Agricultural libraries information notes

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Material Information

Title:
Agricultural libraries information notes
Physical Description:
v. : ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Technical Information Systems (U.S.)
National Agricultural Library (U.S.)
Publisher:
Technical Information Systems, Science and Education Administration, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture
Place of Publication:
Beltsville, Md
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Agricultural libraries -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Agriculture -- Information services -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Agriculture -- Bibliography -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
bibliography   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Citation/Reference:
Libary & information science abstracts
Citation/Reference:
Bibliography of agriculture
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Publication began with Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 1975).
Issuing Body:
Vols. prior to v. 4, no. 1 issued by the National Agricultural Library; v. 4, no. 1-v. 7, no. 7 issued by the Technical Information Systems, Science and Education Administration; v. 7, no. 8/9- issued by the National Agricultural Library.
Issuing Body:
Vol. 1-4, no. 1 were issued by the National Agricultural Library.
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Vols. for 1978- Aug./Sept. 1981 classed: A 106.109:
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 3 (Mar. 1979).
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000478681
oclc - 01197824
lccn - 76647080 //r81
issn - 0095-2699
sobekcm - AA00005269_00004
Classification:
lcc - Z675.A8 A29
ddc - 026/.63/0973
System ID:
AA00005269:00014


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
ISSN: 0095-2699



AGRICULTURAL

UME LIBRARY LIBRARIES
NOV 1' 1980 INFORMATION
NOTES


SUBSIDIZED ONLI ILRVICE IN N AGRICULTURAL LIBRARY
Ken Frazier, Head, Information Services
Steenbock Memorial Library
University of Wisconsin, Madison

No pretense is made here of offering a thorough cost-benefit analysis of online
information retrieval in an academic library. And, although the Steenbock Memorial
Library has developed a system of online access which is uniquely suited to the
needs of its clients, I hasten to add that we would not advocate its adoption as a
model system for
other agricultural
libraries.
CATEGORIES OF
SEARCHES

The Steenbock
Memorial Li-brary is
the principal
service provider for
the 23 academic
departments of the
College of Agricul-
tural and Life
Sciences/School of
Family Resources and
Consumer Sciences of
the University of
S. Wisconsin. Steen-
-' .. .bock has been in-
volved in online
b literature retrieval
steenbook's "QUICK SEARCH" Service takes place in the midst since 1973; it
of the information Services Desk. participates in a
sizable (60 hours
per month) time purchase contract with the BRS System. This connect time is
shared by all of the major libraries of the University of Wisconsin-Madison campus.
Steenbock also has a direct contract with the Lockheed-Dialog System of much
(STEENBOCK, continued on page 2)

TECHNICAL INFORMATION SYSTEMS VOL 6, NO. 9fO SEPT/OCt 1980
SCIENCE AND EDUCATION ADMINISTRATION BELTSVILLE, MARYLAND 20705
IU& DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE






(STEENBOCK, Continued from page 1)
smaller scale and with correspondingly
higher rates. Our use of the online
data base searching systems can be
divided into one of the following
categories.

Retrospective Search: This is the
standard search service; it is
"retrospective" in that it offers the
greatest depth of coverage of the
available services. All data bases of
the Lockheed-DIALOG and BRS systems are
accessible through the service. The
client must pay for connect time and
print charges. The average charge
in fiscal year 1979/80 was $12.00 per
file The typical user is a faculty
member, or graduate student working
with a faculty member, who pays for the
search with departmental funds
designated for research purposes.
Non-university and non-USDA clients
must pay a $0.40 per minute surcharge.
Because of the surcharge and a
uniform pricing structure for print
charges, receipts for the service
more than recover the connect time
costs.

Quick Search: The Quick Search service
is intended to provide limited access to
online data bases for library users who
would not otherwise be able to afford
this type of bibliographic access. It
is a cash only service; clients who have
research funds available for computer
services must use the retrospective
search.

The Quick Search service is limited to
the online portions of the BRS System.
Charges for the service are computed on
a per minute basis from logon until
logoff at the rate of $0.25 per minute.
The $0.25 per minute charge does not
recover the cost to the library, which
is obligated under existing agreements
to reimburse the university libraries
system at a rate of $0.50 per minute.
The average cost to the user is about


$3. The Quick Search service is
conducted at the Information Services
Desk and is offered whenever an
attending librarian is available. The
search is performed usually within the
hour of the request.

Citation Verification and Ready
Reference: Use of the online searching
service is available at the discretion
of reference librarians whenever this
option is considered the most efficient
means of answering a reference question.
It is often the solution of last resort
when a librarian is trying to decipher a
garbled citation. Online time is
usually limited to 1 to 5 minutes for
ready reference purposes.

Current Awareness Literature Service
(CALS): Steenbock's Information
Services staff will act as an inter-
mediary for the USDA-SEA-TIS current
awareness service whenever a faculty
member or USDA scientist requests our
assistance. Profiles are constructed
and revised; results are monitored for
accuracy and quality. Users who wish
to interact directly with the CALS
service are free to do so.

BENEFITS TO INFORMATION SERVICES

All of the computer searching services
are, to some degree, subsidized. Even
in the case of the Retrospective Search
service no attempt is made to recover
the cost of staff time, training,
equipment, or telecommunications cost.
The net cost to the library for the
Quick Search in fiscal year 1979/80 was
$856. The cost of Citation Verification
and Ready Reference is incorporated into
other "in house" uses of the online
system such as instructional demonstra-
tions, citation verification for
interlibrary loan, and information
gathering for administrative projects.
We use a separate password for in-house
use of Lockheed-DIALOG. Connect time
cost for this password was $1,668 in
(STEENBOCK, Continued on page 3)






(STEENBOCK, Continued from page 2)
1979/80. Total net cost to the
Steenbock Library of search service
programs in the past fiscal year was
$3,180. This subsidy allowed us to
provide 653 Retrospective Searches,
419 Quick Searches and all of the other
activities I have described so far.
Whether or not the online service is
worth the price is, perhaps, a
subjective question, but the relative
cost certainly compares favorably with
the cost of major printed abstracting
and indexing tools. There are
undeniably substantial indirect costs
related to the online search service,
the so- called "hidden costs" of staff
time, training, increasing interlibrary
loan activity, and so on. But those
who insist that we make a full
accounting of these indirect costs must
also allow fair consideration of the
indirect benefits derived from the use
of the online systems, which brings me,
at long last, to my original point,
i.e., the benefits of online service
to information services.

Productivity: Librarians use the
online searching service for the same
reasons our clients do: it saves time.
Availability of data base access allows
us to serve more people, answer more
questions and provide a more complete
product for our clients. The primary
advantage of computer access is its
speed of reckoning. In spite of our
rhetoric which describes the online
searching service as an optional means
of gathering information, when a
research problem can benefit from this
phenomenal speed, there is no realistic
alternative to online access.

This should not be interpreted to mean
that more use of computer technology
will always create more productivity.
Knowing when to use the online service
is vitally important. There are many
types of reference inquiry which cannot
be handled by the computer. Computers
are very fast, but they cannot evaluate,
interpret, or exercise intuition.


Librarians often have a "hunch" about
where information might be found;
computers never do.

Staff Development: Traditional
reference skills and online searching
skills reinforce one another. Many
manual reference tools are constructed
by means of computerized data bases.
Knowledge of the capabilities of one
format is often helpful in using the
other. Because of their awareness of
the relative limitations and advantages
of manual and online sources, librarians
are able to recommend the approach which
offers the most efficient solutions to
research problems.

Use of online data bases continually
presents the librarian with new sources
of information. The continual pressure
produced by the discovery of new and
sometimes esoteric bibliographic sources
is not always welcome, but the pressure
upon librarians to acquaint themselves
with unfamiliar titles is unquestion-
ably developmental. Sometimes the use
of the data base information strengthens
the conceptual relatedness of informa-
tion. The wealth of documents informa-
tion contained in the AGRICOLA data base
has fostered a better relationship
between the Documents and Information
Services Department, departments which
are physically separated at Steenbock.

Bibliographic Instruction: Many
faculty members regard the online
searching service as an indispensable
research tool. Within some academic
departments an online data base search
is an obligatory first step in prepar-
ing a research grant proposal. Knowl-
edge of computerized information
retrieval has become a necessary
component in the education of future
researchers. Discussion of online
access to information is included in
all general library orientation and
almost half of our subject oriented
classroom instruction is exclusively
devoted to a description of the
(STEENBOCK, Continued on page 4)







(STEENBOCK, Continued from page 3)
capabilities of the online searching
service. An increasing number of
faculty members require that students
conduct a Quick Search as a preliminary
step in writing a term paper.

An interesting type of one-to-one
bibliographic instruction has developed
within the context of the Quick Search
service. Because of the public setting
for the Quick Search many undergraduate
students become aware of the computer
search service before they become
acquainted with more traditional
sources of information. Their expecta-
tion of the service are very high, in
some cases absolutely Star Trekian. As
a result, the Quick Search interview
must include discussion of what the
computer cannot do as well as the
capabilities of the online system. It
has provided a valuable opportunity
for library instruction for a type of
student who might not otherwise ask for
help.

Public Relations and Image: Perhaps
this point ought not be overemphasized.
Online searches which are ineptly or
inappropriately done will not win the
library friends. Nonetheless,
librarians are uniquely positioned to
use the system to best advantage. They
have no obligation to sell the service
or promote its use unnecessarily. They
have the volume of experience and the
opportunity to develop and update
their searching skills. The value of a
librarian as an intermediary in the
information exchange process is
impressively demonstrated in a timely
and intelligent online search. A good
example: a recent prize-winning search
submitted in a BIOSIS competition on
the subject of bird song dialects
required only 1.2 minutes to submit the
strategy and collect the product. This
amounts to a connect-time cost of less
than $2 for a quantity of bibliographic
research that would require many hours
to accomplish manually. When service


like this can be provided to the user
at equivalent cost or less, librarians
and libraries may not need public
relations or image building.

Librarians will ask how they can
provide any sort of access to informa-
tion, free or otherwise, without
adequate financial support. Informa-
tion is not free, but many of the
people who depend upon us for access to
information, especially agricultural
information, cannot always "recover"
all of our costs for us. Librarians
who work in public or non-profit
institutions must choose between
subsidized access to vniine data bases
or access for the small minority of our
clients who are able to pay full cost.
Free access means, and has always
meant, access which is publicly, insti-
tutionally, or collectively subsidized.
It is justifiable for the same reason
it has always been justifiable; that
is, free access to information funda-
mental to the public good and necessary
for a constitutionally proscribed level
of individual freedom.C



WETLANDS ROLE IN MWVGEMENT
OF ISSTEWATER

A new 16mn film entitled mWetlands Our
Natural Partners in Wastewater Manage-
ment" describes research on the use of
wetlands as an alternative to conven-
tional methods for advanced or tertiary
treatment of wastewater.

For information regarding availability
of the film, contact:
Dr. Edward H. Bryan, Program Manager
Directorate for Engineering and
Applied Science
National Science Foundation
Washington, D.C. 20550

The film is available on TV cassettes
also.






AGRIS SINCE THE FIRST TECHNICAL CONSULTATION


by Abraham Lebowitz
Head, ACRIS Coordinating Centre,
Food and Agriculture Organization


Editor's Note: Condensed From a
Paper Presented to the Second
Technical Consultation of AGRIS
Participating Centres, Rome, Italy,
May 12 15, 1980

In the five years since it became an
operational system and particularly in
the two years since the First Technical
Consultation, AGRIS (International In-
formation System for the Agricultural
Sciences and Technology) has come to be
recognized as the standard bibli-
ographic information system in agri-
culture. It has made its mark not so
much because of the size or complete-
ness of its data base, its published
bibliography, but because it represents
a joint venture of developed and
developing countries working together
under the auspices of the UN to solve a
common problem.

SIZE

AGRIS size as of March 1980 consisted
of liaison offices and input centres in
102 countries and ten multinational
organizations, and the Coordinating
Centre at FAO headquarters in Rome and
Processing Unit in Vienna. As of April
1980 there were 500,705 items in the
data base including 132,072 added in
1978 and 113,708 in 1979. The reduced
input in 1979 was due to the fact that
very little was received from the USA
which was in the process of changing
its computer system. In fact, the
missing U.S. input has already been
supplied and will be added to the data
base in 1980. If we disregard the
anomalous situation of the U.S. input
and compare only non-U.S. input it will
be noted that this increased from
83,083 items in 1978 to 94,774 in 1979,


a growth of 14 percent. Despite this
growth in input we feel that we are
covering only about half of the
literature in scope for the system.
This is due to many factors: some
countries contribute no input at all;
in others a fixed budget is allotted to
AGRIS which determines the quantity of
input; in yet others the input centre
does not handle certain subjects or
forms of documents. The AGRIS Co-
ordinating Centre has begun to make a
concentrated effort, to expand and
improve participation in the system.

INPUT

In 1978 input was received from 72
countries and five inter- or multi-
national organizations including FAO
itself. In 1979 these figures had
grown to 76 and seven, respectively.
In 1978 somewhat more than one-third
of the input reached AGRIS through
the three large multinational input
centres, (CEC; Commission of the
European Communities ; IICA/CIDIA;
Inter-American Centre for Agricultural
Documentation and Information; and AIBA;
Agricultural Information Bank for Asia),
but in 1979 this proportion had risen to
almost half. Input from the Soviet
Union rose from an average of 1,290
items in each of the first four years of
AGRIS to 2,476 items in 1979 after the
recommendation by the First Technical
Consultation (May 1978) that it increase
its input had been conveyed to the USSR.

In keeping with the philosophy under
which AGRIS represents a true partner-
ship of developing and developed
countries, the number of items from
developing countries increased from
17,504 (13.3 percent) in 1978 to
25,959 (22.8 percent) in 1979.
(AGRIS, Continued on page 6)







(ACRIS, Continued from page 5)
TYPES OF COVERAGE

Even though 40 languages are
represented in AGRIS input more than
two-thirds of the 1978 and half of the
1979 input was for documents in
English.

Five languages, (English, German,
Spanish, French, and Italian),
accounted for 87.8 percent of the
input in 1978 and 81.3 percent in
1979.

Journal articles account for approxi-
mately three quarters of the data base
and monographs for almost all the rest.
Some patents, reports, standards, and
an occasional map are received but no
drawings, films or phonographic
materials. On the other hand, there
is extensive coverage of non-
conventional materials, approximately
20,000 items per year (15.9 percent
of the 1978 and 17.9 percent of the
1979 data base). That this percent-
age is particularly high for developing
countries can be illustrated by the
fact that 70.8 percent of the 1979 in-
put coming through AIBA was non-
conventional while only 3.5 percent
of that from the Commnission of the
European Communities was so classi-
fied.

The following table presents a
summary of the primary subject
categories occurring in the AGRIS
data. The major 'agricultural'
categories, plant and animal produc-
tion, represent about half the data
base. On the other hand, forestry
and fisheries, with only about 3
percent of the data base each, are
not well represented, possibly
because some of our input centres are
in organizations not concerned with
these fields.


AGRIS by Primary Subject Category
Category 1978 1 1979 1
Plant production 25.8 28.0
Animal production 23.2 23.1
Plant protection 11.9 12.5
Economics 9.7 8.1
Food science 7.3 5.8
Human nutrition u. 8 3.9
Forestry 3.0 3.6
Fisheries 2.8 2.7
Machinery & buildings 2.6 2.7
Natural resources 2.3 3.3
Administration 1.9 1.3
Pollution 1.6 1.6
Agriculture 1.3 0.6
Others 1.8 2.8

AGRI INDEX

Agrindex was published and distri-
buted regularly in 1978 and 1979.
The subscription price, which was
held at $250 for three years, was
raised to $400 after an analysis of
a projected increase in the size of
Agrindex, number of subscriptions
and world-wide inflation. The size
of Agrindex is expected to increase
substantially in 1980 as a result of
several factors. We anticipate
increased input partly to compensate
for the 1979 shortfall and partly
because several contributing centers
are planning increases. The new
Classification Scheme with its more
detailed breakdown of the subject
matter will result in a slight
increase in the main entry section
(as a result of having to print
additional headings), and an almost
50 percent increase in the com-
modities index. At the recommenda-
tion of the First Technical Con-
sultation, we have also added
something completely new, a geo-
graphical index, which will add
about another 10 percent to the
total size of Ag'index. An 11,000
item issue will now consist of about
800 pages. Because of lack of funds
and page limitations, we were not
able to publish either cumulative
indexes to volumes IV and V or to
(AGRIS, Continued on page 7)







(AGRIS, Continued from page 6)
Include in Ag'index itself the list of
journals covered. As of March 1980 we
are distributing AGRIS tapes to 25
national and multi-national centers.

AGRIS GNLINE

The great power of the AGRIS data base
can only be fully realized when it is
searched interactively by computer.
We have also made the data base
available online, on an experimental
basis, to a group of European countries
on the IAEA (International Atomic
Energy Agency) computer. A possibility
currently under study is that of
providing access to anyone having an
ordinary telex capable of telexing
Vienna. As this includes virtually
every country in the world, this might
be a way of making the power of AGRIS
available to all developing countries.


In 1980 we hope to complete a survey to
determine to what use AGRIS tapes are
put, what hardware and software are
used, and similar information.

SUMMARY

To sum up, the last two years have been
a time of progress, not spectacular
leaps ahead but of steady operation of
the system and step by step advances.
Many of the recommendations of the First
Technical Consultation were not tied to
a specific timetable. We have tried to
implement as many of them as possible
and expect to implement more in 1980 and
1981. I must give credit to the staff
of AGRIS who worked well despite the
fact that for more than half the period
in question the post of the Head of the
AGRIS Coordinating Centre was vacant.
After five years of operation it is
appropriate to evaluate our progress and
chart our future course.


LANGUAGE DISTRIBUTION IN AGRIS AND AGRIODLA


These distributions over five- and nine-year periods


AGRICOLA
(1968-771


37%
24%

8.8%
5.8%


61%


15%


10%




8%
3%
3%
100%


English
U.S.
Other English
AlII Slavic
Russ ian
Other Slavic
Romance
*


German
Oriental
All Other Languages


N=1,013,230
English in both cases refers
even though it might be in a


AGRIS
(1975-Aug. 19801


10%
8%
4%
2%


English


Russian


Romance
Spanish
French
Italian
Portuguese
German
Oriental
All Others


have been relatively the
same in AGRICOLA each
year, but with greater
yearly variation in
55% AGRIS as programs are
implemented and ex-
tended. The Russian
2% shortage in AGRIS is
clear. The other major
difference is in
24% Spanish language
material. Note should
be made that AGRICOLA
is selective on its input.
AGRIS does not select but
7% attempts to cover all
6% literature throughout the
6% world.


100%


N=558,032
to the language of the article
Japanese or Norwegian journal.


1977 AGRICOLA Romance language % were: French, 4%; Spanish,
3%; Italian, 1%; and Portugese, 1%.


Wallace C. Olsen
Library Operations
Division
National Agricultural
Library







NEW SERIALS
RECEIVED AT NAL


AGRICULTURE ACROSS MICHIGAN. Lansing,
Michigan Agricultural Reporting Service.
s.-m. 1979- S1.A322

ADVANCES IN INFLAMMATION RESEARCH. New
York, Raven Press. irr. Vol. 1, 1979-
RB131.A3


ADVANCES IN THE STUDY
Baltimore, University
Vol. 1, 1979-


OF BIRTH DEFECTS.
Park Press.
QM691.A38


ANNUAL REVIEW OF CLINICAL BIOCHEMISTRY.
New York, Wiley. a. Vol, 1 1980-
RB40.A1A55

BULLETIN OF THE HUNT INSTITUTE FOR
BOTANICAL DOCUMENTATION. Pittsburgh,
Pa., Hunt Institute for Botanical
Documentation. S.-A. Vol. 1, 1979-
QK1.B8

CHEMISTRY INTERNATIONAL. Oxford,
N.Y.,Pergamon Press. bi-m. No. 1,
1979- 385.1n88

COMUNICADO TECNICO EMPRESA BRASILEIRA
DE PESQUISA AGROPECUBARIA, UNIDADE DE
EXECUPC AO DE PESQUISA DE AMBITO
ESTADUAL DE CASCATA. Pelotas, EMBRAPA,
UEPAE de Cascata. irr. No. 1, 1979-
S192.C36E56

ENDOCRINE REVIEWS. Baltimore, Williams
& Wilkins. q. Vol. 1, 1980-
QP187.A1E54

INDONESIAN AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH S
DEVELOPMENT JOURNAL. Jakarta Selatan.
Indonesia, Ministry of Agriculture,
Agency for Agricultural Research and
Development. Vol. 1, 1979- S3.141

IRCS MEDICAL SCIENCE: KEY REPORTS IN
CELL AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY. Lancaster,
England: Elsevier-IRCS Ltd. m. 1980-
QH573.17


JOURNAL OF VIROLOGICAL METHODS.
Amsterdam, Elsevier/North-Holland
Biomedical Press. bi.-m. Vol. 1, 1980
QR355.J6

JOURNAL OF INFORMATION SCIENCE.
Amsterdam, N.Y. Published for the
Institute of Information Scientists by
the North-Holland Pub. Co. bi-m.
Vol. 1, 1979- Z699.A1J63

LIST OF SERIALS AND MONOGRAPHS INDEXED
FOR ONLINE USERS. Bethesda, Md., U.S.
Dept. of Health, Education, and
Welfare, Public Health Service,
National Institutes of Health, National
Library of Medicine. irr. 1980-
Z6660.L66

MOLECULAR ENDOCRINOLOGY: PROCEEDINGS.
Amsterdam; New York, Elsevier North-
Holland Biomedical. irr. Vol. 1,
1979- QP187.A1M66

OXIDATION COMMUNICATIONS. Amsterdam,
Elsevier Scientific Publishing Co.,
Budapest, Akadbemiai Kiadbo. bi-m.
Vol. 1, 1979- QD281.0909

OXFORD REVIEWS OF REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY.
Oxford, Clarendon Press. a. Vol. 1,
1979- QP251.09

SOVIET SCIENTIFIC REVIEWS. Section B.
Chemistry Reviews. Chur, Switzerland,
New York, Harwood Academic Publishers.
a. Vol. 1, 1979- QD1.564

PHOTOBIOCHEMISTRY AND PROTOBIOPHYSICS.
Amsterdam, New York, Elsevier/North
Holland Biomedical. Vol. 1,
1979- QH505.A1P4


SPECIAL PUBLICATION
OF PALAEOBOTANY AND
UNIVERSITY UTRECHT.
irr. No. 1, 1979-


OF THE LABORATORY
PALYNOLOGY,
Amsterdam, Rodopi.
QE901.RS


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NEW
BIBLIOGRAPHIES


Bibliography of Glyphosate. Compiled
by P. B. Chykaliuk, J. R. Abernathy,
and J. R. Gipson. (MP-1443). Lubbock,
Texas Agricultural Experiment Station.
[1980]. 87 p. 1,026 citations. Order
from: Publisher, Lubbock, TX 79417.
Free. (NAL call no.: 100 T31M).

The Biological Effects of Magnetic
Fields: A Bibliography. Compiled by
Randi Lie. (LA-7723-MS Informal
Report). Los Alamos, N.M., Los Alamos
Scientific Laboratory. March 1979.
159 p. Approx. 1,695 citations. Order
from: NTIS, U.S. Dept. of Commerce,
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22161. Price: $11.00. (NAL call no.:
Z7144.M4L5).

Energy Accounting and Management: A
Bibliography. (TID-3375). [Oak Ridge,
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(39) p. 536 citations with abstracts.
Order from: NTIS, U.S. Dept. of
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field, VA 22161. Price: $6.50. (NAL
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Gur & Indeginous Sugar Industry of
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International Bibliography on Cropping
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1979. 239 p. 2,016 citations. Order
from: Publisher, P.O. Box 933, Manila,
Philippines. Price: $5.00. (NAL call
no.: Z5074.C9R3 1979).

The Land-Grant Idea in American Higher
Education: A Guide to Information
Sources. Compiled by Alice H. Songe.
New York, H. G. Saur. [19801. 62 p.
600 citations. Order from: Publisher,
175 5th Ave., New York, NY 10010.
Price: $9.80.

Privacy and Access to Government Data
for Research: An International Bibli-
ography. Compiled by David H. Flaherty,
Edward H. Hanis, and S. Paula Mitchell.
London, Mansell. 1979. 197 p. 1,733
citations. Order from: Publisher, 3
Bloomsbury PI., London WC1 A 2QA,
England. Price unavailable. (NAL call
no.: Z7164.L6F56).

Selected Bibliography on Insect Pests
of Sunflower. Compiled by C. E. Rogers.
(Texas Agricultural Experiment Station,
MP-1439). Bushland, Texas. Agricultural
Experiment Station. December 1979. 41
p. 564 citations. Order from:
Publisher, Bushland, TX 79012. Free.
(NAL call no.: 100 T31M).

Selected Biblioqraphy of Recent Litera-
ture on the Substituted Dibenzo-p-
Diozins. Compiled by J. D. Diaz-Colon,
R. W. Bovey, and A. L. Young.
(MP-1433). College Station, Texas
Agricultural Experiment Station.
September 1979. 50 p. 441 citations.
Order from: Publisher, College Station,
TX 77843. Free. (NAL call no.:
100 T31M).
(BIBLIOGRAPHIES, Continued on page 10)


a







QUICK BIBLIOGRAPHY SERIES


The bibliographies in this series are
primarily computerized online or batch
ibliographies emanating from searches
performed by the TIS Reference Staff
in response to customer requests.
Searches are selected for inclusion
based on the currency of the topic,
interest among clientele relative
length (approximately 150 citations or
more) and probable value to a larger
audience. All titles in this series
will be listed for six months.
Revisions or updates will be re-
numbered and reannounced. Only one
copy of a title will be sent; however,
requestors may make copies. To
request a copy of a Quick Bibliography
send the title, series number, and a
return addressed label to:
Reference Branch
Technical Information Systems, SEA,
USDA
NAL Bldg., Room 302
Beltsvi le, MD 20705

NAL--BIBL.--80-13. Volcanic Ash:
Biological Effects, 1968-1979. 38
citations from AGRICOLA. Search by
Charles N. Bebee, Jayne T. MacLean,
and Phyllis L. Cleveland. May 1980.

NAL--BIBL.--80-14. Earthworms:
Raising, Uses, Beneficial Aspects,
7969-1980. 212 citations from
AGRICOLA. Search by Jerry Rafats.
June 1980.

NAL--BIBL. 80-15. Salt Tolerance in
Plants, 1974-1979. 275 citations
from AGRICOLA. Search by Jayne T.
MacLean. July 1980.

NAL--BIBL. 80-16. Windbreaks and
Shelterbreaks, 1968-1979. 332
citations from AGRICOLA. Search by
Charles N. Bebee. July 1980.
NAL--BIBL.--80-17. Nutrition and Aging,
1974-1979. 258 citations from
AGRICOLA. Search by Jayne T. MacLean.
July 1980.

NAL--BIBL.--80-18. Plant Senescence,
1976-1980. 289 citations from
AGRICOLA. Search by Henry Gilbert.
August 1980.
NAL--BIBL.--80-19. Casohol, 1979-1980.
78 citations from AGRICOLA. Search by
Sheldon Cheney. August 1980.


NAL--BIBL.--80-20. Integrated Pest
Management, 1969-1980. 188 citations
from AGRICOLA. Search by Charles N.
Bebee. August 1980.

NAL--BIBL.--80-21. Frost and Freeze
Protection for Sub-Tropical Fruits,
1970-1980. 132 citations from
AGRICOLA. Search by Henry Gilbert.
August 1980.

NAL--BIBL.--80-22. Acid Rain: Impact on
Agriculture, 1969-1980. 108 citations
from AGRICOLA. Search by Sheldon
Cheney and William Longenecker.
August 1980.



Clearance has been granted to USDA
authors to compile or publish the
following bibliographies:

An Annotated Bibliography on Soil
Erosion and Erosion Control in the
Subarctic and High-Latitude Regions.
Compiled by Charles W. Slaughter. For
information contact: Compiler,
Institute of Northern Forestry, USDA,
Forest Service, Fairbanks, AK 99701.

Bibliography on the Non-Game Freshwater
Fishes of North America, 1960-1980.
Compiled by Thomas M. Baugh. For
information contact: Compiler, Research
Information Group, Intermountain Forest
and Range Experiment Station, USDA,
Forest Service, 507 25th St., Ogden,
UT 84401.

A Cavity-Nesting Bird Bibliography --
Including Related Titles on Forest
Snags, Fire, Insects, Disease, and
Decay. Compiled by William C. Fischer
and B. Riley McClelland. For informa-
mation contact: Thomas M. Baugh,
Research Information Group, Inter-
mountain Forest and Range Experiment
Station, USDA, Forest Service, 507 -
25th St., Ogden, UT 84401.







NEW PUBLICATIONS KTN
OF NOTE


The Conserver Society. Karl E.
Henion II and Thomas C. Kinnear.
Chicago, American Marketing
Association, 1979. Member price:
$6.00. Nonmember price: $9.00. ISBN
0-87757-127-9. Attn: Publications
Dept. 222 S. Riverside Plaza, Chicago,
IL 60606.

The Costs of Using Crop Residues in
Direct Combustion Applications. Silvio
Flaim and David Urban. 1536 Cole Blvd.,
Golden, Colo., Solar Energy Research
Institute, March 1980. Printed copy
$5.25, microfiche $3.00. Order from:
NTIS, U.S. Dept. of Commerce, 5285 Port
Royal Rd., Springfield, VA 22161.

A Dialogue on the Structure of American
Agriculture: Summary of Regional Meet-
ings, Nov. 27-Dec. 18, 1979. (Washing-
ton, D.C.) United States Dept. of
Agriculture, April 1980. 116 p. Free.
Order from: Structures Project, Rm.
509-A, Admin. Bldg., USDA, Washington,
D.C. 20250.

First Annual Report to Congress on the
Use of Alcohol in Motor Fuels. (Wash-
ington, D.C.) U.S. Dept. of Energy,
Assistant Secretary for Conservation
and Solar Energy, Office of Alcohol
Fuels. April 1, 1980. Printed copy:
$5.25, microfiche: $4.00. Order from:
NTIS, U.S. Dept. of Commerce, 5285 Port
Royal Rd., Springfield, VA 22161.

Food and Nutrition for the 1980's:
Moving Ahead. Comprehensive Plan for
Implementing the National Food and
Human Nutrition Research and Education
and Information Programs. Washington,
D.C. U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, April
1979. Free. Request from: USDA,
Office of the Secretary, Attn: Audrey
Cross, Coordinator for Human Nutrition
Policy, Rm. 419A, Admin. Bldg., Wash-
ington, D.C.


Graduates of Higher Education in the
Food and Agricultural Sciences: An
Analysis of Supply/Demand Relationships,
Vol. 1--Agriculture, Natural Resources,
and Veterinary Medicine. Kyle Jane
Coulter and Marge Stanton. (Washington,
D.C.). U.S. Dept. of Agriculture,
Science and Education Administration,
July 1980. 194'p. Free. Order from:
Science and Education Administration
Publications, Distributions, and
Requests, Rm. 6007, South Bldg., U.S.
Dept. of Agriculture, Washington, D.C.
20250.

"Popular Reporting of Agricultural
Science: Strategies for Improvement,"
National Agricultural Science
Information Conference. Ames, Iowa,
October 22-26, 1979. [Washington,
D.C.,] U.S. Department of Agriculture
and Land-Grant Universities Coopera-
ting, [1980] 133 p. Available from
Nancy Sowers, Chief, Publications
Requests and Distribution Section, SEA
Information, USDA, Washington, D.C.
20250. All conference participants will
automatically receive a copy.

Regenerating Oaks in Upland Hardwood
Forests. Proceedings of The 1979 John
S. Wright Forestry Conference. Harvey
A. Holt and Burnell C. Fischer. (West
Lafayette) Dept. of Forestry and Natural
Resources and the Indiana Cooperative
Extension Service, Purdue University,
1979. Free. Order from publisher.

*Regulating Pesticides. Committee on
Prototype Explicit Analyses for
Pesticides, Environmental Studies Board;
Commission on Natural Resources,
National Research Council (National
Academy of Sciences, 1980. 301 p. ISBN
0-309-02946-5; ($11.00).
(PUBLICATIONS, Continued on page 12)




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


3 1262 08138 768 9

AGRICULTURE DATEBOOK


November 16-19: NATIONAL ASSOCIATION
OF STATE UNIVERSITIES AND LAND GRANT
COLLEGES. Peachtree Plaza Hotel,
Atlanta, Ga. For information contact
Ruth N. Smith, Suite 710, 1 Dupont
Circle, Washington, D.C. 20036. Tel:
(202) 293-7120.
The theme of the Agricultural
Division is Energy Impact -
Leadership From the Land-Grant
Community in a High Energy Cost
Society.

November 17-21: 9th PAMAMERICAN
SEMINAR ON SEEDS. Buenos Aires,
Argentina. Contact: Secretaria
Administrative, Corrientes 127-5
Pisco-Of. 513 (1043) Buenos Aires -
Republica Argentina.

November 30-December 6: ARID LAND
RESOURCE INVENTORIES, DEVELOPING
COST-EFFICIENT METHODS. La Paz,
Mexico. Sponsored by IUFRO Forest
Resource Inventory Subject Group,
SAF Inventory Working Group, Sub-
secretariat of Forest & Wildlife,
Mexico, Mexican Association of
Professional Foresters (AMPF), USDA
Forest Service, USDI Bureau of Land
Management. Contact: H. Gyde Lund,
*Program Chairman, USDA Forest Service
RMF & RES, 240 W. Prospect St., Ft.
Collins, CO 80526.

December 1-2: ASAE CONFERENCE ON
CROP PRODUCTION WITH CONSERVATION
IN THE 80's. Palmer House, Chicago,
IL. Contact: John C. Siemans,
Chairman, Conference on Crop
Production with Conservation in the
the 80's, Agricultural Engineering
Department, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana,
IL 61801 (telephone: 217-333-2854).

December 9-11: THIRD INTERNATIONAL
CONFERENCE ON THE ENVIRONMENT. UNESCO
Bldg., Paris, France. For information
contact the conference at 21 rue
Danielle Casanova, 75001 Paris, France.


(PUBLICATIONS, Continued from page 11)
*Research Priorities in Tropical Biology..
Committee on Research Priorities in
Tropical Biology; Division of Biologicatl
Sciences, Assembly of Life Sciences,
National Research Council (National
Academy of Sciences, 1980. 128 p.
ISBN 0-309-03-4309; $8.25).

Taxonomic Aspects of African Economic
Botany. Proceedings of the IX Plenary
Meeting of A.E.T.F.A.T. Las Painas de
Gran Canaria, 18-23, March, 1978. G.
Kunkel. Las Palmas de Gran Canaria,
September 1979. 250 p. 11. Surface
postage paid. Order from: The
Secretary, Bentham Moxon Trust, Royal,1
Botanic Gardens, Kew, Richmond, England'
TW9 3AE.

Who's Who in WorlZd Agriculture.
Compiled by the Editorial Staff of
Francis Hodgson. Edinburgh. Francis
Hodgson, 1979. 2 vols. $175.50
(U.S.) ISBN 0-582-90106-5 .
ISBN 0-582-90104-9 (Vol. 1)
ISBN 0-582-90105-7 (Vol. 2). Order
from: Francis Hodgson, Longman Group
Ltd., 43-45 Annandale St., Edinburgh, :.
Scotland EH7 4AT, United Kingdom.

4Documents marked with an asterisk ()
are available from the Office of
Publications, National Academy of
Sciences, 2101 Constitution Avenue -
N.W., Washington, D.C. 20418.


AGRICULTURAL LIBRARIES INFORMATION
NOTES provides a channel of communilea
tion to technical information specialist
librarians, extension workers, re-
searchers, and scientists on agricultui......
information activities. It is publ-ishti
monthly by the U.S. Department of Agri"t
culture, Science and Education Ad- |
ministration, Technical Information .|1
Systems, National Agricultural Librar:y,
Building, Beltsville, MD 20705. Le il| :
Moran, Editor.




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