Summary of U.S. export and import merchandise trade

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Material Information

Title:
Summary of U.S. export and import merchandise trade
Series Title:
FT-900
Physical Description:
v. : ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of the Census
United States -- Bureau of the Census
Publisher:
Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, Foreign Trade Division for sale by the Subscriber Services Section (Publications), Bureau of the Census
Place of Publication:
Washington
Creation Date:
September 1975
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Commerce -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Citation/Reference:
American statistics index
Dates or Sequential Designation:
1974-1976.
General Note:
At head of title: 1977- United States foreign trade.
General Note:
Formerly classed C 56. 210:900 - during the time the Bureau of the Census was subordinate to Social and Economic Statistics Administration.
General Note:
Issues prior to Oct. 1977 were sent to depositories as Item 144.
General Note:
Unnumbered supplements accompany some issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001209840
oclc - 02245761
notis - AFW0105
lccn - 76640395
issn - 0361-0047
sobekcm - AA00005271_00037
Classification:
lcc - HF105 .B73e
ddc - 382/.0973
System ID:
AA00005271:00037

Related Items

Preceded by:
United States foreign trade; export and import merchandise trade
Succeeded by:
United States foreign trade. FT900, Summary of U.S. export and import merchandise trade

Full Text






SUMMARY OF U.S. EXPORT AND

IMPORT MERCHANDISE TRADE


' NLARY 1975 .t31ID j'




Ism W. FOR RELEASE

TORY FEBRUARY 27, 1975
n. .*i 10:00 A.M.


isonally Adjusted and


Data


The Bureau of the Census, Department of Commerce,
announced today that during January 1975, seasonally
adjusted exports on a f.a.s. Free alongside snip) U.S.
port of exportation value oasis, excluding Department
of Defense (DOD) Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid
shipments, were valued at $9,411.9 million 7 and that
seasonally adjusted general um.ports for the month, on a
t.a.s. (free alongside ship) foreign port of exportation
value basis amounted to $9,622.4 million. I Compara-
ble seasonally adjusted totals for December were
8,a62.3 million for exports and $9,249.9 million for
imports.

The Bureau, part of the Department's Social and
economic Statistics Administration I'SESA), pointed out
that as was stated in the 1974 issues of Report FT 900,
effective with the statistics lor January 1975, the
Customs import value is being replaced in this report
biy the "f.a.a. (free alongside ship) foreign port of
exportation import value." Thus, for the first time,
buth export and import figures are being made available
on a f.a.s. value basis In this report. Definitions of
both f.a.s. and c.l.f. import values, as well as the
export f.a.s. value, are given an the "ExplanatLon of
Statistics" section. For purposes of comparison the
January 1975 import total, determined on a Customs
import value basis, amounted to $9,659.3 million, about
0.4 percent more than the comparable f.a.s. import
value. The December 1974 Lmport total on a Customs
value basis was $90,315.1 million. For the period
January-December 1974, the average dtiference in the
monthly f.a.s. Import values and comparable Customs
import values on a seasonally adjusted basis was 0.7
percent, ranging from 0.5 to 1.1 percent. For calendar
year 1974 the Customs import value was $100,972.3
million about 0.8 percent higher than the corres-
ponding import f.a.s. value of $100,218.1 million.


Based on the above seasonally adjusted I.a.s.
export and import figures, a merciandi se trade deficit
of $210.5 million was recoroea in January 1975. 1On
the old basis, using the Customs import value, the
deficit would nave been t247.4 million. Both the
export and import totals for January represent record
highs.

Seasonalll anjusred general imports on a c .1I.
cost, insurance., san freight value o &is amounted E-
$10,364.5 million 1 2s in January. Using the c.i.f.
import value and the f.a.s. expurt value, the mercian-
dise trade deficit for January 1975 woula be $95?.6
million.'

During the 4-tmonth period, October 1974-January
1975, seasonally adjusted exports If.a.s. value basisl
averaged $8,980.2 million per month, a level about 8
percent higher than thne 8,350.0 million average
reported for the preceding 4-month period, June to
September 1974 Ceneral imports If.a.s. value basis)
averaged $9,151.5 million per montn for rne current
4-month period, whimn is about 3 percent .ore than the
$5,862.9 million average reported for the preceding
4 months.

Exports unadjuated for seasonal change and
excluding Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid ship-
ments increased from $8,702.8 million in December 1974
to $9,123.9 million in January 1975. With Military
Assistance Program Grani-Aid shipments included,
January 1975 exports were saluea at 19,202.8 million
as compared to t8,743.5 million in Decemner 1974.
Unadjusted general imports (f.a.s. value basis)
amounted to $9,822.5 million ino Jauary 1975 and
$9,132.4 million in December 1974.


'AtAula tor malnd inad mrkingday variation, bul not t1 chanwig in pnce leml Facto nued to adlui 1974 and 1975 deta Snown this pon repren Iem sonl m adjaisent firtorn darived irm
monthly dil dimigh 1974 and introduced in January 1975 combined with the appropnet workinqday adlnustmewr f ctor
'~~~~. .. l ..... d lM i l f l


CGauglions n dale user asleau enanth peness are esira le to i ent y un erlying treals oun to mont changes in exports armora ant simiar series oten ro ect pr.many unequar movements.
dlRummarill immhly cmyawarr ela Recent month-to-Inonih percent elemps in use overall seasonally adjusted export and import wries are presener.d in Ihe following able wdh .average percent mongh
IIHulullh rile and declim over longer penods shown lan compenson. The awarage me ana amerage dart.ne I.gures enclude percentap cr.ar.gEs for Ill the permous January March IBilS and July Decemour
1551 Imme of abnornaghtim in the data due in effects at dock strikes end 12) penedugnan negligibig changes here gercentl in Ihe Irtrel eleaporal.mportsoccurred Perceritaip changes lor fa x .mport
adual ele me assilable for pilliolk pnol la .1mugly 1974.


Month-to-month Average monthly rates of change

Series Dec. 1974- Nay.-Dec. Oct.-Nov. Sepr.-Oct. Avery.= Average 4 monthr. 12 months
Jan. 1975 1974 1974 1974 rise decline Sept. 1974- Jan. 1974-
1969.1974 1969-1974 Jan 1975 Jan. 1975
(Percenal IPercentl (PETC@HEi IPerCent IFOffEi[ 1 IPercenti IPercenti Peteen[I

F.a.s. export value. 46.2 -1.2 +3.5 +3.3 *3.2 -2.6 *3.0 *2.4

Fea.a. ineport value. +4.0 +3.2 *?.2 +0.8 INAI thAl *2.6 *3.4

LBee the "lbrplana lon of Statastice" for = elanations of the expor and import 'alues and tr de balances.


Inquiries concerning these figures should be addressed to the Chief, Foreign Trade Division, Bureau of the
Census, Washington, D.C. 20233. Tel: Area Code 301, 763-5140.


.T U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE, Social and Economic Statistics Administration, BUREAU OF THE CENSUS

j For sale by the Subscriber Services Section (Publications), Social and Economic Statistics Administration,
Washington, D.C. 20233, or any U.S. Department of Commerce district office. Price 10 cents per copy. Annual
subscription (FT 900, 975, 985, and 986 combined) $3.00.


5b a-O u o- '5 -








EXPLANATION OF STATISTICS


Import Statistics

CoVerage

The U.S. import statistics reflle'both government and
nongovernment imports $opf merchandise from foreign
countries into the U.S. Curtorp. territory, which includes
the 50 states, the District o4 ,ldTnn.bia, and Puerto Rico.
The U.S. import statistics exie-imos -ito thii Virgin
Islands, Guam, American Samoa, a nd other. U.S. posses-
sions; and shipments between the United States and Puerto
Rico, between the United States and U.S. possessions, and
between any of these outlying areas. (Data on U.S. trade
with Puerto Rico and with U.S. possessions are published
separately in Report FT 800. Additional data on such trade
and on imports into the Virgin Islands from foreign
countries are presented in reference tabulations.)

The U.S. import statistics also exclude American goods
returned to the United States by its Armed Forces; intransit
shipments through the United States; temporary shipments;
transactions not considered to be of statistical significance,
such as shipments of personal and household effects;
low-valued nondutiable imports by mail; issued monetary
coins of all component metals; and gold in the form of ores,
concentrates, waste, scrap, and refined bullion. Imports of
silver in these forms are included in the statistics, unless
otherwise noted. (Information on gold movements, pre-
viously shown in Report FT 2402, appears in Report FT
990 effective Januay 1975.)

General Imports/Imports for Consumption

The official U.S. import statistics are compiled by the
Bureau of the Census from copies of the import entry and
warehouse withdrawal forms which importers are required
by law to file with Customs officials. The statistics are
presented in terms of both "General Imports" and "Imports
for Consumption." General imports are a combination of
entries for immediate consumption and entries into
Customs bonded warehouses and thus generally reflect total
arrivals of merchandise. Imports for consumption are a
combination of entries for immediate consumption and
withdrawals from warehouses for consumption and thus
generally reflect the total of the commodities entered into
U.S. consumption channels.
Import Valuation'

F.a.s. Import Value

The f.a.s. (free alongside ship) value represents the
transaction value of imports at the foreign port of exporta-
tion. It is based on the purchase price, i.e., the actual
transaction value and generally includes all charges incurred
in placing the merchandise alongside the carrier at the port
of exportation in the country of exportation.

'Values have not been adjusted for changes in price level.


C.i.f. Import Value

The c.i.f. (cost, insurance, and freight) value represents
the value of imports at the first port of entry in the United
States. It is based on the purchase price and includes all
freight, insurance, and other charges (excluding U.S. import
duties) incurred in bringing the merchandise from the
country of exportation and generally placing it alongside
the carrier at the first port of entry in the United States. If
the merchandise was acquired in a transaction between
related parties, the purchase price used in deriving the c.i.f.
value is based on an arm's-length equivalent transaction
price, i.e., a price which would exist between unrelated
buyers and sellers.
Import Monthly Carryover
It is the objective of the compiling procedures to include
shipments, insofar as practicable, in the statistics for the
actual month of importation. However, for purposes of the
statistics the month of importation is based on the date of
official acceptance by Customs of the import entry or
warehouse withdrawal document. This may not in all cases
correspond to the actual month of importation. (For
example, under the Customs "immediate-delivery" pro-
cedures, importers may file the import entry up to 10
workdays after the actual date of importation.) Also,
because of processing problenis (e.g., late receipt of a
document for an end-of-month shipment, rejection of a
shipment by the computer because the data fail to meet
certain edit criteria established to protect the accuracy of
the statistics, etc.), there is an overall average carryover of
about 7 percent (in terms of value) of the shipments from
the reported month of importation (based on the date of
the import entry or warehouse withdrawal document) to a
subsequent month, usually the succeeding month. In addi-
tion, as a result of the aforementioned Customs "im-
mediate-delivery" procedures, there is a further carryover of
presently unknown magnitude from the actual month of
importation to a subsequent month. These limitations
should be borne in mind when making month-to-month
comparisons.
Cumulations of data over at least 4-month periods are
desirable to identify underlying trends. Month-to-month
changes in imports, exports, and similar series often reflect
primarily irregular movements, differences in monthly
carryover, etc.

Estimated Data for Imports Valued Under $251
The overall import and Schedule A Section 9 totals
include sample estimates for shipments valued under $251.
Therefore, they are subject to sampling error, estimated at
less than one-tenth of one percent for the unadjusted overall
total and about one percent for the unadjusted Schedule A
Section 9 total. This means that we can have about 67
percent confidence that the published unadjusted overall
totals and the unadjusted Schedule A Section 9 totals differ
by less than one-tenth of a percent and one percent,
respectively, from the totals that would have resulted from
a complete tabulation.











Export Statistics
Coverage
The export statistics reflect, in general, both government
and nongovernment exports of domestic and foreign mer-
chandise from the U.S. Customs territory (includes the 50
States, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico) to
foreign countries, whether the exportation involves a
commercial transaction or not. The statistics, therefore,
include Department of Defense Military Assistance Program
Grant-Aid shipments, shipments for economic assistance
under the Foreign Assistance Act and shipments of agri-
cultural commodities under P. L. 480 (The Agricultural
Trade Development and Assistance Act of 1954, as amend-
ed) and related laws. The following are excluded from the
statistics: Shipments to U.S. Armed Forces and diplomatic
missions abroad for their own use; shipments between the
United States and Puerto Rico, between the United States
and its possessions (including the Virgin Islands), and
between these outlying areas; exports from U.S. possessions;
intransit shipments through the United States; transactions
not considered to be of statistical importance, such as
personal and household effects; temporary exports; low-
valued or noncommercial exports by mail; issued monetary
coins of all component metals; and gold in the form of ores,
concentrates, waste, scrap, and refined bullion. Exports of
silver in these forms are included in the statistics, unless
otherwise noted. (Information on gold movements, pre-
viously shown in Report FT 2402, appears in Report FT
990 effective January 1975.)
Exports of Domestic/Foreign Merchandise
The official U.S. export statistics are compiled by the
Bureau of the Census primarily from copies of Shipper's
Export Declarations which are required to be filed with
Customs officials, except for Department of Defense
Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid shipments which are
reported directly to the Bureau of the Census by the
Department of Defense and shipments by qualified ex-
porters who have been authorized to submit data in the
form of magnetic tape, punched cards, or monthly Shipper's
Summary Export Declarations directly to the Bureau of the
Census. The statistics are reported as exports of domestic or
foreign merchandise. Exports of domestic merchandise
include commodities which are grown, produced, or manu-
factured in the United States, and commodities of foreign
origin which have been changed in the United States from
the form in which they were imported, or which have been
enhanced in value by further manufacture in the United
States. Exports of foreign merchandise include commodities
of foreign origin which have entered the United States as
imports and which, at the time of exportation, are in
substantially the same condition as when imported.
Export Valuation'
F.a.s. Export Value
The value reported in the export statistics generally is
equivalent to a f.as. (free alongside ship) value at the U.S.
port of export, based on the transaction price, including
inland freight, insurance and other charges incurred in

'Values have not been adjusted fot changes in price level.


placing the merchandise alongside tlie carrier at the U.S.
port of exportation.
Export Monthly Carryover
It is the objective of the compiling procedures to include
shipments, insofar as practicable, in the statistics for the
actual month of exportation. For purposes of the statistics,
the month of exportation is generally based on the date
when the shipment leaves the United States. (For vessel or
air shipments it is the date when the carrier departs or is
cleared from the port of export.) However, as indicated
above for imports, because of processing problems (e.g., late
receipt of a document for an end-of-month shipment,
rejection of a shipment by the computer because the data
fail to meet certain edit criteria established to protect the
accuracy of the statistics, etc.), there is an overall average
carryover of about 5 percent (in terms of value) of the
shipments from the actual month of exportation to a
subsequent month, usually the succeeding month. These
limitations should be borne in mind when making month-
to-month comparisons.
Cumulations of data over at least 4-month periods are
desirable to identify underlying trends. Month-to-month
changes in imports. exports, and similar series often reflect
primarily irregular movements, differences in monthly
carryover, etc.
Estimated Data for Export Shipments Valued
Under $1,000 to Countries Other Than
Canada, Under $2,000 to Canada
The overall export and Schedule B section and division
totals include sample estimates for shipments valued
$251-41.999 for Canada and for shipments valued
$251-$999 for countries other than Canada. Data for
shipments valued $250 and under to all countries are also
estimated, based on established percentages of individual
country totals, and included in the Schedule B Section 9
totals regardless of the commodity exported. It is estimated
that the unadjusted overall total is subject to a sampling
error of less than one-tenth of one percent, and the
unadjusted Schedule B section or division totals are subject
to sampling errors of about one percent. In addition, the
Schedule B Section 9 total is subject to possible error in the
estimated data for shipments valued $250 and under: and
the overall total, and the individual totals for sections other
than Section 9, to a more limited extent. Such $250 and
under shipments represent about 1.5 percent of the total
value of exports, and about 60 percent of the Schedule B
Section 9 total.
Other Sources of Error
in the Statistics
Monthly import and export figures are subject to the
possibility of errors which may arise from sources other
than sampling errors, discussed above. Among these are
errors in the reporting and/or processing of information as
to commodity classification, value and other statistical
factors, month of inclusion (see paragraphs on import and
export carryover, above), and the undercounting of exports
to Canada due to the non-receipt of Shipper's Export
Declarations. For 1973, the undercounting amounted to
about one billion dollars. In the case of imports the











information as to value and commodity classification (as
well as country of origin and net quantity) is verified by
Customs officials on entries filed for transactions valued
over $250 which are ordinarily subject to examination for
Customs appraisement purposes, thus considerably reducing
the possibility of error. In addition, the procedures used to
compile both the import and export statistics include clerical
and computer processing checks designed to protect the
accuracy of the statistics to the fullest practicable extent.
Merchandise Trade Balances

Two trade balances are presented in this report:
I) The balance between exports based on f.a.s. values
and imports based on f.a.s. values.
2) The balance between exports based on f.a.s. values
and imports based on c.i.f. values with adjustments for
imports from affiliated sellers abroad.to reflect arms-length
equivalent prices.
Both balances are useful for certain purposes. The first
balance corresponds to a measurement of the international
payments or credit flows resulting from merchandise trade
between the U.S. and foreign countries. The second balance
is based on concepts similar to those used by most foreign
countries, and therefore provides a reference for com-
parison with the trade balances published by those coun-
tries.

Revisions to the Statistics

Revisions are carried into the statistics on a periodic
basis. Data for 1974 and 1975 appearing in the 1975
monthly issues of this report are presented as follows-

1975 Statisitcs

a. January through November 1975 issues: figures are as
originally issued, except as noted below.


b. December 1975 issue: figures reflect revisions for
prior months of the year issued with December 1975
statistics or earlier, as noted below.

1974 Statistics

a. January through May 1975 issues: figures reflect
revisions issued with December 1974 statistics or
earlier.
b. June through December 1975 issues: figures reflect
revisions to 1974 data issued with June 1975 statistics
or earlier.

In addition to the revisions which are made on a periodic
basis, instances may occur where a significant error in the
statistics for a month of the current year is discovered after
the statistics for that month are compiled. If the error is of
sufficient importance to require correction prior to the time
that the regular revisions are carried, the correction is made
and so noted in this report.


Sources of Further Information

Additional foreign trade statistics and information re-
garding coverage, valuation, sampling, and _qualifications
which should be considered by users of the statistics are
contained primarily in the following publications: Report
FT 990, Highlights of U.S. Export and Import Trade; FT
135, U.S. General Imports, Schedule A Commodity by
Country; FT 410, U.S. Exports, Schedule B Commodity by
Country; and the Guide to Foreign Trade Statistics.
Information regarding additional sources of statistics, the
methodology used in seasonally adjusting the data, and
other matters relating to foreign trade statistics may be
obtained from the Bureau of the Census, Washington, D.C.
20233.












5

Table 1. U.S. Exports (f.a.s. Value Basis), General Imports (f.a.s. Value Basis), and Merchandise Trade Balance,
Adjusted for Seasonal and Working-Day Variation, by Month: January 1974 to January 1975
(Ins mlltons of dollars See Explanation of Etatistics for Ilniorm.al..n on coverage, definiti.rs if exp-jt and ilport values arid trade balances.
and aouramB of error in the data. All nota shoTi, for 1971 and 1975 rellec, seasonal aduEltment factors introoucea in Jaruary 19751
Period and Jauar- January February March April May June July Augua esoa- OcStoner lovem Dece -
series ber her be,

1974

Exports' ............. 7,15D.2 7,150.2 7,548.9 7,625.4 8,107.8 7,652.4 8,316.6 8,307.5 9,379.7 8,396.3 8,672.9 8,973.6 8,862.3
F.a.B. Isport value.. 6,495.8 6,496.8 7,317.2 7,741.6 8,024.8 8,264.5 8,573.4 8,918.0 9,261.9 6,696.1 8,769.1 8,964.7 9,249.9
Merchandlee trade
balU-e .... ....... 653.4 .653.4 .231.7 -116.2 n83.0 -612.1 -256.8 -610.5 -897.2 -301.8 -96.2 ,.q9 -397.6

1975

Export .......... 9.,11.9 9,411.9
F.a a. Import value 9.6?2.4 9,622.4
Merchandise trade
balance .. ........ -210.5 -210.L

I Represents exports of domestic and foreign merchandise excluding Department of Defense Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid salpoenats.


Table 2. U.S. Exports (f.a.s. Value Basis). General Imports (c.i.f. Value Basis) and Merchandise Trade Balance.
Adjusted for Seasonal and Working-Day Variation, by Month: January 1974 to January 1975
(In millions of dollars. SeeExplanalion of Statlstica for information or, coerage. del ini ions -f export ara import .lue.e aina tr ae Dalances
and Bources of error In the data. All data shown ior 1974 snd 197- reflect seasonal aajastaer.t actors inrreduced -n January 19751

Period and Janury- January February March April Mai Jane July August SepIe- October ove-r Dbcem-
serles btr 9er her

1974

Exports'... ..... 7.,10.2 7,150.2 7,548.9 7,625.4 8,107.6 7,652.4 8,316.6 8,307.5 8,379.7 8,396.3 8.672.9 8,973.6 A,862.3
C.I.f. Import value. 7,019.2 7,019.2 7,881.9 6,310.6 8,638.9 8,921.2 3,256.1 9,610.8 9,998.8 9,37'.8 9,450.8 9,653.1 9,942.3
Merchandise trade
balance.. .. ... .131.0 .131.0 -333.0 -68i.4 -331.1 -1,268.8 -939.6 -1,303.3 -1,619.1 -961.5 -777.9 -679.5 -1,080.0

1975

Eaporta'........ 9,411.9 9,411.9
C.i.f. import value.. 10,364.b 10,364.5
Merhandilae trade
balance... ...... .. -952.6 -952.6

Itepreaents exports of adoestlc and foreign merchandise excluding Departmrent of Efense Milltar) Assistance Prograir Grant-Aid .nippmenta


FT 900 effective January 1975















Table 3. U.S. Exports (fLa.s. Value Basis) of Merchandise Showing Department of Defense (DOD) Military
Assistance Program Grant-Aid Shipments, by Month: January 1974 to January 1975


fin mll iors 01o nillars eeFxplanatior, of Statistics for information on coverage, definition or f.a.s. export value, and source of error in the
data. Unadjusted totals represent sam of unrounded figures and hence nay vary slightly from asm of rounded aeour.inta)

Exports excluding DOD Exports Including DDO Grant-Aid'
Grant-Aid DOD Grant-Aid


Per no Domestic Domeal-c Domestic
aid -and Domestic, ala Domestic, Western Other
fseasonr r' reign, unaajusted foreign, unadjusted Total Europe countries

anj otedl' unadjusted unadjusted


1974

January-Deceoer .......................... I11 9:,907.2 9F.,.44.4 96.506.2 97,143.5 599.1 99.6 499.5

Janr .-ry -......... ........................ 7,150.2 6,824.9 6,743.7 6,866.9 6,785.8 42.1 14.7 27.3


January.................................... 7,150.2 ,624.9 6,743.7 6,866.9 6,78i.8 42.1 14.7 27.3
February................................... 7,.a4 .9 ?,- 9?.2 7,200.8 7,334.0 7,242.7 41.9 16.3 25.6
March...................................... 7,62 .a 8,1497.8 8,394.3 9,525.5 8,412.0 27.7 9.7 18.0
April..................................... 8,10. 7.8 8,372.1 ,252.8 8.408.7 8,289.3 36.6 6.4 30.2
May ........................................ 7,62.4 R,4CA. 3 6,297.2 6,489.4 8,3os.3 61.1 5.8 55.3
Jne...................................... 6,316.6 8,327.4 8,211.4 8,384.3 8,268.4 56.9 8.8 48.1


July.................................... ... ,307.5 7,68 5.4 7,553.2 7.63..2 7,593.0 39.3 3.7 36.7
August.................................... 8,379.7 7,928.9 7,800.8 :,998.U 7,869.9 69.2 4.1 65.0
September..... .......................... 8.396.3 7,602.9 7,503.6 7,669.1 2,564.7 61.2 4.8 56.3
Octooer......................... ......... 8,67-2.4 8 26.:' 8,760.0 8,994.1 8.,47.8 67.8 7.4 60.5
Novemi.er... .............................. 8,7.6 9,343. 1 9,224.3 9,397.5 9,278.5 N4.2 8.1 46.1
December.................................. 8,662.3 8,702.8 ,5932.3 8,243.5 6,633 0 40.: 10.2 30.6

1975

January-,.................................. 9. l11.9 9.123.9 8.948.7 9.202.u 9.027.3 76.8 5.2 73.7

Januar).................................... 9.411.9 9.1:23.9 8.946.7 9,202.8 9,027.5 78.8 5.2 73.7
Februsrb ............................ ......
March ............................... ......
Apr i............... ................. .... ..
May .......................... ... ..........
Jurie.............................. .. .......


July ..................... ................
August .. ........ ..................... .....
September............................ .....
October...................................
ovember ............................ ......
Decestber..................................

'Aojuted Ir seasonal ano aorking-day variation a ng aeasonal adjustment factors introduced Ln January 1975. See footriote I on front page.
'Represents only export shipments from tn& Urained St tes ana d, fers ,roiDOD Mllitaury As3istance Program Grant-Ald shlpmeat I lgures under this
prorae .s follows f-) Transfer; of the iateriai procured outaioe the Ulited States and transfers tram DOD overseas stocks from export shipmmeLs.
fb) Export value i .a.s., -.hereas DOD value, in 'st instances, is .o.b., poLnt of origin. (c) Data for shipments reported oy tne DOD for a given
'sonth are included in Hureau tf the Census reports ir" the -ecrno month subsequent to the month reported by the DOD.
'Arinal total is not shoon Far seaEoriall- adjusted oain. UnadjUSted data should be used for annual totals.


FT 900, effective January 1975














Table 4. U.S. Imports of Merchandise, by Month: January 1974 to January 1975


(In millions of dollars. See Explanation of Statistics for information on coverage, defltilone of F.a a. and c.I.i. mLport values, an esoarcea
of error in the data. Unadjusten toLala represent sum of runrounded figures and hence may vary slightly from sum of rounded amounts)

UI.S. imports of mernsanalse

F 5 value C.z.f. 'alu-

Period General Lmpons Import General imports Imports
for for
Eeasonally Unadju-ten consumption S-a 5ina ly unadjustEd consumption
adjusted' unaiaijatea t a justea .tnaajutred


1974

January-December. ...................... I() 100,218,1 99,169.2 l ul7,996.1 107,111.6

January ... ........................... ,196.8 6.612,4 6.168.5 7,019.2 1,144.1 6,.9 1.7

January....... ....................... 6,496.8 6,612.4 6,47h.. 7,019.2 7,144.1 6,991.7
February............. ................. ?,317.2 6,.14.0 6,633.3 7,661.9 -,16.6 7,146.Z
archb ............................. .. ,741.6 7,781.1 7,664.9 6,310.8 8,3.33.2 6,256.1
April................................. 8,024.8 8,333.0 R,239.3 8,636.9 ,9:0.6 a,875.9
ay ...... ............................. 8,264.z 6,834.7 8,7-0.0 8,821.2 9, 536.e 4,447.6
June................................... 8,573.4 8,498.0 8,449.8 9,256.4 9,174.9 9,124.6

July .... .... 8,918.0 8,961.? n,670.6 9,610.6 9,6.7.9 9,564.0
August................................. 9,261.9 9,091.5 8,997.6 9,998.8 9,814.6 9,716.4
Septemoer........ ...................... ,68.1 8,362.4 8,296.6 9,377.8 9,01 .k 8.948.3
October.............................. 8,769.1 3,090.0 9,030.9 9,450.8 9,796.7 9.734.1
November.............................. 8,964.7 6,876.8 8,8R0 .1 9,653.1 .5t8.1 9,480.9
Deceber..... ........................ 9,249.3 9,132.4 9,112.4 9,942.3 9,816.0 9,R25.7

1973

Januar-........... .................. 9.622.4 9 612.3 9.bu6.6 10.34. 5 10 580.1 10.63 9

January..... .......................... 9,622.4 9,672.5 9.808.6 10 364.5 10.50. 1 lC,"53 9
February ...............................
March..... .................. ........
April ..... ................... ..... ...
May..... .. ...
June... ................... .........

July....................... ... .........
August .................... ...........
September .............. ........ ... ...
October........................ ........
November........................ ......
DecemBer ................ ....... ...

'Adjuatea for seasonal and working-sy variation using seaional adjustment factors introduced in January 197'.
SAnnual total is not hoswn for seasonally adjusted data. IUnadjuatea data should be used for annual totals.


FT 900 effective January 1975











8

Table 5. U.S. Exports (f.a.s. Value Basis) of Domestic Merchandise Including Department of Defense (DOD) Military
Assistance Program Grant-Aid Shipments--Schedule B Sections and Selected Divisions, Seasonally Adjusted and
Unadjusted, by Month: January 1974 to January 1975

fIr. .ailtons of dollarE SeeExplanistion of Stltistics for Infornation on coverage, definition of f.a.s export value, and sourres of error In the
dta Unadjusted totalE represent sum of unroanned figures and hence may vary slightly from sum of rounded amountia

Schedule B sections and selected diJvslaus'

[ 0 1 2 3 4 5 I 6 | 7' 71 172 73 8 9


Seasonally adjusted'


1974

January-................

January................
February...............
March ............ .......
April ...................
May ............. ......
June....................
July ..................
August............ .....
September...............
October.................
November r................
December.. ... .........

1975

January-...............

Janus ry................
February ...............
M rch ...................
April. ............ .....
Bay ............ .. ......
June.............. .....
July.......... ........
August.................
September ..............
October................
November...............
December ...............



1974

January-December........

January-................

Janu.ry ........ ........
February................
March............. ......
April ..................
May .. ..... ...... .......
June ..................
July....................
August ............ ......
Septeaber...............
Octotb r.................
hovemoer................
Dece be r...............

1975

January-................

January.......... .......
February..............
March......... ......
April ..................
May.............. ......
June............. ......
July....................
August................
September...... .......
October...............
Nov mne r...............
Dece. ne r...............


1,191.2

1,191.2
1,220.3
1,218.3
1,216.5
1,082.4
1,116.6
1,133.6
1,078 9
1,023.6
1,147.6
1,292.8
1,211.7



1.589 7

1,589.7


1,398J.4

],191.8

1,194.8
1,152.0
1,257.2
1,178.8
1,084.6
1,074.2
,0681.5
1,020.7
1,000.1
1,170.6
1,144.1
1,321.8


1,247.4

90.s

90.8
87.2
79.1
94.9
111.3
106.9
90.0
97.6
83.7
125.1
141.1
140.7


171.1

171.1
212.3
176.2
226.2
257.1
294.2
323 9
300.9
311.9
384.1
472.9
266.3


473.3

'73.3
196.5
*100.9
124.2
4131.7
138.2
164.0
110.6
'86.9
4112.2
1118.5
'166.3


641.0

641.0
679.7
694.3
735.b
6b4.5
767.5
775.6
777.0
780.8
750.4
763.8
797.4


1.023.0 429.2 '140.9 862.3

1025.0 479.? '140.9 862.3


10,931.2

852.4

532.4
981.4
1,099.3
1,079.6
1,014.1
911. 5
768.4
777.8
647.3
787.3
1,084.7
924.2


3,442.4

144.2

144.2
178.8
162.3
223.2
281.0
310.4
306.7
3318.0
332.2
449.4
464.4
251.9


1.643.7 1I2 .9 1 ..26.0 357.1

1.643.7 122.9 1,026.0 357.1


1,423.3

73.3

73.3
96.5
100.9
124.2
131.7
138.2
164.0
110.6
86.9
112.2
118.5
166.3


795.0

795.0
826.1
858.8
919.9
940.4
970.7
982.3
1,010.2
948.8
996.0
950.9
9b4.4


2,669.3

2,669.3
2,804.4
2,809.5
3,034.0
2,887.4
3,203.1
3,182.2
3,355.1
3,469.1
3,687.2
3,663.4
3,589.1


1,177.8

1,177.8
1,192.9
1,236.7
1,302.6
1,307.6
1,341.9
1,391.6
1,497.8
1,506.3
1,576.2
1,617.9
1,582.0


513.3

513.3
522.4
547.7
565.4
557.4
586.7
601.0
661.4
622.6
635.1
639.9
573.0


943.0

943.0
1,113.5
1,082.5
1,136.3
1,070.6
1,299.0
1,160.3
1,185.4
1,323.3
1,432.9
1,425.3
1,383.8


927.0 3,489.9 1,655.5 606.2 1,169.6

927.0 3.486.9 1,655.5 606.2 1,169.6


Unadjusted


8,822.0

604.4

604.4
653.9
734.5
774.6
711.7
775.9
797.3
811.9
725.3
728.7
729.4
774.2


140.q 619.7

140.9 819.7


11,165.9

756.1

756.1
795.5
934.3
952.1
1,036.3
983.3
936.1
999.1
885.2
1,017.9
935.7
934.2


38,188.5



2,514.5

2,734.3
3,366.6
3,181.7
3,268.
3,267.1
2,809.9
3,019.6
3,139.5
3,768.3
3,652.4
3,459.9


16,668.6

1,116.9

1,118.9
1,136.8
1,414.8
1,353.4
1,418.7
1,360.7
1,334.6
1,440.8
1,358.7
1,603.0
1,603.1
1.525.0


7,019.2

520.5

520.5
489.5
594.3
573.6
590.8
93.1 I
569.1 I
625.7
597.7
669.4
635.4
558.1


14,500.7

675.1

875.1
1,107.9
1,359.6
1,256.7
1,259.0
1,313.3
906.2
953.1
1,183.1
1,495.9
1,413.9
1,376.8


6184.1

184.1
174.2
192.3
'207.8
'218.5
'226.7
222.0
233.1
'224.6
216.0
'239.6
247.7


471.1 238.6

471.1 '238.6


5,349.8

371.3

371.3
382.9
483.4
168.0
500.6
474.1
417.1
461.6
439.9
473.3
468.6
409.0


911 2 3,312.5 1,612.4 615.7 1.084.2 454.6

911.2 3,312.53 1,612.4 615.7 1.084.2 454.6


'Schedule B section and selected division descriptions are as follows.

0. Food and live animals 7. Machinery and transport equipment
1. Beverages and tobacco 71. Machinery, other than electric
?. Crude materlal. Inedible, except fuels 72, Electricea machinery, apparatus, and appliances
3. Mineral fuels, lubricants, and relates materials 73. Transport equipment
4. A-nami and vegetanle oils ann frIs 8. Miscellaneous manufactured articles, n.e.c.
5. Chealcals 9. CcamodltJes and transactions not classIfied according to kind
6. Ma'sufaccured goods clasalfied chiefly by mater Lt
seasonallyy adjusted flt-ires for section 7 may differ slightly from the sum oi aviaslons 71, 72, and 73 aince each Is Independently adjusted.
Ajausted !or seuonal and working-day variatlon usIng seasonal adJusmnt factors introduced Ln January 1975. See footnote I on front page.
Annual totals are not shown for seasonally adju=tea aats. Unadjusted data should be used for annual totals, The adjusted section totals In
thi' table and similar overall monthly totals to tables 1, ?, ana 3 were aojustea Independently
'in the absence of demot'trable seasonal patterns for this section, no seasonal adjustment factors have been applied to data.


FT 900 effective January 1975


2,586.6

184.1

184.1
174.2
192.3
207.8
218.5
226.7
222.0
233.1
224.6
216.0
239.6
247.7




238.6

238.6












9

Table 6. U.S. General Imports (f-a.s. Value Basis) of Merchandise Schedule A Sections, Seasonally Adjusted and
Unadjusted, by Month: January 1974 to January 1975

(In millions of dollars. ".-- Explanation or Stt ti lce for infor t Lon or. coverage definition of i.a.c. airport value, and sources of error
in the data. LlTndjustea totala rewreent .um of urnroundei figure. and hence m y vary lightly from sur. of rounded ouncess'

Schedule A sections'
Pernid
0 I 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 [

Seasonally adjusted'


1974

January-............. 730.4 105.6 443.4 1,226.3 '23.9 199.5 1,rJ62.9 1,809.A 675.7 '145.7

Janua.. ............ 730.4 10".6 443.4 1,226.3 '23.9 199.5 1,062.9 1,809.5 675.7 '143.1
Februarl............. 795.5 100.5 470.1 1,570.8 '24.8 241.3 1,220.3 1,833.2 732.6 156.1
March................ 942.6 111.9 509.4 1,659.1 '35.3 258.2 1,315.3 1,885.6 762.4 171.9
April..... ....... 766.6 114.3 196.1 2,343.4 '40.0 278.9 1,253.0 1,935.? 746.7 '179.0
May.................. 812.8 117.9 521.6 2,175.5 '42.2 314.1 1,345.9 2,016.5 773.3 '173.4
June.... ............ 799.9 123.0 545.6 2,264.6 '26.6 326.2 1,481.3 ?,067.3 803.4 1183.6
July................. 803.0 138.5 506.1 2,369.4 '70.1 365.9 1,454.1 2,216.0 791.7 '194.9
August............... 761.6 137.1 516.9 2,506.3 '44.6 363.6 1,670.4 2,209.6 827.4 166.3
September............ 660.3 122.7 504.0 -,29'.6 3"4.2 409.2 1,614.1 2,113.6 820.7 '201.5
October... .. ........ 23.r 92.5 494.0 2,429.3 '79.3 430.9 1,732.5 1,978.4 819.8 215.3
Nosemoer...... ...... 858.8 81.3 497.9 2,447.1 19.9 424.3 1,743.3 2,039.6 834.9 :228.
December ............ 846.0 97.0 513.4 2,411.2 '53.3 426.7 1,783.8 ?,0?1.7 829.8 '217.7

197 .

Jinuary-. ............ 67'.2 118.3 494 2 3,046 3 '49.5 432 4 1.740 a I.6a5.9 7B- a '218.0

Janua) ............. 6:7.2 11.3 494 2 3.046 3 '48.5 432.4 1.740.8 1.835.9 783.8 '218.0
February .... ......
Ma rh .. ........
April ......... ..
May.. ... ...
Ju .,e............. ..
July................
Augus t.............
September ............
October.............
Noveamor............
December .. .........

Unaaj.s tea

1974

January-Dec.E-.ber ..... 9.396.2 1,322.3 6,033.1 "5, 427.3 544.3 4,017.7 17,716.3 24,062.7 o,126.3 2,255.7

January ............. 83.0 100.6 428.3 1.325.6 ?3.9 202.9 1,074.6 1,887.3 640.6 145.7

January .............. 763.0 100 6 428.3 1,325.6 23.9 20?.9 1,074.6 1,887.3 640.6 14:.7
Febra............. 744.6 86.1 401.9 1,588.1 24.8 228.0 1,059.2 1,717.7 638.5 156.1
March................ 913.6 104.1 502.7 1.820.0 35.3 266.2 1,294.3 1,940.3 73 7 171.9
4pril... ........ 925. 113.3 494.1 2,294.? 40.0 316.0 1,771.8 2,078.4 719.8 179.0
Ma .............. ... 827.4 116.5 571.2 2,790.6 43.2 339.9 1,467.0 2,240.3 766.0 173.4
June.. ........... 769..5127.5 576.9 2,090.2 26.6 332.1 1,185.7 2,108.6 197.0 183.6
July ................ 774.1 126.6 544.1 ?,117.2 70.1 349.8 1,507.3 .,094.1 883.5 194.9
August............... 766.2 112.7 544.7 2,504.0 44.5 380.5 1,670.4 1,946.8 973.3 168.3
aeptember............ 647.8 111.7 508.0 2,17 .3 54.2 387. 1 ,549.. 1,940.3 836.3 201.6
Oc'ooer .........*.... 654.6 113.3 514.3 2,273.6 7.5 131.8 1,839.3 2,061.. 903.9 213.3
November.............. 789.2 10?. 7 475.0 2,207 3 49.9 392 1 1,767.7 2,.3-. 7 624.0 328.2
December ............. 888.3 107.2 497.5 2,490.6 53.3 385.7 1,728.1 2,01 .6 751.8 217.;

1975

January-............. 713 8 112.3 477..9 3.4i4.9 48.5 437.? 1,74 i.694.7 750 E 218.0

January ............. 13.6 112.3 477.9 3,414 9 43.5 437 7? .'49.. l.A94 7 755.6 218.0
February.............
March .......... ......
4pril .. ........
May.... .. ... ..
June ... .........
July ...............
Augus t ... ... ..
September...........
October... .... .....
November....
December,...

'Schedule A ecrton description ire as follows
0. Food ard hI.e anusal; 3. Cheb.coic.
1. Beverages and tobacco 6. Manufractured goods-clas[lreao cruc, y ui material
2. Cruue material, 1 neamale, excepr fuels 7. Machinery ana transport equapient
3. Mineral fuels, lunrcsnt, and related material.a 8. Miscellaneou. manufactured arTicles, n.e.s.
4. Anumal aid vegetable oils snd lats 9. CSorodL lEia and transactionrs not ciassifled accoralng to kind
'Adjusted for seasonal and working-day variation uij0ng seasonal adjustent factors uinroduced in January 1975 See footnote I on front
page. Annual totals are noT ihosan for seasonally adjusted oata. Unjajustea da'a should ne used for -nnual total Thie adjuatea section
totals In this table and saiilar overall monthly totals in tables 1 and 4 %ere adjusted independently.
'In the absence of danontraDle -ea,.onal patte mE for this section, no seasonal adjustment factor_ have been applLea.




FT 900 effective January 1975














Table 7. U.S. General Imports (c.i.f. Value Basis) of Merchandise Schedule A Sections, Seasonally Adjusted and

Unadjusted, by Month: January 1974 to January 1975

(In millions 01 dollars. See Explanation of Stacistica ior nformallononcoverage, definltonofc.l.f. import value, and gourcenof error in. the
aats Unaoju.iLu totals represeni sum ol unr.rjjriaea figures aina hence may tary slightly from sum of rounded amounts)

Scheoule A sect ions'

0 I 1 3 4 5 I I 7 9

Seasonally adjusted'


1-)74

January-...........

January.
February
March. ..
Aprt i
Ma .. .
Jure
Juld .
Aufrgu
September. .
OctonDer .
November
Decenoe r

1975

January-.............

January .
February
March..............
April...............
May ... ......
June.
July .. .
August...............
September............
October............
November
Decn mraoer .





1974

January-December ....

January-.............

January
February .
March ...............
April...............
May.
June .
.lui .e
August..............
September............
October ...............
November.............
December.............

1975

January-..............

January.............
February.............
March..............
April...............
Mav.
ure .
Jul .
August ..............
Septembe- .
c: t ne r
November............
December............


78i.0
8,7.3
1,01;.1
829.7
87 ;.
810.0
666.6
822.2
115. 1
67.1
928.1
90E.6




737.r

717.8


1.),13 1.3

841. %

851.5
807.1
985.6
8-13.6

636.9
a3t. 3
627.1
701.5
711.9

7sa. F




.6
:* ..6 f


466.0

486.0
508.0
551.E
545.6
575.4
603.6
568.8
627.
557.6
549.1
352.6
570.0


1,341.4

1,341.4
1,694.7
1,774.4
',510.5
2,334.6
?,453.6
2, 57, 5
2,709.6
2,471.6
2,604.4
2,250.6
2,175.9


'25.2

'25.2
'26.0
'37.1
'41.8
144.0
'27.8
'72. 7
'4E.5
156.3
'82.7
'52.1
SL5.5


214.3

214.3
257.7
275.4
299.2
339.6
348.5
392. 7
409.9
440.7
461.7
454.9
156.1


1,136.5

1,136.5
1,308.6
1,402.7
1,341.3
1,446.4
1,591.6
1,563.8
1,801.8
1,737.9
1,870.2
1,883.8
1,929.9


1,962.5

1,962.5
1,994.3
2,047.4
2,100.7
2,195.9
?,231.5
2,388.1
2,388.9
2,289.1
2,144.9
2,207.3
2,180.3


722.3

722.3
780.7
811.1
798.4
832.2
859.7
845.9
883.8
876.2
873.3
888.7
86.B


'150.2

150.2
'160.3
176.1
'183.7
'178.2
*189.1
3200.2
'193.7
'207.3
'221.2
'234.3
'223.0


12o.1 "59 3 3,259.1 '50.5 162.5 l,86bs.l 1,95.ri 637.2 '224.3

129 4 559.3 3.239.1 '50.3 462. 1,888.1 1,975.0 837.2 '224.3


1,141. 1

109.1

109.1
.3.2
113.8
13.4
1?7. 1
13.2!
137.6
121.0
122.3
173.7
111.9
117.0


C,691.1

369.9

469. 3
131.3
543.9
544.2
630.1
638.0
611..
606.5
562. ;
571.6


1,450.1


1,450.1
1,713.3
1,946.5
?,457.6
,1586.3
2,2E4.7
2,606.7
2,7,7.7
2,286.2
2,137.7
,3163.8
2,66'J.9


1I;.n 3U.~ 2.613.5

1?1.r 540.'.A 1 653.


inaljusted


567.6



25.2
26.0
37.1
41.8
44.0
1.89

46.5

82.7
52.1


4, 36.9

717.9

217.9
?43.5
203.9
339.0
36;.,
355.1

406.6
417.3
462.6
425.8
412.3


19,051.5

1,1413.0

1,149.0
1,135.9
1,380.3
1,361.4
1,576.6
1,596.4
1,615.4
1,801.8
1,668.4
1,986.1
1,910.2
1,870.1


26,064.5

2,046.9

2,046.9
1,68.?7
2,106.8
2,256.2
2,439.6
2,276.1
2,236.86
2,104.6
2,101.4
2,235.0
?,202.9
2,169.4


10,06.5

684.7

684.7
679.2
779.5
779.7
822.2
853.8
944.0
996.9
892.8
964.1
677.1
803.4


50U. 4F7.- 1.A9:. 7? n3P.' 2 I 07. 1

50.5 4 46;.6 l.897 ? 0J8.2 I 07.1


2,317.4

150.2

150.2
160.3
176.1
183.7
178.2
189.1
200.2
193.7
207.3
221.2
234.3
223.0




224.3

224.3


'Schedule A section descrlDt -*n ar .a. loll..-
0,. Food and live ar.nmal 3 Clhemicala
1. Beverages and tco Manuac. n ctured o'dsE-clsasslea chiefly by material
2 Cruds materii.. z nedible except ruels 7 Machisery and ,rar.sport equipment
3 Mineral fuels, lubricants, and related materials a Miscellaneous manulctured articles n.es
4 Anoma. nd 0.eget bie .15 nua lata 9. Commoasitles arE trnnscttLors not classified according to kund
:a i 'ue a I 3r season i ana aericing-da ,artac ln since c seai.-nai aojusrrent factors introduced in January 1975. See footnote I on front
page. 4rnual totals are 'ar s1.i-n f. r sa 4'jr-liv adjusted data l'a saj. h ulz oe uSea fur annual totals. The anjasted section
*..a1 in tr.nF iDie .ina similar onerati i nihly tLal.s in tlies 2 ana I4 '.ere adjuate i naependently
'in the absence 7[ deonstrablie Za.Lno l patterns far this section, nc seaEonal .dl-t-i.ert actors hate beer spplleo


FT 900 effective January 717'.





[r*





U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
Social and Economic Statistics Administration
BUREAU OF THE CENSUS
Washington, 0 C 20233


OFFICIAL BUSINESS


UMVERSITY OF FLOIDA


Pu2.083 F'
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
COlM- 202
LILIS