Summary of U.S. export and import merchandise trade

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Material Information

Title:
Summary of U.S. export and import merchandise trade
Series Title:
FT-900
Physical Description:
v. : ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of the Census
United States -- Bureau of the Census
Publisher:
Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, Foreign Trade Division for sale by the Subscriber Services Section (Publications), Bureau of the Census
Place of Publication:
Washington
Creation Date:
May 1975
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Commerce -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Citation/Reference:
American statistics index
Dates or Sequential Designation:
1974-1976.
General Note:
At head of title: 1977- United States foreign trade.
General Note:
Formerly classed C 56. 210:900 - during the time the Bureau of the Census was subordinate to Social and Economic Statistics Administration.
General Note:
Issues prior to Oct. 1977 were sent to depositories as Item 144.
General Note:
Unnumbered supplements accompany some issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001209840
oclc - 02245761
notis - AFW0105
lccn - 76640395
issn - 0361-0047
sobekcm - AA00005271_00029
Classification:
lcc - HF105 .B73e
ddc - 382/.0973
System ID:
AA00005271:00029

Related Items

Preceded by:
United States foreign trade; export and import merchandise trade
Succeeded by:
United States foreign trade. FT900, Summary of U.S. export and import merchandise trade

Full Text
i;a. % 0....L, I


7LL U uV f-0


SUMMARY OF U.S. EXPORT AND

IMPORT MER E TRADE


FT 90075-5


"1 "I I. FOR RELEASE
U.S. DEPOITOfRlT J 1 ** .. June 26, 1975
#Tr 1,i11 2:00 P.M.

Seasonally Adjusted and t jtIsted Data


Hae TIuea of the Census, Department of Commerce
ana.mnad adj t% 1 during May 1975, seasonally adjusted
exports on a f.a.S. (free alongside ship) U.S. port of
exportation value basis, excluding Department of Defense
(31D) Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid shipments,
were valu ai:t. i. S.1 m.lilion a 2 and that season-
aly adjusted general imports for the month, on a f.a.s.
S(tree ialsdinga le lbtp): foreign port of exportation value
ba: ts amunled to $7,093.4 million. May sea-
gnally adjusted general imports on a c.i.f. (cost,
:aimrazpe mdi freight) value basis amounted to $7,631.1
itllin. Comparable seasonally adjusted totals for
":'.. 1 wete $;,56S.6 million for exports, $8,012.8 million
;: $s::;ii ...: m n.a f.a.as. value basis, and $8,800.0 million
tr'lhAwpeMats on a c.i.f. value basis.
thi. B:. e tsaeau, part of the Department's Social and Eco-
tk, tiSI tiittiosts Administration (SESA), noted that based
.leth above seasonally adjusted f.a.s. export and import
a merchandise trade surplus of $1,051.7 million
ed in May 1975. For the period January-May
S-' tfr' qrplus on a f.a.s. value basis amounted to
Million. Dsing c.i.f. import values and f.a.s.
li a trade surplus of $514.0 million
v :~i peqed for May 1975, and a $501.7 million surplus
S m'aumnSy-May 1975 period.


Dfsir?.. fa the first 5 months of 1975 (January-May),
1S.j~igi nt on a seasonally adjusted basis were at an annual
of:: '-bM o t04,16 million, or about 7 percent higher than
t"::":t dar Y 3ear 1974 total of $97,907 million. Sea-
'. tAlr:mmpid MIII nmaidity uwiaton. but not lar chanps in price leal. Falon used t
men~Oni lflinl1 tI14 andilducad in Januvy 1975 combined wid the eppropridat working-day
..ai.lti n9tl d t l l d =i l tn id =il andel in re MYon h


sonally adjusted imports for the January-May 1975 period
were at an annual rate of $95,847 million, a level about
4 percent below the calendar year 1974 total of 3100,218
million. (These figures are on a f.a.s. value basis.)

The Bureau stated that seasonally adjusted exports
declined for the fourth successive month with the May
1975 export figure being the lowest reported since the
May 1974 total of $7,652.4 million. The May import
figure was the lowest since the January 1974 total of
$6,496.8 million.

During the 4-month period, February-May 1975, sea-
sonally adjusted exports averaged $8,554.9 million per
month, a level about 5 percent below the 18,980.2 million
average reported for the preceding 4-month period, Octo-
ber 1974-January 1975. Imports (f.a.s. value basis
averaged $7,578.5 million per month for the current 4-
month period, about 17 percent below the $9,151.5 million
average reported for the preceding 4 months.

Exports unadjusted for seasonal change and excluding
Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid shipments decreased
from $9,012.7 million in April to .8,901.8 million in
May. With Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid ship-
ments included, exports decreased from $9,074.4 million
in April to $8,952.8 million in May. Unadjusted general
imports (f.a.s. value basis) were valued at $8,181.1
million in April as compared to $7,358.0 million in May.
The comparable c.i.f. figures for imports were 18,984.8
million in April and $7,915.7 million in Msy


o adinst 1974 and 1975 data shown in this rHDDrt rgprogeni MBzonBI adjustment factors derived IrDrri
adjustment tatters.
-ol month chan s in ex orts im ens and umular s


IdIlm:lim l AlesMl nAme' Im t mMitoHlolOt percent dcanp in the ovell seaonllly adjusd expon and impon series re presented in the following table oth average percent month
emulth de nid dbelmw loupr periods sm i for cmpaoin. The avrap rae nd ngmram decline figure exclude percentage changes or 11 the periods January -March 1969 and July December
1111lI baiomn fi rinibm l dm dto -fAtl of dock strils ad (2) panelshen neglgiblbe changes ner enl in i the lewlof exporlimpors occurred Percentage ranges Dl fa n impori
ala lot aol he Ie pIriode plder Jaary 1974!

Month-to-month Average monthly rates of change

Series Apr.-a#y Mar.-Apr. Feb.-Mar. Jan.-Feb. Average Average 4 months 12 months
1875 1975 1975 1975 rise decline Jan.-May May 1974-
1969-1974 1969-1974 1975 May 1975
(Percent) (Percent) (Percent) (Percent) (Percent) (Percent) (Percent) (Percent

F.a.s. expaot value. -5.0 -1.7 -0.8 -6.6 +3.2 -2.6 -3.5 +O. 6

F.a.s. import value. -11.5 +9.2 -6.8 -18.2 (NA) (NA) -6.8 -1.0


'Eftime dl l si e Jlimvy 1975 bsei of tha rpoent hlartCons Import valemu replaced by he f.a. import viue. Exports have histurcally been hown on e f a.s. value basis See Explanato.n ol
gIMihle'for dldilil of mport ind import nlu and ind blinad



Inquiries coneeming thi figures should be addnre td to he Chief, Foreign Trade Division, Bureau of the
Census, Washington. D.C. 20233. Tel: Area Code 301, 763-5140.

SU.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE, Social and Economic Statistics Administration. BUREAU OF THE CENSUS

For sale by the Subscribers Services Section (Publications), Social and Economic Statistics Administration,
Washington, D.C. 20233, or any US. Department of Commerce district office. Price 10 cents per copy. Annual
subscription IFT 900, 975, 985, and 986 combined) $3.00.









EXPLANATION OF STATISTICS


Import Statistics

Coverage

The U.S. import statistics reflect both government 'ad'
nongovernment imports of merchandise 'from foreign
countries into the U.S. Customs territory, which includes
the 50 States, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico.
The U.S. import statistics exclude imports into the Virgin
Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and other U.S. posses-
sions; and shipments between the United States and Puerto
Rico, between the United States and U.S. possessions, and
between any of these outlying areas. (Data on U.S. trade
with Puerto Rico and with U.S. possessions are published
separately in Report FT 800. Additional data on such trade
and on imports into the Virgin Islands from foreign
countries are presented in reference tabulations.)

The U.S. import statistics also exclude American goods
returned to the United States by its Armed Forces; intransit
shipments through the United States; temporary shipments;
transactions not considered to be of statistical significance,
such as shipments of personal and household effects;
low-valued nondutiable imports by mail; issued monetary
coins of all component metals; and gold in the form of ores,
concentrates, waste, scrap, and refined bullion. Imports of
silver in these forms are included in the statistics, unless
otherwise noted. (Information on gold movements, pre-
viously shown in Report FT 2402, appears in Report FT
990 effective Januay 1975.)

General Imports/Imports for Consumption

The official U.S. import statistics are compiled by the
Bureau of the Census from copies of the import entry and
warehouse withdrawal forms which importers are required
by law to file with Customs officials. The statistics are
presented in terms of both "General Imports" and "Imports
for Consumption." General imports are a combination of
entries for immediate consumption and entries into
Customs bonded warehouses and thus generally reflect total
arrivals of merchandise. Imports for consumption are a
combination of entries for immediate consumption and
withdrawals from warehouses for consumption and thus
generally reflect the total of the commodities entered into
U.S. consumption channels.


Import Valuation

F.a.s. Import Value

The f.a.s. (free alongside ship) value represents the
transaction value of imports at the foreign port of exporta-
tion. It is based on the purchase price, i.e., the actual
transaction value and generally includes all charges incurred
in placing the merchandise alongside the carrier at the port
of exportation in the country of exportation.


C.i.f. Import Value

The c.i.f. (cost, insurance, and freight) value represents
Sthe value of imports at the first port of entry in the United
States. It is based on the purchase price and includes all
freight, insurance, and other charges (excluding U.S. import
duties) incurred in bringing the merchandise from the
country of exportation and generally placing it alongside
the carrier at the first port of entry in the United States. If
the merchandise was acquired in a transaction between
related parties, the purchase price used in deriving the c.i.f.
value is based on an arm's-length equivalent transaction
price, i.e., a price which would. exist between unrelated
buyers and sellers.
Import Monthly Carryover
It is the objective of the compiling procedures to include
shipments, insofar as practicable, in the statistics for the
actual month of importation. However, for purposes of the
statistics the month of importation is based on the date of
official acceptance by Customs of the import entry or
warehouse withdrawal document. This may not in all cases
correspond to the actual month of importation. (For
example, under the Customs "immediate-delivery" pro-
cedures, importers may file the import entry up to 10
workdays after the actual date of importation.) Also,
because of processing problems (e.g., late receipt of a
document for an end-of-month shipment, rejection of a
shipment by the computer because the data fail to meet
certain edit criteria established to protect the accuracy of
the statistics, etc.), there is an overall average carryover of
about 7 percent (in terms of value) of the shipments from
the reported month of importation (based on the date of
the import entry or warehouse withdrawal document) to a
subsequent month, usually the succeeding month. In addi-
tion, as a result of the aforementioned Customs "im-
mediate-delivery" procedures, there is a further carryover of
presently unknown magnitude from the actual month of
importation to a subsequent month. These limitations
should be borne in mind when making month-to-month
comparisons.
Cumulations of data over at least 4-month periods are
desirable to identify underlying trends. Month-to-month
changes in imports, exports, and similar series often reflect
primarily irregular movements, differences in monthly
carryover, etc.

Estimated Data for Imports Valued Under $251
The overall import and Schedule A Section 9 totals
include sample estimates for shipments valued under S251.
Therefore, they are subject to sampling error, estimated at
less than one-tenth of one percent for the unadjusted overall
total and about one percent for the unadjusted Schedule A
Section 9 total. This means that we can have about 67
percent confidence that the published unadjusted overall
totals and the unadjusted Schedule A Section 9 totals differ
by less than one-tenth of a percent and one percent,
respectively, from the totals that would have resulted from
a complete tabulation.










Export Statistics
Coverage

The export statistics reflect, in general, both government
and nongovernment exports of domestic and foreign mer-
chandise from the U.S. Customs territory (includes the 50
States, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico) to
foreign countries, whether the exportation involves a
commercial transaction or not. The statistics, therefore,
,include Department of Defense Military Assistance Program
Grant-Aid shipments, shipments for economic assistance
under the Foreign Assistance Act and shipments of agri-
cultural commodities under P. L. 480 (The Agricultural
Trade Development and Assistance Act of 1954, as amend-
ed) and related laws. The following are excluded from the
statistics: Shipments to U.S. Armed Forces and diplomatic
missions abroad for their own use; shipments between the
United States and Puerto Rico, between the United States
and its possessions (including the Virgin Islands), and
between these outlying areas; exports from U.S. possessions;
intransil shipments through the United States; transactions
not considered to be of statistical importance, such as
personal and household effects; temporary exports; low-
valued or noncommercial exports by mail; issued monetary
coins of all component metals; and gold in the form of ores,
concentrates, waste, scrap, and refined bullion. Exports of
silver in these forms are included in the statistics, unless
'otherwise noted. (Information on gold movements, pre-
viously shown in Report FT 2402, appears in Report FT
990 effective January 1975.)
Exports of Domestic/Foreign Merchandise
The official U.S. export statistics are compiled by the
Bureau of the Census primarily from copies of Shipper's
Export Declarations which are required to be filed with
E'ustoms officials, except for Department of Defense
Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid shipments which are
reported directly to the Bureau of the Census by the
Department of Defense and shipments by qualified ex-
porters who have been authorized to submit data in the
form of magnetic tape, punched cards, or monthly Shipper's
Summary Export Declarations directly to the Bureau of the
Census. The statistics are reported as exports of domestic or
foreign merchandise. Exports of domestic merchandise
include commodities which are grown, produced, or manu-
factured in the United States, and commodities of foreign
origin which have been changed in the United States from
Ithe form in which they were imported, or which have been
~ahanced in value by further manufacture in the United
States. Exports of foreign merchandise consist of commodi-
ties of foreign origin which have entered the United States
as imports and which, at the time of exportation, are in
substantially the same condition as when imported.
Export Valuation

Fas. Export Value


SThe value reported in the export statistics generally is
Iquivalent to a f.as. (free alongside ship) value at the U.S.
port of export, based on the transaction price, including
nd freight, insurance and other charges incurred in


placing the merchandise alongside the carrier at the U.S.
port of exportation.
Export Monthly Carryover
It is the objective of the compiling procedures to include
shipments, insofar as practicable, in the statistics for the
actual month of exportation. For purposes of the statistics,
the month of exportation is generally based on the date
when the shipment leaves the United States. (For vessel or
air shipments it is the date when the carrier departs or is
cleared from the port of export.) However, as indicated
above for imports, because of processing problems (e.g., late
receipt of a document for an end-of-month shipment.
rejection of a shipment by the computer because the data
fail to meet certain edit criteria established to protect the
accuracy of the statistics, etc.), there is an overall average
carryover of about 5 percent (in terms of value) of the
shipments from the actual month of exportation to a
subsequent month, usually the succeeding month. These
limitations should be borne in mind when making month-
to-month comparisons.
Cumulations of data over at least 4-month periods are
desirable to identify underlying trends. Month-to-month
changes in imports, exports, and similar series often reflect
primarily irregular movements, differences in monthly
carryover, etc.
Estimated Data for Export Shipments Valued
Under $1,000 to Countries Other Than
Canada, Under $2,000 to Canada
The overall export and Schedule B section and division
totals include sample estimates for shipments valued
5251-51,999 to Canada and for shipments valued
$251-$999 to countries other than Canada. Data for
shipments valued $250 and under to all countries are also
estimated, based on established percentages of individual
country totals, and included in the Schedule B Section 9
totals regardless of the commodity exported. It is estimated
that the unadjusted overall total is subject to a sampling
error of less than one-tenth of one percent, and the
unadjusted Schedule B section or division totals are subject
to sampling errors of about one percent. In addition, the
Schedule B Section 9 total is subject to possible error in the
estimated data for shipments valued $250 and under; and
the overall total, and the individual totals for sections other
than Section 9, to a more limited extent. Such $250 and
under shipments represent about 1.5 percent of the total
value of exports, and about 60 percent of the Schedule B
Section 9 total.
Other Sources of Error
in the Statistics
Monthly import and export figures are subject to the
possibility of errors which may arise from sources other
than sampling errors, discussed above. Among these are
errors in the reporting and/or processing of information as
to commodity classification, value and other statistical
factors, month of inclusion (see paragraphs on import and
export carryover, above), and the undercounting of exports
to Canada due to the non-receipt of Shipper's Export
Declarations. For 1973, the undercounting amounted to
about one billion dollars. In the case of imports the









information as to value and commodity classification (as
well as country of origin and net quantity) is verified by
Customs officials on entries filed for transactions valued
over $250 which are ordinarily subject to examination for
Customs appraisement purposes, thus considerably reducing
the possibility of error. In addition, the procedures used to
compile both the import and export statistics include clerical
and computer processing checks designed to protect the
accuracy of the statistics to the fullest practicable extent.
Merchandise Trade Balances

Two trade balances are presented in this report:
I) The balance between exports based on f.a.s. values
and imports based on f.a.s. values.
2) The balance between exports based on f.a.s. values
and imports based on c.i.f. values with adjustments for
imports from affiliated sellers abroad.to reflect arms-length
equivalent prices.
Both balances are useful for certain purposes. The first
balance corresponds to a measurement of the international
payments or credit flows resulting from merchandise trade
between the U.S. and foreign countries. The second balance
is based on concepts similar to those used by most foreign
countries, and therefore provides a reference for com-
parison with the trade balances published by those coun-
tries.

Revisions to the Statistics

Revisions are carried into the statistics on a periodic
basis. Data for 1974 and 1975 appearing in the 1975
monthly issues of this report are presented as follows:

1975 Statisitcs

a. January through November 1975 issues: figures are as
originally issued, except as noted below.


b. December 1975 issue: figures reflect revisions for
prior months of the year issued with December 1975
statistics or earlier, as noted below.

1974 Statistics

a. January through May 1975 issues: figures reflect
revisions issued with December 1974 statistics or
earlier.
b. June through December 1975 issues: figures reflect
revisions to 1974 data issued with June 1975 statistics
or earlier.

In addition to the revisions which are made on a periodic
basis, instances may occur where a significant error in the
statistics for a month of the current year is discovered after
the statistics for that month are compiled. If the error is of
sufficient importance to require correction prior to the time
that the regular revisions are carried, the correction is made
and so noted in this report.


Sources of Further Information

Additional foreign trade statistics and information re-
garding coverage, valuation, sampling, and qualifications
which should be considered by users of the statistics are
contained primarily in the following publications: Report
FT 990, Highlights of U.S. Export and Import Trade; FT
135, U.S. General Imports, Schedule A Commodity by
Country; FT 410, U.S. Exports, Schedule B Commodity by
Country; and the Guide to Foreign Trade Statistics.
Information regarding additional sources of statistics, the
methodology used in seasonally adjusting the data, and
other matters relating to foreign trade statistics may be
obtained from the Bureau of the Census, Washington, D.C.
20233.








5

Table 1. U.S. Exports (ta.s. Value Basis), General Imports (f.a.s. Value Basis), and Merchandise Trade Balance.

Adjusted for Seasonal and Working-Day Variation, by Month: January 1974 to May 1975

(In millions of dollars. Sec Explanat on of Stat ilt[ is ir information .-n caveraF df inl ions of export and iimpart aalue- ina trade oal-
ances, and source. oF error in the data. All data ,ho-n for 1974 ind 1975 rercl ct ,osonal adjustment Iactors intri-uced in Iinur$ I.-5ii

Per od and January- lanar, February March April Ma [ June lulv Au t i epem t- c .orc r r.o- b, .r-
SerIes May nbe n-i or

1974

Expor' ............. 38.084 7 ".in.2 7,548.9 7.b75.4 8.107.8 7.8F2. 6,.316.6 6,307.5 8.379.7 8.396.3 a,672-.9 A.973.6 1.862.3
F.a.s. import value.. 37,844.9 6,496.4 7,317.2 ."1 .6 8,2 1.8 8.264.5 ,8;7?.4 8,918.0 9.-61.9 8,690 1 5.:79.1 8,964. 9 "249..9
Merchandise triae
balance............. .239.8 t+53.4 .231.1 -116.? .83.' -.12.1 -25.A. -6LO.5 -882.2 -301.8 -96. ? .. -3;7.n

1975

Exports .......... 43,631.5 9,411.9 8,7R9.0 n,715 9 8 aR9 6 8,14l.1
F.a.s. import value.. 39,936.? 9,622.4 7.h72.r 7 335 6 8 012 8 7.093.4
Merchandise trade
balance ............. 3,695 3 -210.5 .917.0 ,1.i80 3 .a 6 i,OS0.7

'Represents exports Li domestic ar..1 oreL9n m.erchanaise excluding Depi-rtment of Defe'rse Miltarrv s i'ance Pr.ram C r ir, -Aid rip~ren.


Table 2. U.S. Exports (f.a.s. Value Basis). General Imports (c.i.f. Value Basis), and Merchandise Trade Balance.

Adjusted for Seasonal and Working-Day Variation, by Month: January 1974 to May 1975

(In mill ions of dollar.;. See Explanaclor. of Statistics for information on coverage, aosinltions of export jnd Ir.potl values ars n 'rac. bal-
ances, and sources of error ,rn rne data. Ail nat i shoi for 1974 and 1975 relelt ji,.onja L jures i.er.t factor- jntr.;rodL-:-u ir JJpur, 1975

Period and January- Jenuam r fe- riar. March April M. Jur. Jul .ug-u L S e.. Ocr E ,r1 or 5 c- Iecer.-
series Ma. btr c-r r e r

1974

Exports' ............ 38,084 7 ;.150.2 7,548.9 7,625.4 8107.8 7,652.4 8,316.6 8A.307.5 8,379.7 8,39F..3 A.677.9 b.97i.6 8,862.3
C.t.f. Import value.. 40,77 ..]) ;.019.2 7,881.9 8,310.8 8,638..2 8,."1.2 .2 9,6 9,610 9,9r & 9.377.b 9, 5. O 9.6-3.1 9,942.3
Merchandise trade
balan ce...... ....... -?.687 3 .131.0 -333.0 4.85.l -.-31.1 -1 268.6 -939.R -1,303.3 -1,619.1 -981.5 -777.9 -67'.. -I,08I).i

1975

Exports ............. 43,631 5 9,411.9 ,:789.0 a.715 9 8,569 6 8 145.1
C.I.i. tiport value.. 43,129.8 10.364.5 8.440.7 7.893 5 8 00 0 7 631.1
Merchandise trade
balance............ +501.7 -93?.6 *346.3 .822? -230 a +514.0

'Represent esport- ot domestic ario foreiLn m.ercninle excluding Departr.ent I! ir-l.nre Miiitar'y aisintant ProTir. .-;rnt -4 E,-iernt-.











Table 3. U.S. Exports (f.a.s. Value Basis) of Merchandise Showing Department of Defense (DOD) Military

Assistance Program Grant-Aid Shipments, by Month: January 1974 to May 1975
I In millions of dollars. See Explanation of Stati-tlcr for Information on coverage, definition of f.a.s. export value, and sources of error in
the data. Lnadjuseud total- represent maun .f unrounded figures and hence may %ary slightly from sum of rounded amounts)

Fspo.rt excluding DOD Exports Including D Grnt-Ad
Crint-Ald DOD Grant-Aid


Peri d Doe.ic Dome -tic Domestic
a and D,-mesli, and DomsLtc, Western Other
loreign, Total
forei n o reign, unsajustea foreign, unadjusted Europe countries

ji. nadjusted unadjusted


1974

January-December...................... (') *7,907.2 96,544.4 98,506.3 97,143.5 599.1 99.6 499.5

January-May ]8,fil 7 39.41J 3 38,878.8 39.624 5 39,088 0 209 2 53.0 156.3

January ....... ...................... .150.2 F. s ?24. 6,743.7 6,866.9 6,785.8 42.1 14.7 27.3
rebruary............................. .?548.9 7,?92.2 7,200.8 7,334.0 7.242.7 41.9 16.3 25.6
March................................. .6;?, .4 8,497.8 8,384.3 8,525.5 8,412.0 27.7 9.7 18.0
April................................. 8.107." 6,37-.1 8,252.8 8,408.7 8,289.3 36.6 6.4 30.1
May................................. ?7.52.4 .4?8.3 8,297.2 8,489.4 8,358.3 61.1 5.8 55.3
June ................................. 3.. .16.6 8 3?7.4 8,211.4 8,384.3 8,268.4 56.9 8.8 48.1

July.................................. .30',. 7,655.4 7.553.? 7,695.2 7,593.0 39.9 3.2 36.7
Auguslt................................. 8.31? .7 7.928.9 7,800.6 7.998.0 7.869.9 69.2 4.1 65.0
September............................ ;.-A.. ;,r07.9 7,503.6 7,669.1 7,564.7 6J.2 4.8 56.3
October............................... 8..872. 8.9?6.2 8,780.0 8,994.1 8,847.8 67.8 7.4 60.5
November.............................. 78.73., 9,343.3 9,224.3 9,397.5 9,278.5 54.2 8.1 46.1
December .............................. 8,.8?.3 5,7r"2.8 8,592.3 8,743.5 8,633.0 40.7 10.2 30.6

1975

January-May... 43. 4,,31- 5. 44, 323.2 45,242.0 44,549.4 266.2 16.5 249.6

January............................... 9,111.4 9.123.9 8,948.7 9,202.8 9,027.5 78.8 5.2 73.7
February.............................. 6,' ). 8,199.8 8,368.9 8,545.5 8,414.6 45.7 3.3 42.4
March................................ ., '~1 9 9.a37 6 9.29. 2 9,466 5 9,324.1 28 9 2.2 26.7
April.................................. ,h t 9,012 7 8,a84 1 9,074 4 8.945 9 61 7 3.6 58.1
May.................................... 14i. A l .l01.8 i 8,76.3 8,932 8 8,837.3 51.0 2.2 48.8
June..................................

July................................. ..
August.5 ...............................
-epLembe r .... .........................
October................... ...........
November..............................
December.............................

%Adjustea lor seasonal and worKi rn-da vsar ital.r, :lren--r r-onal afjutennt actors introduced In January 1975. See footnote I on front
page.
'Represents only export hlipments frr-m the 'nitze l tatll ll no dillers froun DOD Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid shipment figures under
th0i program as Iolloas Ia) Tran.sfr- nf the mtterfil prycuro nut-ilde the United Sltates and transfers from DOD owerseBj stocks irom export
shpinenls. fo) Extort value i. f.a..;., h-r'a : LOLi value, ir Inmjot instances, is f.o.b., point of origin. Ic) Data for shipents reported by
the DOD for a given month are lnclu aa ir, Bur iu o thI C-nsu- reports Ir the second month subsequent to the month reported by the DOD.
'Annual total is not shown for seaaorall aoa-tro t;a. IJrai u-ted dats should be used for annual totals.










Table 4. U.S. Imports o Merchandise, by Month: January 1974 to May 1975

(In illlons of dollars. See xLaplanaton of 5laLiatlca fur infornnat on n coverage, aeflniLLons of I.&.s. arena c.I.L. Lport .alueI, ana .uurnsl
of error in Ine data. Unadjusted totals represent sun of unrounded figures and hence nay vary slightly from sui, ., ro.nrden a-io.nt

L1.S. Imports of merchandise

P.a.s. value C.i.i. -alue

Period General imports imptorts Gen rtt s ivp.r I i


Seasonal ly cUnonnsupt lor, Se sorally ci.r,.u.,.t itn,
adjusted' Unadj u d unadjusted adjusteao Lirnauajusea


1974

January-December..................... ". 1 100,218.1 99,369.2 I 107 .996.1 lui,111.6

January-May............................ 37,844.9 36,205.2 37,776.1 40,772.0 41,161. 10, 71.4

January ................................. 6,496.8 6,612.4 6.468.5 7,019.2 7,144.1 n,991..
February............................... 7,317.2 6,644.0 6,633.3 7,881.9 7,156.8 i.146.2
March................................. 7,741.6 7,781.1 7,684.9 8,310.8 d,J5J.2 .256.1
April.................................. 8,024.8 8,333.0 8,239.5 8,638.9 8,970.6 8,8d7.9
May................................... 8,264.5 6,634.7 8,750.0 8,921.2 9,516.8 9.447.6
June................................... 8,573.4 8,498.0 8,449.8 9,256.4 9,174.9 9.124.1

July..................................... 8,918.0 8,961.7 8,870.6 9.610.8 9,657.9 9.564.0
August.................................. 9,261.9 9,091.5 8,997.6 9,998.8 9,614.8 9.716.i
September...................... ........ 8,698.1 b.362.4 8,296.6 9,377.8 9,015.8 n,94d.3
October................................. 8.769.1 v.090.0 9,J30.9 9.4 0.8 9,796.7 9,734.1
November............................... 8,964.7 8,876.8 6,8U5.1 9,653.1 9,558., 9,480.9
December................................. 9,249.9 9,132.4 9,142.4 9,942.3 9,Y 16.0 9,t25

1975

January-Ms.y............................ 39,936.2 39,980.2 30.812.1 43, ?19.a 43,13.8 43.008.3

January................................ 9,622.4 9,822.5 9.,688.6 10.361.5 10 i u. 10,563.9
February ............ .................... 7,872.0 7,162.7 7,130.9 d,441U.7 7,oMO.2 7,647.3
March.............. ...... .............. 7,335 6 7,455.9 7,125.3 ?,8923.5 ,0 3.0 7,992.1
April......... ... ................... 8.,.012.8 8,181.1 -,131.4 B,i00.0 ,964.8 8,934.3
May.. ................................. 7,093.4 7, i .0 :, 14.? :,631.1 7, 7 7.870.8
J ne......................... .. ....... .

July..................................
August.. .............................
September..............................
October ...............................
November...............................
December...............................

'Adjusted for seasonal and working-day variation using seasonal adjustment factors introauce a ir .Janjuar 1975.
'Annual total is not snown for seasonally aajuted data. Unadjusted data slhouji c i" ea for .anali total.








8

Table 5. U.S. Exports (f.a.s. Value Basis) of Domestic Merchandise, Including Department of Defense (DOD) Military

Assistance Program Grant-Aid Shipments--Schedule B Sections and Selected Divisions. Seasonally Adjusted
and Unadjusted, by Month: January 1974 to May 1975
In o!li- n o dollars.. SIe fvpl;nrion otr St3rEslCs for Information on coverage. .eetinition of f.a.E. ejporr value, and sources of error in
c-i. Jut-. Irn3idjusled tocrli repre-.nt .-u. of urrounded figures and hence n.;y vary Elightli from sui of rounded amounts I

Schedule B sections and selected divisionsL
PeriAd
i I ?1 3 4 I 6 7' 11 72 73 8 9

SeaonJally iljusted'




Janu ry-May............. i,q9R..7 .32.1 4,691.8 1,042.9 '526.i 3,415.1 4,3_0.2 14,204.6 6,217.6 2,706.2 5,315.9 2,151.3 '976.9

Januiar ................ 1.191..2 107.E 851. 171.1 '73.3 641.0 795.0 2,669.3 1,177.8 513.3 943.0 393.3 4184.1
Fbru r............... .. I. ?2L'.J 1 .6 9t.:. 212.3 496.5 679.7 826.1 2,804.4 1,192.9 522.4 1,113.5 407.3 4174.2
Hirch.................. 1.218.3 A9.6 9610.9 176.2. 'li..9 694.3 858.8 2,809.5 1,236.7 547.7 1,082.5 433.2 '192.3
April ................... 1.216.5 lu .9 979.9 2'6.2 'l124.2 735.6 919.9 3,034.0 1.30?.6 565.4 1,136,3 448.3 4207.8
[L, .................... l.0?.1 116.2 939.0 .1.7.1 '131.7 664.5 940.4 2,887.4 1.3(7.6 557.4 1,070.6 469.2 '318.5
June.................... 111 .6 111.; 911.. '91. '134.2 767.5 970.7 3,203.1 1,341.9 586.7 1,299.0 465.7 '226.7
July................. 1.133.6 1,2.1 693.i 323.9 4164.0 775.6 96?.3 3,182.2 1.391.6 601.0 1,160.3 447.5 '222.0
Auget................... 1,07 .3 103.5 90F.. 3 100.9 '110.6 711.0 1,u1U.2 3,355.1 1,497.8 661.4 1.183.4 460.2 4233.1
eptei b r ............... L.023.. 75.4 I-624. 311.9 '86.9 780.8 946.8 3,469.1 1,506.3 622.6 1.323.3 461.1 '224.6
October........... ... 1.147.0 10:.: 766.s 61..1 '112.2 750.4 996.0 3,687.2 1,576.2 635.1 1,132.9 456.4 '216.0
.avlu .eer.. ................ 1.29..B 103.9 966. *472.9 '118.5 63.8 950.9 3,663.4 1,607.9 639.9 1,4?5.3 467.2 '239.6
December............. 1.61.; 1.7 99.0 2I6.3 '166.3 797.4 964.4 3,589.1 1.58?.0 573.0 1.383.8 441.3 7247.7

197:

January-May............. ,554.2 607.4 ',''...9 2,047.6 5a2 .6 3,675.5 4,493.0 11,723.9 8,337.2 3,055.5 6,421.8 2,285.0 1,264.0

Jinuar............ .... 1.89.7 144.9 1 0I:i..r, 4-9.2 'liD.9 862.3 927.0 3.486.9 1,655.5 606.3 1,169.6 471.1 '238.6
FLerb r, ................ 1.19.1 107.0 813.4 399.3 !'04.5 e96.4 879.9 3,627.3 I1 .6 1. 606.3 1,428.6 454.1 '228.5
Pr rct ................... 1,251. 136.? 80?.5 133.0 '120.8 761.7 905.3 3,457.2 3,620.2 598.6 1,299.0 449.0 '237.8
April................... I,?50.9 116.7 '1., 378.9 475.7 700.8 898.9 3,673.6 1,755.5 630.4 1,265.9 458.9 274.9
M ........... .......... ,4. 102.6 : .] 407 ? n68.9 654.3 881.9 3,478.9 1,684.8 614.0 1.258.7 451.9 284.2
J,,ne ........... .........
Jui ; ....................
AuguSt ........ ........
ptember .............
Octo r ... ..........
[.a. t e r ................
cn.e-r...............



1974

Jinuar.-DErcembnr......... 13.963.4 1,247.4 31,934..' .44'.4 1.423.3 8,822.0 11,165.9 36,186. 16,668.6 7,019.2 14,500.7 5,349.8 2,686.6

Janru.r)--May............. 5, 463.3 5,033.,3 .-18 4 256.5 3,479.1 4,474.3 1i,0;1.7 6,442.7 2,770.? 5,658.4 2,206.2 976.9

January................. 1.194.8 9u.s .ia?.4 14.1 73.3 604.4 756.1 2,514.5 1.118.9 520.5 875.1 371.3 184.1
FetruAry................ 1.152.0 8.2 98..1 176.6 96.5 653.9 795.5 2,734.3 1,136.8 489.5 1,107.9 382.9 174.2
,L.rch.................. 1.2;57.' 79.1 1 .99. 1 2.3 I'i0.9 ;34.5 934.3 3,366.6 1,414.6 594.3 1.359.6 483.4 192.3
.prl ................... 1.176. 94.9 1.0 9.1 6 .23.2 -' .' ;7 4.6 95'.l 3,16.7 1.353.4 575.6 1,256.7 468.0 207.8
MIU ..................... l.i'84.F 111.1 1.014.1 "81.0 131.7 711.7 1,036.3 3.268. 1.416.7 590.8 1,259.0 500.6 218.5
June .................... 1.'74. 106.9 911. 31..4 138.2 775.9 983.3 3.267.1 1.360.7 593.1 1.313.3 474.1 226,7
Jul .................... 1l. i 90.U 768.4 36.; 164.0 797.3 936.1 2.809.9 1.334.6 569.1 906.2 417.1 222.0
-u : .................. 1.0u0. 97. ; .4 336.0 110.6 811.9 999.1 3.019.6 1.440.6 625.7 953.1 '61.6 233.1
Septe ter. ... .... ......l... I. 1iu. 1 3.1 61:.3 ;3'.? 6E.9 725.3 B66 .' 3,133.5 1.358.7 597.7 1,183.1 439.9 224.6
Uc t n r...... ...... ...... 1.17 .6 174.1 "6 .3 149.4 11?.? 7?8.7 1.017.9 3,768.3 1,603.0 669.4 1.495.9 473.3 216.0
Iouemtb r............... 1.44. .1 141.1 1.0i4.7 464.4 113.5 729.4 935.7 3.65..4 1,603.1 35.4 1.413.9 468.6 239.6
L.ce.thc r........... .... 1.3 1.8 140. 7 9 .- .1.9 166.3 714.: 931.2 3.439.9 1,525.0 558.1 1,37e.8 409.0 247.7

L9:5

Januarv-M ,.1 ............ 6,08. 2 .3 ,3i 3.9 I, ''?.I 5?8 3,721 3 4,611.8 16,;9 9 3 8,644.? 3,125.4 7,026.6 2,335.4 1,264.0

jarn,.ar..... ..... 1.64I.; 1?2.9 I1. .0 3!7.1 140.9 620.. ) 911.2 3.312.5 1.612.4 615.7 1,084.2 454.6 238.6
Fi r.ar ......... ...... I 336.2 86.6 I'9.0 337.1 1041.9 669.9 847.4 3,536.6 1.545.0 568.7 1,122.9 426.4 228.5
rlarch............... .... 1,26.6 10.1 4892.3 3'> 6 12u.6 76..8 949.6 4,0: 1.8 1,803.3 649.5 1,599.1 488.6 237.8
.pr ............... ... 2 101.6 6 1. 3 7. 949.3 3,105.1 1,8 3.6 641.1 1,410.2 482.3 274.9
M-y ... .... .......* .O( 4 94.1 7i,5.. 13A.. Bs.9 707.3 4,H4.2 3,990.3 iB.R.T 650.2 1,'1U 4 463.5 284.2
Jin ... ...
J,11 ...... .......... ...
.pt-...t.. .... .
~~,'1 r,-. b .... ...........
r.: r .............. .
c r.e r.... .

I.,L c r ,- r .. ....

S h.c Ill i- cr ia'tor .d :.cC c 1 J l ian di r pti onp s e r. a f3 l lou.

U. Foo.i .-,1 lie sitn '..l 7. raci-tner .and tranai ort Equipler.c
1. Et.: ra s sr r.obicc- 71. Macr.,cr-.r, oth-r than electric
2. t r..li .Ir.r -;1-. ,.,edbt -. tc pi fu l-: 72. Elecr rical .'-acr.tnery, apparatus, and appli'nceE
3. Milnril ti. : lutrcInt '. .and rel..red .maril-r 73. iTrrdport equipaiient
n-. nd ra -cEablk ol% and 'fii 8. MirceLLaneoui marnufactur. d articles, n.e.c.
5. .i -' l-, 9. i3mm.dlir .: and Erar., atCEior not classified according to kind
6. Njr.. .[L[ur. -13dadi Cl. .:L t Chlrtl. b," .-aterai
2Seascnall, jju'. iiur ic-r ecto'r. r ; ,itffr llnh[rlv [rom thE sui' of dulsLonc 731, 7.2 and 73 itnce each is independently ad-
justed.
'AdjusLud t-r Ics.:r.ul ar ..J orkng -da /,ar.tton u. rng 'eonal aJju;itimen fctlors Itroduc Ed in Janlary 1975. See footnote I on front
page. Annual, r.:t i -r ni[ :r-u i-or in j-.nal'. djuited litE. UI-aidjuStij J3E[ htouljd be ujed for annual totals. The adjuEted section
totals in fiL.: [cble i n i .tl irt ou r..ll monthl EOLt l in tables 1, 2, jon 3 wijre IdjustEd Ir.aependentiv.
'In ci. sLt:.r.c. of ier.on. rbli- *eacznal patterns for thi lectton. no EsEsonal ad]ustmTent lacEors have been applied to the data.



I













Table 6. U.S. General Imports (f.a.s.Value Basis) of Merchandise, Schedule A Sections. Seasonally Adjusted and
Unadjusted, by Month: January 1974 to May 1975

(In milJions of dollars. See Explanatlo.n 1 St StiISLcE for Inlo.rmai un on coverage, definition ol f.a.5. import .aiu, and source j rror
in the data. Unadlusted totals represent sui of unrounded figures and hence may vary slightly iromn suI. of rounoau anounts,

SchedlJe A sections'
Per lod
0 I 2 3 4 f u 7 9

Seasonally adjusted'


1974

January-May ......... 4,048.3 5 0.? 2,411.0 8,975.1 '166.1 1,292.0 6,197.4 9,480.0 1,692.3 z 8

Janusry............. 730.4 105.6 443.4 1,236.3 '23.9 199.5 1,d62.9 1,809.5 .75.1 '
February............ 795.5 100.5 470.1 1,570.8 '24.8 241.3 1,220.3 1,833 ? 732.8 '
March....... .... .. 942.8 111.9 509.8 1,659.1 '35.3 258.2 1,315.3 1,885.6 762.4 1
April...... ......... 766. 111.3 496.1 3.343.4 '10.0 27b .9 1,233.' 1,935.2 :4 'I
May ................. 81 8 117.9 521.6 2.17 .5 '142.2 314.1 1.345.9 2,016. 77L.3 '
June................ 799.9 123.' 3543.8 2,264.6 '26.6 326.2 1,481.3 2,067.3 B03.4 1
July................. 803.0 138.5 606.1 2,369.8 '70.1 365.9 1,459. 2,216.0 791.7 '1
August ............. 761.6 137.1 546.9 2,506.5 '44.6 383.6 1,670.4 2,209.6 837.1 '1
Sepi ember............ .60.3 1?2.; 504.0 2,297.6 '54.2 409.2 1,614.4 ?,113.6 820.7 '2
Ocober............. 623.6 92.. 494.0 2,429.3 '79.5 430.9 1,732.3 1,9.8.4 818.8 '2
November............ 858.8 81.3 497.9 2,447.1 '49.9 424.3 1,745.3 .039.8 834.9 '2
December........... 846.0 97.0 513.4 2,411.2 '53.3 426.7 1,783.8 2,021.7 829.8 '

1975

January-May ......... 3,279.0 636.1 3.314 3 10,707.5 3240.9 1,654.5 6,844.0 9.305.1 3.094 '1,0

January............ 677.2 118.3 491.2 3.046.3 '48.5 432.1 1,740.8 1,835.9 783.8 1'
February............ 668.9 124.9 156.3 1,91..3 '44.7 323.3 1,448.8 i,BO0 .4 713 2 1
March....... ........ 666.2 154.7 4 1.6 1,344.5 '55.1 317.6 1.326.f. ?,061.2 712.7 1
April......... ...... 656.3 120.? 167.0 2,443.3 '40.7 309.5 1,248.3 1,773.3 718.9 '2
lay. ................. 610.4 11R.0 132.2 1.957 I '51 9 271.7 1,078.9 1.411.3 665.6 i
June..........
July..... .......
August ...............
Sept e ber ...........
October .............
November.............
December... ....

Unadjusted


1974

January-Derember ..... 9,386.2 1,322.3 6.055.1 25.127.3 544.3 4.u17.7 17,716.3 I24,02.; 5,426.3 2,2

January-May .......... 4094.4 520.6 2,398.7 9,318.6 166 I 1,353.1 6,166.9 9,861.0 3,596.6 a

January.............. 783.0 100.6 428.3 1.325.6 23.9 202.9 1,017 .6 1,887.3 640.6
February........... 744.6 86.1 401.9 1.588.1 24.8 228.0 1,059.2- 1,713.; 63 ..5
March................ 913.6 104.1 502.7 1.b2? .n0 35.3 266.2 1,291.3 1,940.3 ;32.7
April.............. 825.8 113.3 494.6 ?,294.2 410.0 316.0 1,271.6 2.078.4 719.8
May........ .......... 827.1 16. 71.2 ,29 .8 42.2 339.9 1,467.0 2,340.3 7 .66.
Jure................ 76 .5 127.5 576.9 2, u u.2 26.6 533 .4 1,465.7 2, 08.6 797.0
July................ 774.1 126.6 544.1 2,41i.2 70.1 549.8 1,507.3 2,94.1 883. 1
August.............. 766.2 112.7 544.7 2,504.0 44.6 380.5 1,670.4 1,946.8 933.3 1
September.......... 647.8 111.7 508.0 2,125.3 54.2 387.5 1,549.8 1,940.3 836.3 2
October.............. 656.6 113.3 514.3 2,273.b 79.5 431.8 1,833.9 2,061.5 903.9 2
November........... 789.2 102.7 475.0 2,207.3 49.9 397.1 1,767.7 2,035.7 824.0 2
December............ 888.3 107.2 197.5 2, 490.8 53.3 385.7 1,728.5 2,01 .6 7l.8 2

1975

January-May .......... 3,293.6 596.3 2,2-4.4 11,203.8 240.9 1.7.1.1 6,70.5 9,535.4 3,395.3 1,0

January.... .......... 713.8 117.3 47i.9 3,114.9 48.5 437.2 1,749.5 1,894.7 ;55.6 2
February............. 626.6 106.4 390.6 1,937.4 44.7 306.2 l,249.0 1,668.8 62l 9 J
March...... ......... 657.5 143.7 456.3 1.77.6 55.1 340.8 1.313.3 ,?136.4 667.8 I
April............... 684.5 119.1 468.1 2,438.4 40.7 351.9 1,243.9 1,699.2 70r3.8 2
May....... ....... .. 611.0 116.9 451.2 1.937 5 51.9 285.6 1,141.; 1,934.5 626.3 1
June. ...... .........
July. ............
Au u ...............
September.........
October .............
November.. ......
December...........

'Schedule A section descriptions are as folLon-s
0. Food and live animals 3. Cbemicals
1. Beverages and tobacco 6. Manufactured goods clailied chiefly b) niteril
2. Crude materials, inedible, except luels 7. Machinery and transport equipnenl
3. Mineral fuels, lubricants, and related materials 8. Miscellaneoui arliauai tureo articles, n....
4. Animal and vegetable oils ana fats 9. Commodirte and iransactions nt3 cllassaiieo ccorijon to kha,
'AdJusted for seasonal and uorking-da) varisaton using seasonal adjustment factors inlrod.ced in January 19;5. See foolnlte 1 in Iront
page. Annual totals are not shown for seasonally adjusted data. UnadJusted data should De u-ed for annual totals. The aojustea 'ecttln
totals in this table and similar overall monthly totals In tables i and 4 *ere adjusted independently.
SIn t.e absence of demonstrable seasonal pattern for this aecL on, no seasonal aajuslment facLors h.se been appiLed to tne data.


26.2

i5.7
56.1
8. .I
71
79.0
73.4
8J.6
94.9
88.3
01.5
15.3
'28.2
17;.7




14 I

'18.0
81.0
85.4
31.2
9*6.5


5 .7

26.2

85.1
.6.
71.9
79.0
73.4
83.6
94.9
8.3
i1.5
15.3
28.2
17.7




14.1

18.0
8i .u
85.
31.2
h.














Table 7. U.S. General Imports (c.i.f. Value Basis) of Merchandise. Schedule A Sections. Seasonally Adjusted and

Unadjusted, by Month: January 1974 to May 1975
(In million of dollars. See Explanation of Statistics for information on coverage definition of c.i.f. import value. and sources oferrorin
the data. tnadjusteo totals represent som of unrour.ced figures and rence mi) var) slightly from sum of rounded amounts)

Schedule A sections'
Perr id
I n 1 4 5 6 7 a 9

Seasonal y ad lusted"


1974

January-May..........

January ..
February. ...
srch.... ... .
April ...... ...... .
Play ......... ........
June. .. ... ......
Jul .. .... ........
Aurust
SeptE nber. .
October.. .... .
Nove oEr. .
December .. ....

1975

Janr.ry-May .........

Jamuarv... ..... .
Febru ry. ... ........
March. .. ......
4pr l .. ... ....
Ma' ...
June .
Jul ...
Aurust ..
September. .
Oc toner.
NIlo e.ber ..
Decew-ber. .





1974

Jsra.uary-December

January-May ..........

January ..
February............
Mar h. .... ....
April ................
May ..... ...........
June ................
Ju. .. ........
0ue sTr. .. .
September.
Oct ober. ... ..
November. ...
0'eetmber. .. .. .

19:4

lanuary-M va .........

Jinuar) .
February. .. .
March
April


Julv

Septesoer..
October
riosember
December


1,366.6

785.0
85-.3
1 017 1
829.7
877 a
870 0
866.6
822 2
715. 1
676. 1
928.4
vOt. 6




3, i50.3

737 8
726 I
722.9
711.8
6i1. 7


10 131 3

4,416.3

841.5
802.4
985. E
893.6
893.3
836.9
835.4
427.1
701 5
711.9
8.3 2
951.9




3,;-6.3

777.6 F
680.4
713.5
742 4
662. 3


1.441 J

11: 1

109 I
93 2
113.9
123. 4
127. I
138 ?
13? 6
124 0
123 3
123.7
!11.9
117.0




648.6

17?.8
114.,
154.?
129. 7
1 6. .


2,666.8

186 0
,o08 0
25 1.6
.45.8
575.4
,03 6
-uS F
627.8
7.6
-49 I
:52 6
:70.0






5 9 3
:00 8
i1u.4
17 4.
I: I.


91 1




41i9 5
434 3
541.9
.44.2
-30 1


E06 5
S62. I
571

152. 3




2,676.5

540 8
428 "
496.3
716.7
i95.9


9,655.6

I 341 4
1.694 7
I 774.4
2 !10.5
2 334 6
2,453.6
2.5z7.5
2.709.8
2 471.6
3 604.4
2.620.6
- '.7 96




11 ,41i.2

3.259 I
2,036 3
1,435.1
2,598.4


27.355 I

10,026.1

1 450. 1
1,713.3
I 946 5
2 4?7 8
2 458.3
2 261.7
:* 609.-
? 707. I
2 286 2
2,437 7
- 363 8
2 .,-0 9




I 1.9 1.9

3 653.
2 0i8.7
1,5.;;.2
2. 593.?
?,069.4


'174.0

'25 2
'26.0
'3?7
'41.8
'44.0
'27 8
'72 7
ie 5
.'6.3
'82.7
'52.1
'5i.5






'50.5
146 8
,57.6
'42.5


1,386.2

214.3
257.7
275.4
299.2
339 6
348 5
392.7
409 9
440 7
461.7
434 9
456.1




1,760.2

462.5
345 1
336.5
328.6
287 .5


4.306.9

1,451.8

217 9
213 5
283.9
339 0
367.5
355.1
375 4
406.6
417.3
462.6
425.8
412.3




1,831.2

467.6
32F 8
361.0
373.7
30?. 1


6,635.3

1,136 5
1.308.6
1.402.7
1,341.3
1,446 4
1,591.6
1.563.8
1.801 8
1.737 9
1,870.2
1.883.8
1.929.9




7,390.8

1.888. 1
1,564 3
1,429.0
1,346.1
1. lb .3


19.051 5

6,603.1

1.149 0
1.135.9
1.380.3
1.361.4
1.576.9
1.596.4
1.615.4
1.801.B
1.668.4
1.986 1
1.910.2
1.870. 1




;,246.6

I 897 5
1,359 4
1,414.7
1,340.7

1,234.2


10,300.8

1,962.5
1,994.3
2.047.4
2,100.7
2,195.9
2,231.
2,388.1
2,388 9
2.289.1
2.144.9
2.207.3
2.180 3




10.0.1i.0

1.975.0
1,931.4
2,259.2
1,918. 1
1,960.3


26.064.5

10,718.2

2.046 9
1.868.7
2.106.8
2.256.2
2.439.6
2.276.1
? 75E.8
2. 104 6
2.101 4
2.235.0
? 202.9
2 169 4




10,315.7

2,038 2
1,811.7
2,318.0
2,064.2

2,093 6


3,944.7

722.3
780 7
811.1
798.1
832 2
859.7
815.9
883.8
B76.2
873 3
888 ?
886 6




3,854.6

837.2
764 8
765.8
769.7
717.1


10.066 5

3,735.:

684 7
679.2
779.5
769.7
822.2
852 8
944 0
996 9
892 8
964.1
877.1
803.1




3,641.4

807 1
666 9
739.0
753.5

674.A


'848.5

'150.2
'160.3
'176.1
'183.7
'178.2
3189.1
'200.2
193.7
'207.3
'222.2
2a34.3
'223.0




1,041.5

'224.3
'186.2
'190.9
'238.2
'201.9


2.317 4

848.5

150.2
160.3
176.1
183.7
178.2
189 I
200 2
193 7
207 3
221.2
234.3
223.0




1,041.5
224 3
186.2
190.9
238.2

201.9


'Schedule a -ectior desErtpior.n are as follows.
0 Faoa and 1 ie ai-mals
I Beverage' and tobacco
2 Crane materiala ,redble. except fuels
3. ?Hineral fuels. lubricants, and relIted n.arerials


Chemicals
Manufactured gooas classified chiefly ny material
Machinery and transport equipment
Miscellaneous manufacturer articles. n.e s


S Animal and vegetable oils and fats 9 Cornuodilies ana transacrlons nor classified according to hind
'4ajuitel for seasonal snd sorking-day variation uslne seasonal adjustment lacrors introduced in January 1975 See footnote I on front
pic<. .Innual total. re nor shoan for seaonallt adjusted data. ITnadjuEted dara inoula ne used for annual totals The adjusted section
totals in tits ro rai .1 ; l.ilar overall monthly totals In tables 2 and 4 *re adjusted indepenaEntl1
'in rhe absence of demonstrable seasonall patterns for this section, no seasonal adjustment factors have been applied to the data.


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