United States foreign trade

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
United States foreign trade
Alternate title:
United States foreign trade. FT900, Summary of United States export and import merchandise trade
Portion of title:
Summary of U.S. export and import merchandise trade
Abbreviated Title:
U.S. foreign trade, FT900, Summ. U.S. export import merch. trade
Physical Description:
13 v. : ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of the Census
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census :
For sale by the Subscriber Services Section (Publications), Bureau of the Census
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Creation Date:
October 1981
Publication Date:
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Imports -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Exports -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Commerce -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
statistics   ( marcgt )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Issued also to depository libraries in microfiche.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Dec. 1976-
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Ceased in 1988.
General Note:
"FT 900."
General Note:
Description based on: Jan. 1979; title from caption.
General Note:
Beginning with July 1980 for sale by the Supt. of Docs., U.S.G.P.O.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Mar. 1988.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001320869
notis - AGH1745
oclc - 07222812
lccn - 81646118
issn - 0730-3270
sobekcm - AA00005268_00001
Classification:
ddc - 382/.0973/00212
System ID:
AA00005268:00051

Related Items

Preceded by:
Summary of U.S. export and import merchandise trade
Succeeded by:
U.S. merchandise trade. Seasonally adjusted imports and exports

Full Text

C3 ./6 900-


;lS summary of U.S. Export and

3 Import Merchandise Trade



)OCTOBER 1981

F90041-10 s For Ware Transmission 2:30 P.M. Wednesday,. December 2, 1981


Seasonally Adjusted and Unadjusted Data
(Including unadjusted data on imports of petroleum and petroleum products)

NOTE: Beginning with January 1981 statistics, data on the U.S. Virgin
Islands trade with foreign countries are included in the U.S. export and
import statistics published in this report.


-F.A.S. EXPORTS AND F.A.S. IMPORTS
Seasonally Adjusted
The Bureau of the Census, Department of Commerce, an-
nounced today that during October 1981, exports on a
f.a.s. (free alongside ship) U.S. port of exportation value
basis, excluding Department of Defense (DOD) Military
Assistance Program Grant-Aid shipments, amounted to
$19,043.9 million and that general imports on a f.a.s.
foreign port of ejcortation value basis, amounted to
$23,234.4 million.1
Based on the above export and import figures, the October
merchandtsg trade balance was a deficit of $4,190.5
million.1 3
During the first 10 months of 1981 (January-October)
exports were at an annual rate of $234,713 million, a level
about 6 percent higher than the calendar year 1980 total of
$220,626 million. Imports for the January-October 1981
period were at an annual rate of $263,325 million, an in-
crease of about 8 percent over the calendar year 1980 total
of $244,871 million.
For the 4-month period, July-October 1981 exports averaged
$19,253.4 million per month, a level about 4 percent below
the $19,997.9 million average reported for the preceding
4-month period, March-June 1981. Imports on a f.a.s.
value basis, averaged $21,949.5 million per month for the
current 4-month period, a level about 1 percent above the
$21,630.8 millIog average reported for the preceding
4-month period.

Unadjusted
Exports excluding Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid
shipments increased to $19,893.5 million in October from
$18,816.1 million in September. General imports increased
to $23,555.1 million in October from $20,748.7 million in
September.


F.A.S. EXPORTS AND C.I.F. IMPORTS
Seasonally Adjusted
Exports on a f.a.s. (free alongside ship) U.S. port of ex-
portation value basis, excluding Department of Defense (DOD)
Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid shipments amounted to
$19,043.9 million in October 1981 and general imports on a
c.i.f. (cost, insurance and freight) U.S. port of entry
value basis, amounted to $24,311.9 million. These October
1981 export and impyrt figures were reported by the Bureau
on November 30, 1981.
Based on the above export and import figures, the October
merchandise trade balance was a deficit of $5,268.0
million.1 3
During the first 10 months of 1981 (January-October) ex-
ports were at an annual rate of $234,713 million, a level
about 6 percent higher than the calendar year 1980 total of
$220,626 million. Imports for the January-October 1981
period were at an annual rate of $275,502 million, an in-
crease of about 7 percent over the calendar year 1980 total
of $256,984 million.
For the 4-month period, July-October 1981 exports averaged
$19,253.4 million per month, a level about 4 percent below
the $19,997.9 million average reported for the preceding 4-
month period, March-June 1981. Imports on a c.i.f. value
basis, averaged $22,983.8 million per month for the current
4-month period, a level about 2 percent above the $22,618.7
million a erage reported for the preceding 4-month
period.1

Unadjusted
Exports excluding Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid
shipments increased to $19,893.5 million in October from
$18,816.1 million in September. General imports increased
to $24,649.3 million in October from $21,733.1 million in
September.


Note : Footnotes 1, 2, and 3 are shown at the bottom Note : Footnotes 1, 2, and 3 are shown at the bottom
of page 3. of page 3.


SU.S. Department
Zsic of Commerce
S BUREAU OF
/ THE CENSUS
iniP/


Inquiries concerning these figures should be addressed to the Chief. Foreign Trade Division. Bureau
of tne Census, Washington, D.C. 20233. Tel Area Code 301. 763 5140: 763 7754. 763 7755.
For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington. D C
20402 Postage stamps not acceptable, currency submitted at sender's risk. Remittance from foreign
countries must be by international money order or by draft on a U.S. bank. Annual subscription,
FT 900.975,985 and 986 combined $40.00 ($50.00 for foreign mailing).


UNITED STATES FOREIGN TRADE








EXPLANATION


Coverage


The U.S. foreign trade statistics include, in general, both
government and nongovernment shipments of merchandise
and reflect the physical movement of foreign trade shipments
into and out of the U.S. Customs territory (includes the 50
States, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico), with certain
exceptions. The statistics exclude data on shipments between
the United States. Puerto Rico, and U.S. possessions, between
U.S. possessions and foreign countries, shipments to U.S. Armed
Forces and diplomatic missions abroad for their own use and
American goods returned to the United States by its Armed
Forces, intransit shipments, etc. (See paragraph below regarding
sources of further information.)
Users of the statistics are advised that cumulations of data
over at least 4-month periods are desirable to identify under-
lying trends. Month-to-month changes in imports, exports, and
similar series often reflect primarily irregular movements,
differences in monthly carryover, etc.

Valuation of Imports

C.i.f. Import Value.-The c.i.f. (cost, insurance, and freight)
value represents the value of imports at the first port of entry
in the United States. It is based on the purchase price and in-
cludes all freight, insurance, and other charges (excluding U.S.
import duties) incurred in bringing the merchandise from the
country of exportation and generally placing it alongside the
carrier at the first port of entry in the United States. If the
merchandise was acquired in a transaction between related
parties, the purchase price used in deriving the c.i.f. value is
based on an arm's-length equivalent transaction price, i.e.,
a price which would exist between unrelated buyers and sellers.


SOF STAT


F.a.s. Value.-The (free alongside ship) value
repre the transaction val imports at the foreign port
of e tioutt iibase on t rchase price, i.e., the actual
trans p valuJ and gened I des all charges incurred in
placing the merchandise alo the carrier at the port of
exporiatkonQ the country ex rotation.


Valuation of ExpOrts.:-- -"

F.a.s. Export Value.-The value reported in the export statistics
generally is equivalent to an f.a.s. (free alongside ship) value
at the U.S. port of export, based on the transaction price,
including inland freight, insurance and other charges incurred
in placing the merchandise alongside the carrier at the U.S.
port of exportation.



SOURCES OF FURTHER INFORMATION


Additional foreign trade statistics and information regarding 4
coverage, valuation, sampling, and qualifications which should
be considered by users of the statistics are contained primarily
in the following publications: Report FT990, Highlights of U.S.
Export and Import Trade; FT 135, U.S. General Imports,
Schedule A Commodity by Country; FT 410, U.S. Exports,
Schedule E Commodity by Country; and the Guide to Foreign
Trade Statistics. Information regarding additional sources of
statistics, the methodology used in seasonally adjusting the data,
and other matters relating to foreign trade statistics may be
obtained from the Foreign Trade Division, Bureau of the
Census, Washington, D.C. 20233.








Table 1. U.S. Exports, General Imports, and Merchandise Trade Balances, by Month: January 1980

to October 1981

(Valuea In milliouO of dollars, seasonally adjusted. Exports are on an f.a.a. value basal only: general Imports are shown ir, terms of c.i f. arid f a.B.
values. Smo "Hiplanation of Statistics" for information on coverage, definitions of export and Import values, and sources of further information.)

Exports P General Importst I Trade Balances

F..d. value Percent change C.I.f. value F.an.. value
Period eaOn1ly r. F.-s eprt ia.s. exports;
adjusted previous Seasonally Percent change Seasonally Percent change c.i.f. Imports f.a.s imports
S mont adjusted iratn adjusted from
(mll. dollars) (ial. dollars) previous month (all. dollars) previous month (Ill. dollars) (mll. dollaral

1980

Jluary-October ............ 182,718.3 214.,011.,. 0,j.713.0 -31.293.1 -20,99 .7

January .................... 17.419.4 4-.0 22.298.9 -*.3* 21.1.2.2 r' 8 --.869., -3.722.8
February ................... 16984.4 -2.5 22,9.4.1 -2.9 21,"8.: +3.0 -5.962.' --.'9-.3
r 18...................... .265.1 +7.5 22.0e.7.7 -3.9 20,9'7 .. -3.8 -3.782.6 -2.682.3
April......................... 18.567. 1. 20.81 .2 -5.6 19.765.5 -5.6 -2. 2.5.1 -1.198.4
17,646.8 -5.0 21.682.t -.2 20.87.3 -+4..2 -..035..8 -2.4-.0.5
'au ....................... 18.440.3 .4.5 21 ,.03.0 -1.3 20,352.7 -1.1 .962.' -1 912.,+
July....................... 18.266.7 -0.9 20.0'..2 -6.2 19.138.6 -6.0 -1.80'., -871.9
August..................... 19,086.5 -4.4 20.66-.. .2.9 19.'12.7 +3.0 -1.578.1 -62b.2
eptember .................. 18,828.4 -1.- 20.836.7 +0.8 19.9.0.5 ..:2 -2.008.3 -1.112.1
October .................... .19213.6 +2.0 21.2-4.. +2.0 20.1-7 .2 0 -2.030.8 -1 133.8
WovWm er................... 18.715.1 -2.6 20.751.3 -2.3 19.860.3 -2.. 036.2 -1.1"5.2
D canbear................... 19,250.9 .2.9 22,363.5 +57.8 21,-36.3 + .9 -3.112.6 -2.185.4

1981

Jamnu ry-O tober ............ 195,594.0 '.7.0 2'9,41 .1 /. 3 .1,41 I 1.7.7 91.1 -2.,4 1.l
Ja u 7ary.................... 16.824.8 -.2 24.261. 2 *. .5 "31.1.4..! ; .9,. .5
Febia ary................... 19. 64.1 .O0 22,' i.. --.6 :1.I 32i .5 --.1c ." -2.1 :..>
tl eh ...................... 21,,.3..2 .8.5 21,885.6 .5 2',,949.3 -8.l 1.. 8a*.9
April ...................... 19,818.0 -7.5 23.282.5 *6.4 22,289.2 .b.- -3,464..5 -2,-.1.2
ay ........................ 18,869.4 .8 22, J1.1 --.2 ;1,309.9 -.. -3,4-.7 -2,-0.5
June....................... 19,870.1 '5.3 22,992.6 -3.0 21,97..7 -3.1 -3,122.5 -2,104..6
Jutly....................... 19,264.3 -3.0 20,72;.7 -9.9 19, '6b. -9.9 -1,.63.-. -i ..
Augult..................... 19,050.4 -1.1 24,664.8 -*9.0 23,5,8.3 .18.8 -5,61-.- -,477.9
Beptembea.................. 19,654.8 +3.2 22,230.9 -9.9 21.226.6 -9.8 -2,576.1 -1,573.8
October.................... 19,043.9 -3.1 24,311.9 9.4 ,234..9 ,.-4 .- u6.0 5.1 0.;
Nove ber ...................
Dsonmber...................

Notei Monthly figures for 1980 and 1981 include data on U.S. VIrgin Islanai traae with foreign countries.
Bxports represent shipments of domestic and foreign merchandise c.,nsolred, excluding Depart-rient of Dfenre IDOD) Military Assistance Profreal. Grant-Aid
shipments on an f.a.s. (free alongside ship) U.S. port of exmortation value bastc. General i.'prts represent shipment" of merchandlae or. a c.l.ff.icost
Insurance, and freight) U.S. port of entry value bats and on an f.a.s. 'free alongsLae ship' foreign part of exportation ialue DaiEs.
S'he total shown In In this table are derived by ending the -easonally dojustea covmvoaity comrponerts as srown in table 3 for exDortl ena cables i and ,
for Imports.
1Percentage change from same period Ln previous year.


Expolt and moonn Itatist.cal erf s ',e acluItrea ol 15eaSor.Il da o ..n i ng-de. l.3r-a1n u nOt n or cnar r ..r*. *.pr.ce Iel Tr., alUlteda rncrr.tnl eor is .-oOrit total to0
1980 and 1981 presentna .n In.t report are de'..ed 0. faa.ns rnl wvsor.all, adluitaOca onna l.r e SITC ector. Tn. v -tr. .,L to al: tr.c 1980 1981 c.muonent ser.pe
rlgresnn tho combination of seasonal ad|usemnr.t lartor, developed train mhiinr, aTd. tnrougr. 1980 .na i'o iiuproolatt -orK i.o lo i ,t I P'or tI.: Jar.. rl 19t9 m.l..hl,
ltols wea adjusted independently at the compor.ents
'Cumulratlon of data over at least monn periods amr desirable to identlF unlderlv.ng Trend, Month to month rhangles .n eslpos ~.Porn ard similar series aften lef i t
primarily irn leeilr mmo-ants. difnesnctn .n monthly carrgever etc Recent monthrto month pD.ernl Changei in I o.lerall uasonall, sOIuWteO eDorl and IWTo.. W1.BS ire Dr'
noted In the following table wilh erafe percstn month to month r n and cocaine Ge' longer o,er.Ot snon to, CowDr.a.f me Tne averages eniu.a Oercentge cC.hdrg eS o'r II
ithe arloe October-Dec mber 1977 D7cause of acnomalltles ir. The dlta due tO10 *oifecI O' dk 5C rt.el ran 121 eriOOd *nen reg.iglbit Cr'.nght tlro Dtrcentl r. f.. Ite.l l o
ssaortadlinports occurred

Month-to-month Average monthly rates of change

Average Average months 12 months
Serie Sept.-Oct. Aug.-Sept. July-Aug. June-Jul rise decline July-Oct. Oct. 1960-
1981 1981 1981 1981 1977-1980 1977-1980 1981 Oct. 1981

(Percent) IPercent) (Percent) (Percent) (Percent) (Percent) lPercent I (Percent)

F.a.s. export value.. -3.1 -3.2 -1.1 -3.0 *-. -" -1.,1 *.*.1
C.l.f. Import value.. .9.4 -9.9 .19.0 -9.9 '3 2 -.8 ... *1.
F.a.e. import value.. .9.4 -9. -9.3 18.8 -9.9 5.0 -J. 27 2.1 -1.,

'S the "Explinalion of Sthtlics" for dal.n.i.on of he eort a.ina mporn aluiu and reade nuances






TABLE 2. U.S. EXPORTS AND GENERAL IMPORTS OF MERCHANDISE BY SELECTED
COMMODITY GROUPINGS, WORLD AREAS AND COUNTRIES

In millions of dollars. Exports are on a f.a.s. (free alongside ship) U.S. port
of exportation value basis. General imports are valued on a c.i.f. (cost, insurance,
freight) and f.a.s. (foreign port of exportation) bases. Export and import data are
adjusted for seasonal and/or working-day variation unless otherwise noted. Export
and import figures include data on U.S. Virgin Islands trade with foreign countries.

Difference
October September August Value
Item 1981 1981 1981 October September
vs. vs.
September August

Part A. Overall totals:

Domestic and Foreign Exports,
excluding DOD shipments 19,043.9 19,654.8 19,050.4 -610.9 +604.4
General Imports, c.i.f. 24,311.9 22,230.9 24,664.8 +2,081.0 -2,433.9
Trade balance -5,268.0 -2,576.1 -5,614.4 -2,691.9 +3,038.3
General Imports, f.a.s. 23,234.4 21,228.6 23,528.3 +2,005.8 -2,299.7
Trade balance -4,190.5 --1,573.8 -4,477.9 -2,616.7 +2,904.1


Part B. Selected export and import commodity groupings:


Agricultural Commodities
Domestic and Foreign Exports 3,686.1 3,644.1 3,246.5 +42.0 +397.6
.General Imports, c.i.f. 1,570.9 1,420.7 1,520.0 +150.2 -99.3
Trade balance +2,115.2 +2,223.4 +1,726.5 -108.2 +496.9
General Imports, f.a.s. 1,428.0 1,290.0 1,394.7 +138.0 -104.7
Trade balance +2,258.1 +2,354.1 +1,851.8 -96.0 +502.3

Petroleum and selected
products, unadjusted
Domestic Exports 422.5 238.4 243.5 +184.1 -5.1
General Imports, c.i.f. 6,550.3 6,487.6 6,779.3 +62.7 -291.7
Trade balance -6,121.8 -6,249.2 -6,535.8 +121.4 +286.6
General Imports, f.a.s. 6,300.7 6,245.8 6,521.8 +54.9 -276.0
Trade balance -5,878.2 -6,007.4 -6,278.3 +129.2 +270.9

Manufactured goods
Domestic Exports 12,337.9 13,029.5 13,050.5 -691.6 -21.0
General Imports, c.i.f. 13,854.8 12,479.8 14,287.9 +1,375.0 -1,808.1
Trade balance -1,516.9 +549.7 -1,237.4 -2,066.6 +1,787.1
General Imports, f.a.s. 13,260.9 11,931.8 13,635.8 +1,329.1 -1,704.0
Trade balance -923.0 +1,097.7 -585.3 -2,020.7 +1,683.0


Part C. Selected world areas and countries:

Selected Developed Countries
Domestic and Foreign Exports 10,014.7 10,982.1 10,595.4 -967.4 +386.7
General Imports, c.i.f. 12,953.5 11,494.9 13,632.5 +1,458.6 -2,137.6
Trade balance -2,938.8 -512.8 -3,037.1 -2,426.0 +2,524.3
General Imports, f.a.s 12,475.0 11,071.6 13,102.0 +1,403.4 -2,030.4
Trade balance -2,460.3 -89.5 -2,506.6 -2,370.8 +2,417.1

Canada
Domestic and Foreign Exports 2,806.2 3,247.3 3,534.2 -441.1 -286.9
General Imports, c.i.f. 4,075.8 3,840.7 4,419.6 +235.1 -578.9
Trade balance -1,269.6 -593,4 -885.4 -676.2 +292.0
General Imports, f.a.s. 4,036.8 3,804.4 4,368.2 +232.4 -563.8
Trade balance -1,230.6 -557.1 -834.0 -673.5 +276.9

Western Europe
Domestic and Foreign Exports 5,389.5 6,022.4 5,498.2 -632.9 +524.2
General Imports, c.i.f. 4,916.7 4,576.9 5,383.6 +339.8 -806.7
Trade balance +472.8 +1,445.5 +114.6 -972.7 +1,330.9
General Imports, f.a.s. 4,686.8 4,362.9 5,125.9 +323.9 -763.0
Trade balance +702.7 +1,659.5 +372.3 -956.8 +1,287.2







TABLE 2. U.S. EXPORTS AND GENERAL IMPORTS OF MERCHANDISE BY SELECTED
COMMODITY GROUPINGS, WORLD AREAS AND COUNTRIES--continued


Difference
Value
Item October September August October September
1981 1981 1981 vs. vs.
September August


Part C. Selected world areas and countries:--continued


United Kingdom
Domestic and Foreign Exports
General Imports, c.i.f.
Trade balance
General Imports, f.a.s.
Trade balance

Federal Rep. Germany
Domestic and Foreign Exports
General Imports, c.i.f.
Trade balance
General Imports, f.a.s.
Trade balance
Japan
Domestic and Foreign Exports
General Imports. c.i.f.
Trade balance
General Imports, f.a.s.
Trade balance


888.6
1,124.2
-235.6
1,085.2
-196.6


851.7
1,015.3
-163.6
969.2
-117.5

1,819.0
3,961.0
-2,142.0
3,751.4
-1,932.4


Organization of Petroleum
Exporting Countries (OPEC), unadjusted
Domestic and Foreign Exports 1,864.0
General Imports, c.i.f. 4,069.0
Trade balance -2,205.0
General Imports, f.a.s. 3,874.0
Trade balance -2,010.0


Part D. Selected export commodities:


967.6
1,166.2
-198.6
1,126.2
-158.6


919.9
831.2
+88.7
790.1
+129.8

1,712.4
3,077.3
-1,364.9
2,904.3
-1,191.9



1,823.0
3,908.0
-2,085.0
3,727.0
-1,904.0


923.3
1,558.4
-635.1
1,505.0
-581.7


773.8
1,050.8
-277.0
998.8
-225.0

1,563.0
3,829.3
-2,266.3
3,607.9
-2,044.9



1,691.0
4,069.0
-2,378.0
3,872.0
-2,181.0


-79.0
-42.0
-37.0
-41.0
-38.0


-68.2
+184.1
-252.3
+179.1
-247.3

+106.6
+883.7
-777.1
+847.1
-740.5



+41.0
+161.0
-120.0
+147.0
-106.0


+44.3
-392.2
+436.5
-378.8
+423.1


+146.1
-219.6
+365.7
-208.7
+354.8

+149.4
-752.0
+901.4
-703.6
+853.U



+132.0
-161.0
+293.0
-145.0
+277.0


Meat, fresh, chilled or frozen
Wheat, unmilled
Corn, unmilled
Vegetables, fresh, chilled or frozen
Feeding stuff for animals
Soybeans
Pulpwood and wood chips
Cotton, raw
Ores and concentrates of nonferrous
base metals
Bituminous coal
Organic chemicals
Fertilizer and fertilizer materials
Paper and paper board
Textile yarn, fabrics and articles
Iron and steel mill products
Aluminum and alloys
Silver bullion
Power generating machinery
General industrial machinery and
equipment
Passenger cars:
To Canada
To other countries
Aircraft, spacecraft and parts
Furniture and parts
Numismatic coins
Nonmonetary gold


107.3
720.7
627.0
173.9
223.8
560.6
123.6
183.4

79.7
549.9
549.3
120.9
160.6
269.1
252.7
98.0
7.0
701.6


88.7
880.0
503.5
112.5
144.4
650.8
101.2
115.1

60.2
650.8
472.8
152.7
175.2
282.7
227.6
68.0
23.6
722.2


901.8 1,013.3

154.5 229.2
67.5 50.4
1,107.8 1,208.2
51.9 70.2
7.0 2.5
54.3 194.9


105.6
669.0
503.1
79.1
173.3
523.9
91.9
128.3

56.3
559.5
421.0
133.5
177.7
322.4
205.3
75.2
13.9
595.6

958.5

362.7
54.7
1,240.3
59.5
6.6
138.8


+18.6
-159.3
+123.5
+61.4
+79.4
-90.2
+22.4
+68.3

+19.5
-100.9
+76.5
-31.8
-14.6
-13.6
+25.1
+30.0
-16.6
-20.6

-111.5

-74.7
+17.1
-100.4
-18.3
+4.5
-140.6


-16.9
+211.0
+0.4
+33.4
-28.9
+126.9
+9.3
-13.2

+3.9
+91.3
+51.8
+19.2
-2.5
-39.7
+22.3
-7.2
+9.7
+126.6

+54.8

-133.5
-4.3
-32.1
+10.7
-4.1
+56.1








TABLE 2. U.S. EXPORTS AND GENERAL IMPORTS OF MERCHANDISE BY SELECTED
COMMODITY GROUPINGS, WORLD AREAS AND COUNTRIES--continued


Difference
Value
Item October September August October September
1981 1981 1981 vs. vs.
September August

Part E. Selected import commodities, c.i.f. value basis:


Fish and fish preparations
Sugar
Coffee
Alcoholic beverages
Tobacco, unmanufactured
Wood lumber
Pulp and waste paper
Iron ore and concentrates
Crude vegetable materials
Energy products
Organic chemicals
Radioactive and associated materials
Paper, newsprint
Textile yarn, thread and fabrics
Iron and steel mill products
Silver bullion
Power generating machinery
Textile and leather machinery
Metal working machinery
Office machines and ADP equipment
TV sets
Electronic tubes, transistors and
semi-conductors
Passenger cars:
From Canada
From other countries
Aircraft, spacecraft and parts
Furniture and parts
Clothing and accessories
Toys, games, etc.
Numismatic coins
Nonmonetary gold


239.6 218.0 225.4 +21.6
256.0 176.1 125.8 +79.9
230.3 185.6 208.7 +44.7
230.5 212.7 226.1 +17.8
71.2 21.0 92.9 +50.2
157.9 137.5 108.3 +20.4
193.7 131.3 137.5 +62.4
96.2 77.1 127.5 +19.1
64.9 47.4 66.1 +17.5
6,499.9 6,437.3 6,725.3 +62.6
268.3 258.3 303.9 +10.0
74.8 119.2 125.0 -44.4
290.7 236.2 216.3 +54.5
325.4 277.6 303.7 +47.8
1,060.6 1,019.9 1,181.6 +40.7
63.8 60.5 73.5 +3.3
284.5 207.2 228.6 +77.3
89.6 69.5 82.7 +20.1
201.7 167.7 191.0 +34.0
372.2 324.2 320.3 +48.0
166.9 116.4 154.5 +50.5

420.9 316.6 337.5 +104.3

379.6 372.8 506.1 +6.8
1,374.6 949.1 1,347.9 +425.5
187.0 171.3 193.9 +15.7
131.0 107.4 120.1 +23.6
776.5 664.8 696.0 +111.7
238.8 189.5 196.2 +49.3
147.4 72.2 116.6 +75.2
259.1 90.9 200.5 +168.2


Part F. Selected import commodities, f.a.s. value basis:


Fish and fish preparations
Sugar
Coffee
Alcoholic beverages
Tobacco, unmanufactured
Wood lumber
Pulp and waste paper
Iron ore and concentrates
Crude vegetable materials
Energy products
Organic chemicals
Radioactive and associated materials
Paper, newsprint
Textile yarn, thread and fabrics
Iron and steel mill products
Silver bullion
Power generating machinery
Textile and leather machinery
Metal working machinery
Office machines and ADP equipment
TV sets
Electronic tubes, transistors and
semi-conductors
Passenger cars:
From Canada
From other countries
Aircraft, spacecraft and parts
Furniture and parts
Clothing and accessories
Toys, arres, etc.
Numismatic coins
Nonmonetary gold


229.6 207.4 214.5 +22.2
235.0 163.8 117.3 +71.2
216.0 175.4 197.5 +40.6
212.1 195.5 205.9 +16.6
67.3 19.4 86.0 +47.9
153.0 131.4 104.0 +21.6
191.1 130.2 136.2 +60.9
82.5 66.7 107.8 +15.8
58.2 42.5 59.0 +15.7
6,253.9 6,199.2 6,471.3 +54.7
256.2 246.0 291.9 +10.2
14.6 118.7 124.7 -44.1
285.6 233.1 214.0 +52.5
304.7 259.6 284.2 +45.1
978.4 939.8 1,086.8 +38.6
63.2 60.4 72.6 +2.8
281.6 203.7 224.7 +77.9
86.5 67.2 79.7 +19.3
194.0 161.4 183.4 +32.6
361.6 315.1 311.3 +46.5
162.3 112.4 149.7 +49.9

414.4 311.9 332.0 +102.5

377.7 371.3 504.1 +6.4
1,296.4 888.3 1,262.8 +408.1
184.9 169.4 191.6 +15.5
119.2 98.1 108.8 +21.1
729.5 623.6 652.3 +105.9
222.1 176.0 183.2 +46.1
145.9 71.6 115.7 +74.3
256.5 89.8 199.0 +166.7


-7.4
+50.3
-23.1
-13.4
-71.9
+29.2
-6.2
-50.4
-18.7
-288.0
+45.6
-5.8
+19.9
-26.1
-161.7
-13.0
-21.4
-13.2
-23.3
+3.9
-38.1

-20.9

-133.3
-398.8
-22.6
-12.7
-31.2
-6.7
-44.4
+109.6


-7.1
+46.5
-22.1
-10.4
-66.6
+27.4
-6.0
-41.1
-16.5
-272.1
-45.9
-6.0
+19.1
-24.6
-147.0
-12.2
-21.0
-12.5
-22.0
+3.8
-37.3

-20.1

-132.8
-374.5
-22.2
-10.7
-28.7
-7.2
-44.1
-109.2










Table 3. U.S. Exports of Domestic and Foreign Merchandise by Month: January 1980 to October 1981

(In millions of dollars. Data are on a f.a.s. value basis. See 'Explanatlor. of Statistlcs for Information or, coverage. definition of f.a.s. export
value and sources o further Information. Unaujusted totals represent sumi of unrounded figures and may vary slightly from sun of rounoea amounts )

Schedule E Sections. Domestic Merchandise, Excluding IDODI Grant-Aid, and Foreign (REexportasl I Total
Period For- (Sections DD
0 3 65 8 9 ign 0-9. and
0 2 1 4 1 8 9 Foreign1i Al"


1980 Seasonally adjusted if.a.a. value

January-October ...... 22,158.5 ?,2-2.0 20.318.1 6.530.3 1.6 4.3 17.360.*. 18,.20.7 69.683.' 13.660.6 6.96'.8 3.-20.2 182,718.3 I.-,.5
January .............. 2,0-6.6 161.8 2,088.8 018.8 139.6 1,'O1 .0 1.7.0.1 6.250.. 1 669.4 659.7 329.5 17.419.. 1 .0
February............. 1.960.2 215.8 2 084..1 58-.2 142.5 1,598.:5 1. 5.2 6,508.2 1.-01.5 ..55.2 283.3 16. "4.4 12.2
March................ 2.234.6 300.2 2 096.6 036.3 228.1 1.73'.9 1.772.' 6.676.' 1.370.1 833.7 369.5 18,.65.1 13.6
April................ 2.132.i 2-1.9 2,059.5 607.4 210.1 1 '551.9 2.061.8 o.726.2 1.316.. 1,115.8 332.0 18,567.1 12.3
May.................. 1,919.5 233.' 2 029.8 659.9 201.1 1.782.2 1.713.5 6.'67.6 1.2-7.8 o85.1 37..9 17.646.8 5.6
June................. 2.131.6 232.9 2,0"6.3 65b.0 1)..9 1817.9 1.921.3 ',104.0 1.280.9 '02.9 375.0 18,4/40.3
July................. 2.23'.8 209.' I 989.7 694.5. 1-0.5 1.'86.9 1.854.1 .81.2 1.30'.8 1.56.8 310.7 18,.266.7 36.0
August........... ... 2,340.0 19-.2 2.285.5 '01.5 161. I 7-.6 2.03-., '.308.3 1.355 3 b,0.1 315.6 19.086.5 '7.
September............ 2.501.0 223.0 1.881.3 '10 .7 160.5 1 6" .- 1.900 7 538.9 1,.366.- 562.1 301.3 18.828.. 28.1
October.............. 2.o57.5 228.8 1.-6t .5 bb2.0 1,5.3 .'5'0.1 1.8.6.9 7.528.2 1.348.0 856.. 428.u. 19 213.6 12.0
November............. 2,'01 .3 204.. 1 b60 .0 109.4. 131.0 1.638.8 1.608.1 7.439.8 1.353.8 7.? .9 366.5 18.715.1 4.1
December............. 2.88'.6 211.8 1 889.8 O'5.o 1i1 0 1 7?0.6 1,826.5 7.-'1.3 1.3-9.3 703.8 328.0 19.250.9 7.6

1981

January-October...... 80., ..*. 2... i :, i r. .Cj i1. ''... l .i. t .F.r. m 80,.l'"..0 14.059.0 ,1* .5.3 3.86'. 1'95,59 .0 44.4.
January.............. 2.,90.1 236 I ]. 6'.3 805.6 123.5 1,'21.0 1.791.2 7 10 ..3 1,296.7 723.0 366.0 18.824.8 1.8
February............. 2,728.3 209.4 1,834. i 976.1 I 4.? 1,841.0 1.7'6." 7,835.6 1,362.9 .750.9 323.4 19,764.1 7.4
March................ 3,100.2 233.6 2,087.9 950.7 206.8 1,900.2 1,862.6 8.433.7 1,-61.- 762.7 43'.4 21,.3u.;. 10.8
April................ 2,6-3.1 236.2 1.b21.2 690.9 1-,.- 1,765.7 1,889.9 8,263.0 1,-73.0 680.0 409.6 19,818.0 2.6
May.................. ;.,.02.5 i .7.8 1,823.1 565.8 151.8 1,822.7 1,729.0 7.697.7 1,312.. 71L5.9 370.7 18,869.4. 2.6
June................. 2,323.7 258.2 1,588.0 575.3 16..5 1,737.7 1,711.5 8,649.9 1,4.81.6 970.1 409.b 19,870.1 6.8
July................. 2,303.1 231.2 1,.35.- 869.1 129.,. 1.779.7 1,7.5.6 8,082.1 1,638.2 880.1 370.1 19,264.3 3.8
August............... 2,252.5 202.5 1,575.1 89-.. 166.1 1,635.9 1.692.8 8,27-.1 I1,t7.7 597.1 310.6 19,050.4 2.2
September ............ 2,502.0 280.9 1,733.6 ".'.0 12-.3 1,717.5 1.665.2 8,232.3 I1,l-.0 49-.6 44R." 19,65-.8 3.1
October.............. Z:.y .,., .,u i 1 ., S, a.1. I. 1l .1. c .' .. 1 .1' 1.1 4.0.9 ,30.6. 19.r..0.. 3.3
November.............
December.............

L'nd.lUsted (f.a.'. .aluel
1980

January-December..... ;',,73.7 2,663.0 23, 70.7 7.982.3 1,9-6.3 C20,7-0.2 22,25-.6 8.,352.9 16.343.1 8,419.5 4.,114.7 220,626.3 156.2
January-October ...... 22, 1 .- 2.125.0 20,02' .1 o,, 6.1 l,06...3 17,sja3.1 18,230.3 69.649.0 13, 717.6 6,967.8 3,.20.2 182.-68.8 14-.5
January.............. 2,017.9 152.- 2,109.7 -81..- 139.6 1,617.1 1.o47.9 5.612.9 1,575.9 659.7 329.5 16,354.6 17.0
February............. 2.046.5 20..1 2,169.6 -35.8 1.-.5 1,537.8 1,73-.7 6,540.7 1,408.5 455.2 283.3 16,964..3 12.2
March................ 2,212.3 335.3 2.375.- 566.9 228.1 1,880.. 1.882.6 7,44-.5 1,542.7 833.7 369.5 19,680.2 13.6
April................ 2,13-4.8 224.7 2,255.2 630.5 210.1 1.750.6 2.160.8 7.015.- 1,304.6 1,115.8 332.0 19,142.0 12.3
May.................. 1.,95/.1 200.5 2.186.1 736.5 201.1 1,851.7 1.884.7 7.349.6 1,]40.1 685.1 374.9 18,766.3 5.6
June ............ .... 2,071.9 196.3 2.032.7 730.1 13-.9 1,861.5 1,977.0 7.302.9 1.269.9 702.9 375.0 18,681.6
July................. 2,203.5 175.1 1,723.1 707.0 1-0.5 1,.792.3 1,724.3 6,698.' 1,246.1 -56.8 310.7 17,181.1 36.0
August ............. 2.. 0.0 1;". 1,665.0 0".9 lo1." 1,-60.1 1.946.9 6,730.9 1.295.7 640.1 315.6 17,938.9 7.7
September............ 50].0 207.4 1,535.1 :09.7 160.5 1.665.7 1,836.1 7,018.7 1.303.5 562.1 301.3 17,807.2 28.1
October.............. 2.689.. 249.- 1,776.2 755.3 1-5.3 1.765.9 1,935.5 7,934.7 1,400.6 856.4 428.4 19,952.6 12.0
fovember....... ..... 2.652.9 262.7 1.761.3 785.3 131.0 1.488.0 1,717.7 7,372.8 1,32..0 747.9 366.5 18,614.2 -.1
December...... ...... 2,919.- 275.3 2.001.' 7..0.9 151.0 1,769.0 1,806.- 7,531.1 1,311.5 703.8 328.0 19,543.1 7.6

1981

January-October...... ... .. 2 2.0C.2.9 2A .: i i*.--'* 1- .6 6 i .5).. n0.256., 1 1C..' '.r1.5.3 3.86'.6 19-.50'.0 4...
January.............. 2.152.0 221.' 2.0-..I.0 619 123.5 1.081 .' I 705.2 6b.- 2.0 1.253.9 '23.0 366.0 ',.962.2 1.8
February............. 2,709.; 198.3 1.843. 7. .1A 124.: 1,.b84.5 1,664.8 -", ?2. I' 1,311.1 7:0.9 3?3.4 IB,839 6.) 7.4
March......... ...... 3,00'.1 262.3 2,325.9 826.? 206.8 2,0-.6 2,02-.6 9,39,.1 1,630.9 762.7 4.i..- 22,917.7 10.8
April................ 2,610.5 219.0 1,823.9 745.5 1.5.4 1,7a3.9 1,9..0.9 8,651., 1,489.2 680.0 409.6 20,509.3 2.6
May .................. 2,412.L 237.5 1,805.0 63'.7 151.8 1,859.2 1,893.3 8,459.8 1,383.3 715.9 370.7 19,986.1 2.6
June................. 2,330.7 217.7 1,59..- 613.8 16..5 1,819.- L,802.2 8,8S. 0.2 1,.92.0 970.1 -09.6 20,254.7 6.8
July................. 2,342.3 19 ... 1,2. .5 918.6 129.4 1,82b.0 1,660.1 7,597.2 1.,*02.2 880.1 370.4 18,565.2 3.8
August............... 2,241.2 187.3 1,301.0 919.0 168.1 1,6.4..I1 1,559.1 7,-71.5 1,365.2 597.1 310.6 17.76-.2 2.2
September...... ... 2,517.0 259.8 1,376.6 958.- 12..3 1,684.9 1,60.-' "',8-5.- 1,351.8 59..6 44.2.7 18,816.1 3.1
October........ .. .. :.6.1. .1 ''nt 1 i..ii I I 1 i : .'ee d .o1. 6.. 'l.L 1..8 u u.1 Q.).9 .30.4 13, 89 .Z 3 1
November.............
December.......... ..

Note; The 1981 Schedule F comImaot; sectL,:n1 and oerasil totals reflect data 3r, 115 4 irglr, islands trade .itn foreign courtrles For 1960. only the
overall totals Include U.S. VirgL Islanas data.
'Schedule E section description- are as follows- 0. Food and live animals. 1. Beverages and tobacco, 2. Crude materials, Inedible, except fuels,
3. Mineral fuels, lubricants, and related material. -. Oils and fats--animal &rnd vegetable, 5. Chemicals and related products. h.S.P.F.; 6. Manufac-
tured goods cassifflec chiefly by material; '. Machinery and transport equipment: 8. Miscellaneous manufactured articles, N.S.P.F., and 9. Comunodttles
and transactions not classified elemhere.
2Adjusted for seasonal and 'ormrig-aus variation using seasonal ajusEtment actors Introduced in January 1981. Adjustment factors have not been applied
to data for Schedule F sections ana 9 and Foreign iReewoorta) nue to mie absence of identifiable seasonal patterns. Thle monthly seasonally adjusted
export totals presented in table I represent the sum o0 the comDonent totals as athon in thigh table Annual totals are not shown for seasonally adjusted
data. Unadjusted data should be used for anrsuil totals.
"Coimnodities entering the United States as imports and whichh at the tcine of exportation are in substantially the samr.e condition as fnen imported.
'Schedule E sections 0-9, Foreign Reexport; ). and total f L,.S. Virgin l rlanras exDort ron forelgr countries combined. The 1980 Virgin Issands
data are not alstrloutea by Schedule E seciton DC-r Military Assistance Prougra-., Crant-4id shipments are excluded frarn this total.
'Represents oniy export shipments firoms the Ur.itea St.tes ano aiffer fro",- DOD Military Assistance Progrom Grant-Aid shipment figures under this program
as follows: (a) Transfers of the material procured outside tie United States and transfers from DOD overseas stocks are exciudeo from export shipments.
(b) Export value Is f a.s.. whereas DOD salue. In most instances, is f.o,.b.. point of origin, and (c) Data for shipments reported by the DOD for a given
manth are Included In Bureau of the Census reports in the second montn suoeequent to the rs-nth reported ofy DOD.










Table 4. U.S. General Imports of Merchandise by Month: January 1980 to October 1981

(in millIons of dollars. Data are on a c.t.f. value bats. See "Explanation of Statistics" for Information on coverage, definition of c.s.f. Import value,
and sources of further infornatlon. Unadjusted totals represent sum of unrounded figures and may vary slightly Ifrom sum of rounded amounta)

Schedule A sections I
Period Total
0 1 2 1 5 6 7 8 9 I

Seasonally adjusted (C.I.f. value)


1980

January-October............... 13,890.7 2,569.7 9,480.3 72.350.6 444.3 7,523.4 28,533.5 52.369.3 20 126.3 6.123.3 214,011.4
January....................... 1,561.b 214.8 1,063.0 7,479.0 62.7 780.5 3,229.7 5,254.3 2,126.5 526.8 22,298.9
February...................... 1,289.3 227.2 1,053.3 8,546.5 34.8 788.9 3,232.9 5,148.9 2,002.4 622.9 22,947.1
March........................ 1,450.3 22..4. 1,032.3 7,921.- 45.9 7.6.7 3,083.9 5,057.3 2,011.2 474.3 22,047.7
April ............ ............. 1,378.8 239.3 960.1 7,110.2 51.8 727.1 2,705.3 4,965.5 2,115.2 558.9 20,812.2
May........................... 1,396.6 264.5 926.2 7, .41.1 33.0 751.7 2,925.9 5,194.4 2,143.6 605.3 21,682.6
June.. ....................... 1.471.1 238.4 923.8 7,578.b 44.1 770.1 2,745.3 5,087.4 2,011.3 532.9 21,603.0
July ............... .......... ,433.8 281.b 900.3 6,210.8 33.0 753.2 2,.90.3 5,344.8 2,064.8 561.6 20,074.2
August............ ............ 1,296.4 28..9 860.4 6,702.3 32.8 697.5 2,777.3 5,344.6 2,091..3 574.1 20,664.6
September................ .... 1,211.b 293.2 854.8 6,515.1 35.6 722.2 2,671.5 5,497.3 2,11-.1 921.3 20,836.7
October... ................. 1,401.2 301.4 906.1 6,845.3 70.6 785.5 2,671.,. 5,476.8 2,042.9 715.2 21,244,4
November.............. ...... .. 1,540.8 258.7 943.6 6,3.8.8 55.3 721.3 2,798.2 5,-.u3.0 2,085.5 556.1 20,751.3
December...................... ,490.3 216.5 906.5 7,672.6 75.4 776.5 2,860.5 5,498.6 2,234.3 632.3 22,363.5

1981

Jan.uary-October............... 13,685.1 2,877.0 10,459.6 ;1.929.. 441.6 8,381.0 33,059.i 59,795.9 22,769.4 5,956.4 229,585.1
January.............. ...... 1,578.0 301.5 1.,0'8.5 8,323.7 5-.9 818.7 3,236.- n,008.2 2,259.5 635.8 24,265.2
February.................. ... 1,440.7 268.2 1,214.7 8,237.2 66.. 827.9 3,160.1 5 ,077.6 ?.131.2 485.8 22,909.8
March......................... 1.4688. 256.7 1,070.9 6,'10.9 50.8 ?72.9 2.926.3 5,854..2 2.229.3 572 .9 21,.885.6
April ......................... 1,337.0 273.5 1,ln. .8 8.107.7 26.9 b67. 3,159.7 5. o0.1 2.102.1 582.3 23.282.5
ay ........................... 1,48o.1 330.7 1,16.;. 6,307.2 4-.,5 782.0 3,379.7 5,411.1 2.292.3 612.7 22.314,1
June .......................... 1,354.2 247.o 1,061.2 7.5?3.2 35.0 813.9 3,232.8 i.906.4 2,169.2 6-9.1 22.992.6
July ........... .............. 1,2tI.5 246.5 935.9 5,903.2 41.8 752.3 3,117.1 5.765.b 2.168.9 534.9 20.727.7
August............. .......... 1,270.8 353.3 932.6 '.150.2 35.8 1.051.8 3.848.0 6.930.7 2.-57.4 634.2 24.664.8
September ............... ..... 1.256.? 26f'.2 8'6.6 .,80')0.7 .0. 9-..8 3.-26.5 5 809.- 2.31q.1 509.7 22.230,9
October....................... 1.41 1. '31.8 1 ,r16.2 6.89 .. 45.O B64.3 3,N'3.1 r.,772.u 2,640.4 737.0 4? ,311.9
November......................
December..................... .

Unadjusted (C.I.f. value)

1980

January-December.............. 16,921.9 3.0'0.2 11,301.2 86,372.1 575.0 9.021.0 3'.131.3 63,271.8 25.037.8 7,312.0 256,984.2
January-October ............... 13,890.2 2,53j-.6 9,450.2 72,350.6 -4-,3 7,586.7 28,JJ2,1 52.3U2.i 20,8.80. o,123.3 213,852.2
January....................... 1,561.6 197.4 972.6 71,479.0 62.7 735.2 3,081.1 5,233.3 1,984.0 526.8 21,833.6
February...................... 1,289.3 217.2 953.2 8,546.5 34.8 766.8 3,000.1 4,979.0 1,172.1 622.9 22,181.8
March.................... ... 1,450.3 234.0 1,051.9 7,921.4 45.9 828.8 3,077.7 5,335.4 1,924.7 474.3 22,344.4
April .. ..... ................ 1,378.8 2,7.0 929.4 7,110.2 51.8 810.7 2,791.9 5,278.3 1,996.7 558.9 21,153.3
May......................... 1,396.6 269.5 962.3 7.441-.' 33.0 808.1 2,996.1 5,334.7 2.030.0 605.3 21,877.1
June.......................... 1,671.1 244.8 985.7 7,578.6 4-.1 807.1 2,838.6 5,296.0 2,150.1 532.9 21,949.0
July.......................... 1,433.8 277.1 926.. 6,210.8 33.0 734.- 2,599.9 5.403.6 2,306.4 561.6 20,487.1
August......... ............. 1,296.4 250.- 875.0 6,702.3 32.8 645.2 2,641.2 -.767.4 2,263.9 574.1 20,048.1
September ..................... 1,211.6 285.9 895.8 6.515.1 35.6 668.8 2,545.9 5,145.5 2,194.4 921.3 20,420.0
October....................... 1,401.2 311.3 897.9 6,845.3 70.6 781.6 2,759.6 5,529.5 2,214.5 145.2 21,556.7
RIovember...................... 1,5-0.8 265.7 920.0 6,348.8 55.3 680.2 2,784.2 5,443.0 2,089.7 556.1 20,683.9
December...................... 1,-90.3 239.9 931.0 7.672.6 75.4 754.0 3.015.0 5,526.1 2,111.4 632.3 22,448.0

1981

January-October............... 13.886 .1 2.3.11.0 101, 6.9 71,95.-1 442.0 6,405.0 12?,805. 59,61.1l 2 2,899.0 5, 956.5 229,218.8
January....................... 1,578.0 275.3 951.0 8,323.7 54.9 773.7 3,061.b 5,846.0 2,114.9 635.8 23,614.9
February...................... 1.440.7 :'6.4 !,099.3 8,237.? 6b.4 803.9 .,929.4 .1,879.6 1,873.3 485.8 22,072.1
March.......................... i,a .' 2 b.2 1.05b.t. h.710.9 i0.6 857.2 2.9-3.9 b.211.3 2.155.7 574.9 22,316.1
April......................... 1,337.0 283.9 1,11..5 8.107.7 26.9 8oi.3 3,292.- b 16f9.1 2.009.6 582.3 23.786.9
May........................... .8a-1. 1 338.3 1.212.7 6.307.2 4.5. 831.3 3..00.0 6 077.. 2.15-.8 612.7 27.464.9
June.......................... 1. 5-.. 2 253.3 Il. b. 1 .57J.2 35.0 853.8 3,358.9 t 142. 2.251.b 649.1 23.568.0
July.......................... 1,261.5 2. ".3 462.1 5.903.2 41.8 73'.) 3.260.5 5.909.7 2.4.4.3 53,.9 21,297.5
August........................ 1,270.8 371.6 953.1 7,150.2 35.8 96b .7 3.6'.'.9 6 112.9 2,631.9 634.2 23,716.2
September..................... 1.256.2 260.8 902.9 .o.800.7 40.7 852.? 3,255.2 5.437.6 2.-lb.5 509.7 21,733.1
October....................... J.411." "42.8 1,016.6 6,,9'.2 4.,. 864.1 i,655.3 6,83:.q ?,846.4 ?37.0 24,649.3
November.....................
December.....................

Note: Monthly figures for 1980 and 1981 Include data on 1U.S. Virgin Islands trade with foreign countries.

1Schedule A section descriptions are as follows: 0. Pood and live animals; 1. Beverages and tobacco 2. Crude materials. Inedible, except fuels:
3. MIneral fuels, lubricants, and related material; 4. Olle and fats--animal and vegetable. 5. Chemicals and related products, N.S.P.F.. 6. Manu-
factured goods classified chiefly by material 7. Machinery and transport equipment 8. Miscellaneous manufactured articles, N.S.P.F., and 9. Commoditell
and transactions not classified elsewhere.
tAdjusted for seasonal and working-day variation using seasonal adjustment factors introduced In January 1981. Adjustment facLors have not been applied
to data for Schedule A sections 0, 3. 4, and 9 due to the absence of identifiable seasonal patterns. The monthly seasonally adjusted Import totals
(c.i.f.) presented In table L represent the sum of the component totals as shown In this table. Annual totals are not shown for seasonally adjusted data,
Unadjusted data should be used for annual totals.







9

Table 5. U.S. General Imports of Merchandise by Month: January 1980 to October 1981

(In millions of dollarsB. Data are on a f.a.s. value basis. See "Explanation of SctatistIc' for information on coverage. definition of f.a.a. import
value, and sources of further Informatton. Unadjusted totals represent sum of unrounded figures and may vary slightLy from sum of rounded amounts I

Schedule A sectionsB1
Period ital
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 .-1

Seasonally adjusted (f.a.s. value)

1980

January-October............... 12,938.3 2.353.2 8.811.? 69,382.7 .13.1 '.16..6 26.903.- 50.03-'.6 19 6t,.6 6 049.t, 203 '13.0
Ja1u4ry....................... 1,466.5 196.0 968.6 7,118.2 58.2 7-0.3 3,058.4 ..,996.3 2,019.5 520.2 21,142.2
Ebruary...................... 1,203.5 207.7 988.3 8,152.*. 32.7 747.7 3,038.3 4,903 8 1,886.2 618.1 21,'78.7
IMarch.......................... 1,351.3 206.4 970.8 7,563.5 42.3 710.7 2,917.8 4,819.9 1, 46.B a 6' 9 20,9.7.4
April ......................... 1,279.2 218.7 898.6 6,796.6 '8.8 687.7 2,538.3 4.729.4 2,015.. 552.8 19,765.5
May.......................... 1,294.3 241.5 853.2 7,150.4 30.7 716.0 2,731.6 -,9,.1.J 2,032.i j95.8 20,387.3
Jmo .......................... 1,373.1 218.'. 857.3 7,275.8 41.2 728.2 2,575.9 4,853.7 1,90k..8 52..3 20,352.7
July.......................... 1,335.8 257.9 8.35.9 5,986.0 30.8 723., 2,3i.6.u 5,110.7 1,957.7 554.0 19,138.6
August......................... 1,207.5 259.8 800.3 6,461.0 30.8 6b7.4 2,616.8 5,119.1 1,98v.3 563.7 19,712 7
September..................... 1,122.1 268.7 800.2 6,278.3 33.0 693.5 2.533.3 5,292.8 2.00..5 91-.1 19,91,0.5
October....................... 1,305.0 278.1 8.0.5 6,600.5 64.6 749.7 2,5.6.6 5,280.6 1,9.3 1 '38.7 20,3.?7.-
November...................... 1,441.6 237.9 879.5 6,128.2 51.3 690.1 2,656.1 5,243.4 1,982.5 549.7 19,860.3
December...................... 1,386.1 197.2 848.7 7,'.13.2 69.0 7..0... 2,709.2 5,309.5 2,13'.4 625.5 21,.36.3

1981

January-October................ 12,6C 4 .' 1.6 9,'-4. 6 9.3'6.5 Q.. I .01 -.1 31 ,74. 6 I '.r.'. -I,ti' 7 ,a' :kz' .
January....................... 1,471.0 277.- 976.7 8,014 2 50.1 778.6 3,0'6.b 5,771.5 2,150.1 b28 I .3,194 3
February...................... 1,340.9 246.9 1,137.5 .,943.4 60.0 790.3 3,015.2 4,884.7 2, 0'4. : 478.6 :'1,Q 1.7
March......................... 1.. 72.9 236.2 955.8 6.475.9 .6.6 :37.7 2.791.0 5 6.0.? ;.12t4.i 568.1 20 9-9.3
April......................... 1,225.0 2 1.9 1,.086.1 7,835.5 24.9 '33.' 2.999.0 5 559.b 1.99'1.0 5' .. ..28)9.2
May ........................... 1,371.2 304... 1.0687.3 6.078.2 '*0. '.0 3 201.8 5 o9'.- 2 1' .9 0o 0.3 21. 30j .'
June .......................... 1.20.9 226.i 982.8 7.254.5 32.0 ;1?.8 3.060.5 5 4-,9 ".Ob .ts 6-0.Bo 1. ..
July.......................... 1,161.6 223.5 867.6 5.692.0 36.3 "22.2 2.956.3 3.55,.3 2 0r O .2 527.7 19.80B.7
August........................ 1.I176, 323.7 85'.- 6 880.5 32.8 1,009.8 3.628.9 6.n'0.1 .; 3 '.0 625.0 23. i2. .3
September ..................... 1,. 15C,. 7 %5.2 805.0 6t.547.9 3'.2 665.' 3,238.9 I .6)3.9 2 193.3 '00.9 -1 223.o
October....................... 1.9l, '. 306. 2 9I1.0 6,6 ., .L. 1 3 5 .,"' 4 ,, 2 ,.. --.B :3.'i .
November .......... ..........
December......................

Unadjusted (f.a.a. value

1980

January-December.............. 15,766.3 2,784.5 10,515.7 82,92-.0 53i3.4 8,593.5 32,210.8 60,557.9 23,?59.6 7,22..9 24-,870.6
January-October............... 12.9j8.3 2, 21.b) 8,;86.- 69.382.' .13.1 7.221.0 26. '12.- 9.99 8.7 1r. 33.21 o 0 49.6 2,.3 560.1
January....................... 1,466.5 180.1 886.3 7,118.2 58.2 697.4 2,917.7 4,976.3 1,88-..2 520.2 20,705.2
February...................... 1,203.5 198.6 894.4 8,152.- 32.7 726.8 2.819.5 .,742.0 1,669.3 618.1 21,057.2
March......................... 1,351.3 215.3 989.2 2,563.5 -2.3 788.9 2,912.0 5,085.0 1,815.2 .67.9 21,230.7
April......................... 1,279.2 225.7 869.8 6.796.6 48.8 766.8 2,619.5 5,027.. 1,902.3 552.8 20,089.3
may........................... 1,296.3 246.1 886.5 7,150.4 30.7 769.7 2,797.2 5,07..7 1,924.8 595.8 20,770.3
June.......................... 1,373.1 224.3 914.7 7.275.8 41.2 763.2 2.663.5 5,052.7 2.036.2 52-.3 20,869.0
July.......................... 1,335.8 253.8 860.1 5.986.0 30.8 705.3 2.-.9.6 5.166.9 2,186.8 55-.0 19,529.2
August........................ 1,207.5 228.4 813.9 6,.61.0 30.8 617.3 2,-88.6 ..466.2 2,147.2 563.7 19.124.5
September ..................... 1,122.1 262.0 838.6 6.278.3 33.0 642.2 2,41.2 4.954.1 2,080.7 91-.1 19,539.3
October....................... 1,305.0 287.3 832.9 6,600.5 6'..6 746.0 2,630.6 5.333.4 2,106.3 738.7 20.645.4
November...................... 1,441.b 244.3 857.5 6,128.2 51.3 650.8 2.6.2.8 5,2,).5 1,986.5 5-9.7 19,796.2
December...................... 1,386.1 218.5 871.6 7.413.2 69.0 718.9 2,855.5 5,336.0 2,019.9 625.5 21,51-.2

1981

January-October............... 12,84' .' 2, 4 .4 9 6 2. o'5,;"6.8 '.03.8 9.036.3 31.10' 6 ,' ..5 .'-6 4 '. -.. .1 ,,i .j
Janu.ary............ .......... 1,.71.0 253.3 885.9 8,01-.2 50.1 735.8 2,910.5 5,615.7 2,012.5 628 I 2.,577.1
February...................... 1,340.9 236.0 1,029.4 7,943.4 60.0 767.4 2,795.1 4.694.? 1,779.3 4'8.6 '1.124.3
March ........................ 1.3)2.9 2-. .9 989.3 6,'75.9 46.6 818.1 2.80'.7 5.98 .2 2.05 .8 568.1 21 362.b
April ......................... 1,225.0 261.5 1,038.3 '.83..5 2-.9 825.- 3.125.0 5 945 .3 1 911.0 5'..5 22 '15.2
May ........................... 1.371.2 311.7 1,129.' 6.078.2 -0.5 "9-.1 3,221.0 5.8i3.8 2 0-'.a 606.3 21 45-.2
Jime ......................... I,2 .0.9 '31.3 1.061.4 '.255.5 l2.0 815.9 3,179.9 ..92 7 2 1-2.0 640.n 2: 522.2
July .......................... I,161.B 219.' 691,9 5.692.0 38.3 '07.8 3.0 2.3 5.694.2 2.324.1 52'.7 20 3.9.6
August ........................ ,l?7.l 285.5 873.2 6.880.5 32.8 929.0 3,-40.2 5.883.0 2..492.2 b25.0) 22.61.'.5
September ..................... 1,14 '0.7 23Q.3 829.2 6.557.9 ''.2 816.6 3.07'.0 i ,2.' .6 : 265.- ;00. 20 "-8.'
October....................... 1, .. 316.3 9.4. 6,643.' ,1 4 826.3 3.415.3 6.60-.6 7,699.P "5.. ", 5 I
November......................
December......................

Note: Monthly Figures for 1980 and 1981 Include aatm on U.S. Virgin Islands trade with foreign countries.

1Schedule A section descriptions are as follows: 0. Food and live--amimals; i. Beverages and tobacco; 2. Crude materials, inedible, except fuels:
3. Mineral fuels, lubricants, and related material. 01 Oils and fate--animal and vegetable; 5. Chemicals and related products. N S.P.P.: 6. Manu-
factured goods cleassifed chiefly by material, 7. Machinery and transport equipment; 8. Miscellaneous manufactured articles. N.S.P.F.; and 9. Com-
modities and transactions not classified elsewhere.
tAdjusted for seasonal and working-day variation using seasonal adjustment factors Introduced in January 1981. Adjustment factors have not been
applied to data for Schedule A sections 0, 3. 4, and 9 aue to the absence of Identifiable seasonal patterns. The monthly seasonally adjusted Import
totals (f.a.s.) presented in table I represent the sun of the component totals as shown in this table. Annual totals are not sbhon for seasonally
adjusted data. Unadjusted data should be used for annual totals.









General Imports of Petroleum and Selected Petroleum Products into the
U.S. Customs Area and U.S. Virgin Islands From Foreign Countries,
Unadjusted

Beginning with January 1981 statistics, monthly and cumulative-to-date data on general imports of petroleum and
selected petroleum products into the U.S. Customs area and into the U.S. Viroin Islands from foreign countries for
the period January 1980 through the current month are presented in tables 6 and 7 on the pages that follow. Current
year (1981) data are shown in table 6 and prior year (1980) data are shown in table 7.

The commodity classifications (Schedule A and TSUSA) covering petroleum products, that are effective with
January 1981 statistics are reflected in the listing of classifications below and in the tables which follow.

Schedule A and TSUSA Commodity Numbers Used in Compiling the Petroleum
Information Presented in This Report


Energy products


Schedule A No.


TSUSA No.


Schedule A No.


Crude petroleum and deriv-
atives to be refined
333.0020
333.0040
334.5440


Crude petroleum
333.0020
333.0040

Gasoline
334.1500

Jet fuel
334.1205

Kerosene
334.2000

Distillate fuel oil
334.3021

334.3045


Residual fuel oil
334.4050
334.4060

Propane and butane gas
341.0025


Naphthas
334.5420

Liquid derivatives of
petroleum, n.e.s.
334.5430 pt.


475.0510
475.1010
475.6510


475.0510
475.1010


475.2520, 475.2560


475.2530
475.2550


475.3000


475.0525
f 475.0545
475.1015
475.1025


475.0535
475.1035


Lubricating oils
334.5410 pt.


Lubricating greases
334.5410 pt.


Paraffin and other mineral
waxes
335.1225 pt.
335.1245


Asphalt
335.4500


All other petroleum products
(pitch of tar coke, non-
liquid hydrocarbon mix-
tures, and calcined petro-
leum and coal coke not for
fuel)
335.3000 pt.
334.5430 pt.
598.5020 pt.


475.4500



475.5500, 475.6000


494.2200
494.2400



521.1100


401.6200
475.7000
517.5120
517.5140


475.1525, 475.1535,
475.1545


475.3500


475.6530


Nonenergy products


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980 Edition of U.S.


reign Trade .... 4


cstisti -

r. -. -. Tbr
assifications & Cross-Classifications

S publication brings together the basic schedules of commodity and.
ugaphic trade classifications currently being used in the compilation .
Jl publication of U.S. foreign trade statistics. Included, for example, .
the TSUSA (imports) and Schedule B (exports) classifications and
ir respective correlations to the categories comprising end-use and '"
SC-based product classifications. Schedule A (imports), including its
sias-classification to TSUSA, and Schedule E (exports).which has been -
awilverted on a one-for-one basis to Schedule B, also are included, as are
dp individual Schedule A/E classification number assignments to the
iblm descriptions shown in the selected commodity groupings and '
enmmodity tables of Report FT 990, Highlights of U.S. Exports and
'Iports. Similarly, Schedule C-E and C-1 (both numerically and U ID-..
l habetically arranged) and the individual country designations includ-
od in summary reports involving geographic trade areas are presented.
bIch Schedule of foreign trade classifications and/or cross-classifica-
lgns comprises a separate section of the publication.

For the convenience of the users of this publication, changes which were effective during 1979 to the basic
commodity classification systems (i.e.. Sections 1 through 10) are presented in the addenda to this publication. Thus,
this 1980 edition updates the information contained in the 1974 edition of the "Cross-Classifications" and the 1978
edition of the Correlations of Selected Export and Import Classifications Used in Compiling U.S. Foreign Trade
Statistics. This ready reference to cross-classifications, it is believed, permits better use and interpretation of
commodity and geographic trade statistics in summary reports in the current program.

Unless otherwise noted, the classifications in this book are those in effect January through December 1980.

ORDER FORM To: Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office. Washington, D.C. 20402
U.S. Foreign Trade Statistics. Classifications and fl Credit Card Orders Only
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guide to

foreign trade

statistics:

1979


Exports...imports...whatever you wish to know concern-
ing foreign trade the "Guide" offers you the most
convenient way to find the facts. The foreign trade sta-
tistics program, conducted by the Bureau of the Census,
involves the compilation and dissemination of thousands
of facts relating to imports and exports of the United
States. These statistics are designed to serve the needs of
both Government and non-Government users who have
wide ranges of interests and a variety of reasons for re-
quiring information on foreign trade. The "Guide to
Foreign Trade Statistics" includes the listings of data
presented in many different arrangements and released
in the form of reports available by subscription and in re-
ports and machine tabulations, magnetic tapes, and micro-
fiche offered for public reference use. Up-to-date reports
and special tabulations listed show current plans for the
release of foreign trade statistical data through 1979.
184 pp. at $5.50


ORDER FORM Mail To: Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402
Please send me __ copy ties) of Credit Card Orders Only
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Make your work or study easy
...fast...and accurate! Use the
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tistics: 1979"


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