Summary of U.S. export and import merchandise trade

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Summary of U.S. export and import merchandise trade
Series Title:
FT-900
Physical Description:
v. : ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of the Census
United States -- Bureau of the Census
Publisher:
Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, Foreign Trade Division for sale by the Subscriber Services Section (Publications), Bureau of the Census
Place of Publication:
Washington
Creation Date:
June 1974
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Commerce -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Citation/Reference:
American statistics index
Dates or Sequential Designation:
1974-1976.
General Note:
At head of title: 1977- United States foreign trade.
General Note:
Formerly classed C 56. 210:900 - during the time the Bureau of the Census was subordinate to Social and Economic Statistics Administration.
General Note:
Issues prior to Oct. 1977 were sent to depositories as Item 144.
General Note:
Unnumbered supplements accompany some issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001209840
oclc - 02245761
notis - AFW0105
lccn - 76640395
issn - 0361-0047
sobekcm - AA00005271_00009
Classification:
lcc - HF105 .B73e
ddc - 382/.0973
System ID:
AA00005271:00009

Related Items

Preceded by:
United States foreign trade; export and import merchandise trade
Succeeded by:
United States foreign trade. FT900, Summary of U.S. export and import merchandise trade

Full Text





SUMMARY OF U.S. EXPORT AND

IMPORT MERCH4NDDJ E TRADE

S1974 ..h L.r
,

-I IIVA


IaI U 7_ .W _a..F .. J u ly 2 6 1 9 7 4
". DEPO TO ** at 10:00 A.M.

Seasonally Adjusted an ltd Data


The Bureau of the Census. Department of Commerce.
.' Snounced today that during June 1974, seasonally
adjusted exports excluding Department of Defense >DOD)
.. Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid shipments,
amounted to $8,356.7 million I" and that seasonally
adjusted general Imports for June amounted to
$8,612.5 million.ta Comparable seasonally adjusted
totals for May were $7,629.7 million for exports and
$8,406.6 million for imports.

The Bureau, part of the Department's Social and
lcouomeic Statistics Administration tSESA), noted that
based on the above seasonally adjusted figures, a
merchandise trade deficit of $255.8 million' was
recorded for June. For the first 6 months ol 1974, a
merchandise trade deficit of $254.3 million was
recorded.

Seasonally adjusted imports on a c.i.f. (cost.
insurance, and freight) value basis for June amounted
: to $9,235.6 million.'" The merchandise trade balance
.:. reputed by substituting the c.i.f. import value for
the regular (Customs) import value and using the same
.p'brt value, which is on a f.a.s. ffree alongside
'. lip) U.S. port-of-exportation basis, would amount to
A deficit of $878.9 million.12'

The Bureau also stated that both the June export
S Md import seasonally adjusted totals were at new
7: .::re1.. rd high levels. Seasonally adjusted exports for
tnue exceeded the previous high monthly total (April
... :S) by $122.7 million. The June import total was
spout $206.0 million higher than the comparable May
figure (the previous high), and represents the s.ventn
consecutive seasonally adjusted monthly total Customs
value basis) to have exceeded the comparable total for
the previous month.


During the first 6 months of 1974. seasonally
adjusted exports were at an annual rate of $93,222
million, or about 32 percent higher than the calendar
year 1973 total of $70,823 million. Seasonally
adjusted imports ICustoms value hasisl for the period.
were at an annual rate of $93.730 million, or about
35 percent higher than the calendar year 1973 total of
$69,476 million During the 4-montn period, March-
June 1974. seasonally adjusted exports averaged
$7,973.6 million per month, a level about 12 percent
above the $7,136.1 million average reported for the
preceding 4-month period, November 1973-February 1974.
General Lmports averaged $8,251.4 million for the
current 4-month period, about 23 percent above the
$6,708.B million average recorded for 'ne previous
4 months, November 1973-February 1974.

Seasonally adjusted and unadjusted export and
import totals for selected Schedule A and B commodity
sections and divisions are snown in table 4, U.S.
Exports of Domestic Merchandise--Schedule B Sections
and SelecLed Divisions If a.s. value basis;"
table 5A, "U.S. General Imports--Schedule A Sections
(Custome value basts'l," and table 5B. "U.S. General
Imports--Schedule A Sections ic.i.f. value basisi"
Commodity components for exports exclude foreign
merchandise, but include data on DOD Military Assist-
ance Program Grant-Aid shipments.

Exports unadjusted for seasonal change and
excluding Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid ship-
ments decreased from $8.427.0 million in May to
$8,327.5 million in June. With Military Assistance
Program Grant-Aid shipments included, June exports
were valued at $8,384.4 million as compared to
$8.488.1 million in May. Unadjusted general imports
amounted to $8.R99.2 million in May and $8,556.5
million in June.


LAdjsfed lor seasonal and nwrkingday varanon, but not for price test Factors used to adjust 1973 and 1974 data shoin 'p this report represent
ial adiusonent factor derived omrn monthly data through 1973 and introduced n January I9/d rcomoned wnth the appropfarse workimg-ay
a &tnment actors.
Cunmulations of data over at eist 4,month periods are desirable to identify underlying trends Monrtronmonrth changes rn reports .ports and
aimAWf" series often effect primarily regular movements. ilferences an moaitny cant vone, ere Recent month r.montraperent crranges in he overall
esonally adusted export and import series am presented in rth following table nth average percent month to month rse and dFeclne over longer
partd sh2m1 Mt r comparison. The average nse and decline figures exclude percentage changes for ({t the per,oas DecerrbiEt 1968 tfa,'ch 1969 and
JAdlyeDenIbWr F97F because ofabnormahtres in the data tue to effects of dock strikes and i21 pertodsr .nen negl.gable changes lzero pecenti .n the
leal of exparnfinports occurred.

Month-to-maont Average monLhly ratls or change

aS a-June Apr.-May Mar.-Apr. Feb.-Mar. Average Average 4 months 12 months
serie 19 1974 1974 1974 rise decline FTb.-Juse June 1973-
1968-1973 1968-1973 1974 JwJaL 1974
(Percent) (Percent) (Percent) (Percent) iPercent) (Percent) (Percent) IPercent)

Exports ........ 9.5 -7.3 .7.3 r.9 J3.9 -3.9 .2.6 .3.3
Import ........ .2.4 .3.3 .3.8 G6.1 .3.8 -2.6 .3.9 *3.5

1'e ? e "EcExplaerio of Statsties" action of this report for explanations of these export and import values ana trade balances

Inquiries concerning these figures Should be addressed to the Chief, Foreign Trade Division, Bureau of the
Census, Washington, D.C. 20233. Tel: Area Code 301. 763-5140.

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE, Social and Economic Statistics Administration, BUREAU OF THE CENSUS

\ For sale by the Subscribers Services Section (Publications), Social and Economic Statistics Administration,
Slimes 6 Washington, D.C. 20233, or any U.S. Department of Commerce district office. Price 10 cents per copy. Annual
subscription (FT 900,975, 985 and 986 combined) $3.00.


4 6






EXPLANATION OF STATISTICS


Import Statistics

General Imports/Imports i, o.i npi i d ton
*q '. '
The official U.S. imporJ 5mfistics are compiled S 4ie
Bureau of the Census from cpjies of the import ern'tradd
warehouse withdrawal forins'. vhi6iPtnporte reqwurqd
by law to file with Custbnr officials. The mt isti 'are
presented in terms of both r'General Imports" and 1Imports
for Consumption." General'impOfg .are a corbmmAqoff of
entries for immediate consumptip- r htis into Customs
bonded warehouses and thus generally it total arrivals
of merchandise. Imports for consumption area combination
of entries for immediate consumption and withdrawals from
warehouses for consumption and thus generally reflect the
total of the commodities entered into U.S. consumption
channels.
Import Valuation'

Customs Import Value
The value of imports as appraised by the U.S. Customs
Service in accordance with the legal requirements of
Sections 402 and 402a of the Tariff Act of 1930, as
amended, is referred to as the Customs value. It may be
based on the foreign market value, export value, con-
structed value, American selling price, etc. It generally
represents a value in the foreign country, and therefore
excludes U S. import duties, freight, insurance, and other
charges incurred in banging the merchandise to the United
States This valuation is primarily used for collection of
import duties and frequently does not reflect the actual
transaction value.

CIF Import Value
The c.i.f. value represents the value of imports at the First
port of entry in the United States. It is based on the
purchase price and includes all freight, insurance, and other
charges (excluding U.S. import duties) incurred in bringing
the merchandise from the country of exportation and
generally placing it alongside the carrier at the first port of
entry in the United States If the merchandise was acquired
in a transaction between related parties, the purchase price
used in deriving the c.i.f. value is based on an arm's-length
equivalent transaction price, i.e., a price which would exist
between unrelated buyers and sellers.

Import Monthly Carryover

It is the objective of the compiling procedures to include
shipments, insofar as practicable. in the statistics for the
actual month of importation. However, for purposes of the
statistics the month of importation is based on the date of
the import entry or warehouse withdrawal document. This
may not in all cases correspond to the actual month of
importation. (For example, under the Customs
"immediate-delivery" procedures, importers may file the
import entry up to 10 workdays after the actual date of
importation.) Also, because of processing problems (e.g.,

'Values have not been adjusted for changes in pnce level.


late receipt of a document for an end-of-month shipment,
rejection of a shipment by the computer because the data fail
to meet certain edit criteria established to protect the
accuracy of the statistics, etc.), there is an overall average
carryover of about 7 percent (in terms of value) of the
shipments from the reported month of importation (based
on the date of the import entry or warehouse withdrawal
document) to a subsequent month, usually the succeeding
month. In addition, as a result of the aforementioned
Customs "immediate-delivery" procedures, there is a further
carryover of presently unknown magnitude from the actual
month of importation to a subsequent month. These
limitations should be borne in mind when making
month-to-month comparisons.

Cumulations of data over at least 4-month periods are
desirable to identify underlying trends. Month-to-month
changes in imports, exports, and similar series often reflect
primarily irregular movements, differences in monthly
carryover, etc.
Export Statistics
Exports of Domestic/Foreign Merchandise
The official U.S. export statistics are compiled by the
Bureau of the Census primarily from copies of Shipper's
Export Declarations which are required to be filed with
Customs officials, except for Department of Defense Mil-
itary Assistance Program Grant-Aid shipments which are
reported directly to the Bureau of the Census by the
Department of Defense. The statistics are reported as
exports of domestic or foreign merchandise. Exports of
domestic merchandise include commodities which are
grown, produced, or manufactured in the United States, and
commodities of foreign origin which have been changed in
the United States from the form in which they were
imported, or which have been enhanced in value by further
manufacture in the United States. Exports of foreign
merchandise include commodities of foreign origin which
have entered the United States as imports and which, at the
time of exportation, are in substantially the same condition
as when imported.
Export Valuation'
FAS Export Value

The value reported in the export statistics generally is
equivalent to a f.a.s. (free alongside ship) value at the U.S.
port of export, based on the transaction price, including
inland freight, insurance and other charges incurred in
placing the merchandise alongside the carrier at the U.S.
port of exportation.

Export Monthly Carryover
It is the objective of the compiling procedures to include
shipments, insofar as practicable, in the statistics for the
actual month of exportation. For purposes of the statistics,
the month of exportation is generally based on the date
when the shipment leaves the United States. (For vessel or
air shipments it is the date when the carrier departs or is

Values have not been adjusted for changes in pnce level.


FT 900 -







cleared from the port of export.) However, as indicated
above for imports, because of processing problems (e.g., late
receipt of a document for an end-of-month shipment,
rejection of a shipment by the computer because the data fail
to meet certain edit criteria, established to protect the
accuracy of the statistics, etc.), there is an overall average
carryover of about 5 percent (in terms of value) of the
shipments from the actual month of exportation to a
subsequent month, usually the succeeding month. These
limitations should be borne in mind when making
month-to-month comparisons.

Cumulations of data over at least 4-month periods are
desirable to identify underlying trends. Month-to-month
changes in imports, exports, and similar senes often reflect
primarily irregular movements, differences in monthly
carryover, etc.

Merchandise Trade Balances

Two trade balances are presented in this report:

1) The balance between exports based on f.a.s. values
and imports based on Customs values.
2) The balance between exports based on f.a.s. values
and imports based on c.i.f. values with adjustments for
imports from affiliated sellers abroad to reflect arms-length
equivalent prices.

Both balances are useful for certain purposes. The first
balance is comparable to the U.S. trade balances published
in the past, and permits comparisons with earlier data. The
second balance is based on concepts similar to those used by
most foreign counties, and therefore provides a reference
for comparison with the .trade balances published by those
countries.

Neither of these balances corresponds to a measurement of
the international payments or credit flows resulting from
trade between the U.S. and foreign countries. In the first
balance, exports are valued f.a.s. and reflect transactions
prices, while imports are valued according to Customs legal
requirements. In the second balance, imports include freight
and insurance charges, even those paid to U.S. firms, while
exports which are valued f.a.s. exclude freight and insurance
charges even if they are earned by U.S. firms. Furthermore,
imports from affiliated foreign sellers are revalued to
arms-length prices, while no such adjustments are made for
exports.

Effective with the statistics for January 1975, the balance
using import data based on Customs valuation will be


replaced by one calculated on a consistent basis with both
exports and imports based on f.a.s. transactions values. At
that time comparable data for 1974 will be available.


Revisions to the Statistics

Revisions are carried into the statistics on a penodic
basis. Data for 1973 and 1974 appearing in the 1974
monthly issues of this report are presented as follows

1974 Statistics

a. January through November 1974 issues. figures are as
originally issued, except as noted below.
b. December 1974 issue. figures reflect revisions for
prior months of the year issued with December 1974
statistics or earlier, as noted below.

1973 Statistics

a January through Ma 1974 issues figures reflect
revisions issued with December 1973 statistics or
earlier.
b. June through December 1974 issues- figures reflect
revisions to 1973 data issued with June 1974 sta-
tistics or earlier.

In addition to the revisions which are made on a periodic
basis, instances may occur where a significant error in the
statistics for a month of the current year is discovered after
the statistics for that month are compiled. If the error is of
sufficient importance to require correction prior to the time
that the regular revisions are carried, the correction is made
and so noted in this report




Sources of Further Information

Additional information regarding foreign trade statistics
coverage, valuation, etc., is contained pnmanly in the
following publications- Report FT 990, Highlights of U.S.
Export and Import Trade, FT 135, U.S. Imports, General
and Consumption. Schedule A Commodity by Country: FT
410. U S Exports, Schedule B Commodity by Country; and
the Guide to Foreign Trade Statistics. Information regarding
additional sources of statistics, the methodology used in
seasonally adjusting the data, and other matters relating to
foreign trade statistics may be obtained from the Bureau of
the Census, Washington. D C. 20233.


FT 900 -










Table 1. U.S. Exports. General Imports, and Merchandise Trade Balance, Adjusted for Seasonal
and Working-Day Variation, by Month

Part A Exports (las. Value Basis) and General Imports (Customs Value Basis): January 1973 to June 1974

(In millions ol dollars See Explanation of SlatisiUca for mfornnaon on cL, rage and definitions of export ana import values and trade balances. All data shown for 1973 and 1974
reflect iceasonal adjustment actors introduced in January 1974)

Period and January- January February March April May June July Autap S ia- October Novem- Decam-
series June er ber ber


1973

EaiporLS'..... ....... J. ,1219.7 4,9 2 .2 ',070.3 .11. ., -.193.7 J,3061.4 ,7?17.v 5.865.3 6.042.0 6,419.8 6.586.1 6,878.8 6.948.9
Customs import value. 1.2,78.9 .."I.A E 5,1 I .] .J J...i i. 36I'.J 5,703.. 4 J.7741.A i.28.7 6.010.5 5,643.6 5,998.3 6,684.3 6.291..
MerchandLse trade
balance............. -450.7 -2-l-.6. -112.8 -Ii.. .133.4 -142.0 -47.2:' 36.6 .31.5 .776.0 *.589.1 .194.5 .657.6

1974

Exports' ............. 46.6In 8 7,111.0 7,605.5 7,673.q 8.734.0 7.6?9.7 8.156.7
Customs Laport nalue. 46.865 L 6,167.2 7,392.4 7,d45.2 8,141.2 6,406.6 8.612 5
Merchandise trade
balance.... ......... -2.i 3 +t43.8 +213.1 -171.1 .92.6 -776.9 -255.1

'Represents exports of domestic ana foreign mercnandiae excluding Department of Defense Military Asssatance Program Granl-Aid shipments.


Part B Exports (f.a.s. Value Basis) and General Imports (c.i.f. Value Basis): January 1974 to June 1974

In millions of dollars. See Explanation uf St itucs for ,nforrnation on covecra and definitins of export and import values and trade balances Al data shown for 1973 and 1974
relecl t-seonal adjustment l faclo introduced in January 1974)

Peodesd une Janear February Marc h April May June July August Sepbe" Ocbtorer Novem- Dber


1974

Exports'............. 6 Glo 8 7, 111.0 ?,604.5 7,671.9 8 231.0 7,629.7 8.356f.7
C.I.f. Import value.. ,.1.1 :, 6,94j., 7,902.5 n,376. 1.7722.? 9.,08.7 9,235.6
Merchandise trade
balance.............. 3 fin 4 1 165.4 -297.n -702.7 -18A.2 -1,379.0 -878 9

'Rtpresents export. v1 dol -estic and foreign merchandise e excluding Deparr'.ent of Defense Military Asstatance Progras Grant-Aid ablpments.










Table 2. U.S. Exports (f.a.s. Value Basis) of Merchandise Showing Department of Defense (DOD) Military
Assistance Program Grant-Aid Shipments, by Month: January 1973 to June 1974


(In mlltions of dollars. See Explanation of Statistics for information on coverage and a definition of rf.a.s.t report value. Unadjusted totals
represent sum of unfounded figures and hence may vary slightly from sum of rounded amountia)

Exports e-eluding DOD Exports Including DOD Grant-Aid'
Grant-Aid DOD Grant-Aid

Period DoeB.tC Dot t Domestt
and
foreign. and DomestIc, and Domestic, tota] osatern Other
sasnal ly foreign, unadjusted foreign. unadjusted Europe countries
ad justed' -uadjusted unadjusted

1973

Janltuay-December........................... I' 70.623.2 69.730.1 71,J38.8 70,2486 u .1.6 185.5 330 I

January-June.. ............. ................ 3-J.I19.2 32,71 1 32,43?.A 1'3 217 3 12,979.0 1i .. ? .s .3 163.9


January................................... 4.9,!.2 4,7.1' 4, 6'.62.* 4 774 u 1,7104.5 -1.6 19.9 22.0
February...............................j.... i JU. 4.66. C 4.796.4 4,' s.6 4.633.0 36.6 9.1 27..
March... ................................... 9all.) j.924.9 ,829.2 ,77 S 5.882.1 S2.9 13.5 37.4
April........................... .......... 494 .; 5 i36 9 4 8.9 i 398. 1:,494-. 32.3 10.9 24.4
May......................... ......... ... 5,61.4 6.023.2 5 929.3 6.06. 2 5.970.3 41.0 13.1 .20.9
June........ ............ .......... ..7.. ..859.9g 5,756.4 ,8966.4 2.794.9 38.5 11.8 23.8


July....................................... .8 5.3 5 331.' 5 249 3 2.397 1 !.31] .4 66.1 39.0 27.1
August........... .......................... .072.0 5.785.2 5,681.8 9.617.1 3.713 7 31 9 7.9 24.0
September.................................. 6. 19.8 5.964 6 35.881 3 6.021.2 5 91?.1 56.6 19.7 31.9
October................................... 6.59 ..4 6,750.7 6.6)3.2 6.784 4 6,669.4 34.2 6.0 28.2
November.................................. ,78.e 7 099.6 7 008.3 7,136 1 7,044 9 36.6 6.5 30.1
Deceaber................................ ... .948.9 6.921.1 ,ei. 7.ia s.9 5.1 6.61.6 44."( 43.2 165.

1974

January-June ............ ................. f.6flO, h 47.8'6 3 47.126 7 4h..0i 5 47 392 9 266 2 61 it 204.4

January................................ .. 7.111.0 d3 .1.6 6.7i13J.4 h.7?3.6 nr.7:'..i 42 1 14.7 27.3
February.................. ......... .. 7.h0l;.i 7 29o ? 7,20b. 7, 2. .0.1 ? ?tl.7 1.9 16.3 25.6
March..................... ............ .. 7.193.9 1_ 19.F n.404.2 8, 7.3 8, 131 27.7 9.7 18.0
April................................. 71'.i 9t.181 ri.2f1..4 .41S.) 8.3'42.1 3I.. 6.1 30.1
May................................... ..... 7 ?.? 127.0 2 ?95. 4 6 16.1 a.357.0 61.1 5.8 55.3
June....................................... 8 356 7 4 327 5 11 ?11 a R.3104 4 A '468 5 3i6 c4 6 48.1

July............ .......... ...... ......
August .................. ........ ......
September........................... ......
October............................. ......
November............................ ......
December............................ ......

'Adjusted for seasonal and workang-day variation .1arag seasonal adjustment factors Lntroduced In January 1974. See footnote I on front page.
'Represents only export ablhJents from the United States and differ from DOD Military Assistance Pr.gram Grant-Aid shipment figures under this
program as follows- (a) Treansfers of the material procured outsLde the United State. ana transfers from DOD overseas stocks feroe export shipments.
(b) Exrport value Is f.a.s., whereas DOD value, in most instances, as f.o.b., point of origin. 1c) Data for snjpmeats reported by the DOD for a given
month are included In Bureau or the Census reports In the second month subsequent to the montn reported by the DOD.
'Annual total is not shonst for seasonally adjusted data. Unadjusted data should be uced fir annual totals.








6

Table 3. U.S. Imports of Merchandise, by Month: January 1973 to June 1974

I In mdlion oi doll&n See Explanation of Statisucs rot information on coverage and definitions of Customs and ci import values Unadjusted totals epmnl nunm of unounded
figures and hence may sary slightly from sum of rounded amounts)

U.S. imports of merchandise

Customs value C.l.f. value

General imports Imports General unports Imports
for for
Seasonally Uradjusted consumpLton Seasonally Unadjusted consumptIon
adjusted uunadjusted adjusted' unadjusted


1973

January-December ....................... i 69,475.7 69,023.9 ()1 0a IlI (f)

January-June ... .......................... 32, .9 33,270.3 33,049.6

January..... ........................... ,243.u 5,406.4 5,351.7
February........................... .... ,483.1 4,958.9 4,943.5
March .................................. ,413.5 5,604.1 5,592.3
April.......... ................... ... 5,360.3 5,353.3 5,293.7
May................................ .... ,103.4 6,037.0 6,013.6
June... ............................... ,774.8 ,910.5 5,854.8

July............... .................. 5,628.7 5,659.1 5,598.9
August ............. ............... ... 6,010.5 6,016.5 5,927.9
Septemoer..... ........... ............. 5,643.6 5,307.4 5,304.3
October................................ ,996.3 6,402.9 6,339.4
Notember............................... 6,684.3 6,845.4 6,841.2
December ............................... 6,291.3 5,971.2 5,962.6

1974

January-June......................... 16,865 1 46.991 6 46,519.9 50,191.2 50,329 1 49,834.7

January.............................. 6,467.2 6,649.6 6,505.7 6,945.6 7,141.5 6,989.3
february... ........................ 7.392.4 6,692.3 6,689.4 7.902.5 7,154.1 7,143.5
March... ............................. 7. 7,823.2 7,724.6 n,376.6 8.353.1 8,256.0
April ..... ............................ 8,141.2 8,370.8 8,277.3 8,722.2 8,968.2 8,873.5
Mtay................................... 8,406.6 8,899.2 8,813.8 9,008.7 9,536.6 9,447.4
June................................... aR. 2.5 R,55 5 <,.nq.1 q,'135 q,175.6 9.125.3

July ........ ................. ........
AuKuat ......... ....... .......... .......
September..............................
October ......................... ......
November........................ ......
December ........................

'AdjuBstd for seasonal and sorking-day variation using seasonall adjusLtment factors introduced in January 1974.
'Annual total Is nor shown (or seasonally adjusted data. Unadjusted data should be used for annual totals.
'C.i.f. data not collected prior to Januars 1974.










Table 4. U.S. Exports (faIs. Value Basis) ot Domestic Merchandise Including Department of Defense (DOD) Military
Assistance Program Grant-Aid Shipments--Schedule B Sections and Selected Divisions. Seasonally Adjusted and
Unadjusted, by Month: January 1973 to June 1974

(Iun millions of dollars. See Explanation of Statistlcs for Infornation on coverage and a aefsintion of (f.a.s.) export value. Unadjusted totals
represent sum of unfounded figures and hence may vary lightly from sum of rounded maounts)

Schedule 8 sections and selected distalonma
P e r i o d -7-7 1 a9
0 I 2 3 4 5 6 7' 71 7 732 8 9

Seasonsily adjusted'
1973

January-June........... 4,749.5 507.14 4,101.9 786.2 '301.3 2,61 .2 3.123.8 12,976.2 5,584.1 2,330.8 5,050.9 1,845.2 '883.3

January................. 672.2 78.6 179.i5 l,,.a 44.0l 04.2 494.7 2,101.2 996.2 368.2 765.6 290.1 '118.9
February................ 701.2 96.4 466.9 12 9 '44.8 400 0 477.0 2,09?.2 904.1 376.9 824.9 286.5 '132.6
March................... 787.2 67.1 756.4 126.5 '61.0 420.6 494.8 2,097.1 896.9 379.7 860.4 291.9 '145.7
April................... 810.4 91.2 696.4 1)3 7 13h.0 435.3 148.2 2,162.5 940.3 383.4 810.8 315.8 '168.4
ay ..................... 837.1 73.7 725.9 126.4 '54.4 434.6 546.6 2,272.1 971.9 411.7 908.1 325.6 '146.7
Ju.ue.................... 941.4 80.2 676.9 137.4 459.1 466.3 560. 2,251 I 974.7 410.9 883.1 335.3 '171.1
July .................... 476. 82.0 651.6 146.0 58.9 161.8 599.9 2,300. 1,045.9 422.3 825.7 328.2 '193.2
August.................. 1,244.1 60.7 632.9 13i.0 '59.6 501.3 610.6 2,306.3 1,043.3 437.3 833.0 330.1 '126.8
September............ 1,233.6 81.9 625.1 112.2 '66.0 531.1 693.9 2,499.4 1,095.' 448.7 963.2 340.5 '147.7
October................. 1,185.8 88.1 721. 1en60.6 '59.1 143.1 696.0 2,576.2 1,144.7 463.0 962.7 365.3 '162.3
November............... 1,252.4 91.1 400.' 13.6 '61.4 599.6 739.4 2,650.0 1,113.0 467.0 1,056.5 373.3 '178.6
December ................ 1,256.8 77.3 510.9 174 7 '77 6 .562.7 731.0 .,683.4 1,126.0 464.6 1,045.2 365.1 '150.7

1974

Jmauary-June ........... 7,027 9 E66.5 5,714 4 1,332 3 6' I 1.195 2 6,51a E 17 4?1 1 7,534 8 3.302 9 6,615 9 2,631.1 '1.209..

January................. 1,180.4 113.5 H14.1 165.7 '73.7 627.9 789.4 2.684 1,171.6 518.9 917.3 390.0 *184.1
February................ 1,211.3 112.7 )96.6 315.4 '9%.5 675.9 628.6 2,821.h 1,180.a 523.b 1,135.2 405.2 '174.2
March................... 1,233.8 87.6 1,027., 172.1 '100.9 696.5 859.6 ?,7?h.t 1.228.1 551.3 1,080.0 433.3 '197.8
April................... 1,239.9 115.2 1,026.1 221.2 '124.2 761.7 919.8 3,06-.1 1,310.2 567.6 1,145.6 451,8 '207.8
May..................... 1,043.7 120.5 943.0 2.7.3 '131.7 673.. -43.8 2,4A?.0 1,3u6.4 553.2 1,033.6 477.7 '218.5
1hme.................... 1,098.9 117 n ?17 7 3O .6 136 2 757 7 977 4 3.234 9 1.339 0 51111.4 1,304 2 473.1 206 7
.Jh ..................
AnLua i.................
September..............
October................
November r...............
December r..............

Unadjusled

1973

January-December........ 11,930.2 1,008.1 8,380.2 1,670.5 664 0 5,749.1 7,].I 6 27,869.2 12,098 6 5,032.3 30,73a.3 3,950.7 1,842.0

Jmnm ry-une............ 4,723.0 432.1 1, 61.1 7I.1.0 301.3 2,59 ".4 3,2112.6 13,-50.2 5,777.1 2,374.6 5,498.5 1,876.0 883.3

January................. 689.7 68.9 584.7 10.2 44.0 388.6 476.i 1.956 2 852.3 369.7 734.2 275.1 118.9
February............... 670.3 74.' 663.6 106.7 44.8 364.4 45.0 ) .02 .3 670.6 352.4 804.3 270.8 132.7
March................... 806.9 76.0 ) 40.4 l .1.2 61.' 441.7 534.4 2,327.i 1.034.1 4-39.7 1,0O 3.2 325.1 145.2
April................... 769.0 74.8 71;.3 14 .(A' 38.1 443.6 36..7 2,7l1.2 971.3 389.6 890.3 324.3 168.4
May..................... 837.1 68.4 778.) 141.0 54.4 460.4 .76.9 2,569.7 1,034.1 439.3 1,096.3 334.7 146.7
June .................... 949.9 73.4 676.2 137.8 59.1 476.6 586.8 ?.318.6 1,1)4.7 413.8 890.3 345.4 171.1
July................... 907.4 72.1 363.6 132.3 58.9 467.8 S56.7 2.1154.3 995.3 397.8 671.3 308.9 193.2
Augul .................. 1.216.7 77.3 353.2 154.1 59.6 516.3 607 6 2,1171.0 988.0 414.1 668.9 331.1 126.8
September............... 1,191.6 93.0 506.3 121.,i 66.0 505.6 146.8 2,124.5. 1,003.6 429.9 890.9 336.9 147.7
October................. 1,216.7 1u0.6 717.5 177.1 5.9.1 .52.9 7C.9.2 2,5a.E 1,142.4 488.9 924.2 378.5 162.3
Noomber ................ 1,33.9 128.7 697.0 156.2 61.4 566.6 731.3 2,567.8 1.088.6 466.1 1,013.2 373.3 178.6
De oaber................ 1,290.8 94.3 851.5 175.0 77 6 544.7 705.4 2,645.9 1,113.6 460.9 1,071.3 346.1 150.2

1974

January-June ........... 6,9i1 9 370 2 3 96E 9 I 297 1 661 I 4 ?52.2 5 457 18.147 6 7 803 5 3,364 8 7,179 3 2.674 8 1.209 2

January.................. 1,198.1 90.6 854.0 144.2 73.7 604.6 756.3 2,15.5 1,118.9 521.5 975.1 371.3 184.1
February................ 1,156.8 87.2 992.6 178.6 96.5 6530.2 795.5 2,734.3 1,136.8 489.5 1,107.9 382.9 174.2
March................... 1,237.3 79.1 1,113.8 161.6 100.9 734.8 934.3 3.376 3 1,414.8 a34.3 1,367.3 477.9 197.8
April................... 1,181.8 94.9 1,080.4 2??.7 124.2 774.7 932.0 3.16..7 1,353.4 575.6 1,256.7 468.1 207.8
May..................... 1,083.4 111.3 1 013.8 281.0 131 7 711.9 1,(36.3 J,468.6 1.418.8 630.8 1,259.0 500.6 238.5
June .................... 1.074 6 1C-6.9 91? 2 319 3 138.2 775.9 963 3 3.267? 1.160 8 543 1 1,313.3 474.1 226.7
July ...................
Alugust.................
September.... ........
October.................
Hovember...............
December................

'Schedule B section and selected division descriptions are as follows:

0. Pood and live animal 7. MachInery and transport equipment
I. beverages and tobacco 71. Machinery. other than electric
2. Crude materials, Lnedible, except fuels 72. Electrical aschinery, apparatus, and appliances
3. Mineral fuels, lubricants, and related materials 73. ranasport equtpment
4. Animal and vegetable oill and lals 8. Miscellaneous manuracturea arllcles, n.e.c.
5. Chellcala 9. Commodities ard transactions not classified according to kind
6. Manufactured goods classified chiefly by material
eSeasonally adjusted figures for section 7 may differ slightly from the sum of divisions 71, 72, and 73 since each Is independenDly adjusted.
Adjusted for seasonal and working-day varitlion using seasonal adjustment factors Introduced In January 1974. See footnote I on Iront page.
Annual totals are not shown for seasonally adjusted data. Unadjusted data should be used for annual totals. The adjusted section octals in
this able and sBmilar overall monthly totals In tables 1 and 2 ere adjusted Independently.
'In the abBence of demonstrable seasonal patterns for this section, no seasonal adjustment factors have been applied to data.










Table 5 U.S. General Imports Schedule A Sections. Seasonally Adjusted and Unadjusted by Month:

January 1973 to June 1974

Part A Customs Value Basis

In millions of dollars See iE planalon of Slalistics lot information on coseragr and a definition uf Cusloms value Unadjusted totals meprtesen m of unfounded figures and hence
may & ,r slghll from sum uf rounded amounts)

Schedule 4 seconds'
Period
S0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Seasonally adjusted7


1973

JanuJar -Jine. .......

Jarus r ... .
FeDruarv............
Marc n ....... .........
Apr i ..... ..........
Ma ...... .. .
June ... .... .......
July.. .. .. ..... .
August..... .. .......
Septber............
Oct ober .. .......
Novemnier. .. ...
Decemoer........ ...

1974

January-June .

January..............
February ...... .
March ...........
April ........ .... .
May ............ .....
June..... .. ... .
July ....
Aupust .... ..
September .... .....
October ....... .......
Pl o einer ... .......
Decembiber ..... ....




197-

Janua v -D-cahe r ....

Janua r-y Jure ......

January .. ..........
February.............
Ha rch ........ ........
April ....... ........
May.......... .......
June. ..
July. .. .... ........
Augus .. ....... .
September ... ......
Oc tober...........
November.............
December ...........

1974

Janua ry J.j,-e .........

January) ..... .......
Fenr ars .............
Ma'ch .. ...... .......
April ........... ...
May............ .....
June.................
Jul. .... .. ..
Augtust ..... .. ....
lepte er .... ......
October... .......
November.............
December.............


'i(.m.2 77.

50I 7 112l ,A
li1 4 Pia 3 1
631 3 85Ai 6
63n 1 1 3 I-
7i043 5 101 ?2
647' 0 H
620 4 101.7
s71 ? 120 '
649 1012 r,
nHl l Li'| l' 1
k4s I II" 8
73K 1I I 'J l



I.669 7 66i' 6 I

719 n '6 ,

I71" b | [i 9
q 2 a I II.1 9I
'I.. I If 1

riil 3 2 170 2


I.. 14 .. I .?2 '

3 134 Mr I

G16 3I 7~1 3|

630 (. 'J 1
rni 5 4 1
732.10 10 10

1 3 9. 4


In 11 I :n I
0lo 4 171 I
7221 111 1




4,853.0 648.2

; r5 R 100.3
743 1 86.2
910.4 104.1
823.4 113.1
822.6 116.5
772.4 127.8


tSchedule A jPction aeir.ptior.s are ar foilous
0. Food and live animals


2. 413.h

j-y 3
30a 8
J3i.3
413 ,
4114 ?
127 5

4416. 2
20-1. I







2 926.6

.12 1 .2
452 7


16 7.6
544 7


5.013 4





3 11 1
3_ 3 9
35( 4

21 01

-10 ;
3l, 1.i
.*l I
4SF <
3-2 1i




2,886.8



488.0
478.6
556.9
561.6


1,316.0

466 4
.00.9
539.4
536.7
632.6
6410 4
590 5
738 3
763 f8
753 9
1.009 2
970 1




11.432 5

1.192 7
1,92 9
I.666 3
2.385 I
2.317 9
2.277 6


3 IT. I

53? 2
495 5
197.?


l09 c

786 4
701 2 1
7(' 7
111 4
I U64 2




11,365.3

1 313. 9
1.;77 A9
1,819.6
2,292.1
2,285.5
2,086.3


'Al.7.

'R.8
'16 0
aI' 7
13 1.
'13 6

'19 R

23 ,
121 4
'?E 3
]19 3







'3 6
'24 i
'35 3

'42 2


1.166.2

184.81
198. 1

194.2
196.5
2U6 8
203 5
204.6
209 8
216.5
2236 9
242 8




1.586.5

195 1
235.7
248 9
272 0
311 1
323 7


Unadjusted


3. Chemicals


2,463.0

2.2 5 2

189 1
190 2
202.5
721 1
'13 2

18b 4
?u,7 iq
190 5
21i9 4

223 9




I 664.0

200 1
226 3
262 .3
310 4
333 A
330.'


6,448.0

1,063.8
1.1145.3
1.066.8
98.1
1 ,072
1.099.5
1,167.1
1 .144.2
1.024.1
1,065 1
1,191 7
1,117 I"'




7.831.4

1,055 i8
I 25q9 0n
1.354 8
12,27 I
1,371 1
I.543 6


1] 244. I

6.4"b 3

1 .1lJ6.3
963. a
1,07 4
9I3 I
1,179.7
1,111 91
I 11 9
S137 3

I It 1
I 251 3
1.093 9




7 784 5

1.094 8
1.081 4
1 .312.

I.494 1
1 214 2


10,187.7

1.613 0
1,674 0
1,672 8
1,649 3
1,737.3
1.841.3
1,868 1
1.910.1
1.700 6
1,887.
1.961 3
1,601 0




11.7B6.4

1,846 I
1 8.1 ?
I 897 0
1,974 0
2 164.9
? 103.2


21 .06 1I

10 636 8

I.(61 4
1.573 6
1.816 3
1,710.3
I.'154 1
1,918 7
1 701.65
1.696 6
I bil 6
1 9N3 6

I ,?(i.2




12 ?76 1J

1.943 9
1.1770 2
1.,04 3
2,12i' 1
2.303 8
2 153 6


3.972.5

J39.9
677 8
659.7
652.3
666 4
676.4
684 4
701.4
677 5
689 9
779 8
699 R




4.521.1

660 1
741 0
779 3
746 3
784 3
810 1


l,217 4

3,816.8 a

631 6
584.2
643 9
609.9
649 8
697.4
721 4
P21.4
668 7
795 2
779.0
624 9




4 311 8
642.3
f.4" 2S
735 6
723.1
770.2.
800 4


'877.8

'162.8
'128.7
'151.3
'142.1
'131.8
'161.1
'154.0
'156.0
'145.6
160.5
'144 1
'156.0




'2,005.7

'144 .6
'155.1
'170 8
2179.0
.173.2
'183.0


1,794 0

877.8

162.8
128.7
151.3
142.1
121.9
161 1
154.0
156.0
145.6
160.5
144 1
126.0




1,005.7
144.6
155.1
170.8
179 0
173.2
183.0


1. fBeserages and tobacco 6. M:nufac ured goods -clasa ied chiefly by material
2. Crude matnrlals, inedible, except fuels 7. Macn inery and transport equipment
3. MineraI tuels, luon cats, and related .material 8. Miscellaneous manufactured articles, n.e.s.
4. Animal .nd vegetable oils and fIts 9. Comntoatles and transactions not elasnifled according to kind
Adjusted _or seasonal and azrklng-day sarialor. aunnri seasonal adjustment factors Introduced in January 1974. See footnote I on rrolt
pane. ,r.nu.i totals arc not r.o'.n for se0 rnalis adjusted data. UnadjuFteua ata should be used for annual totals. The adjusted section
totals in 'h,m tanle and itlar overall monthlyy tliais in tables I and 3 ere adjusted independently.
aln the absence of demonstrable seasonal patterns for this section, no .easonil adjustment lactors have neen applied.


I 1 I 1











Table 5. U.S. General Imports Schedule A Sections, Seasonally Adjusted and Unadjusted, by Month:

January 1974 to June 1974


Part B C i. f. Value Basis

lIn milliors oif dollss See espi3nalion of siat ics for information on coveag and a definition of ci.. vaJue Unadjusted locals repreieni sum ol unrounlred figures and hence min,

a__ry slighly from sum of rounded amounts

Schedule A sections'
Period 2 1-J-----
e0 2 3 4 y 6 7 8 9

Seasonally adlusted'


1974

January- June .

January........... ...
February..............
March................
April .................
May..................
June..................
July ..................
August............. ..
September.............
October...............
November..............
December r..............


5.277- U1 7,6.1 3.296.2 12.361 0 '201.8 1.722.2 e 244.'3 2 I17' 3 I "10 3 'I s 7C

774.9 104.4 479.0 1.325.4 '25.2 211.6 1,108.0 1,943.9 703.7 1i5.-.2
87".2 108.2 504.0 1.730.4 326.0 253.6 1.J22.4 1,9 5.9 786.1 160.3
1.05,3 0 121 2 56o.U I.7R2.4 '37.1 269.4 1,42-.5 2:.014 I ". ". -I
k?8 2- 128 6 543 9 2 557.5 341." 297.1 1,315.4 2.11, 0.8 94 J '183 7
874 : 125 2. 5.4 5 2.493.0 '44.0 342 5 1.446.4 '.?r. 8 837 178.
868 4 L?7 8 61R 8 2,472.3 '27.6 347 6 1.627 3 :.2"- 8 8d6a 2 li.!


UnasjuILCJ


1974

January-lure. ':53 6 704 6 3,252 7 12.269.9 201.8 1.06.I Pa L La2,994 3 1 5A I i.'17.S

January.............. _A41.4. 19.1 467.0 1,450.0 25.2 217.9 1 149.0 2,046.9 681.7 1 0.2
February................ 02.4 93.2 431.9 1,713.1 26.0 243.. 1, 135.9 1,68.7 679.? 1E0.3
March ................. :. I lI,1 8 543.9 1.946.4 37.1 283.)3 1 390 3 2.1".C '79., 1'6.1
April .. ............ ... 893 I?3.4 S41.7 2.457.8 41.3 339.11 I 3] 1 A4 1,.;' ` "9 7 183.7
May................... 81 1 127 I 630.1 2.15R.1 44.0 367.5 ` i'F.1 ? 134 F 827 2 176 ?
June.................. M3, 13s 2 638 .0 ?,294 6 27 8 32 .1 .96r.4 2 t7 i 52, Lai
July............ .....
August................
September............
October..............
November r.............
December.............

'Scheoule A ,ec tEIn 3 kcrpti.;n- are 1 folisas:
0. Food and 1I- .m a.,il- 5. Chemicals
1. Beverages and tlobbcco 6. Manufac[ured gooas ciEsitflEa entally by -ateriai
2. Crude materials Ir,edibje, except !uels 7. Machinery and transport equipment
3. Mineral iueis, lutricants. r.a relatea .atertais 8. Mlscellanreoua manufactured articie:, r..e.a.
4. animal and eget ble oilJ .rd ltats 9. Cnimorditles ans trsnsaciians n-t cla.-siled .,:a.rding t. Kind
'Adjusted for -eassal sia. trs.Lng-day variation using seasonal adjustment factors Int.roauces in J.'aru.ay 1473. 0ee 'oo[n,:.t 1 on front
page. Annual tota.ls re r t .no-n ISr seasonally adjusted data. Ir.aaujated data Enould ne used ior inrnual iarnlis. Tre anjuten a section
totals in this t.ole ania similar .er&ll monthlI totals In tables I and 3 aere adjusted independently y.
'In the absence of dman.-tranie seasonal patterns for this sectlorn, no seasonal aojusmaeqt lactor.s rnae -(n appli-..





































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