
silver in these forms are included in the statistics, unless
otherwise noted. (Information on gold movements, pre-
viously shown in Report FT 2402, appears in Report FT
990 effective Januay 1975.)

General Imports/Imports for Consumption

The official U.S. import statistics are compiled by the
Bureau of the Census from copies of the import entry and
warehouse withdrawal forms which importers are required
by law to file with Customs officials. The statistics are
presented in terms of both "General Imports" and "Imports
for Consumption." General imports are a combination of
entries for immediate consumption and entries into
Customs bonded warehouses and thus generally reflect total
arrivals of merchandise. Imports for consumption are a
combination of entries for immediate consumption and
withdrawals from warehouses for consumption and thus
generally reflect the total of the commodities entered into
U.S. consumption channels.


Import Valuation

F.a.s. Import Value

The f.a.s. (free alongside ship) value represents the
transaction value of imports at the foreign port of exporta-
tion. It is based on the purchase price, i.e., the actual
transaction value and generally includes all charges incurred
in placing the merchandise alongside the carrier at the port
of exportation in the country of exportation.


C.i.f. Import Value

The c.if. (cost, insurance, and freight) value represents
the value of imports at the first port of entry in the United
States. It is based on the purchase price and includes all
freight, insurance, and other charges (excluding U.S. import
duties) incurred in bringing the merchandise from the
country of exportation and generally placing it alongside
the carrier at the first port of entry in the United States. If
the merchandise was acquired in a transaction between
related parties, the purchase price used in deriving the c.i.f.
value is based on an arm's-length equivalent transaction
price, i.e., a price which would exist between unrelated
buyers and sellers.

Import Monthly Carryover
It is the objective of the compiling procedures to include
shipments, insofar as practicable, in the statistics for the
actual month of importation. However, for purposes of the
statistics the month of importation is based on the date of
official acceptance by Customs of the import entry or
warehouse withdrawal document. This may not in all cases
correspond to the actual month of importation. (For
example, under the Customs "immediate-delivery" pro-
cedures, importers may file the import entry up to 10
workdays after the actual date of importation.) Also,
because of processing problems (e.g., late receipt of a
document for an end-of-month shipment, rejection of a
shipment by the computer because the data fail to meet
certain edit criteria established to protect the accuracy of
the statistics, etc.), there is an overall average carryover of
about 7 percent (in terms of value) of the shipments from
the reported month of importation (based on the date of
the import entry or warehouse withdrawal document) to a
subsequent month, usually the succeeding month. In addi-
tion, as a result of the aforementioned Customs "im-
mediate-delivery" procedures, there is a further carryover of
presently unknown magnitude from the actual month of
importation to a subsequent month. These limitations
should be borne in mind when making month-to-month
comparisons.
Cumulations of data over at least 4-month periods are
desirable to identify underlying trends. Month-to-month
changes in imports, exports, and similar series often reflect
primarily irregular movements, differences in monthly
carryover, etc.

Estimated Data for Imports Valued Under $251
The overall import and Schedule A Section 9 totals
include sample estimates for shipments valued under $251.
Therefore, they are subject to sampling error, estimated at
less than one-tenth of one percent for the unadjusted overall
total and about one percent for the unadjusted Schedule A
Section 9 total. This means that we can have about 67
percent confidence that the published unadjusted overall
totals and the unadjusted Schedule A Section 9 totals differ
by less than one-tenth of a percent and one percent,
respectively, from the totals that would have resulted from
a complete tabulation.









Export Statistics
Coverage
The export statistics reflect, in general, both government
and nongovernment exports of domestic and foreign mer-
chandise from the U.S. Customs territory (includes the 50
States, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico) to
foreign countries, whether the exportation involves a
commercial transaction or not. The statistics, therefore,
include Department of Defense Military Assistance Program
Grant-Aid shipments, shipments for economic assistance
under the Foreign Assistance Act and shipments of agri-
cultural commodities under P. L. 480 (The Agricultural
Trade Development and Assistance Act of 1954, as amend-
ed) and related laws. The following are excluded from the
statistics: Shipments to U.S. Armed Forces and diplomatic
missions abroad for their own use; shipments between the
United States and Puerto Rico, between the United States
and its possessions (including the Virgin Islands), and
between these outlying areas; exports from U.S. possessions,
intransit shipments through the United States; transactions
not considered to be of statistical importance, such as
personal and household effects; temporary exports; low-
valued or noncommercial exports by mail; issued monetary
coins of all component metals; and gold in the form of ores,
concentrates, waste, scrap, and refined bullion. Exports of
silver in these forms are included in the statistics, unless
otherwise noted. (Information on gold movements, pre-
viously shown in Report FT 2402, appears in Report FT
990 effective January 1975.)
Exports of Domestic/Foreign Merchandise
The official U.S. export statistics are compiled by the
Bureau of the Census primarily from copies of Shipper's
Export Declarations which are required to be filed with
Customs officials, except for Department of Defense
Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid shipments which are
reported directly to the Bureau of the Census by the
Department of Defense and shipments by qualified ex-
porters who have been authorized to submit data in the
form of magnetic tape. punched cards, or monthly Shipper's
Summary Export Declarations directly to the Bureau of the
Census. The statistics are reported as exports of domestic or
foreign merchandise. Exports of domestic merchandise
include commodities which are grown. produced, or manu-
factured in the United States, and commodities of foreign
origin which have been changed in the United States from
the form in which they were imported, or which have been
enhanced in value by further manufacture in the United
States. Exports of foreign merchandise consist of commodi-
ties of foreign origin which have entered the United States
as imports and which, at the time of exportation, are in
substantially the same condition as when imported.
Export Valuation

F.a.s. Export Value


The value reported in the export statistics generally is
equivalent to a f.a.s. (free alongside ship) value at the U.S.
port of export, based on the transaction price, including
inland freight, insurance and other charges incurred in


placing the merchandise alongside the carter at the U.S.
port of exportation.
Export Monthly Carryover
It is the objective of the compiling procedures to include
shipments, insofar as practicable, in the statistics for the
actual month of exportation. For purposes of the statistics,
the month of exportation is generally based on the date
when the shipment leaves the United States. (For vessel or
air shipments it is the date when the carrier departs or is
cleared from the port of export.) However, as indicated
above for imports, because of processing problems (e.g., late
receipt of a document for an end-of-month shipment,
rejection of a shipment by the computer because the data
fail to meet certain edit criteria established to protect the
accuracy of the statistics, etc.), there is an overall average
carryover of about 5 percent (in terms of value) of the
shipments from the actual month of exportation to a
subsequent month, usually the succeeding month. These
limitations should be borne in mind when making month-
to-month comparisons.
Cumulations of data over at least 4-month periods are
desirable to identify underlying trends. Month-to-month
changes in imports, exports, and similar series often reflect
primarily irregular movements, differences in monthly
carryover, etc.
Estimated Data for Export Shipments Valued
Under $1,000 to Countries Other Than
Canada, Under $2,000 to Canada
The overall export and Schedule B section and division
totals include sample estimates for shipments valued
$251-S1.999 to Canada and for shipments valued
$251-$999 to countries other than Canada. Data for
shipments valued $250 and under to all countries are also
estimated, based on established percentages of individual
country totals, and included in the Schedule B Section 9
totals regardless of the commodity exported. It is estimated
that the unadjusted overall total is subject to a sampling
error of less than one-tenth of one percent, and the
unadjusted Schedule B section or division totals are subject
to sampling errors of about one percent. In addition, the
Schedule B Section 9 total is subject to possible error in the
estimated data for shipments valued $250 and under; and
the overall total, and the individual totals for sections other
than Section 9. to a more limited extent. Such $250 and
under shipments represent about 1.5 percent of the total
value of exports, and about 60 percent of the Schedule B
Section 9 total.
Other Sources of Error
in the Statistics
Monthly import and export figures are subject to the
possibility of errors which may arise from sources other
than sampling errors, discussed above. Among these are
errors in the reporting and/or processing of information as
to commodity classification, value and other statistical
factors, month of inclusion (see paragraphs on import and
export carryover, above), and the undercounting of exports
to Canada due to the non-receipt of Shipper's Export
Declarations. For 1973. the undercounting amounted to
about one billion dollars. In the case of imports the









information as to value and commodity classification (as
well as country of origin and net quantity) is verified by
Customs officials on entries filed for transactions valued
over S250 which are ordinarily subject to examination for
Customs appraisement purposes, thus considerably reducing
the possibility of error. In addition, the procedures used to
compile both the import and export statistics include clerical
and computer processing checks designed to protect the
accuracy of the statistics to the fullest practicable extent.
Merchandise Trade Balances

Two trade balances are presented in this report:
1) The balance between exports based on f.a.s. values
and imports based on f.as. values.
2) The balance between exports based on f.a.s. values
and imports based on c.i.f. values with adjustments for
imports from affiliated sellers abroad.to reflect arms-length
equivalent prices.
Both balances are useful for certain purposes. The first
balance corresponds to a measurement of the international
payments or credit flows resulting from merchandise trade
between the U.S. and foreign countries. The second balance
is based on concepts similar to those used by most foreign
countries, and therefore provides a reference for com-
parison with the trade balances published by those coun-
tries.

Revisions to the Statistics

Revisions are carried into the statistics on a periodic
basis. Data for 1974 and 1975 appearing in the 1975
monthly issues of this report are presented as follows:

1975 Statisitcs

a. January through November 1975 issues: figures are as
originally issued, except as noted below.


b. December 1975 issue: figures reflect revisions for
prior months of the year issued with December 1975
statistics or earlier, as noted below.

1974 Statistics

a. January through May 1975 issues: figures reflect
revisions issued with December 1974 statistics or
earlier.
b. June through December 1975 issues: figures reflect
revisions to 1974 data issued with June 1975 statistics
or earlier.

In addition to the revisions which are made on a periodic
basis, instances may occur where a significant error in the
statistics for a month of the current year is discovered after
the statistics for that month are compiled. If the error is of
sufficient importance to require correction prior to the time
that the regular revisions are carried, the correction is made
and so noted in this report.


Sources of Further Information

Additional foreign trade statistics and information re-
garding coverage, valuation, sampling, and qualifications
which should be considered by users of the statistics are
contained primarily in the following publications: Report
FT 990, Highlights of U.S. Export and Import Trade; FT
135, U.S. General Imports, Schedule A Commodity by
Country; FT 410, U.S. Exports, Schedule B Commodity by
Country; and the Guide to Foreign Trade Statistics.
Information regarding additional sources of statistics, the
methodology used in seasonally adjusting the data, and
other matters relating to foreign trade statistics may be
obtained from the Bureau of the Census, Washington, D.C.
20233.









Table 1. U.S. Exports (fa.s. Value Basis), General Imports (fa.s. Value Basis), and Merchandise Trade Balance.

Adjusted for Seasonal and Working-Day Variation, by Month: January 1974 to October 1975

fin millrln- oa dollars. Lee EAplanatlon of Stattitcs fnr tnfnrnrmation ion toeae. delitnison. of enp.rt and imperl Ial.,e ..nO trc.d. .dl-
ant' e, and F*uarce' nl error in the data. All data sho-wn for 1974 ano 1975 reflect seasonal adjustment lactors introdu:ed r, J.n.uart 19

Period ad ar,.ar Hlanial Febrlar March April May Jute July %uu_-;t b m- OLtt ,re-r h i.,- Dtecr-


1974

sports' ........... 80,159.9 7.150.2 7.548.9 7,625.4 8.107.8 7.652.4 8.316.9 B 306.9 8.379.3 8,J99 3 8,7;: A 6 977 9 6 es2.l
F.a.s. jr.Dcrt sole 82,042.7 6.498.0 7.317.7 7.741.9 ,.02 3. 8,264.5 8, 77.0 8 321.6 a 2'67.1 8.096 4 8,1.77 3. .73.3 3.2.-.8
Merchandi :e trade
balance ............ -1,9:2 8 .652.2 -231.2 -115.5 *82.8 -612 1 -20j.I -614.7 -8B7.8 -297.1 -100.1 -0 4 -394 7

1975

Faports ............ E j. 6 9 9.411.9 8,789.0 8.715.9 8,569.6 8,145.1 8,6ql. 8,884-.6 8,996.2 9, 16 .0 9,?78k 1
F.a.s. import value.. 79,159 7 9 6?72.4 7?.872.0 7.35.6 8,012.8 7,093.4 6,9 -4 2 7,907.5 7,961.0 ,1A68.6 8,217.7
Merchandi-e trade
balance ............ -9,197 2 -210.5 .917.0 1..380.3 *556.8 'I.051.7 r1,737 3 .977.1 .1,035.2 .976.4 I1,075 9

'Represents expOnrt:- i dnme-tic and foreign merchandise excluding Department of Delanse Mintary Assitanec fProgram Crani -aid intipm.nnt


Table 2. U.S. Exports (f.a.s. Value Basis). General Imports (c.i.f. Value Basis), and Merchandise Trade Balance.
Adjusted for Seasonal and Working-Day Variation, by Month: January 1974 to October 1975

[In millions of dc-tier-. :ee Fipirs at.'.r t- at stica for inl oraetl rn or. ctte are. de i in ir ,,.- rj e xpnrt n.1 in.ip.rt alU n, I race 0r) -
aices, and -ourrc- f c-rr'-r ir. tnr cata. All data snu*r, tor 1971 ar.n 1975 ri lect ,e.son..l djui tent ti.r- lntrao Lto Ir, Jinjar 19751

Period and J n. r I rur Februtar March April May J.Je lult Aug'- er- *.:l.ober Noer- 1te.-
series .5 i-b- r -e o *r i ne

1974

Exportis........... 0,159.9 7.150.2 7,548.9 7.62E.4 8,107.8 7. .52 4 8,316.9 8.306.9 A 379.3 8.399 3 8 672 B 8.972.9 8.862.1
C.I.I. import valu.. 88,162.9 7.09 71 7.881 9 8.310.8 8.639 0 8.921 ? 9,2"6 9 9,611.8 9 999 7 1.!1 i 9 111 a 3 9 65-.5 9,943.0
Merchandisne trade
balance............. -8,303 0 -131.5 -333.0 -685.4 --31.2 -1.268.8 -940 0 -I 304.9 -1 620.4 -97? 2 -778 -682.6 -1 U(S 9

1975

Exports ............ B,'-56 9 9 411.9 8.789.0 8.71i.9 A.a69.6 8 14a.1 0.91.5 ,8b4.B 8,996.2 9,16t .0 9.288 1
C.I.f. import value.. A',335 9 10 314.5 8.440.7 893.5 8.800.0 7,631.1 ;,431 BI 8491.8 8,568.9 B,l..2 86.810 1
Merchandise Iraae
balance............. *3,371.0 -952.6 *346.3 822.4 -230.4 -514.0 1,.200.4 .390.6 .427.J .352.6 '1411 0

'Represents e-pr,- ,, in t arit. ir ifr,. merchanaLse exc luacin Departmoni :l D fensE- Mil liars AiEstince programm Crant- d nipment:.











Table 3. U.S. Exports (f.a.s Value Basis) of Merchandise Showing Department of Defense (DOD) Military
Assistance Program Grant-Aid Shipments. by Month: January 1974 to October 1975

, In mtillions of dollar. See Fxplanation of Statistics for Information on coverage, definition of I.a.s. export value, and sources of error in
the vdta. 'nddjuseie totals represent .am of unrounded tirures and hence may vary slightly from sum of rounded amounts

Fiports excluding DOD Beports including DOD Grant-Aid'
Grant-Aid DOD Grant-Aid


P.. r, od Dome, tic Domes t ic Dome x ic
orag D'metic. and Damestc. Total Wesatern Other
oren' foreign, unadjusted foreign, unadjusted Europe countries
da'dn 1de un-djule adjustedd


1q74

January-ferember...................... 'I 97. 08. 96,545.0 98.507.2 97.144.2 599.1 99.6 499.5

January-Oc tber...................... 80,159.9 79,863.0 78,729.4 0b,367.2 79,233.6 504.2 81.3 422.9

Jar.uary .............................. 7.150.? 6,.24.9 6,743.1 6,866.9 6,785.8 42.1 14.7 27.3
February....................... ..... 7,518.9 7.292.2 1,200.1 7,334.0 7.242.6 41.9 16.3 25.6
March ............ ..................... 1.625. 8,497.8 8,3 41.2 ,525.5 8,411.9 27.7 9,. 18.0
April ................... ............. 8. 07. 8.172.1 8,252. 8,408.7 8.289.3 36.6 6.4 30.1
May.................................. 7,6"2.4 8,428.4 86,297.2 8,489.5 8.3z8.3 61.1 5.8 55.3
June ................................. 8,316.9 8.327.7 8,211.8 8,384.7 8,268.7 56.9 8.8 4B.L

July .................................... 6,306.9 7,654.8 7,552.6 7,694.6 7,592.4 39.9 3.2 36.7
augu t ............................... 8.379.3 7,92B.5 7.800.4 7,997.7 7,869.6 69.2 4.1 65.0
Eeptrber ............. .............. 6. 399. 3 7.610.6 7.506.2 7,671.8 7,561.1 61.2 4.8 56.3
October............................... 8,672.8 6,926.0 8,779.8 8,993.9 8,847.6 67.8 7.4 60.5
November .............. ............... 8,972.9 9.342.6 9.223.6 9,396.8 9,277.8 54.2 8.1 46.1
December ......................... 6.8F.2.1 8,702.6 8.592.1 8.743.3 8,632.8 40.7 10.2 30.6

1975

January-October ....................... 88R.,56 9 88.430.2 87,159 5 88.853 1 87.562 4 422.9 20.8 402.1

Jiriiar ............................ .... 9.411.9 9.123.9 .948.7 9.202.8 9.027.5 78.9 5.2 73.7
February .............................. .789.0 8.199.8 -.368.9 8,545.5 8,414.6 45.7 3.3 42.4
March ................................. 8.715.9 9,437.6 9.295.2 9.466. 9,324.1 28.9 2.2 26.7
April ....... ....................... 8.569.6 9 112.7 8.84.1 9.074.4 8.945.9 61.7 3.6 58.1
May.................................... 8.115.1 8.901.8 8.,86.3 8,952.8 8,837.3 51.0 2.2 48.8
June .................................. 8,691.5 8,630.7 8, 190. 8,691.0 ,551. 1 60.3 0.8 59.5

July.................................. 8,884.6 8,236.0 8,129.6 8,265.4 l8,159.0 29.4 1.0 28.4
4 gu s e............ .................... 6,996.2 8,470.8 8,377.1 8,480.6 8,387.0 9.9 1.6 B.3
Sept ber ............................. 9,165.0 8,398.8 8,277.2 8,424.4 8,302.7 25.6 0.7 24.9
October............................... 9.288 I 9,718.1 9,601.7 9,749.7 3,633.2 31.6 0.2 31.4
SNo te .................... ........
1ec- l tber ..............................

4tniu.[ed f,-r zea-.nal and .orking-day vJrition Jusing seaonal adjustment factors introduced in January 1975. See footnote I on Iront
page
:Ri.present: only export shipments lrom tne United States and asifers f ro- i DO Military Assistance Progrmn Grant-Ad shipment figures under
tink= program s- follr ws (a) TanAlers of the material procured outside the United States ann transfers from DOD oversea- stocks from export
sh peni_. b) E rnnrt talue i= f.a.s., *neres DOr nolue. 'r mot instances, s f...o point of origin. tec Data ior _hjipents reported by
the D[JD 1or 3 1isn mlinth are include' in B.reau ot tie Cens.m reports in the second month subsequent to the month reported by the DOD.
'Annual iotal no, i :h.o.. for seaL~omlly udju.tsd data. Unudjusted data should be used tor annual totals.










Table 4. U.S. Imports of Merchandise. by Month: January 1974 to October 1975
,Inmilions ol uollers. SeE hxpl.anl ion of Statistics tor inlormatonoDncoverage, delLAElions of [.&.&. and C.I.1. impurt values, and sources
ul error in tie data. LinanjusLed toLals represent sum of unrounded figures and hence pmay vbr) slightly froiT,. sui of rounded amountisl

U.S. kmpon's 0i .aerrchindis

F.a.s. -t lue C.I.I. talue
SGeneral imIports loporis Central imports Imports
lur lor
Seasonally conrsumutiont easonal]y najt. c.nunipt L.jn,
adjusted' naunajusted adsa.stun ur.adjusted


1974

January-December....................... t100.251.0 99.391.3 107.995.1 107.110.6

January-Oetober ........................ 82,082.7 82,226.4 81,428.1 88,452.9 88,618.1 87,H01.1

January.................... ........... 6,498.0 6,613.7 6.469.a 7.U18.7 7.143.6 b,991.2
Iebruary........ ........... ......... 7.317.7 6,844.5 6.633.8 7,881.9 7,1 6.8 7,146.2
Marc .... .... ............... ... 7,741.9 7,781.4 7.8 .2- 8,31U.8 8,353.2 8,256.1
April .............................. ... 8,025.3 8.333.5 8."36.9 B.639.0 8.970.7 8.87i.9
May..... .......................... .. 8.264.5 8,834.8 6,74?.- 8,971.2 9,536.16 9,447.4
June........... ........ .... .. ... 8,577.0 8,501.5 5.4 ,3.3 9, 2L6.1 ,17.3.a 9,125.2

July........ ...... ..... .... ...... 8,921.6 8,963.3 6.871.8 9.611.8 9.656.9 9.564.8
Augus t...................... .... 9,267.1 9.096.6 9,C002.7 9,999. ; i,61S.7 9,717.3
September.................. ... 8,696.1 8,360.7 8,294.9 9,371. 9,u00 .8 6 942.3
October................... ...... ... .. 8.73.2 9,094.3 9.0 5o. 9.4 ,1 .4 9.797.3 9.734.;
November........................ .... .. -.973.3 8.885.4 8,o1l .7 9,o5:.5 9, 60.. 9,463.3
Decemher.... ... ...... ............ 9,26.8 9,139.' 3.149.6 9.913.0 9.816.7 v,826.4

1975

January-October....................... 79,19.7 79,354 0 79.Oi u i,335 9 53.5:.2 1 63,224 7

January...................... ........ 9.622.4 9,822.5 9.80A.F. 110.364.i 10,580.1 10.563.9
February............ ................ 7,872.0 7.162.7 7.130.9 8.440.7 7.680.2 7.647.3
March ..................... ...... .... 7,335.6 7,455.9 7, 125.3 7,891 .5 ,0. 3.0 7,992.1
ApI'I ................................ 8,012.8 8,181.1 8.133.4 8,800.0 8,984.8 8.934.3
May.......... ....... .. .. .. 7,093.4 7,3519.0 7.314.2 7,631.1 7.91t3. 7.870.8
June.............................. ... 6.9 4.2 7.271.3 7,247.4 7,491 1 7., 32 7 7.805 0

July .................. .. .... ... 7,907.5 7,915.4 7,886.2 8,493.8 8,502.3 8,470.6
Augus ............. .. ...... ... 7,961.0 7,513.6 7,421.9 8,568.9 8,087.3 7,991.0
September.. ...... ............ ... 8,188.6 8,11.6 8,140.8 8,812.2 8,783.1 8.763 1
October............... .......... .... 6,21..2 8,511 9 l. '.33s 8 ,640 1 .IF.2 8 9.186 6
Novenber.......................
Derember................ .. ..

'Adjusted for seasonal and -orking-da) sariatior. using seasonal adjustment .actor- inuroducti in January 1975.
'Anrnial total is not a -.j.r, l.r Scaorr.li) aojuiLed aoLa. Unadjuste. data srnoLa be -ued for annual tauaia.








8

Table 5 U.S. Exports (fa.s. Value Basis) of Domestic Merchandise, Including Department of Defense (DOD) Military

Assistance Program Grant-Aid Shipments--Schedule B Sections and Selected Divisions. Seasonally Adjusted
and Unadjusted. by Month: January 1974 to October 1975
,In millor.- of collars. See ifplanialon of StcatLtice for information on coverage, definition of f.a.s. export value, and sources of error in
the data. LrUnadjuSed totals represent Asm of unrounded figures and hence nm'v vary slightly from asun of rounded amountsI

Schedule B recrtone and selected divisions'


Period


1914

Jarna ry-.Otober........

J n ary .................
February..............
Marc .... ...... ........
Apr ........... .........
May ...... ...... ........
June ......... ..........
Jul, ............. .......
A.4gi es ....... .........
-cep e rber...............
'3c Lobe r ... ..... .... ..
oventber.................
De c ber ........ ...... .

1973

January-October.........

Jinua..ry......... ........
February ........ ........
earch ..................
April ........... ..... ..
ray......... ...........
June ............ .......
Ju ly. ..... .. .......

Ai.per r t ...... ........
Ocpteo ..r. ... ........
Oct -ber .......... ......

December .... ........



19-4

January- L-c bEr ..... ..

Janu ry-October.........

Ji "uary.... ........... .
February ................
March ....................
Apr I ........... ........
May.............. ........
June ...... ..........
July........... ........
August ................. .
.epa ib~r..... ... ..
Octobcr.......... ........
Nho'.' r r ... .... ........
Dec,--ber ........ ........

197?-

January-October.........

Janua r .................
Fenruary................
March............ .......
April ... ....... ....
Mey....... ..... ........
JJne ..............
Jul ............ ........
Aul st .......... .........
S.pt embr: r...... ........
October .................
Novae, ber ... ........
Decerb.r. ...........


0 1 2 3 4 1 6 7' 71 72 73 8 9

Seasonally adjusted'




11,431.6 1,030.8 9,027.1 2,659.3 41,138.5 7,213.7 9,248.2 1,101.3 13,531.4 5,813.0 11,746.8 4,442.2 '2,099.3

1.191.? 1U7.6 851.5 171.1 ';3.3 641.0 193.0 2,669.3 1,177.8 513.3 943.0 393.3 4184.1
l.27u.3 108.6 960..3 212.3 '96.5 679.6 826.1 2.804.4 1,192.9 522.4 1,113.5 407.3 174.2
1.?1.3 89.8 960.9 176.2 '100.9 694.2 858.8 2,809.5 1,236.7 547.7 1,082.5 433.2 '192.3
1.216.5 109.9 919.9 226.2 '134.2 733.6 919.9 3,034.0 1,302.6 565.4 1,136.3 448.3 4207,8
1.0n8.4 116.2 939.0 257.1 '131.7 664.5 940.4 2,887.4 1,307.6 357.4 1,070.6 469.2 '218.5
1,116.6 114.7 941.8 294.2 '138.2 767.7 970.7 3,203.1 1,341.9 386.7 1,299.0 465.7 '226.7
1.133.6 n10.4 893.5 323.9 '164.0 775.0 98?.3 3,182.2 1.391.E 601.0 1,160.3 447.5 4222.0
1.078.9 103.5 906.6 300.9 '110.6 776.6 1,010.2 3.3.Z.1 1,497.8 661.4 1,185.4 460.2 '233.1
1 026.2 7 .4 824.6 J12.5 '86.9 780.3 948.8 3 469.0 1,506.3 6??.6 1,323.3 461.1 '224,6
1.117.6 102.7 766.8 384.9 '112.2 749.2 996.0 3 687.3 1,576.2 635.1 1,432.9 456.4 '216.0
1.297.8 102.7 96.51 472.9 '118.5 763.7 950.9 3,663.4 1,607.9 639.9 1,425.3 466.5 '239.6
1.261.7 116.7 899.0 266.3 '166.3 797.1 984.4 3,589.1 1,582.0 573.0 1,383.8 441.3 '247.7




12,761 9 1,087.? 8,277.4 3,7i2.1 '797.3 7,225 1 8,317.9 37.761.1 17,236.1 6,256.7 14,315 3 4,688.7 '2,547.2

1.t89.. 111.9 1 0?7.0 429.2 '140.9 6_.33 927.0 3.486.9 1,655.5 606.2 1.169.6 411.1 '238.6
1.119.1 10.L. 815.4 399.3 '410.5 696.4 879.9 3.627.3 1,621.2 606.3 1,426.6 454.1 '228.5
1.251.5 136.2 802.5 433.0 '120.8 761.1 905.3 3.457.2 1.620.2 598.6 1,299.0 449.0 '237.8
1.?50.9 116.7 7n1.7 378.9 '73.7 700.8 898.9 3,673.6 1.755.5 630.4 I.2(74.9 458.9 '274.8
1.043.0 102.6 701.j 407.2 '68.9 654.3 881.9 3,476.9 1.684.8 614.0 1.28.7 451.9 4284.2
I 090.9 86.0 700.6 395.6 '57.9 717.3 886.8 3.965.8 1,809.8 617.4 1,538.0 473.9 '241.4
1,185.9 81.2 867.8 313.5 '66.3 686.8 192.5 4,011.1 1,760.9 629.7 1,623.2 486.7 '239.1
1,268.9 110.6 932.1 3R7.7 '43.9 689.0 880.5 3,962.8 1,748.7 659.7 1,605.8 465.0 4278.4
1,259.4 95.6 847.9 312.2 '43.5 709.9 939.3 3,963.8 1,773.9 624.2 1,539.2 478.2 '246.0
1.402. 0 i'S 4 833 1 275 5 '56.9 746.6 925.8 4.133 7 1,805.6 670.2 1,587.3 499.9 4278.2



ULnadjusted


13.985.91 1 217.4


11,217.0

1. 194.8
1,152.0
1.257.2
1,178.8
1,084.6
1.074.2
1.1,01.5
1 0, o". 7
1.0,02.6
1.170.6
1,441.1
1,324.8




12,584 n

1,643.7
1.338.2
1.276.6
1.219.6
1,026.4
1 060.3
1,114.7
1 ,132.6
1,244.3
1 .415.6


965.6

90.8
87.2
79.1
94.9
111.3
106.9
90.0
97.6.
83.7
174.1
141 .1
140.7




1,019 6

172.9
86.6
120.1
101.6
98.1
;9.8
71.5
104.7
105.7
126 6


10. 974.4

8,925.5

152.4
967.4
1.099.3
1,079.8
1,014.1
911.6
768.4
777.9
647.3
767.3
1 .0684.7
924.2




,10: 1

1.026.0
839.0
692.3
610.7
763.
A68.4
757.6
775.5
693.5
177 2


3,4413.9

2,727.6

144.2
178.8
162.3
223.2
281.0
310.4
306. 7
338.0
332.8
450.3
464.4
251.9




3, 89 7

357.1
337.4
399.6
391.4
436.5
406.2
310.3
404,1
328.4
318.i


1 .423.3

1,138.5

73.3
96.5
100.9
124.2
131.7
138.2
161.0
110.6
86.9
112.2
118.5
166.3




797.3

140.9
104.5
120.8
73. 7
88.9
37.9
66.3
43.9
43.5
56.9


8.819.2

7,315.8

604.4
653.8
734.4
774.6
711.8
776.1
796.7
811.6
714.9
727.5
729.3
774.0




2,2E6 I

820.0
669.9
78E.8
737.3
707.3
718.7
704.6
711.1
682.2
730 2


11 .16 .8 138.186.6


9,295.9

756.1
793.5
934.3
952.1
1,036.3
983.3
636.2
999.1
885.2
1,017.9
933.7
934.2




9.109 I

911.2
847.4
949.6
949.3
954.2
899.2
862.3
875.2
880.1
960.4


31,076.2

2,514.5
2,734.3
3,.368.6
3.185.7
3,268.5
3,.267.1
2,809.9
3.019.6
3,139.5
3.768.4
3,652.4
3.459.9




37,739 6

3.312.5
3,536.6
4,051.8
3,905.1
3,990.3
3 938.0
3,577.9
3,550.7
3,618.9
4.257 8


16,668.7

31,540.5

1.118.9
1.136.8
1,414.8
1,353.4
1,418.7
1.360.7
1,334.6
1.440.9
1,358.7
1.603.0
1.603.1
1,525.0




17,299 2

1,612.4
1,345.0
1.803.3
1,853.8
1,829.7
1.798.9
1,690.5
1,680.5
1,603.6
1.881 5


7,019.2

5,825.8

520.5
489.5
594.3
575.6
590.8
593.1
369.1
625.7
597.7
669.4
635.4
558.1




6.276 3

615.9
568.7
649.5
641.1)
650.2
624.2
596.9
624.1
599.2
706.4


L4,500.7

11,709.9

675.1
1.107.9
1,359.6
1.256.7
1,259.0
1.313.3
906.2
953.1
1,183.0
1,495.9
1,413.9
1.376.0




14,161 2

1,084.2
1,422.9
1,599.1
1,410.2
1,510.4
1,514.9
1,290.5
1,246.1
1,416.0
1.669 8


5,349.1

4,472.1

371.3
382.9
483.4
468.0
500.6
474.1
417.1
461.6
439.9
473.3
467.9
409.0




4.7?2.7

454.6
426.4
486.6
482.3
483.5
481.0
454.6
460.8
460.0
530 9


2,586.6

2,099.3

184.1
174.2
192.3
207.8
218.5
226.7
222.0
233.1
224.6
216.0
239.6
247.7




2,547.2

238.6
228.5
237.8
274.9
284.2
241.4
239.1
27B.4
246.0
27B 2


'5ch.d.l-.? 6 secca.)n and aelecEel di.iion 3decriptione are as tolloi:

aI. Fooa and Itse anin..L 7. Macsiner) and transport equipment
I. uevur-e. and tbacaco 71. Machinery. other than electric
3. rude maLPrsials, Inediible, rerpt f.El 72. Electrical nmschinery, apparatus, and appliances
3. i rsr al .' 1S. lubricunt ond related am3Lertial 73. Transport equipment
1. Animal and vegetablee oils and fits 6. Miscellaneous manufactured articles. n.e.c.
S. Che ,.icas 9. Cor.r.di[ie: and trar.acLions not classified according to kind
6. M-r.uractured gjo cicz iLf, chiefly' by material
'eason;ll/ adj.i-e' i'are' for section 7 mes differ lightly irom the sur ol division; 71, 72. and 73 since each To independently ad-

'djuste1 Tor se as nai anra uork tr.--aa vari st or. uoin seasonal adjJt.?er.[ factors In reduced in Januarv 1975. See footnute I on front
paue. Arnnual total re not ih-un for esionallv 3djusJCed ]Ilta. Ir.adjusted jats nnould b, used for annual toarls. T1he adjusted section
tjCals in hthi tahtle and s r. lar overall monthL/ totals in tables 1, 2. andr 3 were adjuste.- indcpendentl.
In cte. abent *i d iironrable seasonal pa'rerns for this .ectlon, no seasonal adjustment actors have been applied to the dala.












Table 6 U.S. General Imports (f.a.s.Value Basis) of Merchandise, Schedule A Sections. Seasonally Adjusted and
Unadjusted, by Month January 1974 to October 1975
in millions lr lull-r,. See LUplant Jon of Statistitc for information on coserrre, aetinition of t.a... import %alue, and sources of eTrr.r
3r, H ve .ta. unaau.sted totals represent sun of inrounaed figures and hence may vary slightly from tum of roundea amouria i

Schedule A sect ans'

u I 2 3 4 I 6 I I

Seasonally adjusted2

1971

Jan,.ar)-Occober .. 7,696.7 1.164.0 5,044.2 20,855.9 '441.1 3,207.8 14,157.6 20,061 1 7,754.8 '1,809.i

Jmnudr ..... .. 730.1 15u.6 444.7 1,22F.3 '23.9 199.5 1,062.9 1,809.6 67-5 7 '12.7
February ... ...... 795.5 luo.5 170.6 1,570.8 '24.8 241.3 1,220.2 1,533.3 732.6 alsi,6.
Narc .. .. .... 942.8 1l1.9 509.9 1,639.1 '35.3 258.2 1,315.3 lH,.8 .o 792 4 07, .9
April .. .. .. .. 7 d 114.3 496.1 2,343.4 '40.U 276..1 1,233.6 1,9,5.2 746?.' 79.u
May. ...... .. 81. B i17.9 521.6 2,115.5 '42.2 314.1 1,346.0 2,016.. 77: .j '1 ;3 4
June..... .. ..... 99 L23.1i 548.1 2,264.6 '26.6 326.2 1,482.4 2.067.53 u3. 1i 3.6
Jul).... l.u 138.5 608.3 2,369.6 70.1 365.9 1 .4* 9.9 2,216.6 o91 .E I. l.
ugu .. .. ........ 761.6 137.1 546.9 2,511.0 '44.6 383.6 1,670.4 ;,21D.t L27.4 *L9 .3
September. ..... 66 .3 122.7 30 1. 2,301.5 '54.7 109.2 1,614.4 2,107.7 87 .7 1 201.5
October. ....... 623.6 92.5 494.0 2,133.9 '79.5 430.9 1,732.5 1 .97.5 816.8 '21 .3
November.. .......... 8.b 81.3 497.9 2,455.3 1'49.9 424 3 1,143.3 2,041.1 134.9 '228.2
December. ............ .u 97.l0 513.4 2,417.8 '53.3 426.7 1,763.9 2,021 .7 82 6.8 '217.7

1975

January-October..... 7.056 ? 1,212 1 1,582 2 21,658 1 '411 7 3.026 2 12.3B7 7 19,297 3 7.101 B 7,30 6

January......... .... 677.2 118.3 194.2 3,046.3 '48.5 432.4 1,740.8 1,83o.'. ;83.b '216.
February......... 668.9 124.9 456.3 1,918.3 '44.7 323.3 1,446.8 1,600.4 :13.2 '181.0
March............ .. 666.? 154.7 464.6 1.344.5 '55a. 317.6 1 .326. 2 t044.2 .;1.; 'I18 .
April ..... .. .. 656.3 120.2 167.0 2.443.3 4(. ; 109.5 1 ..48.9 1.7?73.i 71 '231. ?
May.................. 6103.4 11f.O0 432.2 1,957.1 '51.9 271.7 I flU76. I 81l.] *56..b '196.5
un... ........ 768.2 125.1 462.9 1,471.0 '33 2 241.3 1,171.6 1,836 7 ;01.0 '219 7
July... .. .. 717 3 112.8 477.7 2,191.2 '41.8 252.7 1,106 7 2.050 .5 780.6 '223.8
Qugus.......... 670.0 1h.7 428.2 3,249.4 37.7 283.4 1.041.8 2.141.0 727.2 '189.7
September.. .. 885.4 117.7 459.4 2,616.1 '41.6 290.2 1,095.1 1,885 7 777.6 '217.9
October .. ... .. 736 3 1M1.7 139.7 3 42.9 '46 8 303.6 1,16 57 2.076 3 621 2 1217 4
flo. ember ...... .
December .. ..

Unadjus tea


i974

Janu.ry-L.ceiber.. 9,386.2 1,372.3 6.065.6 25,453.8 544.3 4,017.7 17.718.7 ;?4 tU60.3 9.426.2 2 215.;

January-October ...... 7.708.7 1,112.4 5,093.1 20,741.6 441.1 3,235.0 14,222.5 20.011 7 7.850 5 1,609.8

Jinuar) ........ .. 763.0 100.6 429.6 1,326.6 23.9 2112.9 1,074.6 I,81 7.4 610.6 145.7
february .. ........ 744.6 86.1 402.4 1,588.1 24.8 228.,1' 1,059.1 1.717.4 637.5 156.1
March.......... 913.6 101.1 502.6 1,820.0 35.3 266.2 1,291.3 f19411. 732.: 175 .9
April... ..... ...... 825.m 113.3 494.6 2,294.2 40.0 316.0 1.272.4 2,n07 .4 ;19.8 179.0
May.................. 627.4 116.5 .71.2 2,290.8 42.2 339.9 1,467.1 2.340.3 ;;.6.0 1"].4
June.... .. ....... .7"9. 127.5 579.1 2,090.2 26.6 33?.4 1 .486. 2,108.6 9n7.o 163.6
July ........... ... 174.1 126.6 546.4 2,417.2 70.1 349.8 l t.S.l 5 2,694.1 663.4 194.9
AuEust.. .. ......... 766.2 112.7 544.; 2,508.5 44.. 380.5 1,970. ,917.5 933.3 188.3
September............ 647.8 111.7 .08.0 2,128.9 54.2 367.s 1,549.8 1,934. 8436.] 201.5
October.............. 656.6 113.3 514.3 2.278.1 79.5 431.8 1,839.9 2.061.6 904.0 215.3
November............ 789.2 102.7 475.0 2,214.7 49.9 397.1 1,767.7 2.C,37.0 .24.0 228.2
December........... 988.3 107.2 497.5 2.497.6 53.3 38i.7 1.728.6 2.011.6 231.8 -.17.7

1975

January-October O D71 F I L61 9 i 618 1 21,798 0 111 7 3.U?70 i 12 3F.9 6 19,235 I 7. 04 9 :082' 6

January ....... 713.8 112.3 477.9 3.414.9 48.5 437. 1,.49.5 1.894.7 115.6 218.0
February. .. .. 626.8 106.4 390.6 1.937.4 44.7 306.7 1,259.0 1.608.8 621.9 181.0
March......... .... 657.5 143.7 456.3 1,177.6 55.1 3411.8 I 313.3 2.138.4 A6 7.6 185.1
April.......... ... 684.5 119.1 468.4 2.438.4 40.7 351.9 1,.243.9 1.899.2 703. 231.2
y..... .. .. 611.0 116.3 451.2 1,937.5 21.9 265.6 1.144.7 l.i31.0 626.3 198.5
mune............. ... 779.7 129.6 512.4 1,428 3 33.2 262.9 1,231.4 1.961.6 722.7 219.7
July.. .... 705.8 103.4 506.4 2,132.0 44.8 247 4 1,136 6 1,964.4 850.9 223.8
August ........... 635.8 95.8 420.9 2,240.4 32.7 270.6 1,005.3 1,622.0 800.6 189.7
SepLemer. ... 896.9 106.9 476.4 2,446.1 41.6 275.1 1.091.8 1,793.3 815 7 217.9
October... ....... 759 9 126 0 457 7 2,345 5 48.B 302 4 1.194.0 2,13v e 919.7 217 4
.Nov ember"... .
DEcembe r. .

'Scrt,.eulm e t .reci r l escrip ilr. are a. tolfos
i.-. FoyoJ nd lite intmal. 5. Chicatal,
1. Be erc,.: and Lobacco 6. Maanuf ctEur.] gto: c iLaSSlfied cniell0 Dy rmaeriat
2 Cr.-t m materials. Imedioie, escep tuels 7. itahinr) a.nd transport equipment
3. hineral laels, L.,bricants, and related materials 0. Mli cellanoua. aanufactureo articles, n.e.;.
4. Animal an veg, table oils and fat s 9. Coonoatl.es and ransacttions noat cl.inEtfied al.corn to kind
2ArJejla for seasonal and sarlting-day variation us.ng seasonal aoju stmnIt tacturs inlroducea in January 1975. _Se footnote I 2n front
page. Annual iLtals are not siho n for seasonally adjusted data. Unadju,.ea na[a should he uned for anr.ual Loctal. Ine adjusted 'ectiu.n
totals in thes table and sImnlar overall monanJl totuls to tables I ana 4 sere adjusted independently.
3ln the absence of demonstrable seasonal patterns for this section, no seasonal adjustment actors have been apple to the data.









10

Table 7. U.S. General Imports (c.i.f. Value Basis) of Merchandise, Schedule A Sections, Seasonally Adjusted and
Unadjusted, by Month: January 1974 to October 1975
(in millions of dollars. See Explanation of Statistics for Information on coverage. definition of c.l.f. Import value, and sources oferror In
the data. Unadjusted totals represent sum of unrounded figures and hence may vary Blightly from sum of rounded amounts)

Schedule A sect ons'
Per.od
0 ? 3 4 5 I 7 8 9

Seasonally adjusted'


1974

aruarty-October .. ... 8,316.6 1,268.9 5.573 4 22,454.0 'a40.0 3,439.7 15,201.9 21,736.9 8.283.6 '1,860.1

Januar... .. 785.0 114.5 485.5 1.341 4 '25.2 214 3 1.136.5 1,962.6 722.3 150 2
February ..... 857.3 105.8 508 0 1,694 7 '26.0 257.7 1,308.5 1,994 3 780 7 '160.3
iMarch. ... 1.017.1 122.4 551.6 1.774 4 37 1 275.4 1.402.7 2 047.4 811.1 '176.1
April. .. 829.7 124.5 545.8 2.510.5 341.9 299.2 1.341.3 2.100 7 798.4 '183.7
MHy .... 877. 128.6 575.4 2.334 6 '44.0 339 6 1,446 4 2.195 9 832.2 '178.2
unre .. .. 870.0 133 3 603 6 2,453.6 327 8 348 5 1,592.1 2,231.5 859 7 189.1
July.. 86.6 150.5 569.0 2.557 5 72.7 392.7 1,564.5 2,388.3 845 9 '200.2
August.. ... ... 822.2 150.9 627.6 2,710.4 '46.5 409 9 3.801.8 2,389.1 883 8 '193.7
eptember 715.1 134.4 557.6 2,472.0 56.3 440 7 1.737 9 2,282.1 876.2 '207.3
October..... 676 1 101.0 59 1 2,604.9 182 7 461 7 1,870 2 2,145.0 873 3 '221.2
November ... 928.4 88 5 552.6 2,622.0 '52.1 454.9 1,883.8 2.208.5 888.7 '234.3
memberr. .. 906.6 105 9 570.0 2,576.6 55.5 456.1 3 929.9 2.180 3 886 8 '223.0



Januarn-Oc-tober ... 7.644 2 I 319 9 5 2E0 I 23.139.3 '465 9 3.234.7 13,363 0 20.805 5 7,967 8 '2,133.3

January.. 717.8 129.4 559 3 3.259 1 '50.5 462 5 1.888.1 1 975.0 837.2 '224.3
February. 726 I 134 5 50) 85 2,036.3 '46 8 345.1 1,564 3 1.931.4 764.8 5186.2
March 7 7.9 166.3 505.4 1,435.1 "'7.6 336.5 1,429.0 2 59.2 765.8 '190.9
p l 711.8 130.9 714.6 2.598.4 '42.5 328.6 1.346.1 1,918.1 769.7 '238.2
May.. .661.7 128.0 475.0 2.090.3 '54.6 ?87.5 1,163.3 1,960.3 717.1 1201.9
June... .27.7 135 7 513.2 1,573.4 '35.1 258.5 1,264.0 1,984.9 764.4 '224.3
uly. 778.8 -3.9 530.8 2,332.9 '47.7 275.5 1,191.1 2,201.1 841.7 '228.5
Aurust. ... 731.7 126.8 471.8 2,105.9 '34.9 301.9 1,125.3 2.301.8 786.5 3194.0
September.... 954'2 129.5 505.2 2,810.9 344.4 308.6 1,174.8 2,031.7 842.6 '222.9
October 796 5 114 7 484 7 2.597.0 '51 9 320.0 1.217 0 2,3242.0 8B8 0 1222.1
November
1'ecerne r

Llnaj ust ed

1974

January-DeL:,cir ..... 10,134 3 1.441.3 ,690 8 27,358 6 56 .6 4,306 9 19,052 7 26,060.0 10,066.5 2,317.4

Januar-October 8,3?9.2 1.212 3 5,611.3 22,332 0 460 0 3,468.8 15,272.4 21,686.2 8,385.9 1,860.1

Jar.uar .. .. 841.5 109.1 49.0 1.450.1 25.2 217.9 1,149.0 2.047.0 6B4.7 I50.2
Februr.ry .... 02.4 93.? 434.3 1,713.3 26.0 243.5 1,135.8 1,868.7 679.2 160.3
March.... 985.6 113.8 543.9 1,946.3 37.1 283.9 1,380.3 2,106.8 779.5 176.1
pril.. .. ..... 863.6 123.4 644.2 2.457.8 41.8 339.0 1,361.4 2,256.2 769.7 183.7
Mat ... 893.3 127.1 630.1 2.158.3 44.0 367.5 1.576.6 2,439.6 822.2 178.2
Jure .. ........ 836.9 138.2 636.0 2,264.7 27.8 355.1 1.596.9 2,276.1 852.8 189.1
July.. ..... 835.4 137.6 611.7 2.608.; 72.7 375.4 1,616,1 2,256.9 944.0 200.2
August .. 827.1 124.0 606.5 2,707.7 46.5 406.6 L,801.6 2,104.8 996.9 193.7
Sep'eeber. .. 701.5 122.3 562.1 2,86.6 ,6.3 417.3 1.668.4 2,095.0 897.8 207.3
Octoberr 111.9 123.7 5,1.6 2.436..2 82.7 462.6 1,861.1 2,235.1 964.1 223.2
hv.ember 853.? 111.9 527.2 2.365.0 532.1 15.6 1.910. 2.204.1 877.1 234.3
December.. 951.9 117.0 552.3 2,661.6 ,5.5 412.3 1.870.0 2.169.4 803.4 223.0

19?:

Januar)-Octuber 7 665 7 1..?65 5 3nl 5 ?3.638 I 165.9 3.265 4 133 13.3 20.712 2 8,081 0 2,133 3

January. 777.6 122.8 540.8 3,653.1 50.5 467.6 1,897.5 2,038.2 807.1 224.3
lebruar. 660.4 114.6 428.7 2.nl56.7 46.6 326.8 1,359.4 1,811.7 666.9 186.2
March 713.5 154.7 496.3 1,577.2 57.6 J61.0 1,414.7 2.318.0 739.0 150.9
April. 742.4 129.7 716.1 2.593.? 42.5 373.7 1.340.7 2.054.2 753.5 238.2
May .. .. 663.3 126.8 495.9 2.069.4 54.6 302.1 1.234,2 2.093.6 674. 201.9
ure. 840.1 140.6 568.1 1,527.8 35.1 270.6 1,328.5 2.119.9 777.8 224.3
Jul3... .. 766.3 113.6 562.7 2.269 9 17.7 264.2 1.223.3 2.108.7 917.4 228.5
Au"us! 694.4 105.0 463.8 2,396.3 34.9 288.3 1,085.9 1,958.8 865.9 194.0
Septemor. 966.6 117.6 523.9 2,628.2 44.4 292 2 1,171.3 1,932.1 883.9 222.9
I-c aer P. 822.0 140.1 aIt 2.513.9 .I 9 31I.7 1.287 6 2.307.0 794. ?72.1
%ouember
L ec ibe r .

';nedule A sectr.;p de-criprior, are iA follows
0 Food and live anital- 5 Cheistcals
1 Beverages and tobacco 6 Manufacrtured goods classified chiefly by maiLeral
2. Crude mndterial inetlDne. except lu lE 7 Machinery and transport equipment
'. Mineral fuels. Luiorcant:, anq related material. 8 Riscellaneoura manufactured articles. n.e s.
4 Arstr.al ann veetable oils ana fats 9. Commoditles arnd transarLions not classified according to kind
Adjulstd for seasonal and *nrkpr.-day sariatiton using seasonal adjustment factors introduced in January 1975. See fool note 1 on front
page Anrul ortals are not ,hown for seaaonslty adjusted data Unadjusted naai should ne used for annual totals The adjusted section
total- ir, rthi table and smloar overall monthly ,oral' in tables 2 and 4 uere adjuEtea independently.
In the absence of demorsterable seasonal patterns for tilsa section, no seasonal adjustment factors have been applied to the data.









U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
Bureau of the Census
Washington, D.C. 20233


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