Summary of U.S. export and import merchandise trade

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Summary of U.S. export and import merchandise trade
Series Title:
FT-900
Physical Description:
v. : ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of the Census
United States -- Bureau of the Census
Publisher:
Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, Foreign Trade Division for sale by the Subscriber Services Section (Publications), Bureau of the Census
Place of Publication:
Washington
Creation Date:
March 1975
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Commerce -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Citation/Reference:
American statistics index
Dates or Sequential Designation:
1974-1976.
General Note:
At head of title: 1977- United States foreign trade.
General Note:
Formerly classed C 56. 210:900 - during the time the Bureau of the Census was subordinate to Social and Economic Statistics Administration.
General Note:
Issues prior to Oct. 1977 were sent to depositories as Item 144.
General Note:
Unnumbered supplements accompany some issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001209840
oclc - 02245761
notis - AFW0105
lccn - 76640395
issn - 0361-0047
sobekcm - AA00005271_00026
Classification:
lcc - HF105 .B73e
ddc - 382/.0973
System ID:
AA00005271:00026

Related Items

Preceded by:
United States foreign trade; export and import merchandise trade
Succeeded by:
United States foreign trade. FT900, Summary of U.S. export and import merchandise trade

Full Text
I Vy I7 L- (b5 Z'




SUMMARY OF U.S.. EXPORT AND

IMPORT MERCHANpt% PDE



!

jJ00.75.3 I OR RELEASE
U,. OEP TOR ) APEW 75 10:00 A.M.
U.S. DEPOMtTOR Y .

Seasona y Adjusted and Una 6aata

S : : Bureau of the Census, Department of Commerce During the first quarter of 1975 (January-March),
| bi i,; n ad today that during March 1975, seasonally exports on a seasonally adjusted basis were at an annual
adjtaited exports on a f.a.a. (free alongside ship) U.S. rate of $107,667 million, or about 10 percent above the
'part of exportation value basis, excluding Department of calendar year 1974 total of $97,907 million. Seasonally
Defense (0D1) Milttry Assistance Program Grant-Aid ship- adjusted imports Ior the first quarter of 19;5 mere at an
smints., lke valued at $8;TIS.?B.lIhlon 1 a and that annual rate of $99,320 million, a level about I percent
ai fsoeaUly adjusted general imports for the month, on a below the calendar year 1974 total of $100,218 million.
tg.i.s. (free alongqlje ship) foreignn port of exportation (These figures are on a f.a.s. value basis.)
'ie .. in h6as amounted to $7,335.6 million.'S' Comparable
'ae:: hinMI adjusted totals for February were $8,789.0 mil- The Bureau also stated that although record high
'Iq:~v '1lm fo reports sand $7,872.0 million for imports. surpluses %ere recorded in March, both the export and
import seasonally adjusted monthly totals were the lowest
s tlhe Bureau, part of the Department's Social and of the vear. The March export total was the lowest
1jl :lrlt- lle 'Statietics Admiltistration (SESA), previously recorded since October 1974 i$8,672.9 million), and
pip 1 ted outi... efectlve. with the January 1975 issue of imports the lowest since February 1974 ($7,317.2 million).
"P itk fl.l.O00 the Cusanas import value in this report
r..: ileplaaed by the "t.a.s. (free alongside ship) foreign During the 4-month period, December 1974-March 1975,
ijll oQitt af deportation import value." Exports have his- seasonally adjusted exports (f.a.a. value basis) averaged
t rI : cai been bhown on a f.a.s. (free alongside ship) $8,944.8 million per month, a level about 4 percent above
E ..Sa. port of exportation basis. Thus, beginning with the the $8,605.6 million average reported for the preceding
L.rl S ee, both the export and Import figures in this 4-month period, August to November 1974. General imports
:. !ri rt. ae on a comparable (f.a.e.) value basis. Definl- (f.a.s. value basis) averaged $8,520.0 million per month
::"' of both i.a.s. import and export values, as well as for the current 4-month period, about 5 percent below the
!:. 't"''ei .l.i. Import value, are given in the "Explanation of $8,923.5 million average reported for the preceding
lrQ'&,...ii tse" section. 4 months.
i .':. :. Bae~ed on the above seasonally adjusted f.a.s. export Exports unadjusted for seasonal change ana excluding
::.: S'ii h.'i::. ItkLt figure, a record high merchandise trade sur- Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid shipments increased
: ls 1l363 milion was recorded in March 1975. from $8,499.8 million in February 'o 19,437.6 million In
49 .' T1 i the Custonm tlport value, the surplus would have March. With Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid ship-
".. !ri :H.20'.9e million.) ments included. exports increased from 18,545.5 million
in February to $9,466.5 million in March. Unr.djusted
..Beasanally adjusted general Imports on a c.i.f. general imports (f.a.s. value basis) aere valued at
t, ts Insurance, and freight) value basis amounted to $7,162.7 million In February as compared to 17,455.9
i"' :.;'"J."lrasA. million in March. Using the c.i.f. import million In March.
:! i:. ...:ul se *snd the f.a.a. export value, the merchandise trade
l.: rilt for March would be $822.4 million..', '"

'"Asjasfw UM" mi alls order varianon, bai not fotar e anng in prie Ilal. Fatos used to adp t 1914 and 1975 data shown in thI, report reprs.nl mioasl Idjunstmn lancto dinend hom
i i'.r "niMy doib liho. 1S74 ihd introduce in Jimy 1915 combined wmel tle approprian rkmg-dos adqusnsint hfactr
M. ibhi m ofld sa ot a 4 llew 1 a maith p dso Ls me desia lbl to idnstlhd u inmnl tires. nnU th o .anm hal in pom ,aons aund t, miie gtrisg an tl pn refle y p nmat lar mnammren
imai In lma t yMras.. It ea mont smll. tgo-lDm il aIE t ngesi in th ovrdl mnally adlustld export and nport mrs am preened in the tnllwing tabit a awt rage pgsaen month
i '" im" L u f s a 1 im I*dM dla dua inrlf t si of dark isd 12 pideriodiarhn naglqibl changes (ero percent) in the leel of eapoartsmporm occurred Pert etage changes or I.ns. import
: luopnih not israu e I p rioads rsior to Jlmmy 1974:

H Month-to-month Averape monthly races of change


Iii- -'i


Series Feb.-Mar. Jan.-Feb. Dec. 1974- Nov.-Dec. Aerage A'erage I months 12 months
13975 1975 Jan. 1975 1974 riEe decline o o 1974- Mar. 1974-
q196-1974 1969-1974 Mar 1975 Mar. 1975
I Percent I Percent (Percent I I P1rcent I Percent i Perceent I PPrcn ~l Prcent

..a., export value. -0.8 -6.6 48.2 -1.2 .3.2 -2.6 -0.6 -1.2
P.a.s. import value. -6.B -18.2 +4.0 .3.2 INA I iNA -4.5 -0.2


Se "ExlalnaiM af Stanlisa" rs daif nrmonsl sn I lnd Inprnl MI InB bisal nces.

Inquiries concerning these figures should be addressd to the Chief, Foreign Trade Division, Bureau of the
Census, Washington, D.C. 20233. Tel: Area Code 301, 763-5140.

S U.S. DEPARTIIENT OF COMMERCE, Social and Economic Statistics Administration. BUREAU OF THE CENSUS

For sale by the Subscribers Services Section (Publications), Social and Economic Statistics Administration,
~ ^ B Washington, D.C. 20233, or any U.S. Department of Commerce district office. Price 10 cents per copy. Annual
subscription (FT 900, 975, 985. and 986 combined) $3.00.















The U.S. import Watplics reflect tflgirg l ent and
nongovernment impn-sPIf merchandise i foreign
countries into the U.S et s.terriWrv ch includes
the 50 States, the Distni=,bt 3L W36 ji,, i Puerto Rico.
The U.S. import statistics e ixMu d ts into the Virgin
Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and other U.S. posses-
sions; and shipments between the United States and Puerto
Rico, between the United States and U.S. possessions, and
between any of these outlying areas. (Data on U.S. trade
with Puerto Rico and with U.S. possessions are published
separately in Report FT 800. Additional data on such trade
and on imports into the Virgin Islands from foreign
countries are presented in reference tabulations.)

The U.S. import statistics also exclude American goods
returned to the United States by its Armed Forces; intransit
shipments through the United States; temporary shipments;
transactions not considered to be of statistical significance,
such as shipments of personal and household effects;
low-valued nondutiable imports by mail; issued monetary
coins of all component metals; and gold in the form of ores,
concentrates, waste, scrap, and refined bullion. Imports of
silver in these forms are included in the statistics, unless
otherwise noted. (Information on gold movements, pre-
viously shown in Report FT 2402, appears in Report FT
990 effective Januay 1975.)

General Imports/Imports for Consumption

The official U.S. import statistics are compiled by the
Bureau of the Census from copies of the import entry and
warehouse withdrawal forms which importers are required
by law to file with Customs officials. The statistics are
presented in terms of both "General Imports" and "Imports
for Consumption." General imports are a combination of
entries for immediate consumption and entries into
Customs bonded warehouses and thus generally reflect total
arrivals of merchandise. Imports for consumption are a
combination of entries for immediate consumption and
withdrawals from warehouses for consumption and thus
generally reflect the total of the commodities entered into
U.S. consumption channels.


Import Valuation

F,a.s. Import Value

The f.a.s. (free alongside ship) value represents the
transaction value of imports at the foreign port of exporta-
tion. It is based on the purchase price, i.e., the actual
transaction value and generally includes all charges incurred
in placing the merchandise alongside the carrier at the port
of exportation in the country of exportation.


OF STATISTICS

C.i.f. Import Value

The c.i.f. (cost, insurance, and freight) value represents
the value of imports at the first port of ietry in the United '
States. It is based on the purchase price and include all
freight, insurance, and other charges (excluding U.S. inDott
duties) incurred in bringing the merchandise front te
country of exportation and generally placing it
the carrier at the first port of entry in the United Stal
the merchandise was acquired in a transaction lH
related parties, the purchase price used in deriving o
value is based on an arm's-length equivalent tranuif~ t
price, i.e., a price which would exist between liisi* t ,
buyers and sellers.
Import Monthly Carryover
It is the objective of the compiling procedures o ijnd I
shipments, insofar as practicable, in the statistics foar ie
actual month of importation. However, for purposs,e e
statistics the month of importation is based On the date 't
official acceptance by Customs of the import entgy or
warehouse withdrawal document. This .may not in all cases
correspond to the actual month of importation. (P.E.-'
example, under the Customs "immediate-delivery" pr- i
cedures, importers may file the import entry up tpi .l 5
workdays after the actual date of importation.) ALbat:
because of processing problems (e.g., late receipt of.
document for an end-of-month shipment, rejection of i
shipment by the computer because the data fail to meet
certain edit criteria established to protect the accuracy of
the statistics, etc.), there is an overall average carryover qf
about 7 percent (in terms of value) of the shipments frieam
the reported month of importation (based on the date of
the import entry or warehouse withdrawal document) tq a.r
subsequent month, usually the succeeding month. In addi
tion, as a result of the aforementioned Customs '"ij
mediate-delivery" procedures, there is a further carryovert ,
presently unknown magnitude from the actual month ao
importation to a subsequent month. These limitati os
should be borne in mind when making month-to-maoth
comparisons.
Cumulations of data over at least 4-month periods am J
desirable to identify underlying trends. Month-to-indnt:
changes in imports, exports, and similar series often reflect
primarily irregular movements, differences in mount~ h
carryover, etc.
Estimated Data for Imports Valued Under $251
The overall import and Schedule A Section 9 totals
include sample estimates for shipments valued under $251.
Therefore, they are subject to sampling error, estimated at
less than one-tenth of one percent for the unadjusted overall
total and about one percent for the unadjusted Schedule A
Section 9 total. This means that we can have about 47
percent confidence that the published unadjusted overall
totals and the unadjusted Schedule A Section 9 totals differ
by less than one-tenth of a percent and one percent,
respectively, from the totals that would have resulted from
a complete tabulation.









". Export Statistics
Coverage
The export statistics reflect, in general, both government
and nongovernment exports of domestic and foreign mer-
chandise from the U.S. Customs territory (includes the 50
States, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico) to
foreign countries, whether the exportation involves a
commercial transaction or not. The statistics, therefore,
Include Department of Defense Military Assistance Program
Grant-Aid shipments, shipments for economic assistance
under the Foreign Assistance Act and shipments of agri-
cultural commodities under P. L. 480 (The Agricultural
Trade Development and Assistance Act of 1954, as amend-
Sed) and related laws. The following are excluded from the
Statistics: Shipments to U.S. Armed Forces and diplomatic
missions abroad for their own use; shipments between the
United States and Puerto Rico, between the United States
and its possessions (including the Virgin Islands), and
Between these outlying areas; exports from U.S. possessions;
Sintransit shipments through the United States; transactions
not considered to be of statistical importance, such as
personal and household effects; temporary exports; low-
valued or noncommercial exports by mail; issued monetary
coins of all component metals; and gold in the form of ores,
: oncentrates, waste, scrap, and refined bullion. Exports of
Silver in these forms are included in the statistics, unless
:otherwise noted. (Information on gold movements, pre-
Sviously shown in Report FT 2402, appears in Report FT
990 effective January 1975.)
Exports of Domestic/Foreign Merchandise
The official U.S. export statistics are compiled by the
SBureau of the Census primarily from copies of Shipper's
Export Declarations which are required to be filed with
Customs officials, except for Department of Defense
Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid shipments which are
reported directly to the Bureau of the Census by the
Department of Defense and shipments by qualified ex-
porters who have been authorized to submit data in the
form of magnetic tape, punched cards, or monthly Shipper's
Summary Export Declarations directly to the Bureau of the
Census. The statistics are reported as exports of domestic or
foreign merchandise. Exports of domestic merchandise
include commodities which are grown, produced, or manu-
factured in the United States, and commodities of foreign
origin which have been changed in the United States from
the form in which they were imported, or which have been
enhanced in value by further manufacture in the United
States. Exports of foreign merchandise consist of commodi-
ties of foreign origin which have entered the United States
as imports and which, at the time of exportation, are in
. substantially the same condition as when imported.
Export Valuation

F.a.s. Export Value


The value reported in the export statistics generally is
equivalent to a f.a.s. (free alongside ship) value at the U.S.
port of export, based on the transaction price, including
inland freight, insurance and other charges incurred in


placing the merchandise alongside the carrier at the U.S.
port of exportation.
Export Monthly Carryover
It is the objective of the compiling procedures to include
shipments, insofar as practicable, in the statistics for the
actual month of exportation. For purposes of the statistics,
the month of exportation is generally based on the date
when the shipment leaves the United States. (For vessel or
air shipments it is the date when the carrier departs or is
cleared from the port of export.) However, as indicated
above for imports, because of processing problems (e.g., late
receipt of a document for an end-of-month shipment.
rejection of a shipment by the computer because the data
fail to meet certain edit criteria established to protect the
accuracy of the statistics, etc.), there is an overall average
carryover of about 5 percent (in terms of value) of the
shipments from the actual month of exportation to a
subsequent month, usually the succeeding month. These
limitations should be borne in mind when making month-
to-month comparisons.
Cumulations of data over at least 4-month periods are
desirable to identify underlying trends. Month-to-month
changes in imports, exports, and similar series often reflect
primarily irregular movements, differences in monthly
carryover, etc.
Estimated Data for Export Shipments Valued
Under $1,000 to Countries Other Than
Canada, Under $2,000 to Canada

The overall export and Schedule B section and division
totals include sample estimates for shipments valued
$251-$1,999 to Canada and for shipments valued
$251-S999 to countries other than Canada. Data for
shipments valued $250 and under to all countries are also
estimated, based on established percentages of individual
country totals, and included in the Schedule B Section 9
totals regardless of the commodity exported. It is estimated
that the unadjusted overall total is subject to a sampling
error of less than one-tenth of one percent, and the
unadjusted Schedule B section or division totals are subject
to sampling errors of about one percent. In addition, the
Schedule B Section 9 total is subject to possible error in the
estimated data for shipments valued $250 and under; and
the overall total, and the individual totals for sections other
than Section 9, to a more limited extent. Such $250 and
under shipments represent about 1.5 percent of the total
value of exports, and about 60 percent of the Schedule B
Section 9 total.
Other Sources of Error
in the Statistics
Monthly import and export figures are subject to the
possibility of errors which may arise from sources other
than sampling errors, discussed above. Among these are
errors in the reporting and/or processing of information as
to commodity classification, value and other statistical
factors, month of inclusion (see paragraphs on import and
export carryover, above), and the undercounting of exports
to Canada due to the non-receipt of Shipper's Export
Declarations. For 1973, the undercounting amounted to
about one billion dollars. In the case of imports the








information as to value and commodity classification (as
well as country of origin and net quantity) is verified by
Customs officials on entries filed for transactions valued
over $250 which are ordinarily subject to examination for
Customs appraisement purposes, thus considerably reducing
the possibility of error. In addition, the procedures used to
compile both the import and export statistics include clerical
and computer processing checks designed to protect the
accuracy of the statistics to the fullest practicable extent.
Merchandise Trade Balances

Two trade balances are presented in this report:
1) The balance between exports based on f.a.s. values
and imports based on f.a.s. values.
2) The balance between exports based on f.a.s. values
and imports based on c.i.f. values with adjustments for
imports from affiliated sellers abroad.to reflect arms-length
equivalent prices.
Both balances are useful for certain purposes. The first
balance corresponds to a measurement of the international
payments or credit flows resulting from merchandise trade
between the U.S. and foreign countries. The second balance
is based on concepts similar to those used by most foreign
countries, and therefore provides a reference for com-
parison with the trade balances published by those coun-
tries.

Revisions to the Statistics

Revisions are carried into the statistics on a periodic
basis. Data for 1974 and 1975 appearing in the 1975
monthly issues of this report are presented as follows:

1975 Statisitcs

a. January through November 1975 issues: figures are as
originally issued, except as noted below.


b. December 1975 issue: figures reflect revisions for
prior months of the year issued with December 1975
statistics or earlier, as noted below.

1974 Statistics

a. January through May 1975 issues: figures reflect
revisions issued with December 1974 statistics or
earlier.
b. June through December 1975 issues: figures reflect
revisions to 1974 data issued with June 1975 statistics
or earlier.

In addition to the revisions which are made on a periodic
basis, instances may occur where a significant error in the
statistics for a month of the current year is discovered after
the statistics for that month are compiled. If the error is of
sufficient importance to require correction prior to the time
that the regular revisions are carried, the correction is made
and so noted in this report.


Sources of Further Information

Additional foreign trade statistics and information re-
garding coverage, valuation, sampling, and qualifications
which should be considered by users of the statistics are
contained primarily in the following publications: Report
FT 990, Highlights of U.S. Export and Import Trade; FT
135, U.S. General Imports, Schedule A Commodity by
Country; FT 410, U.S. Exports, Schedule B Commodity by
Country; and the Guide to Foreign Trade Statistics.
Information regarding additional sources of statistics, the
methodology used in seasonally adjusting the data, and
other matters relating to foreign trade statistics may be
obtained from the Bureau of the Census, Washington, D.C."
20233.













Table 1. U.S. Exports (f..s. Value Basis). General Imports (f.a.s. Value Basis), and Merchandise Trade Balance.
Adjusted for Seasonal and Working-Day Variation, by Month: January 1974 to March 1975
(In millions of dollars See Explanation of Statistics for Intormationn or, overage definition l L port aird import values ana tradi Del ar.Lti
and sources of error in the data All data sholn for 1974 and 1975 rellect seasonal aJusrtnent factors introduced In Jar.ury 19751

Period and J.aanary- January February Marcn April May June tJly Au,,usl 6E.er- Octoer INoer-- Lece.-
series March hear her hber

1974

Exports 22,324.i 7,150.2 7,548.9 7,625.4 8,107.8 7,652.4 8,316.6 K,307. &.,379.7 8,396.3 R,.:'2.' Ba, 73.F AB,.6?.3
F.a.s. import value 21,555.6 6,496.8 7,317.2 7,741.6 8,024.8 8,264.5 8,573.1 8,918.0 9,261.9 ai69.1 7,769.1 8.964.? 9,249.9
Merchandlae trade
balance .768.9 653.4 *231.7 -116.2 +83.0 -612.1 -256.8 -610.5 -8.2.: -301.4 -90.2 *B.9 -HA-.r

1975

Exports'.. 26,916.8 9,411.9 8.789.0 8.711.9
P.a s mpprt val-e 24.830.0 9,562.4 7,872 0 7,335.6
Merchandlae trade
balance... 42,086.8 -210.5 +9j7.0 t1,380.3

'Represents exports of domestic and foreign merchandise excluding Department of DErepfe Mllirtar 4Atic'le'r Program rBni-Aiia ahlpmenis.


Table 2. U.S. Exports (fa.s. Value Basis). General Imports (c.i.f. Value Basis) and Merchandise Trade Balance,
Adjusted for Seasonal and Working-Day Variation, by Month: January 1974 to March 1975
(In millions of dollars Seerp plnation of Statlstics for information n ,cver&de. definit i.n'of rp rt ..r1 i.Ti-. L allies anad r. .e talarnce
and sources of error in the data. All data sno-n for 1974 and 1975 rlefJlt seasocril djustmen[ facItor inirrc.a-u:d in, Janujr 19751

Period and Jaiiuar January Februar) Marcr April May June July AufEEu Sepre- toer No -- Decem,-
aerJes March oer h r E r


1974

Exports. 22.324.5 7,150.2 7,54d.9 7.625.4 8.107.8 7.652.1 A,316 6,307.5 8.379.' r.7,6d.3 S.67..9 6,9'3.6 5,A62.3
C.l.f. import -a1l.e. 23,311.9 7,019 ? 7.81l.Q 8.310.a b..'38.9 8,921.2 .,2136.4 *j,10.. 9. ,99.6 9.377.8 9,450l.3 9,653 I 9.942.3
MerchandLae trade
balance .. -887.4 *.31.0 -333.0 -685.4 -531.1 -1.268. -939.1 -1,303.3-1,619 I -961. -777.9 -679.5 -1.030.0

2975

Exports. 26,916.8 9,411.9 8.769 0 8,71..9
C.I.F. Import value. 26,698.7 10,364.5 8,440.7 7,893.5
Merchandise trade
balance. t218.1 -952.6 r348 3 1 822 4

'Iepresents exports of domestic and foreign merchanails excluj ar.g Department .i Dln." Miliiar 4asaistance Prarram Grant-4a snipmenant















Table 3. U.S. Exports (fa.s. Value Basis) of Merchandise Showing Department of Defense DOD) Military
Assistance Program Grant-Aid Shipments, by Month: January 1974 to March 1975


(In millions of dollars See Ewplanator. of Statsltics for inforsaation an coverage, definition of f.a.s. export value, and sources of error In the
data. Unadjusted totals represent -ai of unrounded fLgures and hence may vary slightly from ma of rounded amounts)

Erporta earluding DOD Exports Including D Grant-Aid'
Grant-Aid DOD Grant-Aid


Period Domemtic Do Ieic Dseaht c
and and Domestic, and Domesic. Tal eastern Other
foreIin, foreign, unadjusted foreign, unadjusted Toal urope countrie

anjusate.' ansdjusted unadjusted


1974

January-December...... ................... I) ,907.2 F.,'.44.4 98,506.2 97,143.5 599.1 99.6 499,5

January-iarch 22.374.J 2,5614.9 22,328.9 22,726.5 22,440 4 111.6 40.7 70.9


January.................................... 7,150.2 6g,24.9 E,743.7 6,866.9 6,785.8 42.1 14.7 27.3
February................................. 7, d.9 : ,?92.2 7,200.8 7,334.0 7,242.7 41.9 16.3 25.6
March .................................... 7,625.1 8,49.8S 8,381.3 8,525.s 8,412.0 27.7 9.7 18.0
April................................. .. 8,107.5 8,J72.1 8,252.8 8,408.7 8,289.3 36.6 6.4 30.1
May.................................... ,65 ?.4 9,428.3 8,297.2 8,489.4 8,358.3 61.1 .8 55.3
June..... ............................... 8,316.6 8,327.4 8,211.4 8,384.3 8,268.4 56.9 h.8 48.1


July................................... R,307.5 ,65-.4 7,553.2 7,695.2 7,593.0 39.5 3.2 36.7
August................................... 8,379.7 7,928.9 7,800.8 7,998.0 7,869.9 69.2 1.1 65.0
September................................. 8,396.3 7,607.9 7,.03.6 7,669.1 7,364.. 61.2 4.8 56.3
October..................................... 6,2.3 ,'26.? 8,780.0 B,994.1 8,847.8 67.8 7.4 60.5
November............... ..... ........ ,.373.6 9,343.3 9,'24.3 9,397.5 9,278.. 34.2 8.1 46.1
December................................... 6,862.3 8,702.8 8,592.3 8,743.a 8,633.0 40.7 10.2 30.6

1975

Janus ry-March 26.916.8 27,061.3 26,612.8 27,214.8 26,766.3 153.5 10.7 142.7

January................................. 9411.9 9,123.98 ,948.7 9,202.8 9,027.5 78.8 5.2 73.7
February.................................. 8,789.0 8.499 8 8.368.9 8.546.5 8,414.6 45.7 33 42.4
March....................................... ,;15.9 ,437.6 9,295.2 9,466.5 9.324.1 28.9 2.2 26.7
April ....... ...........................
May............................ .........
June .....................................


July. ....................... .......... .
August............................. ......
September.................................
October................................
NDovember....................... ....
Dlcenber..................................

iAdjusted for seasonal ana sorking-day sariation dsing seasonal adjustment factors introduced in January 975. See footnote 1 on front page.
'Represents only Export --lip~iert i romi the unite State-l and dilsers irmnDD Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid shipment figures under this
program as follows: (a) rTrerfer s othr maternal procurea obt;lde the Unlled States and transfers frors DOD overseas STOCKs from export ehipmpnts.
fb) Export value Is [.a.., DherEa3 DOD vilue, in a. ;t Ir.rr.ces, is I.o.b., point of origin. fc) Date for silpments reported by the DOD for a glven
month are included in Bureau or the Cenrsu reports in the second month subsequent To the monlh reported by the DOD.
'Annual total in not shon for seasonall) adju.tea data. unadjusted data should be used for annual totals.













Table 4. U.S. Imports ot Merchandise, by Month: January 1974 to March 1975

(In llltons of dollars. See Explanation of Statistics for lnformatlon nn coverage. definitionsof r.a.a. and c a.f. import salden, ar.0 sources
of error In the data. Unadjusted totals represent sum or unroundea figures and hence may vary slightly from sum of rounded amountal

U.S. Lmports of merchandls.

F.a.a. value C.I.t. value

Period General Lmporta Ilmprts General Liports imports
lor T lor
Seasonally Unadjusted consumption seaconaly Uaduslea consption
adjusted' unrad used adjusted' unadjusted


1974

Januaxy-December ....................... I") 100,218.1 99.369.2 1 107,996.1 107,111.6

January-iarch. .. ..... .. ...... 21,555.6 21,037 6 20,786 7 23,211.9 22,654 0 k2,393.9

January ................................ 6,496.8 6,612.4 6,46b.5 7,019.2 7,144.1 6,991.7
February............................... 7,317.2 6.644.0 6,633.3 7,881.9 7, l .8 7.146..
March................................ 7,741.6 7,781.1 7,684.9 8,310.8 8,353.2 8,256.1
April.................................. 8,024.8 8,333.0 6,239.5 8,638.9 6,970.6 8,875.9
May.................................... 8,264.5 8,834.7 8,750.0 8,921.2 9,536.8 9,447.6
June................................... 8,573.4 8,498.0 8,449.8 9,256.4 9,174.9 9,124.6

July.................................... 8,918.0 8,961.7 8,870.6 9,610.8 9,f57.9 9,564.0
August................................. 9,261.9 9,091.5 6 99 98.8 9,814.8 9,716.5
September.............................. 8,698.1 8,362.4 8,296.6 9,877.B 9, 1. 8 8,948.3
October................................ 8.,769.1 9,090.0 9,030.9 9,450.8 9,796.7 9,;31.1
November ............................... 8,964.? 8,876.8 8.905.1 9,653.1 9,E58.5 9,480.Q
December............................... 9,249.9 9,132.4 9,12.4 9,942.3 9,816.0 9,845.

1975

January-March. ..... ..... 24,830.0 24,441.0 24,364.9 26,698.7 26,283.3 ?F.,203.3

January................................ 9.622.4 9,822.j 9.808.6 10,364.5 10.580.1 10,I 563.9
February ............................... 7,872.0 7.162 7 7,130.q .1440 7 7.691.2 7.47 3
larch................................. 7,335.6 7.455.9 7,425.3 7,693.5 8,023.0 7.992.1
April..................................
May....................................
June..................................

July...................................
August................................
September.............................
October...............................
November..............................
December. ..............................

LAdjouted for seasonal and worklDng-ay varLation UElng seasonal adjustment factors introduced In January 1975.
'Lnnual total is rot ahow n for seasonall adjusted data. Unadjusted data 3houla be used for annual totals.













8

Table 5. U.S. Exports (f.a.s. Value Basis) of Domestic Merchandise. Including Department of Defense (DOD) Military
Assistance Program Grant-Aid Shipments--Schedule B Sections and Selected Divisions, Seasonally Adiusted and
Unadjusted, by Month: January 1974 to March 1975

(In millions of dnllars SeeExplanation of Statrltics for Information on coverage. definition of I.a.s. export value. and sources of error In the
data. Unadjusted totals represent sun of unfounded figures and hence may vary slightly from sun of rounded amounts)
Schedule B sec lolns and selected divisions'
Period
0 I 2 3 4 5 6 7' 7 7 1 2 7 73 1 9

Seasonally adjusted'

1974

January-March .. 3,629 8 306.0 2,772.9 559.6 '270.7 2.015.0 2,479.9 9,283.2 3,607.4 1,583.4 3,139.0 1,233.8 -550.6

January................. ,1191.2 107.6 651.5 171.1 '73.3 641.0 795.0 2,669.9 1,177. 513.3 943.0 383.3 41W4.1
February............... 1,220.3 108.6 960.5 212.3 496.5 679.7 826.1 2,804.4 1,192.9 522.4 1,113.5 407.3 '174.2
March.................. 1,218.3 89.8 960.5 176.2 4100.9 694 3 858.8 2,809.5 1,236.7 547.7 1,082.5 433.2 192.3
April.................. 1,216.5 109.9 979.9 226.2 '124.2 735.b 919.9 3,034.0 1,302.6 565.4 1,L36.3 446.3 4207.8
ay...................... 1,082.4 11b.2 939.0 257.1 '131.7 664.5 940.4 2,867.4 1,307.6 557.4 1,070.6 469.2 218.5
June................. 1,116.6 114.7 941.6 294.2 '138.2 767.5 970.7 3,203.1 1,341.9 586.7 1,299.0 465.7 3228.7
July................... 1,133 6 L02.4 893.5 323.9 '164.0 775.6 982.3 3,182.2 1,391.6 601.0 ,160.3 447.5 '28S.0
lugust............... 1,078.9 103.5 906.6 300.9 '110.6 777.0 1,010.2 3,355.1 1,497.8 661.4 1,185.4 460.2 233.1
Septeber............. 1,0,3 6 75.1 824.6 311.9 '86.9 780.8 948.8 3,469.1 1,506.3 622.6 1,323.3 461.1 184.6
October................ 1,147.6 102.7 768.8 384.1 112.2 750.4 996.0 3,687.2 1,576.2 635.1 1,432.9 456.4 216.0
November............... 1,-92.6 103.9 968.5 472.9 '118.5 763.8 950.9 3,663.4 1,607.9 639.9 1,425.3 467.2 '239.6
December............... 1,261. 116.7 b99.0 266.3 166. 79.4 984.4 3,j89.1 1,582.0 573.0 1,363.8 441.3 '247.7

1975

January-March .. 4.260.3 388.1 2,642.9 1,261.5 '366.2 2,320.4 2,712.2 10,.61.4 4,896.9 1,811.1 3,897.2 1,374.2 '704.9

January..... .......... 1,589 7 194.9 1.U25.n 429.2 *140.9 862.3 927.0 3,486.9 1,655.5 606.2 1,169.6 471.1 '238.6
February................ ].419.J 107 1 1.4 399.3 '104.5 696.4 879.9 3.627.3 1,621 2 606.3 1,428.6 454 I *228.5
March................. 1.2S1.5 136.2 802.i 433.0 '120.8 761.7 905.3 3,457.2 1,620.2 598.6 1,299.0 449.0 2237.8
April..................
May .......... ..........
June..................
July. ...................
August..................
September.............
October................
November..... .........
December...............

Unadjusten

1974

January-December........ I'l, 3.4 1,241.4 10,934.2 3,442.4 1,423.3 8,872.0 11,165.9 38,188.5 16,668.6 7,019.2 14,500.7 5,349.8 2,586.6

January-Marc .. 3,6U4.1 257.1 7,939.1 465.2 270.7 1,992.9 2,485.9 8,617.4 3,670 5 1,604.3 3,342.7 1,237.6 550.6

January................. 1,194.8 90.6 65.1 114.2 73.3 604.4 756.1 2,514.5 1,118.9 520.5 875.1 371.3 14.1
February ................ 1,1.0 87." 98;.4 178.8 96.5 653.9 795.5 2,734.3 1,136.8 489.5 1,107.9 382.9 174.2
March .................. 1,257.? 79.1 1,099.3 162.3 100.9 134.5 934.3 3,369.6 1,414.8 594.3 1,359.6 483.4 292.3
April................... 1.178.8 44.9 1,09.8 223.7 124.2 774.6 952.1 3,185.7 1,353.4 57j.6 1,256.? 468.0 207.8
May .................... 1,084.6 111.3 1,011.1 781.0 131.7 711.7 1,036.3 3,269.5 1,418.7 590.8 1,259.0 500.6 218.5
June.................... 1,074.? 106.9 911. 310.4 138.2 775.9 983.3 3,267.1 1,360.7 593.1 1,313.3 474.1 226.7
July................... 1,081. 90.0 768.4 306.7 164.0 797.3 936.1 2,909.9 1,334.6 569.1 906.' 417.1 222.0
August.................. 1.020.? 97.6 777.R 336.0 110.6 811.9 999.1 3,019.6 1,440.8 625.7 953.1 461.6 233.1
Septeber............... 1,000.1 n3.7 61:.3 332.2 86.9 725.3 885.2 3,139.5 1,358.7 597.7 1,183.1 439.9 224.6
October................. 1.170.6 124.1 781.3 4.9.4 112.2 728.7 1,017.9 3,769.3 1,603.0 669.4 1,495.9 473.3 216.0
Noember................ 1,44.1 141.1 1,084.7 161.4 118.5 729.4 935.7 3,652.1 1,603.1 635.4 1,413.9 468.6 239.6
December.............. 1,3?4.8 140.? 925.7 251.9 16E.3 774.2 934.2 3,459.9 1,525.0 558.1 1,376.6 409.0 247.7

197i

January-UMarch 4,238.5 329.6 2,'57.4 1.0.4 2 366. : 2,27.65 2,708.2 10.901.0 4,960.7 1,834.1 4,106.2 1,369.6 704.9

January................. 1.641.7 122.) 1,02F 0 357 1 140 9 820.11 911.2 3,312.5 1,612.4 615.7 1,084.2 454.6 238.6
Fbruary................ 1.338 86 6 639.0 337 4 101.i 669.9 817.4 3,536 6 1,545.0 568 7 1,422.9 426.4 228.5
March................... I.7b.6 120.1 89?.] 399.6 120.8 786.8 949.6 4,Oi1.8 1,803.3 649.5 1.599.1 488.6 237.8
April ................
May ... .. .. .......
June .. ...................
July. .. .................
Au ygus .................
Septembe r.............
October.................
Novnmber..............
Dece be r................

'Scheaule B -ection ran srelcted dauLsjn desriptip ns are a follows.

n. food and live animals 7. Machinery and transport equipment
I. Aeverages anr. tobacco 71. Machinery, other i[nn electric
2. Crun e aterlals, Inedible, excepI fuelo 72. Llectrlcal machinery, apparatus, and appliances
J. Mineral lueln. lubricants, ann rElaLed materials 73. Transport equipment
a. Animal ana vegetable aolii and Int' 9. Ml.;-Illc-wus manuacturea articles, n.e.c.
5. Cr.-,r c il 9. Contodlt and tran.aclton. not classified according to kind
6. Manufactar.d goods clasiilEd chll'ly P) material
'Se-onilly aalustea figures for sictlon 7 may naflpr Ellehily from the sum. ol alions 71. 72, and 73 stnce earn L; independently adjusted.
'Adjui--d for seasonal ana rorring-day uarlalior using seasonal adjustment factors introduced In January 1975. See footnote I on front page.
.nnanl totals are non hob for -j. sonnlly adjusted dets. LUnnijusten dat. shotla be used for annual totals. The asodsted section totls In
nis table ano alilar vFrall uOelhli total. in tables I. 2 and 3 verP dl]uSIPd Lnoependently
tni the absrnre of dpor.-trable seasonal pattern. for Lnis setlion, no seasonal lsaojLsent factors have been applied to data.











9

Table 6. U.S. General Imports (f.a.s. Value Basis) of Merchandise Schedule A Sections, Seasonally Adjusted and

Unadjusted, by Month: January 1974 to March 1975

(In millions of dollars. Se t. pl na!r In of Sritistc[s Enlt nrornriacn on n covervut. defaniacn n of f.s.r. Lnpyrt .alue, and r,.riicr i err'r
in the dara. Unadj;ried total r-present sum oaf unrounded fTgl~re and herca mi', vary ItIghtlv from sum of rourild nmountl'

Schedule A I-ectons'
Period
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1 9

Seasonally Adjusled'


1974

January-March ..... 2,468.7 318 0 1.421.3 4,456 ? '83.9 699 0 3.596 5.:2b,.3 170 9 IT.B

January ............ 73110. 105.6 443.4 1,226.3 '23.9 199.5 1,062.3 1,809. 5.5 7.: 14>.7
February............. 795.5 100.3 470.1 1,570.8 '24.1 241.3 1,2170. 1,8J..2 732.9 '156.1
March................ 942.8 111.9 509.8 1,659.1 '35.3 25' .? 1,315.3 1,.86 .6 TR6 I I..
April................ 766.8 111.3 496.1 2.,3 3.1 '40.0 271.9 1,.53.0 1,93'.- ." 179.0
Ma ........ ......... 1.8 117.9 521.6 2.175.; '42.2 314.1 1,34,.' 2,016.5 775.3 '173.4
June. ..... ....... ;99.9 123.0 545.8 .,3264.6 '26.6 326.2 1,411.3 2 ,067.] *1-.3.1 'IR3.F
July................. 803.0 136.5 506.1 3,369.8 '71J.1 36 .9 1,459.1 2,216 0 :91." '14.'
Augs............... 761.6 137.1 546.9 ?. 506.5 '.6S 383.6 1,670.4 :,.209.8 7". '1e.3
eptember........... 66..3 122.7 504.0 ,297.6 '54.2 1 409.2 1,614.1 1,113.6 620.7 '201.5
October.... ......... 623.1 92.5 494.0 2,429.J 179.5 43IJ.4 1,732. 1,976.4 _1A.6 '?1..3
November...... ..... 858.8 81.3 497.9 2,147.1 '41.9 Vl4.' 1,713.3 2.,04.. ..32.9 ''281.
Deceanber............ 816.0 97.0 513.4 2,411.2 '53.3 426.7 1,783.8 2,021.7 b?"9..A 217.7

1975

January-March.. .. 2,012.3 397.9 1,415 1 6,307.1 '14a.3 i.073.3 4,i16.? 5,720.5 2,1O .; '581.5

January.............. 677 2 11 .3 494.2 J,u46 3 '4-.5 432.1 L.74,.,. 1.i3 9 783, r ;21 .0.
February............. 66.9 124 9 4563 1.96 3 J44.7 33J 3 1,448.6 1 kno. 4 713 1 '181 0
March.... .......... 666.2 15'.7 464.6 1,344.5 '35.1 317 6 i,3?6.6 2,084.2 717 7 'B16 4
April l. ..............
ay...............
June...... .... ..
July.. ........... ..
Augus ...............
Seplteimber...........
Olob r...........
November............
Dec ember.............



1974

January-Decemoer .... 4,36E.2 1,312.3 6,059.1 ?...127.3 144.3 4,)l". 11,' 16.3 24,i0.2. 9. 1.3.3 3 .7

January-March ,411 I 290.8 1,332.9 d.733 i 83.9 697 I 3.4.6 I 51:,5 4 2,01.1 i 473 a

January ......... .... 7 3.0 I"'i'.i 42- 8.1 1 ,32 s. 2:,. ?U:'.-3 ] ,',7.1. ln I. 7.3 i140. 1 ..
February............. 711.6 6. .1 401.3 1 ,58. 1 24.. '228.; 1,59.2 I,17 6J .5 1i6.
March.... ........... 913.6 104.1 60?.7 l,&20.0 35.3 266.2 1,?'4.3 1,in.3 3:. 171.
April............... 825.8 113.3 494.F 2,294.2 40.0 316 1 1, 1 I U,07r 4 .19 i 179.0
May ......... ... .. 827.1 16.5 i71.7 2.290.8 12.2 3j9.' 1,467.,** .?40.3 76.0 173.4
June..... ......... 69.5 127.5 576.9 2,090.2 26.6 332.4 I, I~. 7?.10M.6 79;.1l 1B.C
July........... ..... 774.1 126.6 544.1 2,417.2 70.1 344.A I. "l .3 ,u34. 1 i3 144.'
August....... .... 7.. 766.2 112.:7 a .? 2. 04.0 44.6 oa0. 1,673.1. 1,, t. .lj. 166.3
Sepiteber. ......... 647.6 111.7 508.5 2,127 .3 .4.? 3o:. 1 9 r 1.940.3 636.3 2u1.5
October. ............ 65.6 113 3 514.3 2,273.b 79 5 431.8 1.e39.1 2,061." -.,.9 21;.3
November. ........... 74.? 102.7 475.0 2,207.3 '.,] a 1 ,7 I .,13.. l4.i 2' .2
Decembe r............ 888.3 107.2 497.5 2,490.6 53.3 381.- !, 2.7:? ,0U1 5l. 21. .

1975

January-M rch 1,398.1 362.3 1,324.8 ,h 2b 9 148.3 1,0 4.. 4, 1l. ; i. 2, .3 bl4.

January ...... ....... 711.8 10 .1 1'7 J].I1l 9 1I 4 7 .74'. l I 7 r. .l '
February........... 626.8 1.. 4 390 1.937 4 44 "- 1i .. I 25 1 I 1 IRI
March............. ... 657.5 143.7 156 3 1,4'7.1> i .l 340 r 1.31 .31 :,!J 4 .r7. IP,.. I
April l... ...........
May ...... ......
June.... .. ..
July. ...............
AuKua .... ........
September...........
October.............
November .........
ecember.............

'Schedule A secl on description irc as5 Iollo'.
0. Food and live aninml.a Cnvi.l.ils
1. Beverage' and tobacco Mrl.rrl rure ,a '.1 -las... I.l 1I. 0, m.lteral
2. Crude materials, Inedible. except fuelz 7,. Mjca rcr, i nI trt. npor. -r4ul.I,,tl
3. Mineral fuels, lubrrcanti, and related materia as M: elIlnctJu m u '. : [ur..J rl I I.., r.....
I1. 4 i.Lal and vegetabnle oils and Irsa '. Ciiom, modltl al [Irard Lt I ln nut ; ll Lted cCordinn i s cind
'Adjusted for seasonal and aorklne-Cay ariation using c.sort.jl adiI,-tmen la.rtr s inlroduLt in J.rnuiry I: lo I c-lote. I on front
page. Annual totalF are not shown lfr seasonally adjusted darl. Unaddjuied 1.ta r.huld tJ u-ed ror annual i, als.. T-re adusita Oclfion
totals in this table and saliriar overall monthly totals in tibl]: I and 4 .ere Aj.just. d lndcnenaentl,.
"In the absence of dononstrable seasonal pail I n for this se'clln, ns Peason3il apa.u., -nl facItr' n.ae been applied.











10

Table 7. U.S. General Imports (cj.f. Value Basis) of Merchandise Schedule A Sections, Seasonally Adiusted and

Unadjusted, by Month: January 1974 to March 1975

(In millions of collars. See Explanation of Statistics for Informanlononvcoverage, deftnlltloofc.l.f. Importvalue, andasouriesof error In the
data Unadjusted totals represent sue of unrounded figures and hence may vary slightly from sum of rounded amountsl

Schedule A seccIons'

0 1 3 4 5 1 7 1 1 9

Seasonally adjusted'

1974

January-March........ 2,659.4 345.7 1,545 6 4,810.5 '88.3 747 4 3.847.8 6,004.2 2,314.1 '486.6

January. 7.0 114.5 486.0 1,341.4 a25.2 214.3 1,136.5 1,962.5 22.3 150.2
February 657.3 108.8 508.0 1,694.7 '26.0 257.7 1,308.6 1,994.3 780.7 '160.2
March. ... 1,017.1 122.1 551.6 1,774.4 '37.1 275.4 1,402.7 2,047.4 811.1 a176.1
April. ......... 829.7 124.5 545.8 2,510.5 a41.8 299.2 1,341.3 2,100.7 798.4 '193.7
Ma ... ... .. 877.Z 128.6 575.4 2,334.6 '44.0 339.6 1,448.4 2,195.9 832.2 '178.2
June 87.0 133.3 603.6 2,453.6 '27.8 348.3 1,591.6 2,231.5 859.7 189.1
JulyS... ..... 866.6 150.5 568.8 2,557.5 '72.7 392.7 1,563.8 2,388.1 845.9 200.2
August ... 822.2 150. 627.8 2,709.8 446.5 409.9 1,801.8 2,388.9 883.8 193.7
September 71.1 L34.4 557.6 2,471.6 '56.3 440.7 1,737.9 2,289.1 876.2 '207.3
October. 676.1 101.0 549.1 2,604.4 '82.7 461.7 1,870.2 2,144.9 873.3 221.2
November. 928.4 8.5 552.6 2,620.6 '52.1 454.9 1,883.8 2,207.3 888.7 "234.3
December ... 906.6 105.9 570.0 2,575.9 '55. 456.1 1,929.9 2,180.3 886.8 '223.0

1975

January-March........ 2.186.8 430.4 1,565.5 6,730.5 '154.9 1,144.1 4,881.4 6,165.6 2,367.8 '601.4

January .. 731.8 129.4 559.3 3.259.1 a5'0.5 462.5 1,888.1 1,975.0 837.2 '224.3
February ... 72F I 134 5 500.8 2.036 3 1'6 8 345.1 1,564 3 1,931 4 764 8 '186.2
UMrch..... .. 722.9 166.5 505.4 1,435 1 '57.6 336.5 1,429.0 2,259.2 765.8 '190.9
April.. .
May
Jure. .
July
Augut. r .. .
September.
October .
November.
December


Unadjustea


1974

Januar,-December 10,134.3 1,411.3 6.691.1 27,355.1 i67.6 4,306.9 19,051.5 26,064.5 10,066.5 2,317.4

January-4arn .. 2.629 4 316.0 1.447 6 5,110 0 88 3 745.3 3,665.1 6,022.4 2,143 3 486.6

January .... 841.5 109.1 469.5 1,450.1 25.2 217.9 1.149.0 2,046.9 684.7 150.2
Febrisry .802.4 q3.2 434.3 1,713.3 26.0 243.5 1,135.9 1,868.7 679.2 160.3
Marcn .. 985.6 113.8 543.9 1,946.5 37.1 263.9 1,380.3 ?,106.8 779.5 176.1
April 893.6 123.4 541.2 2,457.8 41.8 339.0 1,361.4 2,256.2 769.7 183.7
ay.. .. 893.3 127.1 630.1 2,458.3 44.U 367.5 1,576.6 2,439.6 822.2 178.2
June .. .. 836.9 138.2 639.0 2,264.7 27.8 355.1 1,596.4 2,276.1 852.8 189.1
July .... 835.4 137.6 611.5 2,608.7 72.7 375.4 1,615.4 2,256.8 944.0 200.2
Aug 827.1 214.0 606.5 2,707.1 46.5 406.6 1,801.8 2,104.6 996.9 193.7
September 701.5 122.3 542.1 2,286.2 56.3 417.3 1,668.4 2,101.4 892.8 207.3
Orontoer 111.9 123.7 ;71.6 2, 437.7 82.7 462.6 1,986.1 2,235.0 964.1 221.2
November 853.2 I11.9 i2. ? 2,363.8 52.1 425.e 1,910.2 7,202.9 871.1 234.3
Decenoer 91j.9 1137.0 i5?.3 :2,t0.9 55. 5 12.3 1,870.1 2,169.4 803.4 223.0

1975

lanur -Ma7rc. .. ... ?,171.6 392.1 1,465 9 7,289.4 154.9 1,155.4 4,671.7 6,161.8 2,213.0 601.4


January) ;76 12?2 I 54h..8 1 653.3 50.5 467.6 1.B91.5 2,038.2 9, 7.1 224.3
February 680 4 114.f. 428 ? ? 01R 7 46 8 3?6 8 1 359.4 1.811 7 666 9 186.2
Maruh 713.5 154 7 496 3 1,577.2 57.6 361.0 1.414.7 2,318.0 739.0 190.9
Apr- .
May
June
July

Se pt e.mbe r .
CIoer .
Novenaber.
ece member.

'5h-.-ule 4 section aescriDrrr aru a.- olla.
iJ loao and liv animal. Cnemicals
1 B vera es and lr.bsi r. 6. anufactured anod.-clas.F lred chiefly by material
I Cruae ma'erials, inedlblF except fuels 7 Macninery and transport equipment
J Mineral Iueis. lubricarn,. and related material- 8 MIscel leotus manufactured articles, n e.s
1. Ansm]1 and vegetablr cale an.d fIres Cumnmo]stles and transactions nol classified according to kind
Adjusted tir seacsna! ana oorkin.-dav jariation using seasonal adlustrennt Ia[,rs irntruducea in January 1975 See footnote I on front
p.. r Annual tdtals are not sn.%or, ,r se-_oriall adjusted data Unadjusted data should he used for annual totalss Ihe adjusted section
tnals in Itnis Lable 3d slnamlar overall monthly rl.ial in tables 2 and 4 were adjusted independently
'In the absence lof emon.r raale eaunal pat tlfrr' lr this sectl' n no sasoairl adluEtinent fatrs hare beer, applied











































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U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
Social and Economic Statistics Administration
BUREAU OF THE CENSUS
Washington. D.C. 20233


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