Summary of U.S. export and import merchandise trade

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Title:
Summary of U.S. export and import merchandise trade
Series Title:
FT-900
Physical Description:
v. : ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of the Census
United States -- Bureau of the Census
Publisher:
Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, Foreign Trade Division for sale by the Subscriber Services Section (Publications), Bureau of the Census
Place of Publication:
Washington
Creation Date:
August 1975
Frequency:
monthly
regular

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Subjects / Keywords:
Commerce -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Citation/Reference:
American statistics index
Dates or Sequential Designation:
1974-1976.
General Note:
At head of title: 1977- United States foreign trade.
General Note:
Formerly classed C 56. 210:900 - during the time the Bureau of the Census was subordinate to Social and Economic Statistics Administration.
General Note:
Issues prior to Oct. 1977 were sent to depositories as Item 144.
General Note:
Unnumbered supplements accompany some issues.

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University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001209840
oclc - 02245761
notis - AFW0105
lccn - 76640395
issn - 0361-0047
sobekcm - AA00005271_00035
Classification:
lcc - HF105 .B73e
ddc - 382/.0973
System ID:
AA00005271:00035

Related Items

Preceded by:
United States foreign trade; export and import merchandise trade
Succeeded by:
United States foreign trade. FT900, Summary of U.S. export and import merchandise trade

Full Text



SUMMARY OF U.S. EXPORT ..

IMPORT MERCHANDISE TR* E

UNIV. OF FL LIs. EB IB

August 1975 .5. I '


FT 900-75-8 FIllfl t
U.S. DEPOSITO member 26, 1975
10:00 A.M.
Seasonally Adjusted and Unadjusted Data


Th.. e Bureau of the Census, Department of Commerce about 6 percent below the calendar year 1974 total of
annou:': nced today that during Augurst 1975, seasonally $100,251 million. (These figures are on a f.a.a. value
aijuated exports on a f.a.a. (free alongside ship) U.S. basis.)
pert of exportation value basis, excluding Department of
t'.. ense (DOD) Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid ship- The Bureau also stated that the export total lor
m ei' nts, were valued at $8,996.2 million '2 and that August, on a seasonally adjusted basis, is the second
si..easionally adjusted general imports on a f.a.s. foreign highest total of the year, being exceeded only by the
Spoft o. exportation value basis, amounted to $7,961.0 record high January 1975 total of $9,411.9 million. The
i"J" llE n.'1 n August seasonally adjusted general imports comparable import figure la the highest reported since
i' a cI..f. (cost, insurance, and freight) value basis April 1975 when Imports amounted to $8,012.8 million.
ia ipated to $8,56.9 million.' s Comparable seasonally
i"- adjusted totals for July were $8,884.6 million for exports, During the 4-month period, May-August 1975, sea-
*'! ,901.5 million for imports on a f.a.a. value basis, and sonally adjusted exports averaged $8,679.4 million per
$,493.8 million for imports on a c.i.f. value basis. month, a level about 2 percent below the $8,871.6 mil-
lion average reported for the preceding 4-month period,
Th e Bureau stated that based on the above seasonally January-April 1975. Imports kf.a.s. value basil
:, adjust. f.a.s. export and Import figures, a merchandise averaged $7,479.0 million per month for the current
trade surplus ol $1,035.2 million was recorded in August 4-month period, about 9 percent below the $8,210.7
ti 1975. For the period January-August 1975, the surplus on million average reported for the preceding 4 months.
ai .jp.a. value basis amounted to $7,444,9 million. Using
*.. .f. import values and f.a.s. export values, a trade Exports unadjusted for seasonal change and excluding
suplus of $427.3 million ag a was recorded for August Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid shipments increased
1. 7I, and a $2,520.2 million surplus for the January- from $8,236.0 million In July to $8,470.B million in
a0iga. tut 1975 period. August. With Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid ship-
j p .a ments included, exports Increased from $8,265.4 million
A ring the first 8 months of 1975 (January-August), in July to $8,480.6 million in August. Unadjusted general
Wi' a te on a seasonally adjusted basis were at an annual Imports (f.a.s. value basis) were valued at $7,915.4 mil-
i t.fB of $105,306 million, or about 8 percent higher than lion in July as compared to $7,513.6 million in August.
*.a.. lendar year 1974 total of $97,908 million. Sea- The comparable c.i.f. figures for imports were $8,502.3
o'usiamly adjusted imports for the January-August 1975 million in July and $8,087.3 million in August.
"prlted were at an annual rate of $94,138 million, a level

Mea ie'l r naoim il and working-day vwnation, but no ilor changes m price leal. Factors used to adjust 1974 and 1975 data shown in this nrpor represent seasonal adijustmeni lanors der.d from
,LmPhvi) dita through 1174 and introduced an January 1975 combined with the appropnate working-day adiustmint factors
tli.. ulll~~B ss of d a ver as Ilem 4-iDltsh periDm Mr desirable toi idenl yi und trleng trends. Month lo-ont changes in exports. imports. and similar i s often reflect primarily irregular movements.
Ii. mons ily carryi o. Recent month-Mo-t month percent hageps in the overall seasonally adjusted export and import sees are presented in the liloaing table witt average percent month
lj aIsd t dalne atnmw long penids sham loa compasinnm. The averap rise and average dKime s figures edude percentage changes for (1) te periods January March 1969 and July DecemDel
. i. b a il at abi orsn rimie in the data diue i effects of dock inkes and 121 periods when negligible change (ero percent)l n the level a exportisimpnrti occurred. Percentage change for Ifas. import
W i"t*f notmilable for periods prior to January 1914

| Month-to-month Average monthly rates of change

Series July-Aug. June-July May-June Apr.-May Average Aderige 4 months u2 months
1975e 1w I975 1975 rise decline Apr.-Aug. Aug. 1974-
1975 1975 1975 1975 1969-1974 1969-1974 1975 Aug. 1975
. (Percent) (Percent) (Percent) (Percent) (Percent) (Percent) (Percent) (Percent)

l-..a.. export value. +1.3 +2.2 +-6.7 -5.0 Q3.2 -2.6 +1.3 40.7

.ea. import value. +0.7 .13.7 -2.0 -11.5 (NA) (NA) +0.2 -0.9
qctive with January 1975 issue of this report, the Customs import value was replaced by the f.a.s. Import value.
.tI' have historically been shown on a f.a.s. value basis. "See Explanation of Statistics" for definitions of export
'prl.."*t values and trade balances.


Inquiries concerning these figures should be addremed to the Chief, Foreign Trade Division, Bureau of the
aCensus, Weihington. D.C. 20233. Tel: Area Code 301, 763-140.

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE, BUREAU OFTHE CENSUS

a J For sale by the subscriber Services Section (Publications), Bureau of the Census, Washington, D.C. 20233, or any
U.S. Department of Commerce District Office. Price 10 cents per copy. Annual subscription (FT 900, 975, 985,
and 986 combined) $3.00.




." t ".
I '
f"


EXPLANATION OF STATISTICS


Import Statistics

Coverage

The U.S. import statistics reflect both government and
nongovernment imports of merchandise from foreign
countries into the U.S. Customs territory, which includes
the 50 States, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico.
The U.S. import statistics exclude imports into the Virgin
Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and other U.S. posses-
sions; and shipments between the United States and Puerto
Rico, between the United States and U.S. possessions, and
between any of these outlying areas. (Data on U.S. trade
with Puerto Rico and with U.S. possessions are published
separately in Report FT 800. Additional data on such trade
and on imports into the Virgin Islands from foreign
countries are presented in reference tabulations.)

The U.S. import statistics also exclude American goods
returned to the United States by its Armed Forces; intransit
shipments through the United States; temporary shipments;
transactions not considered to be of statistical significance,
such as shipments of personal and household effects;
low-valued nondutiable imports by mail; issued monetary
coins of all component metals; and gold in the form of ores,
concentrates, waste, scrap, and refined bullion. Imports of
silver in these forms are included in the statistics, unless
otherwise noted. (Information on gold movements, pre-
viously shown in Report FT 2402, appears in Report FT
990 effective Januay 1975.)

General Imports/Imports for Consumption

The official U.S. import statistics are compiled by the
Bureau of the Census from copies of the import entry and
warehouse withdrawal forms which importers are required
by law to file with Customs officials. The statistics are
presented in terms of both "General Imports" and "Imports
for Consumption." General imports are a combination of
entries for immediate consumption and entries into
Customs bonded warehouses and thus generally reflect total
arrivals of merchandise. Imports for consumption are a
combination of entries for immediate consumption and
withdrawals from warehouses for consumption and thus
generally reflect the total of the commodities entered into
U.S. consumption channels.


Import Valuation

F a.s. Import Value

The f.a.s. (free alongside ship) value represents the
transaction value of imports at the foreign port of exporta-
tion. It is based on the purchase price, i.e., the actual
transaction value and generally includes all charges incurred
in placing the merchandise alongside the carrier at the port
of exportation in the country of exportation.


C.i.f. Import Value

The c.i.f. (cost, insurance, and freight) value represents
the value of imports at the first port of entry in the United
States. It is based on the purchase price and includes all
freight, insurance, and other charges (excluding U.S. import
duties) incurred in bringing the merchandise from the
country of exportation and generally placing it alongside
the carrier at the first port of entry in the United States. If
the merchandise was acquired in a transaction between
related parties, the purchase price used in deriving the c.i.f.
value is based on an arm's-length equivalent transaction
price, i.e., a price which would exist between unrelated
buyers and sellers.

Import Monthly Carryover
It is the objective of the compiling procedures to include
shipments, insofar as practicable, in the statistics for the
actual month of importation. However, for purposes of the
statistics the month of importation is based on the date of
official acceptance by Customs of the import entry or
warehouse withdrawal document. This may not in all cases
correspond to the actual month of importation. (For
example, under the Customs "immediate-delivery" pro-
cedures, importers may file the import entry up to 10
workdays after the actual date of importation.) Also,
because of processing problems (e.g., late receipt of a
document for an end-of-month shipment, rejection of a
shipment by the computer because the data fail to meet
certain edit criteria established to protect the accuracy of-
the statistics, etc.), there is an overall average carryover 6f
about 7 percent (in terms of value) of the shipments from
the reported month of importation (based on the date of
the import entry or warehouse withdrawal document) to a
subsequent month, usually the succeeding month. In addi-
tion, as a result of the aforementioned Customs "im-
mediate-delivery" procedures, there is a further carryover of
presently unknown magnitude from the actual month of
importation to a subsequent month. These limitations
should be borne in mind when making month-to-month
comparisons.
Cumulations of data over at least 4-month periods ame
desirable to identify underlying trends. Month-to-month|
changes in imports, exports, and similar series often reflect
primarily irregular movements, differences in monthly
carryover, etc.

Estimated Data for Imports Valued Under $251d
The overall import and Schedule A Section 9 to
include sample estimates for shipments valued under $25-1l
Therefore, they are subject to sampling error, estimated
less than one-tenth of one percent for the unadjusted ovr
total and about one percent for the unadjusted Schedule
Section 9 total. This means that we can have about
percent confidence that the published unadjusted ovr
totals and the unadjusted Schedule A Section 9 totals di
by less than one-tenth of a percent and one percent
respectively, from the totals that would have resulted fro
a complete tabulation.









Export Statistics
Coverage
The export statistics reflect, in general, both government
and nongovernment exports of domestic and foreign mer-
chandise from the U.S. Customs territory (includes the 50
States, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico) to
foreign countries, whether the exportation involves a
commercial transaction or not. The statistics, therefore,
include Department of Defense Military Assistance Program
Grant-Aid shipments, shipments for economic assistance
under the Foreign Assistance Act and shipments of agri-
cultural commodities under P. L. 480 (The Agricultural
Trade Development and Assistance Act of 1954, as amend-
ed) and related laws. The following are excluded from the
statistics: Shipments to U.S. Armed Forces and diplomatic
missions abroad for their own use; shipments between the
United States and Puerto Rico, between the United States
and its possessions (including the Virgin Islands), and
between these outlying areas; exports from U.S. possessions;
intransit shipments through the United States; transactions
not considered to be of statistical importance, such as
personal and household effects; temporary exports; low-
valued or noncommercial exports by mail; issued monetary
coins of all component metals; and gold in the form of ores,
concentrates, waste, scrap, and refined bullion. Exports of
silver in these forms are included in the statistics, unless
otherwise noted. (Information on gold movements, pre-
viously shown in Report FT 2402, appears in Report FT
990 effective January 1975.)
Exports of Domestic/Foreign Merchandise
The official U.S. export statistics are compiled by the
Bureau of the Census primarily from copies of Shipper's
Export Declarations which are required to be filed with
Customs officials, except for Department of Defense
Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid shipments which are
reported directly to the Bureau of the Census by the
Department of Defense and shipments by qualified ex-
porters who have been authorized to submit data in the
form of magnetic tape, punched cards, or monthly Shipper's
Summary Export Declarations directly to the Bureau of the
Census. The statistics are reported as exports of domestic or
foreign merchandise. Exports of domestic merchandise
include commodities which are grown, produced, or manu-
factured in the United States, and commodities of foreign
origin which have been changed in the United States from
the form in which they were imported, or which have been
enhanced in value by further manufacture in the United
States. Exports of foreign merchandise consist of commodi-
ties of foreign origin which have entered the United States
as imports and which, at the time of exportation, are in
substantially the same condition as when imported.
Export Valuation

F.a.s. Export Value


The value reported in the export statistics generally is
equivalent to a f.a.s. (free alongside ship) value at the U.S.
port of export, based on the transaction price, including
inland freight, insurance and other charges incurred in


placing the merchandise alongside the carrier at the U.S.
port of exportation.
Export Monthly Carryover
It is the objective of the compiling procedures to include
shipments, insofar as practicable, in the statistics for the
actual month of exportation. For purposes of the statistics,
the month of exportation is generally based on the date
when the shipment leaves the United States. (For vessel or
air shipments it is the date when the carrier departs or is
cleared from the port of export.) However, as indicated
above for imports, because of processing problems (e.g., late
receipt of a document for an end-of-month shipment.
rejection of a shipment by the computer because the data
fail to meet certain edit criteria established to protect the
accuracy of the statistics, etc.). there is an overall average
carryover of about 5 percent (in terms of value) of the
shipments from the actual month of exportation to a
subsequent month, usually the succeeding month. These
limitations should be borne in mind when making month-
to-month comparisons.
Cumulations of data over at least 4-month periods are
desirable to identify underlying trends. Month-to-month
changes in imports, exports, and similar series often reflect
primarily irregular movements, differences in monthly
carryover, etc.
Estimated Data for Export Shipments Valued
Under $1,000 to Countries Other Than
Canada, Under $2,000 to Canada
The overall export and Schedule B section and division
totals include sample estimates for shipments valued
$251-$1,999 to Canada and for shipments valued
$251-$999 to countries other than Canada. Data for
shipments valued $250 and under to all countries are also
estimated, based on established percentages of individual
country totals, and included in the Schedule B Section 9
totals regardless of the commodity exported. It is estimated
that the unadjusted overall total is subject to a sampling
error of less than one-tenth of one percent, and the
unadjusted Schedule B section or division totals are subject
to sampling errors of about one percent. In addition, the
Schedule B Section 9 total is subject to possible error in the
estimated data for shipments valued $250 and under; and
the overall total, and the individual totals for sections other
than Section 9, to a more limited extent. Such $250 and
under shipments represent about 1.5 percent of the total
value of exports, and about 60 percent of the Schedule B
Section 9 total.
Other Sources of Error
in the Statistics
Monthly import and export figures are subject to the
possibility of errors which may arise from sources other
than sampling errors, discussed above. Among these are
errors in the reporting and/or processing of information as
to commodity classification, value and other statistical
factors, month of inclusion (see paragraphs on import and
export carryover, above), and the undercounting of exports
to Canada due to the non-receipt of Shipper's Export
Declarations. For 1973, the undercounting amounted to
about one billion dollars. In the case of imports the









information as to value and commodity classification (as
well as country of origin and net quantity) is verified by
Customs officials on entries filed for transactions valued
over S250 which are ordinarily subject to examination for
Customs appraisement purposes, thus considerably reducing
the possibility of error. In addition, the procedures used to
compile both the import and export statistics include clerical
and computer processing checks designed to protect the
accuracy of the statistics to the fullest practicable extent.
Merchandise Trade Balances

Two trade balances are presented in this report:
1) The balance between exports based on f.a.s. values
and imports based on f.a.s. values.
2) The balance between exports based on f.a.s. values
and imports based on c.i.f. values with adjustments for
imports from affiliated sellers abroad.to reflect arms-length
equivalent prices.
Both balances are useful for certain purposes. The first
balance corresponds to a measurement of the international
payments or credit flows resulting from merchandise trade
between the U.S. and foreign countries. The second balance
is based on concepts similar to those used by most foreign
countries, and therefore provides a reference for com-
parison with the trade balances published by those coun-
tries.

Revisions to the Statistics

Revisions are carried into the statistics on a periodic
basis. Data for 1974 and 1975 appearing in the 1975
monthly issues of this report are presented as follows:

1975 Statisitcs

a. January through November 1975 issues: figures are as
originally issued, except as noted below.


b. December 1975 issue: figures reflect revisions for
prior months of the year issued with December 1975
statistics or earlier, as noted below.

1974 Statistics

a. January through May 1975 issues: figures reflect
revisions issued with December 1974 statistics or
earlier.
b. June through December 1975 issues: figures reflect
revisions to 1974 data issued with June 1975 statistics
or earlier.

In addition to the revisions which are made on a periodic
basis, instances may occur where a significant error in the
statistics for a month of the current year is discovered after
the statistics for that month are compiled. If the error is of
sufficient importance to require correction prior to the time
that the regular revisions are carried, the correction is made
and so noted in this report.


Sources of Further Information

Additional foreign trade statistics and information re-
garding coverage, valuation, sampling, and qualifications
which should be considered by users of the statistics are
contained primarily in the following publications: Report
FT 990, Highlights of U.S. Export and Import Trade; FT
135, U.S. General Imports, Schedule A Commodity by
Country; FT 410, U.S. Exports, Schedule B Commodity by
Country; and the Guide to Foreign Trade Statistics.
Information regarding additional sources of statistics, the
methodology used in seasonally adjusting the data, and
other matters relating to foreign trade statistics may be
obtained from the Bureau of the Census, Washington, D.C.
20233.











Table 1. U.S. Exports (fUa.s. Value Basis). General imports (f.a.s. Value Basis), and Merchandise Trade Balance.
Adjusted for Seasonal and Working-Day Variation, by Month: January 1974 to August 1975

(In millions of dollars. See Explanation of Stbtistics for Information on cover-ge, definitions of e-port ann impr,,it alue- nd trade bti-
ances, and sources of error in the data. All data shown for 1974 and 1977 reftere seasonal adjustment lacrs 5 ntrr auca ir. Januirh v7,


Period and uary- Jan ary February March April Mas June I .y Au gu st eptr.- Oct o er b xve -.- .Deco.-

1974

Exports ............ 63,087.8 7,150.2 7,548.9 7,625.4 8,107.8 7,652.4 8,316.9 8 306.9 8.379.3 8,399.3 8.672 B 8 972.9 8.86'.1
F.A.s. Import value.. 64,613.1 6.498.0 7.317.7 7.741.9 8.025.3 8,264.5 8,577 0 8 921.6 9.267.1 8 696.4 8.773 2 8,973.3 9.256.8
perchandlse trade
balance............ -1,525.3 -652.2 '231.2 -116.5 .82.5 -612.1 -260.1 -614.7 -87.8B -297.1 -100.4 -0.4 -394.7

1975

Exports ............ 70,203.8 9,411.9 8,789.0 8,715.9 8,569.6 8,145.1 8,F9.1.5 8,884 6 8,996.2
F.a.s. Itlport value.. 62,758.9 9,622.4 7,872.0 7,335.6 8,012.8 7.093.1 6,92-4.2 7,907.u 7,961.0
Merchandise trade
balance............. .7,444.9 -210.5 .917.0 .1,380.3 .556.8 -i.0 1.7 -ri,737.3 .977 1 -1.035.2-

'Represents exports ot domestic and foreign merchandise excludiner DeperEilri of Defense Mliltsr) Asslstarnc Program Crant-A'd shnpvnnts.


Table 2. U.S. Exports (f.a.s. Value Basis). General Imports (c.i.f. Value Basis), and Merchandise Trade Balance.
Adjusted for Seasonal and Working-Day Variation, by Month: January 1974 to August 1975

(In willtlona of dollars. See explanation at Statiasice for information on coverage, deiinitnin- f e port &r5a import value, arnd [rade bhal-
ances, and sources ol error ir, the data. 411 data shoan [ r 1974 and 1975 reflect =esonal adjusteSent laraOrs introadie.1 in January 197.31

jer and Jaury- January February March April May JJ- JulV Aue' "epte. October ove- De'em


1974

Exports ............ 63,087.8 7,150.2 7,548.9 7,625.4 8.107.8 7,.652 4 8.316 9 8 306.9 6.373.3 8.399.3 8.n72.8 8 972.9 8.862.1
C.I.f. Import valUE.. 69,640 0 7.018.7 7.881.9 8.310.8 8.639.0 9.921.1 9.256 9 9,611.8 9.999.7 9.371..5 9.4.1.4 9 63 ..' 9.913.0
Merchandise trade
balance............. -6,552 2 -131.5 -333.0 -685.4 -531.2 -1.268.8 -940 -1 301.9 -1.620.4 -9""?.2 -776.6 -62.E -1.08r0.9

1975

Export ............ 70,203.8 9,411.9 8.789.0 8,715.9 8.569.6 8 14.l ,9.1 l.3 8.8&4 6 a,996 2
C.I.f. import value.. 67,683.6 10.364.5 8,440.7 7 893.5 8.800.0 7.631.1 *, 491.1 ,493.8 8,568.9
Merchandise trane
balance............. 2,20.2 -952.6 .348.3 .B22.4 -230.4 -534.9 i,20,.4 .390.8 .427.3

'Represents exports of domestic ara foreign Iierchandise excluidijre Departenei of Defenme Mil,tar Assaistance Program Grant-Aid iam-entz.








6

Table 3. U.S. Exports (fa.s. Value Basis) of Merchandise Showing Department of Defense (DOD) Military
Assistance Program Grant-Aid Shipments, by Month: January 1974 to August 1975

f In millions of dollars. See Explanation of Stattistics for Information on coverage, definition of F.a.s. export value, and sources of error tn
the data. LUnadjusieu totals represent sum of unrodnued figures and hence may vary slightly from sum of rounded amounts)

Erports excluding DOD Exports tacluding GrantA
Grant-AId DOD Grant-Aid O ant-Aid


Peri od Dostic Doaestlc Domeatic
and and Domestr, and Doimeatic, Western Other
foreign' foreign, unadjusted foreign, unadjusted Total Furope countries

adjusted' unadjusted unadjusted


1974

January-ecember ...................... I '1 97,908.1 96,545.0 98,507.2 97,144.2 599.1 99.6 499.5

January-August ....................... 63,087.8 63,326.4 62,443.4 63,701.6 62,818.6 375.2 69.1 306.1

January .............................. 7.150.2 6,824.9 6,743.7 6,866.9 6,785.8 42.1 14.7 27.3
February............................ 7.4. 7,292.2 .200.7 7.334.0 7,242.6 41.9 16.3 25.6
March..... ................. 7.625.4 8,497.8 8,384.2 8,525.5 8,411.9 27.7 9.7 18.0
pril............................... 8,107.8 8.372.1 8,22.8 8,408.7 8,289.3 36.6 6.4 30.1
May ................................. 7,652.4 8,428.4 8,297.2 8,489.5 8,398.3 61.1 6.8 55.3
June................................. 8,316.9 8.327.7 8,211.8 8,3J 4.7 8,268.7 56.9 8.8 48.1

Jury....................... ........ 8,306.9 7,654.8 7,6b 2.6 1,694.6 7,592.4 39.9 3.2 36.7
Augus ...................... 0.379.3 7,928.5 7,800.4 7,997.7 7,869.6 69.2 4.1 65.D
Eeptember.......................... .. 8,399.3 7,610.6 7,506.2 7,671.8 7,567.4 61.2 4.8 56.3
October.............................. 8.672.8 8.926.0 8,779.8 8,993.9 8,847.6 67.8 7.4 60.5
Novemoer.............................. 8,972.9 9,342.6 9,223.6 9,396.8 9,277.8 54.2 8.1 46.1
December.............................. 8.86..1 8,702.6 8,592.1 8.743.3 8.632.8 40.7 10.2 30.6

1975

January-August ...................... 70,203.8 70.313.2 69,280.7 70,679.0 69,646.5 365.7 19.9 345.9

January................. ......................... 9,411.9 9,123.9 8,948.7 9.202.8 9,027.5 78.8 5.2 73.7
February............................... 8.789.0 8.499.8 8,368.9 8,545.5 8,414.6 45.7 3.3 42.4
March................................. 8.715.9 9.437.6 9.295.2 9,466.5 9,324.1 28.9 .2 26.7
April ................................ 8,'69.e 9,012.7 8.884.1 9,074.4 8,945.9 61.7 3.6 58.1
May.................................. 8.145.1 8.901.8 8,786.3 8,9j2.8 8,837.3 51.0 2.2 48.8
June................................ 8,69 .-, 8.630 7 8,490.8 8,691 0 8,551.1 60.3 0.8 59.9

Juld ............................... ... 8,884.6 8,236.0 8,129.6 8,265.4 8,159.0 29.4 1.0 28.4
August................................ 8,996.2 8.470.8 8,377.1 8,480.6 8,387 0 9.9 1.6 8.3
September ..........................
October....................... ....
November ....... .......................
Derembe r..............................

'Adjusted for ieas nal and -orking-day variation using seasonal adjustment factors introduced In January 1975. See footnote I on front
page.
'Repre-ents only report 'hipmere Irm, tIhf Unatea State- ar, differs rrom DOD Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid shipment figures under
thi3 program as fIlloss (1) Traifers of tne .lalerial procured outside 'he United States and transfers from DOD overseas stocks from export
;hfpments. tb) oi'.rt viue i. f.a.s., shere.. DOD ealue. n most instsances, as I.o.., point of origia r.. c) Data for snipmentsreported by
the [DOD ior a ti.en ..ortn are included in Bureau of tne Censue reports In the second month subsequent to the aonth reported by the DOD.
,Annual total is not :nown for seasonally ad ru-ted data. Unadjusted data should be used for annual totals.










Table 4 U.S. Imports of Merchandise, by Month: January 1974 to August 1975
11nmall on. of noo'ars ee LxpmanaL or. oi 6-tastIcl. for inLoria..ononooveraL0 aer0 n.tOur e I 1 .a..a.no c.s.I ilport lt-.-, &rn0 Siuce
oi error in the data. UnodJjuEieo totals represent sumz of unrounded f gures and nence may .ary 3l'i'rly Iroet r-i nl riur.aea *.O.unrs i

U.S. imporLa Af ,erc andise

F.a... -alta C.I.I. vAlu,-

Prod General imports import. Central import- I.prt.~
Ir lor
Seasonally Unaj slted cnJut.pL ior, e.s aaj or-sO lb ..r.au 1, ..rt I ,
Aajuasted' unur.aaju ted a1jl-ieO' un. ajuida .d


1974

Jaruary-Dl.emrewr...................... "I 100,251.0 39,391.3 '1 107.9 i .7 107,110.8

January-Auguat ......................... 64,613.1 64,771.4 64,096.0 69,64r) 0 69,611L 1 .1 ,'4.1

January) ...... .. ....... .......... 6,498.0 6,613.7 6.469.6 7,016.7 :.1%3. Il,991.2
February) ................... .... .. .... ,317.7 6,644.5 6,633.8 7.881. -.1 6.6 7,146.2
March .... ...... .... .... ......... ... 7,741.9 7,781.4 7,685.2 6,31l.8 a ,323.? 8,256.1
April..... ........................ ... 6,025.3 6.333..5 .8.238.9 -,639.0 8 97 ; 6,.irI.
May .... .................. ..... .. ... 8.264.5 8,834.8 6,7423. ,21.2 9-,,36.8. 9,44:.4
June .................. ... ......... .... 8,577.0 8,501.5 8,453.3 9.2z'. 9,17-.4 9,125.2

Jul ......... .. .... ........... .... 8,921.6 8,965.3 8,871.4 9,611.8 9 6J8. 6 9.564.8
lugual... ......... ......... ..... ... 9,267.1 9.096.6 9, LIO 7 9.99.7 ,81 .7 9,717.3
September....... .... ............. ... 8,696.4 8,360.7 6,294.9 9,371.; 9, 00D .I. 8,912.3
October............... .... ........ .. 8.773.2 9,094.1 9.1,35.3 9. 4. ,I 97.3 9,734.;
November...................... ...... ... 6,973.3 8,885.4 b.813.7 9,655., 9 6. ;60. 9.463,3
December............. ............. ... 9,256.8 9,139.2 9,149.6 9 143.0 C.616.7 9.61' 1. .

19;3

January-Augusu ........................ 2,758.9 62,680.5 6?,377.0 o".683 F. .el. lo 6,2; 3.i

Jain ar ...... .......................... 9.622.4 9,822., 9.808.6 10,3bq1._ I1, I.. I 10,363.A*
Peh uar) ................. ..... .. 7.872.0 7,162.7 7.130.9 1,44-10.7 : 0.. '' :.647.3
M.rch............................. ..... 7,335.6 7,45 .9 7,425.3 7,6)j.5 ., fJ, ?3. 7,992.1
Aprl......... ... .......... ... .. 8,012.8 8,181.1 8.133.1 8.6'jr.0) 6.964.6 6.934.3
May......................... .......... ,093.4 7.358.0 7.314.? 7,631.1 7.91 .7 7,87jU.
June... ........ ... .9,4.2 7,271.3 7,747.4 .,431 I 7.532 7 7.80b..)

July.................. ....... .... 7,907.5 7,915.4 7 8"6.2 8,49]3. e6,3i. 3 6,470.6
Auigust ................... .. ... ... 7,961.0 7,513.6 7,426 I 68,68.9 6,087.3 ;,9l,. 2
Septemner...................... ...... ..
October .... ................... ........
November........... ....................
December...
Dec m e.r ............... .... ... .. ...

'Adjujted for seasonal and eork1n_'-day Varatlon uI ing seIaonsai -aj]aienil E&ctors ir roaucet ar. Jlaary 19l5.
Irur total ,o ,ot Irao.r, ior seasEnall adjouter dat. UnadJu.ted ao1 .noulda ne usen (or f anrOuai totals.









8

Table 5 U.S. Exports (f as. Value Basis) of Domestic Merchandise. Including Department of Defense (DOD) Military
Assistance Program Grant-Aid Shipments--Schedule B Sections and Selected Divisions. Seasonally Adjusted
and Unadjusted, by Month: January 1974 to August 1975
'In millions of dollars. See Explanation of Statistics for Information on coverage, definition of f.a.s. exportvalue, and sources of error in
the data. 'nadjusted totals represent sum of unrounded figures and hence may vary slightly frae sam of rounded amounts)

Schedule B sections and selected divisions.
Per-od
0 1 3 4 5 1 6 7' 71 72 73 8 9

Seasonally adjusted'


1974

January-August 9,257 8 852 7 7,433.7 1,961 9 '939.3 5,734 2 7,303.4 L3,945.0 10,448.9 4,555.3 8,990.6 3,524.7 41,658.8

January ...... .. 1,191.2 107.6 851.5 171.1 '73.3 641.0 795.0 2,669.3 1,177.8 513.3 943.0 393.3 4164.1
February............... 1.220.3 108.6 960.5 212.3 '96.5 679.6 826.1 2,804.1 1,192.9 522.4 1,113.5 407.3 '174.2
Harch.................. 1,216.3 89.8 960.9 176.2 '100.9 694.2 B58.8 2,809.5 1,236.7 547.7 1,082.5 433.2 '192.3
April................... 1.-16.5 109.9 979.9 226.2 '124.2 735.6 919.9 3,034.0 1,302.6 565.4 1,136.3 448.3 4207.8
May..................... 1.082.4 116.2 939.U 257.1 '131.7 664.5 940.4 2,817.4 1,307.6 557.4 1,070.6 469.2 '219.5
June................... 1.116.6 114.7 941.8 294.2 '138.2 767.7 970.7 3,203.1 1,341.9 586.7 1,299.0 465.7 '226.7
July.................... 1,113.6 102.4 893.5 323.9 '164.0 775.0 982.3 3,182.2 1,391.6 601.0 1,160.3 447.5 4222.0
Aug st............ 1.078.9 103.5 906.6 300.9 *110.6 776.6 1,010.2 3,355.1 1,497.8 661.4 1,185.4 460.2 4233.1
Septesber.............. 1.026.2 75.4 824.6 312.5 '86.9 780.3 946.8 3,469.0 1,506.3 622.6 1,323.3 461.1 '224.6
October............... 1.147.6 102.7 768.B 384.9 '112.2 749.2 996.0 3.687.3 1,576.2 635.1 1,432.9 456.4 '216.0
November .. .............. 1.?9.8 102.7 968.5 472.9 '118.5 763.7 950.9 3,663.4 1,607.9 639.9 1,425.3 466.5 '239.6
Decemnber... ........ l.261.7 116.7 199.0' 266.3 '166.3 797.1 984.4 3,589.1 1,582.0 573.0 1,393.9 441.3 '247.7

1973

Jaruary-Augus! 10.099.9 885.2 6,576.4 3,124.4 '696.9 5,768.6 7,172.8 29,663.6 13,656.6 4,962.3 1,186.8 3,710.6 '2,022.9

January.. ............ 1.5a9.7 144.9 1.025.0 429.2 '140.9 862.3 927.0 3.486.9 1,655.5 606.2 1,169.6 471.1 '238.6
February............... 1.419.1 107.0 815.4 399.3 '104.5 696.4 879.9 3,627.3 1,621.2 606.3 1.428.6 454.1 4328.5
March................... .1251.5 136.2 802.5 433.0 '120.8 761.7 905.3 3.457.2 1,620.2 598.6 1,299.0 449.0 '237.8
April............... 1,250.9 116.7 731.7 378.9 473.7 700.8 898.9 3,673.6 1,755.5 630.4 1,265.9 458.9 '274.9
May. .................... 1.043.0 102.6 701.3 407.2 488.9 654.3 66881.9 3,478.9 1,684.8 614.0 1.258.7 451.9 '284.2
June.................... 1090.9 86.0 700.6 395.6 '57.9 717.3 886.8 3,965.8 1,809.8 617.4 1,538.0 473.9 4241.4
July.. ............ 1,185 9 1 2 867 8 313.5 '66.3 686 8 912 5 4,011.1 1,760.9 629.7 1,623 2 486 7 9239.1
August. .................. ,268.9 110.6 932.1 367.7 '43.9 689.0 880.5 3,962.8 1,748.7 659.7 1,605.8 465.0 '278.4
Sept ember .........
October... ... .. .
November................
December ................

Linadjusted

1971

Janu ry-Decenber.... .. 13.985.9 1.2-17.4 10.934.4 3.443.9 1,423.3 8,819.2 11,165.8 38,188.6 16,668.7 7,019.2 14,500.7 5,349.1 2,586.6

January- Auguet 9,043 8 757 8 7,490 6 1,944 5 939 3 5,863.4 7,392.8 24,168.3 10,578 8 4,558.6 9,030.9 3.559.0 1,658.8

January ................. 1,194.8 W0.6 852.4 144.2 73.3 604.4 756.1 2,514.5 1.118.9 520.5 875.1 371.3 184.1
February... ... 1,152.0 87.2 9(1.41 178.8 96.5 653.8 795.5 2,734.3 1,136.8 489.5 1,107.9 382.9 174.2
March.................. 1,257.2 79.1 1.099.3 162.3 100.9 734.4 934.3 3,368.6 1.414.8 594.3 1,359.6 483.4 192.3
April................... .178.8 94.9 1,079.8 223.2 124.2 774.6 952.1 3,185.7 1,353.4 575.6 1,256.7 468.0 207.8
May..................... 1.0841.6 111.3 1.014.1 281.0 131.7 711.8 1,036.3 3,268.5 1,418.7 590.8 1,259.0 500.6 218.5
June................... 1,074.2 106.9 911.6 310.4 138.2 776.1 983.3 3,267.1 1,360.7 593.1 1,313.3 474.1 226.7
July.................... 1.081., 90.0 768.4 306.7 164.0 796.7 936.2 2,809.9 1,334.6 569.1 906.2 417.1 222.0
Augut .................. 1,020.7 97.6 777.9 338.0 110.6 811.6 999.1 3,019.6 1,440.9 625.7 953.1 461.6 233.1
.ptember............... 1,002.6 8J3.7 647.3 332.8 86.9 724.9 885.2 3,139.5 1,358.7 597.7 1,183.0 439.9 224.6
October................ 1.170.6 124.1 787.3 450.3 112.2 727.5 1,017.9 3,768.4 1.603.0 669.4 1,495.9 473.3 216.0
ovember ........... .... 1,444.1 141.1 1,084.7 464.4 118.5 729.3 935.7 3,652.4 1,603.1 635.4 1,413.9 467.9 239.6
December............... 1,324.8 140.7 924.2 251.9 166.3 774.0 934.2 3,459.9 1,525.0 558.1 1,376.8 409.0 247.7



January-August 9,864 2 75 3 6,5335.4 3,042.8 E96.9 5,855.7 7,248.6 29,862.9 13,814 1 4,970.6 1,078.3 3,731.8 2,022.9

January................ 1.643.7 172.9 1.026.0 357.1 140.9 820.0 911.i 3,312.5 1,612.4 615.7 1,084.2 454.6 238.6
February............... 1,33d.2 86.6 839.0 337.4 104.5 669.9 847.4 3,%.36.6 1,545.D0 568.7 1,422.9 426.4 228.5
March.................. 1,276.6 1'2.1 692.3 399.6 120.8 786.8 949.6 4,051.8 1,803,3 649.5 1,599.1 488.6 237.8
April................... 1,219.6 101.6 810.7 391.4 73.7 737.2 949.3 3,905.1 1,853.8 641.1 1,410.2 4B2.3 274.9
May.................. 1.028.4 98.1 765.8 436.5 88.9 707.3 954.2 3,990.3 1,829.7 650.2 1,510.4 483.5 284.2
Jun............. 1,060.3 79.8 '.18 406.2 57.9 718.7 899.2 3,938.0 1,798.9 624.2 1,514.9 481.0 241.4
July................... 1,114.7 71.5 77.6 .10 3 66.3 704.6 862 3 3,577.9 1,690.5 596.9 1,290.5 44.6 239.1
AUeust................. 1,182.6 104 7 775.5 404.1 41.4 711.1 875.2 3,550.7 1,680.5 624.1 1,246.1 460.8 278.4
September ...............
October .........
November...........
D c embe r................

'Schtdul. 8 :ectson .naj sel-cted division descr-ptsons are ua follows

0. Food and iive animals 7. Machinery and transport equipment
1. BEverupe' and tobacco 71. Machinery, other than electric
2. rude 'atatenals. Inedible. escepe fuel 22. Electrcal machinery, apparatus, and appliances
3. mineral fuels. lubricant.. and related materials 73. Transport equipment
4. Anmal snd vegetable u-. and iIt-: Miscellaneous manufactured articles, n.e.c.
5. Cremiwcals 9. CoonditLea and transactions not classified according to kind
6. Manufactured poods clas-ri-d chtefly by nlter.al
'Seasonalls idju cj fiLgures for section 7 nay utifer slightly from the sum of divisions 71, 72. and 73 since each so independently ad-
justed.
Adjusted totr seasonal and urkLneg-da wartitilon .~ig seasonal adjustment factors introduced in January 1975. See footnote I on front
page. Annual totals are not ,how-n for senaonallv adjusted data. Uradjusted data should be used for annual totals. The adjusted section
totals in this table and 'aimlar overall monthly totals in tables I. 2, and 3 were adjusted independently.
'In the absence of diaionstrabLe seasonal patterrc. for this section, no seasonal adjustment factors have been applied to the dates.













Table 6. U.S. General Imports (f.a.s.Value Basis) of Merchandise, Schedule A Sections. Seasonally Adjusted and
Unadjusted, by Month January 1974 to August 1975
I in nillion- ci dollare Le E.tpl-nation 31 aliiic [for infnormnaton i.n u.co rge, a i ntin i' Ii a.a. import slue, ana -'ource C,. error
,.n Ie a31. LnnsajuStEa totals represent oum of anroildea figure: arena nence ma, t ary a tgl I I rr,tu-n. oi ruIr,a ndt a.lur,.,

Lcnreaule A ccti.'n'

0 I 2 3 4 F t I ,

neauonIlly daoj.'tej


1971

January- August. 6,412.8 948 8 4,046.2 16,120.5 '31'7.4 ?,3S; 7 10,610 1 ,9=.1 9 6.115 3 '1,393 0

January. .... .. 730.4 i i.6 444.7 1,226.3 '23. !9 5 i.uL4..9 I Oiut.6 .. -,.72 15.
February ....... ...... 795.1 10,.5 470.6 1 ,70.8 24 .8 41.3 1.3. 0." 163j.3 "32. 15 E.
Marc .... .. 942.86 111.9 09.9 1,659.1 J'31.3 o8 .3 1,31,.3 1,8B-.- 76?.4 il *i.9
April .. ... ... 766. 114.3 496.1 21,43.4 140.0 23o.9 1,:.3 6 1 1. 7? 4r .7i '179.u
May .... ... n812 117.9 .321.6 2,173.5 '42.2 314.1 1,3'6., i~lt .' 77; .1 173.4
June.... .......... 799.q 123.0 64a.1 2,364.6 '26.6 .1 .2 1,4 2.4 ?.,'6: 3 .03 4 1i 3.1
uly...... ...... 803. 138.3 506.3 ?,169.86 '70.1 36., 9 1,419.9 2,?16.6 91.6 1 4.9
Auguc' ......... ... 2761.6 137.1 546.9 2,511.0 144.6 363 ].:u.4 :,:110.e 62i 'b166.3
September ... .il.3 i22.7 5''4.13 2,301.5 '54.2 un 2 1, 614 4 2,107.7 ?7l.i '201.5
October ............. 623.6 92.5 194 .u 2,433.9 171 .5? 430.9 1.732.., 1.4.- 5 A.li.A 25.3
November ...... ... 818.86 ..3 197.9 2,455.3 '49 Y 424.3 1,743 J 2,041.1 834 9 '27? .
DeceMber......... .. 846.u) 97.-. 513.4 2,417.6 53.3 426.7 1,7Ja 9 0?,21..7 i4.6 217.7

l97i

January-August .. .. ,434.5 989.7 3,683.1 16,619.1 3il.4 2,432 1 i,l6 .l 15,333 3 803. '1,647 3

Jan. Jary. ............ 77.2 .16.3 194.2 3,046.3 I 46 5 433.4 ,, 40. 63 .1 .3 .8 I. I' .C.
Fenru.ry.. ...... 666.9 i24.9 456.3 1,916.3 11.1 3'25.3 1,146.6 1, A0. 1 71 3.2 II.U
Maren.. .. .... .. 666..2 15..7 464.6 1,J44.5 153.l 317.6 1 12r .F. .06-t 1:".? id .4
April......... ... ... 56.3 1?0.2 14I 7.0 2,443.3 41.,.. 30,.? I 241.9 1.773 3 71L.4 231.?
blay........... .... 6110.4 116.0 432.2 1,95;.1 L.9 1.1 1.: 6.9 1,61l.] e3 .. 1196.z
June............. .. 'A. 17 I 462 4 1,471.0 `33 2 1 .1 1. 1 ,634 1 :1 71 219 7
July........... ... .. 717 3 112.8 477.7 2,191 .2 '44 3 252.7 1. lIr 2,051, :. 7 ,3.e E223 8
August... .. 670.0 115.7 428.2 2,249.4 '32.7 53. I',041.6 2. 41.0 727 2 Il8 .7
Septembe r ..........
October ... .. ....
november. ...
December ..........

uLadjusLe


1974

J .nuary-De, mber.. 9.386.2 1.322.3 6.065.6 25.453.6 544.3 4.1311.; 17,718.: 24 .**',. 3 .,4126.2 2 .25 .7

Januari-August ,404 3 b87 a 1.070 9 16,3"4 6 JO? s .415 7 lI,d831 8 16,015 I 6,110 3 1,313 -)

January.............. 763.0 10.6 .6 429.6 1.323.6 23.9 1 ?. 9 ,'071.6 1.367.4 640.6 145.7
February.......... 744.6 86.1 402.4 1.588.1 24.8 ?:'.' 1 ,,59.1 1,-1:.6 637. 4 156.1
March................ 913.6 104.1 30?.8 1,820.0 35.3 I?t- .2 1, '2i.3 1.94t0., 73'.: 171.9
April.............. .. 825.8 113.3 494.6 2,294.2 40.6f 316.0 1.2;2.4 5., t7'T.4 itl .e 179.U
May... ... ....... .. 827.4 116.3 571.2 2.2900.A 42.' 339.9 1,467.1 2..40.3 ;e6.0 1 3.-4
June................. 769.5 1731. 579.3 2,090.2 26.6 33'.4 1,4e6. I ,1.. b ;9..U 183.6
Jul ............... 774.1 126.6 546.4 2,417.2 7; .I 341.8 1, 8.1 ,91i.; 66.3. 4 194.'4
August.............. 766F.2 112.7 344.7 2,508.3 44.6 3ani.- 1,670.4 1.94?.. 933.3 188.3
Sepitem.ber.... ..... 647.8 111.7 al'8." 2,128.9 54.? 36..5 1 i'49.e 1,934. a3e. J 01.5
October ....... ... 656.-. 113.3 514.3 2,278.1 79., 431.6 1.839 19 ,U61.6 904.0 315.3
Noi e ber... .. 789.2 102.7 475.0 2.214.7 45.9 39 :.1 1, 7.; 2.,313.-' 21.0 228.2
December............. 888.3 107.2 497.5 2,497.6 23.3 3685.7 4.7 t.6 ',1.11'.6 .51.6 .17.7

'975

January- August. 5,414.9 927.0 3,684.0 17,006.4 3.1 4 '?,4'2.6 10,063.68 l.,,03).i 3."-69 5 1,647 3

January.. .. ... .. 713.6 112.3 477.9 3,414.9 46.5 431.? 1.741.- 1 631J. 7.5.i 218.0
February............ 626.6 106.4 390.6 1,937.4 44.7 306.2 1.-59.0 1, 6.8 6?1.9 181.0
March.. ........ 657.4 143.7 456.3 1,477.6 55.1 340.8 1.313.3 2.136.4 6e7 I 165.4
April.. ..... .. 684.5 119.1 468.4 2,438.4 4".7 351.9 1.2.l.9 1,6A99. 703.8 231.2
May.............. ... 611.0 116.9 451.2 1.937.5 51.9 '262. 1.114. 14..341. 626.3 198.3
June...... .. ...... 73.i 129.6 .512.4 1,428.3 33.2 212 9 I. '31 4 1., l :22 : 219.1
July................. 705 8 103 4 506.4 2,132 0 44 6 4; 4 1,13. 6 1, ?4 4 850 9 223 8
Augait .......... 635.8 95.6 420.9 2,240.4 32 7 ?7U.6 l.005 3 1,8 ..0 900,. 189.7
September........ ...
October .........
Isos ember.........
December......

crheaule 4 ,ectrsn de--'crrption- re ,s iol o',s
0 froLd sna lhae a In3 als 5. Chelmiials
I. Be.eraue. r ar [obacco 6. Manufictured Geco cl.sIzoia cr,,Iliy y matiLernl
2. Cruae materials. .renible, except iuel: 7. Mac.h,pery an-] transport equip.5en0
3. Mineral fuels, lubr.,caue ,. n- related axrer. ls 8. Miscellnesu d .ar.lct lured Idttcie rn.e..
4. Arnri jnd .eget able oil' and faIl 9. Co.sodi t e and I rn-actI, I. n'1L ciia, ll iea d ,ar1n l r, o kna
Adjusted ior c:o-.nal -na *orlh tnn-ay pari.atore ung sea-onal acqjuiesnent actors introduced in janu-ry 1975. 3ee cotr.oile k or, iront
page. Annual tot is are not chon n for .seatonaly adJusted data. bn7djuoed s daT a' nutd De used r appual toral. ine adjustEd 'ection
totals ar 'hs table and i tsLar o erali F.or.thl) totdlS n Lanies I and 4 *ere adjusted irJ.pnentsI,
'In the absence ot demonstrable seasonal pstterns t lr tls secton, eo seu-.'nrl aJuSJtmertt tuhres ruase beers applied to the ,ata.










10

Table 7. U.S. General Imports (c.i.f. Value Basis) of Merchandise, Schedule A Sections, Seasonally Adjusted and
Unadjusted, by Month: January 1974 to August 1975
fTn millions of dollars. See Explanation of Siatsties for Information on coverage. definition of c.i.r. import value, and source aoferrorAn
the data. tlnadjusted totals represent sum of unrounded figures and hence may vary slightly from am of rounded amounts

Schedule A sections'
P.od 1 24 5 I I 7 89


Seasonally adjusted'


1974

Janujrv-Auguat .... .. 6,925.4 1,033.5 4.466.7 17,377.1 '321.0 2,537.3 11.593.8 17,309.8 6,534.1 '1,431.5

January. 786.0 114.5 465.5 1.341 4 '25 2 214 3 1,136.5 1,962.6 722.3 '150 2
February. 857 3 108.6 506.0 1,694.7 '26.0 257.7 1,308.5 1.994 3 790.7 *160.3
March 1 017 I 122.4 551 6 1 774 4 '37 I 275.4 1.402.7 2 047.4 811 3 '176 1
April 829 7 124 5 345.8 2,510.5 '41.8 299.2 1,341.3 2100.7 798.4 '183.7
May 877.5 126 6 575.4 2,334 6 '44.0 339.6 1,446 4 2.195.9 832.2 '178.2
June 870 0 133.3 603 6 2,453.6 '27 8 348.5 1,592.1 2,231.5 869.7 189.1
July .. 86 6 150.i 5b9.0 2.557.5 '72.7 392.7 1,564.5 2,388.3 845.9 '200.2
4uLust .... .. 82 2 150.9 p27.8 2,710.4 '46.5 409 9 1.801 8 2,389.1 663 8 '193.7
September. 715 I 134.4 557.6 2,472.0 '56.3 440.7 1.737 9 2,282.1 876.2 '207 3
October..... 676 I 101 0 549 I 2,604.9 '82.7 461.7 1.870.2 2,145.0 673 3 2221.2
Novrmber. 928.4 88.3 552.6 2,622.0 '52.1 454 9 1.883 B 2,GB.65 888 7 '234.3
December ... 906 6 105 9 570 0 2,576.6 '55.5 456.1 1.929.9 2 180.3 886.8 '223.0

1975

January-Auuat ....... 5,6898.5 1,075.7 4,270.9 17,731.4 '369.6 2,596.1 10,971.2 16,531.8 6,237.2 '1,688,3

January .. .. 137 129.4 559.3 3.259.1 '50.5 462 5 1,888 1 1.975 0 837.2 1224.3
February. 726.1 1314. 500.8 2,036.3 '46.8 345 1 1,564 3 1.931 4 764 8 186.2
March .... 722.9 166.5 505.4 1,435.1 '57.6 336.5 1,429.0 2,259.2 765.8 '190.9
April 711.8 130.9 714.6 2,598.4 s42. 328.6 1,346.1 1,918.1 769.7 '236.2
May .. 661.7 128.0 475.0 2.090.3 '54.6 287.5 1.163.3 1.960.3 717.1 '201.9
June 927 ; 135.7 513.7 1.573.4 '35 I 258.5 1.264.0 1,984.9 754.4 '224 3
July .. 778.8 123.9 530.8 2,332.9 '47.7 275.5 1,.191.1 2,201.1 841.7 '228.5
August 731.7 126 9 471 8 2,405.9 '34.9 301.9 1,125.3 2,301.8 766.5 '194.0
September. .
October ...
November.
December ...

Unadjusted

1974

January.Lecemter..... 10.341 3 1,441.3 6,690.8 27,358.6 567.6 4,306 9 19,052.7 26,060.0 10,066 5 2,317.4

January- ugust....... 6.915 A 966,.2 4.477.6 17,607.1 321.0 2,588.9 11,617.9 17,156.1 6.524.9 1.431.5

January .. 841.5 109.1 469.0 1,450.1 25.2 217.9 1,149.0 2,047.0 684.7 250.2
February. ... ...... 602.4 93.2 434.3 1,.713.3 26.0 243.5 1,135.8 1.868.7 679.2 160.3
March... ..... 985.6 113.8 543.9 1.946.5 37.1 283.9 1,380.3 2,106.8 779.5 176.1
April........ 893.6 121.4 544.2 2,457.8 41.8 339.0 1,361.4 2,256.2 769.7 183.7
.M $..... 893.3 127.1 630.1 2,458.3 44.0 367.5 1,576.6 2.439.6 822.2 178.2
June.. ............ 836.9 138.3 638.0 2,264.7 27.8 355.1 1,596.9 2,276.1 852.8 188.1
July. .... 835.4 137.6 611.7 2,608.7 72.7 375.4 1,616.1 2,256.9 944.0 200.2
August... 827.1 124.0 606.5 2.707.7 46.5 406.6 1,801.8 2,104.8 996.9 193.7
September .. 701. 122.3 562.1 2,286.6 56.3 417.3 1.668.4 2,095.0 892.8 207.3
October. ... ... 711.9 123.7 571.6 2.438.2 82.7 462.6 1,986.1 2.235.1 964.1 222.2
Wonember 853.2 111.9 527.2 2.365.0 52.1 425.8 1.910.2 2,204.1 877.1 234.3
Decembrer... 91.9 117.0 S52.3 2.661.6 55.5 412.3 1.870.0 2,169.4 803.4 223.0

1471

January- ALugus ..... 5,877.1 1,007.9 4,273 0 18,146 0 369.6 2,654.4 10,884.3 16,503.0 6,202.4 1,688.3

January. 777.6 122.8 540.8 3.653.5 50.5 467.6 1,897.5 2,038.2 807.1 224,3
February 6680.1 114.6 4!6B.- 2.058.7 46.8 326.8 1,359.4 1,811.7 666.9 186.2
"Mrch 713.5 154.7 496.3 1.577.2 57.6 361.0 1.414.7 2,318.0 739.0 190.9
April 742.4 129.7 716.7 2.593.2 42.5 373.7 1,340.7 2.054.2 753.5 238.2
May 662.3 126.8 495.9 2.069.4 54.6 302.1 1,234.2 2,093.6 674.9 201.9
June B40 1 140 s6 569.1 1,527.8 35.1 270 6 1,328.5 2.119 9 777.8 224.3
July .... 766.3 113.6 562.7 2,269.9 47.7 264.2 1.223.3 2.108.7 917.4 228.5
Aust 694.4 105.0 463 t1 2,396.3 a4.d 286.3 1,085.9 1,958.8 865.9 194.0
September
OcT uber
November
December.

'Schedule A secrion description, ns arm as IOlla-s
0 Fooo and live -n1mal, 5 Cihemicals
I Beverapes and 'ooacco 6. Manufactured goods classified chiefly by material
2. Crude material., Inedible, except fuels 7. Machinery and transport equipment
3. Mineral fuels, l edbrtrant and related asterlals 8 Miscellaneous manufactured articles n e S.
4. 4nlatI ana vwetable oils and Fd transactions not classified according to kind
'Adjusted for seasonal and workcJn-day tariation using seasonal adjustment factors introduced In January 1975. See footnote I on front
pace. Annual towels are not shoan for seasonally adjusted data Unadjusted data should be used for annual totals. The adjusted section
totals In this table and similar overall monthly totals In tables 2 and 4 sere adjusted Independently.
'In ]h absence of demonstrable seasonal patterns for this section, no seasonal adjustment factors have been applied to the data.























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