United States foreign trade

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
United States foreign trade
Alternate title:
United States foreign trade. FT900, Summary of United States export and import merchandise trade
Portion of title:
Summary of U.S. export and import merchandise trade
Abbreviated Title:
U.S. foreign trade, FT900, Summ. U.S. export import merch. trade
Physical Description:
13 v. : ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of the Census
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census :
For sale by the Subscriber Services Section (Publications), Bureau of the Census
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Creation Date:
October 1979
Publication Date:
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Imports -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Exports -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Commerce -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
statistics   ( marcgt )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Issued also to depository libraries in microfiche.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Dec. 1976-
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Ceased in 1988.
General Note:
"FT 900."
General Note:
Description based on: Jan. 1979; title from caption.
General Note:
Beginning with July 1980 for sale by the Supt. of Docs., U.S.G.P.O.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Mar. 1988.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001320869
notis - AGH1745
oclc - 07222812
lccn - 81646118
issn - 0730-3270
sobekcm - AA00005268_00001
Classification:
ddc - 382/.0973/00212
System ID:
AA00005268:00036

Related Items

Preceded by:
Summary of U.S. export and import merchandise trade
Succeeded by:
U.S. merchandise trade. Seasonally adjusted imports and exports

Full Text
/16# y-79-1/


UNITED STATES FOREIGN TRADW


Summary of U.S. Export and

Imnt Merchandise Trade


OCTOBER 1979
1 2-30 P.M. Thursday. November 29. 1979.


Seasonally Adjusted and Unadjusted Data
(Including unadjusted data on imports of petroleum and petroleum products)


F.A.S. EXPORTS AND F.A.S. IMPORTS
Seasonally Adjusted


lB.reau of the Census, Department of Commerce an-
ed today that during October 1979, exports on a
si.(free alongside ship) U.S. port of exportation value
4, excluding Department of Defense (DOD) Military
i tanc.e Program Grant-Aid shipments, amounted to
8 38.1 'million and that general imports on a f.a.s.
,ign port of ex ortation value basis, amounted to
1U6.0 million.1
aed on the above export and import figures, the October
Merchandise trade balance was in deficit by $2,017.9

A|tring the first 10-months of 1979 (January-October),
~ports on a seasonally adjusted basis were at an annual
lt of $177,640 million, a level about 24 percent higher
En the calendar year 1978 total of $143,575 million.
ports for the January-October 1979 period were at an
ual rate of $201,722 million, an increase of about 17
cent over the calendar year 1978 total of $172,026
lion.
the 4-month period, July-October 1979, exports
Iraged $16,040.0 million per month, about 12 percent
|gher than the $14,308.6 million average reported for the
.ceding 4-month period, March-June 1979. Imports on a
..s. value basis, averaged $18,118.9 million per month
the current 4-month period, a level about 12 percent
Higher than the $16,147.1 million average reported for the
receding 4-month period.1
Unadjusted

Fxports excluding Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid
shipments increased from $14,919.6 million in September to
$17,275.5 million in October. With Military Assistance
Program Grant-Aid shipments included, exports increased
,from $14,939.6 million in September to $17,283.2 million
i k October. General imports increased from $18,075.5
Oill ion in September to $19,243.3 million in October.
Iote : Footnotes 1, 2, and 3 are shown at the bottom
of page 5.


F.A.S. EXPORTS AND C.I.F. IMPORTS
Seasonal ly Adjusted


The Bureau of the Census, Department of Commerce an-
nounced today that during October 1979, exports on a
f.a.s. (free alongside ship) U.S. port of exportation value
basis, excluding Department of Defense (DOD) Military
Assistance Program Grant-Aid shipments, amounted to
$16,838.1 million and that general imports on a c.i.f.
(cost, insurance, and freight) U.S.2p rt of entry value
basis, amounted to $19,957.3 million.1
Based on the above export and import figures, the October
merchandl s trade balance was in deficit by $3,119.2
million.1
During the first 10-months of 1979 (January-October)
exports on a seasonally adjusted basis were at an annual
rate of $177,640 million, a level about 24 percent higher
than the calendar year 1978 total of $143,575 million.
Imports for the January-October 1979 period were at an
annual rate of $214,131 million, an increase of about 17
percent over the calendar year 1978 total of $183,137
million.
For the 4-month period, July-October 1979, exports
averaged $16,040.0 million per month, about 12 percent
higher than the $14,308.6 million average reported for the
preceding 4-month period, March-June 1979. Imports on a
c.i.f. value basis, averaged $19,208.2 million per month
for the current 4-month period, a level about 12 percent
higher than the $17,152.0 millionn average reported for the
preceding 4-month period.1
unadj usted
Exports excluding Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid
shipments increased from $14,919.6 million in September to
$17,275.5 million in October. With Military Assistance
Program Grant-Aid shipments included, exports increased
from $14,939.6 million in September to $17,283.2 million
in October. General imports increased from $19,155.1
million in September to $20,367.4 million in October.


f U.S. Department
tiN of Commerce
kS j BUREAU OF
THE CENSUS
%rm Gf


Inquirim concerning these figures should be addressed to the Chief, Foreign Trade Division, Bureau of
the Census. Washington. D.C. 20233. Tel: Arm Code 301. 763-5140; 763-7754; and 763-7755.
For msle by the Subcriber Service Section (Publications), Bureau of the Census, Washington, D.C.
20233. or any U.S. Deptment of Comnmerce district office. Posage stamps not sccepttble; cumncy
submitted at sender's rik. Remittances from forei countries must be by international money order
or by a draft on a U.S. bank. Price 30 center copy. Annual subscription (FT 900, 975.985, and 986
combined) $14.90.


&-79-10






EXPLANATION OF STATISTICS


IMPORT STATISTICS


Coverage


The U.S. import statistics reflect both government and
nongovernment imports of merchandise from foreign countries
into the U.S. Customs territory, which includes the 50 States,
the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico The U.S. import
statistics exclude imports into the Virgin Islands, Guam,
American Samoa, and other U.S. possessions; and shipments
between the United States and Puerto Rico, between the United
States and U.S. possessions, and between any of these outlying
areas. (Data on U.S. trade with Puerto Rico and the Virgin
Islands of the United States are published separately in Report
FT 800. Additional data on such trade and on imports into the
Virgin Islands from foreign countries are presented in reference
tabulations.) Data on imports of petroleum and selected
petroleum products, including shipments into the Virgin Islands
from foreign countries, are included in this report effective with
the January 1976 statistics (previously shown in former Report
FT 900-Supplement).
The U.S. import statistics also exclude American goods re-
turned to the United States by its Armed Forces; intransit ship-
ments through the United States when documented as such
with Customs; temporary shipments; transactions not con-
sidered to be of statistical significance, such as shipments of
personal and household effects; low-valued nondutiable im-
ports by mail; and issued monetary coins of all component
metals.

Inclusion of Gold in the Statistics

Effective with the statistics for January 1978. imports of
nonmonetary gold (in such forms as ore. scrap and base bullion.
nonmonetary refined bullion. etc ) which were previously
excluded, are now included in the statistics. Imports of silver in
these forms have been included since January 1969. Additional
information regarding the inclusion of gold in the 1978 statistics
appears in the January 1978 issues of Report FT 990 and
FT 135.

General Imports/Imports For Consumption

The statistics on U.S. imports are presented in terms of both
"General Imports" and "Imports for Consumption." General
imports are a combination of entries for immediate con-
sumption and entries into Customs bonded warehouses, and
thus generally reflect total arrivals of merchandise. Imports for
consumption are a combination of entries for immediate
consumption and withdrawals from warehouses for con-
sumption, and thus generally reflect the total of the com-
modities entered into U.S. consumption channels.
Source Of Import Information

The official U.S. import statistics are compiled by the Bureau
of the Census from copies of the import entry and warehouse
withdrawal forms which importers are required by law to file
with Customs officials. The information as to country of origin.
net quantity, value, and commodity classification is verified by
Customs officials on entries filed for transactions valued over
$250, which are ordinarily subject to examination for Customs


appraisement purposes. The statistical copy of the entry is|'
corrected if it does not accurately reflect the information
called for by the statistical requirements.

Import Valuation

F.a.s. Import Value.-The f.a.s. (free alongside ship) val
represents the transaction value of imports at the foreign portdl
exportation. It is based on the purchase price, i.e., the actu
transaction value and generally includes all charges incurred
placing the merchandise alongside the carrier at the port of
exportation in the country of exportation.

C.i.f. Import Value.-The c.i.f. (cost, insurance, and freight)
value represents the value of imports at the first port of entry ii
the United States. It is based on the purchase price and includes
all freight, insurance, and other charges (excluding U.S. impor'
dues) incurred in bringing the merchandise from the country
of exportation and generally placing it alongside the carrier a
the first port of entry in the United States. If the merchandb
was acquired in a transaction between related parties, thfl
purchase price used in deriving the c.i.f. value is based on a
arm's-length equivalent transaction price, i.e., a price whi .
would exist between unrelated buyers and sellers.

Import Commodity Information

Import data are initially reported in terms of the commodity.
classifications in the Tariff Schedules of the United States Ai
notated (TSUSA). which is an official publication of the U.S
International Trade Commission, embracing the legal text oi
the Tariff Schedules of the United States together with static
tical annotations. The TSUSA data are rearranged and presented
in this report in terms of totals for the 1-digit commodity
sections in Schedule A, Statistical Classification ofCornmoditid
Imported Into the United States, which is based upon
Standard International Trade Classification (SITC), Revision 2
effective with the statistics for January 1978. Prior to January%
1978, Schedule A was based upon the former SITC, Revised

Date of Importation and Import Monthly Carryover i

It is the objective of the compiling procedures to include'
shipments. insofar as practicable, in the statistics for the actual
month of importation (or the month of withdrawal in the casi.
of warehouse withdrawals for consumption) Prior to 1978,thea,
date of Customs official acceptance of the import entry,
documents was used to determine the statistical month in which9
ihe shipments were included. Effective with the January 1974;
statistics, the date of importation as reported on the import'
entries is being used to determine the statistical month.,'
However, since under the Customs "immediatedelivery" pro7
cedures importers ma) file the import entry up to 10 workdayai
after the date of release of lie merchandise, some documents
for merchandise imported during the last few days of a give,
month may not be received in time for inclusion in the statislicsi. I
for that month. As a result. there is a carryover, estimated ati11
about 15 percent from the actual month of importation to a,
subsequent month. In addition, processing problems (e.g., late
filing of documents. rejection of a shipment by the computer
because the data fail to meet ceramin edcd criteria established to
I":







protect the accura,.. ot the statliiLs. elL ) contribute to an
additional carryover of dh ut 5 percent (in ermis ul \jlu) of
shipments from the reported munth of iinportJli in (iJr v. ilh
drawal from warehouse) t)o j subsequent month, usually the
succeeding month These limitations should be horne in mind
when making month-to-month )oinpadrisriNs.

Curnulations of data over at least 4-month periods are desir-
able to identify underlying trends. Month-to-month changes in
imports, exports, and similar sees often reflect primarily
irregular movements, e.g., exogenous events such as strikes,
differences in monthly carryover, etc.


Estimated Data for Imports Valued Under $251

The overall import and Schedule A Section 9 totals include
sample estimates for shipments valued under $251. Therefore,
they are subject to sampling error, estimated at less than
one-tenth of one percent for the unadjusted overall total and
about one percent for the unadjusted Schedule A Section 9
total. This means that we can have about 67 percent confidence
that the published unadjusted overall totals and the unadjusted
Schedule A Section 9 totals differ by less than one-tenth of a
percent and one percent, respectively, from the totals that
would have resulted from a complete tabulation. The statistics
on imports of petroleum and petroleum products included in
this report reflect fully compiled data and, therefore, are not
subject to sampling error.



EXPORT STATISTICS

Coverage
The export statistics reflect, in general, both government and
nongovernment exports of domestic and foreign merchandise
from the U.S. Customs territory (includes the 50 States, the
District of Columbia. and Puerio Rico) to foreign countries,
Whether the exportation involves a commercial transaction or
not. The statistics, therefore, include Department of Defense
Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid shipments, shipments for
economic assistance under the Foreign Assistance Act and
shipments of agricultural commodities under P.L. 480 (The
Agricultural Trade Development and Assistance Act of 1954, as
amended) and related laws. The following are excluded from the
statistics. Shipments to U.S. Armed Forces and diplomatic
missions abroad for their own use: shipments between the
United States and Puerto Rico. between the United States and
i its possessions (including the Virgin Islands). and between these
outlying areas; exports from U.S. possessions; intransit ship-
ments through the United States, transactions not considered to
be of statistical importance, such as personal and household
effects; temporary exports: low-valued or non-commercial
exports by mail; and issued monetary coins of all component
metals.

Inclusion of Gold in the Statistics.

As indicated above for imports, effective with the statistics
for January 1978. exports of nonnmonetary gold (in such forms
as ore, scrap and base bullion, nonmonetary refined bullion,
etc.) which were previously excluded, are included in the


statistics. Exports of silver in these forms have been included
since January 1969. Additional information regarding the
inclusion of gold in the 1978 statistics appears in the January
1978 issues of Report FT 990 and FT 410.

Definition of Exports of Domestic and Foreign Merchandise

Exports of domestic merchandise include commodities which
are grown, produced, or manufactured in the UnitedStates. and
commodities of foreign origin which have been changed in the
United States from the form in which they were imported, or
which have been enhanced in value by further manufacture in
the United States. Exports of foreign merchandise consist of
commodities of foreign origin which have entered the United
States as imports and which, at the time of exportation, are in
substantially the same condition as when imported.

Source of Export Information

The official U.S. export statistics are compiled by the Bureau
of the Census primarily from copies of Shipper's Export
Declarations which are required to be filed with Customs
officials, except for Department of Defense Military Assistance
Program Grant-Aid shipments which are reported directly to the
Bureau of the Census by the Department of Defense and
shipments by qualified exporters who have been authorized to
submit data in the form of magnetic tape, punched cards, or
monthly Shipper's Summary Export Declarations directly to
the Bureau of the Census.

Export Valuation
F.a.s. Export Value. --The value reported in the export statistics
generally is equivalent to a f.a.s. (free alongside ship) value at
the U.S. port of export, based on the transaction price,
including inland freight, insurance and other charges incurred in
placing the merchandise alongside the carrier at the U.S. port of
exportation.

Export Commodity Information
Beginning January 1978, export commodity information
is collected in terms of the commodity classifications in the
1978 edition of Schedule B, Statistical Classification of Do-
mestic and Foreign Commodities Exported from the United
States, which is based on the framework of the classification
system in the Tariff Schedules of the United States (TSUS).
In this report, the Schedule B data are rearranged and presented
in terms of totals for ihe 1-digit commodity sections in Schedule
E, which is based upon the Standard International Trade Classi-
fication (SITC), Revision 2, effective with the statistics for
January 1978. Prior to January 1978, the export classifications
in Schedule B were based upon the organizational framework
of the former SITC, Revised.

Export Monthly Carryover
It is the objective of the compiling procedures to include
shipments, insofar as practicable, in the statistics for the actual
month of exportation For purposes of the statistics, the mon.n
of exportation is generally based on the date when the shipment
leaves the United States. (For vessel or air shipments it is the
date when the carrier departs or is cleared from the port of
export.) However, as indicated above for imports, because of







processing problems (e.g., late reCeipt .)f a document for an
end-of-month shipment, rejection of a shipment by the com-
puter because the data fail to meet certain edit criteria
established to protect the accuracy of the statistics. etc.), there
is an overall average carrvNover of about 2 to 3 percent (in terms
of value) of the shipments from the actual month of exporia-
tion to a subsequent month, usually the succeeding month.
These limitations should be borne in mind when making
month-to-month comparisons
Cumulations of data over at least 4-month periods are
desirable to identify underlying trends. Month-to-month
changes in imports, exports, and similar series often reflect
primarily irregular movements, differences in monthly
carryover, etc.

Estimated Data for Export Shipments

Effective with the March 1979 statistics, the overall export
and Schedule E section and division totals include sample esti
mates for shipments valued $501 -1,999 to Canadaand for ship-
ments valued $501-$999 to countries other than Canada. Data
for shipments valued $500 and under to all countries are also
estimated, based on established percentages of individual
country totals, and included in the Schedule E Section 9 totals
regardless of the commodity exported It is estimated that the
unadjusted overall total is subject to a sampling error of less
than one-tenth of one percent, and the unadjusted Schedule E
section or division totals are subject to sampling errors of about
one percent. In addition, the Schedule E Section 9 total is sub-
ject to possible error in the estimated data for shipments valued
S500 and under; and the overall total, and the individual totals
for sections other than Section 9, to a more limited extent.
Such $500 and under shipments represent about I percent of
the total value of exports. and about 30 percent of the Schedule
E Section 9 total. Prior to the Mardi 1979 statistics, the overall
export and Schedule E section and division totals include
sample estimates for shipments valued $251-$!,999 to Canada
and for shipments valued $251J-$0iq to countries other than
Canada.


SOURCES OF ERROR IN THE STATISTICS

Monthly import and export figures are subject to the
possibility of errors which may arise from sources other than
sampling errors, discussed above. Among these are errors in the
reporting and/or processing of information as to commodity
classification, value and other statistical factors, month of
inclusion (see paragraphs on import and export carryover.
above), and the undercounting of exports to Canada due to the
non-receipt of Shipper's Export Declarations. For 1978,
the undercounting is estimated to be about $2 billion dollars.
In the case of imports the information as to value and
commodity classification (as well as country of origin and net
quantity) is verified by Customs officials on entries filed for
transactions valued over $250 which are ordinarily subject to
examination for Customs appraisement purposes, thus con-
siderably reducing the possibility of error. In addition, the
procedures used to compile both the import and export sta-
tistics include clerical and computer processing checks designed
to protect the accuracy of the statistics to the fullest practicable
extent.


Adjustment for Seasonal and Working-Day Variation

Monthly totals for exports and imports and major cornm-"
modity components (Schedule E and Schedule A section totals)
are shown adjusted for seasonal/working-day variation. Effec-.
tive with the release of the January 1979 statistics. the seasonally:
adjusted export and import totals represent the sum of com-.
modity components adjusted for seasonal and working-day
variation. Previously, the monthly totals for exports and im-
ports were adjusted independently of the components. Their!
procedure of aggregating seasonally adjusted commodity com-
ponents more accurately reflects the seasonal movements within
the totals Under this procedure, only those section totals that
show identifiable seasonal pat terns are seasonally adjusted.


MERCHANDISE TRADE BALANCES

Two trade balances are presented in this report.
I) The balance between exports based on f.a.s. values and.
imports based on f.a.s. values.
2) The balance between exports based on t.a.s. values ant.
imports based on c.i.f. values with adjustments for imports frotn
affiliated sellers abroad to reflect arms-length equivalent prices,
Both balances are useful for certain purposes. The firf
balance corresponds to a measurement of the intemationd
payments or credit flows resulting from merchandise trade
between the U.S. and foreign countries. The second balance 19 ,
based on concepts similar to those used by most foreign.
countries, and therefore provides a reference for compariso- i
with the trade balances published by those countries.



REVISIONS TO THE STATISTICS

Under the revision policy adopted effective with the 1977:
statistics, revisions to the monthly statistics for the current yea'
will be issued once a year. i.e.. with the reports for June of tl:.
following year. Thus. revisions to 1979 statistics will be issue#
only in June 1980.



SOURCES OF FURTHER INFORMATION

\Jdiiotrial itircigil trade %latiisiit s and information regarding
i.ii\ICagc. %.iliaiiiiiI. sampling. .id Liualifkati ons winch should
be considered h% ioisci ol the stailsiis :ire contained primarily
in the following pubhlLiationi Report FT)00. Highlights of U.
Export and Iimport Trade FT 135. UIS General Inmport
Schedule A (Coniiidit\ h, (oinitr\. FT 410. U.S. Export,
Schedule E Cmitniiiodil\ h\ ("Cotiitr\ and the Guide to Foredi
Tuide Statistic, lIiforitiatiii regarding addilinnal sources t i
statistics, the mieilhdoloE ,ii .ed in seasoniall adjusting the data.t
and other matters relating to foreign trade statistics may be
obtained froin the Foreign Trade Division. Bureau of the
Census. Washington. D.C. 20233. i;









5

Table 1. U.S. Exports (f.a.s. Value Basis), General Imports (f.a.s. and c.i.f. Value Basis), and Merchandise

Trade Balance, Adjusted for Seasonal and Working-Day Variation, by Month: January 1978

to October 1979

(tn millions of Gollar-. See Explat..ilon of Srtaclkttic for iinformatsonn i ncoveryge. d.ae ei Emportation, aefir, ion of export ana import value. ar
trade balances. and sources of error in the nata)


Perld


Janu ary-O-c ,i, ... .. .

January



une. ... .. ..
Marn .. .. .


Juiy .

Septe.ber

Not ieib ber .
Doct ,.be r.
net E n-ier.


Ji uart r r c .L' '
Jarnuare- .e :r, ..


j anuarv
FE or..ry ..-
March ..
Apr i .I
M y .
lune.. .

July .
August ...
t-ptemDer ,, .
0C er .
'iiemiber .
Leer-nor ir


i a : i r r. t ir 1 I iriC.


1. r *I- .'




LI L.ir. -
L1 1 ';:,' .






i i'. "
" 2 -J -






I .. .




1. ..ii


i .. ,.
i. 3*c;


I i I






1 '..
L- IL
L L I.









L-. L









I- ,


I E. i. r nh c 1 ir, i.tr'
iE -Fd T.r i l Hn 3 r u = ir r r I


T id,-







-. 1 L








- L 1
- L 3"- .


i, ;
- ', i -'


- *.1.
- I


. ,, -


..


i .+




i r.'.'


S" .


I I..


mr
fi i J111


- i.- I '



- i. l, i' i


-. A. 93
- 2. -0. '

-2.' .

L








L .


Erpori n ta r 1pr: :r a i .- 1 .: I1 r *C r.ir. i c- I i 1-i. L 1 rt .1ir. eL i .. *1 .'L' 1 l i r. i- I n.: Fra r ra -, 3 r *i1p.i nr w
Irrpor[ dv;a repre-et epr.irrai i.,:rrr 7,t, rrr r.- L
The itlo i sho-r. In rh6. si CL. =rr o -ri.te 0r a r. the I:a- :orii ii jU 'ea :.jh.Ia r .j p, .rn i r.T : ,i ia 1 1 mr p rt i r. tin ar. ipe a r.3
6 I Lr i~i i i;. :: I^? -., t I *`. U r. k t C, 1 7 ,^


Export and imnort statistical series are adjusted for seasonal and working 1ay variation but not for changes nice level Refliectng a new methodology introducedd wiTh slal.sisfor January 1979,the
adjusted monthly export and .mport totals for 1978 and 1979 presented in this report are deed D adding the seasonally 3austied components lie SITC sections The actors used tO adjust the 1978-1979
component series present the combination of seasonal adjustment faclori developed from monmiVy data through 1978 and the appropriate workngla, tatoli In issues of thi irpoirt pr.or TO January 1979,
monthly toals were adjusted independently of the componenTs
'Cumulat.ans of data over at least 4 monin periods are desirable to ideniril underlying trends Month to month changes in PeKports. imports and similar series Otlen reflect prirmaly regularr movements.
differences in monthly carryover. etc Recent monTh 10 month percent changes in the overall seasonally adasted e port and import series are presented in ine following labli with average percent month-to-
month rise and decline over longer periods shown lfo comparison The averages exclude percentage changes for i 1 the period OctobeP December 1977 because of abnormalities .i the data due to effects of
dock strikes and 121 periods when negligible changes Iero peicenti in The level of expartsiimporls occurred

Month-to-month Average monthly rates of change



Sept.-Oct. Adug-Sept, July-Aug. June-Juls Average Average 4-rTmonrnI 12-tronths
Series 1979 1C79 1?979 19-9 rise decline June--Or t. Oct. 1978-

1977-1978 1972-i977 197 Occ r. 1979

(Percent) (Percent) (Percent) (Percent) (Percent) (Percent) (Percent) (Percent)




F.a.s. export value.. .6.41 -u .1 .11 *- .2 *4.6 -5.4 .* +2.3
F.a.s. import value.. *!. +2.7 +*..3 -1.0 +6.4 -3.3 -- +2.1
C.i.f. import value.. +-*". 2.b b8.1 -'J. +6.4 -3.4 2. +2.1


'See the "Explanation of Slatist.cs' for definitions oft The epon and import values and Trade balances


FT 900 effective January 1979 statistics.


, r ;











Table 2. U.S. Exports (f.a.s. Value Basis) of Merchandise Showing Department of Defense (DOD)

Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid Shipments, by Month: January 1978 to October 1979


i n millions 'f dollar:. See ElDianation of Stati 'ic. for Information or. coverage, aeflaition of f.&.a. export value, and sources of error in
the data. ITr..dni-ted Pital' represent sum of ianrouanded figures and hence may vary slightly from sum of rounded amounts)


Pe rI od


Tar u r.1 .
r'-r: u ri
Mar -n
ter I r

uys, .. .

July .
Augus a .
Sert i.n.r .
Oct r r .

Deccr owo r ..



Jar..- r -)E cEFri


Jaruars
Feru-r .n
March
Apr.
May.
Jure

Jul,
Aug.-t
Sept -.ber*.
Oct Is-r
OtCIIbc r .
Decem'.ber


Export; eicludlag DOD
Crant-Ald1


Dome iti c
.nd

a.sona I
i0 .dI '3


I '. 0

.863.







ii
1I L-l J

11 '"f6 n
13..A .


12 2., I




i13 282.i







i :, "




I iii .I


1:.'nl.o


Dome.s tic
and
for ign,.
-.nadjusted


Dome s tic,
tunadjuated


Frporte InC luaing
DOD Grant-Ald'


DOD Grant-4td


F F -


Domes tl
and
foreign.
unaamjuised


Domestic.
unadjusted


Total


Western
Europe


Other
countries


_________ I t I- -l------------------------- 4 4


1.3.i'.. Al

li[, 'd'.2

.36- -
9 :14.01
L2 ,'. l

12.''....
1i .'8 9

1' q^ 0
10 9,.. ,
il 613.9
IL :3.6

i3.e3.n..


I-.c'i.-i





I? 2 4.1

li.if- ..
I".:. u

i -. .


1...1.,;
I "


1.1.1a8.I




.21.l 1
3 3,:- 8
II.63u 5.
11.8 I
12.23- 3
12 2n-'I

I'. 7t9.
11..-21 .

12d422 q3
13 -LI.
li. 302 i








14 --


S., I .]


l..s..I
I 1. i
]t i .,.


l .it, -..




a .8i "
'a. 9", 9







11 36.9








' .4 jr "

12. j9 3




I- 2i .8
1i 132.9




1i,"Uar..






1-.. .ls .3


lt.1. I .. 2





S316: e
'.3-1.
11. 632 I

12 2 1
I ."1 '

ID. 786U 0
i ..21 3

l2.'2b.-

13.3 3.'




iJ.U:ll.I

12, 3,2 ,




I Ci.

is '...)


Ia.i.e .:
's.9'.-.'


2: .9

0.3
1 ]

0 7
1 .0
b. 5





1.>








l.D


c.1
59


S.
-s


Le:- rn. rI n* r, 1 arI u I ..I .1 m r-m ar .i n

e r:I .r. l r- r I I t I i r.p r. ir* o. Ti, .,i i. r i ar.as 3if fers tr O M iat-n A:=a [ arICE Fr raIm F r ant A r l pment f iguresE uns er thi
prc:r-.i 1 r,..f .r=-. f=r .1 tne .1r ri pr r a r' ciii- tl e inIe Lt.n" t.-ia "'rai c r -,'r :l'cr: iron. [j)LI O-er- a..i "rckhE~ fr.-i erDori ihperent[s.
(b) t .rei .. .lu' i- .r-er-.: Iri .Ilue it ... i r. ans.e E r t eat.n t o o i1rn i rear1 lr ar- .pesr.lts repo-tea oy the DOD lot a
giv r, -0r., A r i uc i i J n 0 ur'a. .-e a n reparT ir he t .cC na .-30 4 rir- n.u.-r:4.,en t c [he -Irinrn rpc.-r'ca G) i10.
i'rn. : cr.a, = c.3 u- ] t.-'r3 n .-r, tr Fr c I :l .r. o rL .3 sov ai l ,1 the ea ,onsily adjuo.trd I:.,Iu ,1t r c I j I p ner.tit .no n In t ble -. See
foc ln. r I, r t .f rl.r. -. r .,:-
'inr "'i 't 1 r, n>r -rn...r. r n,.il .d j iu t d.-r r caa I' a i Ia .e. .-houla s ea fc r a...InuaI ir. a1











Table 3. U.S. Imports of Merchandise, by Month: January 1978 to October 1979

(In millions of dollars. See Explanation of Statistics for inrformatin on coverage, date of importation, definrttlons of f.a.a. and c.l.i. Import
values, anra source of error in the aota. LUnadjieted totals represent sum of unrournaed figures and hence may vary lightly from aum of rounnEd
amoui is)


F.a.-. value C.l.f. value


Period General sports lGportm General imports Import.
for for
Sea-onall Iy Unadj tea amp t in, Iea-or.lly djconiumption.
aajusted U J unadjus -td d jute? ,.-adljusted


LV 6

January-Decer .er .................. .. I 83.l 3 6I L1 &o.

Janua ry-0< I..-r '. .' 1 i, l.. l ,l r I ,'- 1. 2

January.. .. ... ....-.*.l* I .,. .c 2 l. .'- L l 1 1-. Li.i' 7
February .. ..................... .. .... i I .13 II.' .- '- 3 1. 10 2
March .... ............. .. .. 1- .',. 1 L i 3 L '. 3 L, A- 3. 4
April... ...... .......... ...*** ** ****** : .. ',l 3 3.3.0
Ma riy ........................... ....... L- l 3 2 4 .


June ...... .. ......... ..... .... ... Li '.' i- 1- L 3n6.4

Junely........... .. .. .. 1- ." -. l ': I i 636.3
August ..................... ... ........ I -- '' 3 L. 1 "60.-
Septe.ner. ............. .............. 61 l- 1 .1 3 0 6
OSeptemob er .. ................. .. ........ I-. )I' 1. .L I I-. L '..' J. L5 .
ovt.ob er ... ............................. .. ... I l' L 2'.-', "I 9 '
December.............................. .. I -'i .- 3- ". L '. 81.-9




Janiiar lor .L. .. .1'. ... --. l L

J neiiary ........................ ...... I. 1 1 I l '. '. I 06 3
February. .......................... '..' .L 3
March................................. .. '-. L3o' -. L
April ......... .. ....... ..... .... ... .. I I I 1 ,


J ne ................... .............. .. .i 1 ..' r I I I .

August........................... ....... .

ptember......... ...................... 3
p r . . . . .r 1 4 6 I .

Octo ber. ........... .. .................. .
Not emer ............... ... .. .......
December........... .. .........



footre'Al I i Da I : -.. r .t r I' 1 .&
Annu l. a! r -r 'r I r. *r : -r l I ir.1' Jar i,. :r-. Th :hL:ulI 3 .r d f *r *i-n-i J ,r l









8

Table 4. U.S. Exports (F.a.s. Value) of Domestic Merchandise, Schedule E Sections, Excluding

Department of Defense Military Grant-Aid Shipments and Foreign Merchandise (Reexports),

Seasonally and Unadjusted by Month: January 1978 to October 1979

S'r .'Illion oi 3011s s F pi... rp. r in if Ireai -: r.r in orI at on on c 5er ae. de f I n Irn ui [. exuiort value, ana sources of error In the
a.1r, r i,., .3 i l rt31!1 E L pretir en w ,- f -lrunrdao rd ures ar.a hence vma) vary Sitt9Ily Irom I um f rounde ET, oifnt E


Schedule E .ectt,'.,i


-3 3i 6 8 j ro I relgr r Ia

S all ireexportatd
Se-a:o a ... III lu5ti-d


.1 jnuj r -,.,.r J i r ..
J irua r ..
I ?uru r\ ...
'( rc r % ...
pr l .. .. ..

J .r. .
1..11. .


P', r L D, r








j ,u s ...


A.pr .
J n .......r .


e,.' ... .. .. .



i .pl* .D9 r .
Ft. o r ... ... ..









i rinu r r [i n : r .
Jun, .....l. .


t as' r .
rij r, .
, lr .. r

.y .. ..
Jl r,


|, et,. .
.ieprui I r

OTc .k r








1., .
11.re1 .






r' .- r .
. L r .
'.- 0',L. r7
["4 I


I '-- 8

I -31. J
I -'I.


L. 99' 8
I 386
I -e6 I


- I


16 133 2








1 1 I
L 1






L. L. 2









I :8

L


.1-,J -
l."1 .
l l.) ,

;' 1 15 .

106.
Iby';
199 3,
>.23.
I'l. 3
-.', 9
22:0.
I.'il. 8





l'4'. I
136 0






1.3 3
I: u
1 *


;1 .1 .


- -8 ,
- I. 2


199 *
213

1.3.-

I, "


'-. 3
221 I
; .







2

211


I 1.
i '

1 1


12 is.


I '123.3
L 186 9
1. 260.1
I. 316. -
1.,8 ."
L. 1io .
L 2" ..i 5

L .30 1









I. 7
I 'l i




I .li
i .n11
L.P <*:


12.31 .

. Oh..8
1.n1.3.11

I )3' i
I 386."
a -.ir..'
l.i".3 9

1. '-3 3
i I

l.D' -





l i r >
Le, -,;




I A .

1 r '

I 429o
1 Lq 1
I ') '

I .


2.9;?.5


181.U
200.5
38'l .


32.. 6
333 -
133.9
3713.3
2-.8. C
-0')0 3









43 8




-"v.8


3 1'. t,

3..AI-1







3 ,. -
321 '
33-..








- '








3- i

.31


1,25) 3


9 7

1-5.-
I l5. 3
11). T

120. V
15t. ]
113 9






I .

1-5.8
I i

]2i.6



1-. 1
]63 "


1.5311.3

I.'.'.3

*6.
'31 2
I .: I !. 3

1-1.5
1.5.
119.3
t32.1
132 .
l 3'0. ;
I ?0.
ih.]
11 3 I')





121 .
l *-. u




'll.
t-. 8

I 1.$

L -' C

16 r
L.''

193.
ilr ,


10 301 9

893.5
l11.5
94.. 2
962.6

'.027...
I. Ob3..
1. 138.9
1 237.5
1. 1.-6. 1
1.228.
L. 101.9





1. 31- .
.19 r 0
1.39.. 0
. 2''.0

1 -6i.3
L, 31.8
I, 0).2
1 66' .
I, '' .i


10. 1 29 I

89'. L
9q1 3
9,0.9
9ol. 7
1.023.6
1. Dio.5
i.003.b
1.0"0.
1, 1r, 3
1. 106.-
I. 1-8. I
1. 186b. r.









I 2' : .
1,2 .. 9.

1 I 9.


87:6


.. 956...

..093. 1

6536.
.,8.3.
S'759.9
. 90'.6
..853.2
.,9.2.2
5, 29.0
..25.1
),>b0..r?
5,o'b 5





v.311 6

5. ; 2.

i. 3. 3
.. '39.3
L,. Oj3.9
, i35 3
in.5 86
.1196.1


8 311.6

'2..0
7.2.9
)7 1.9
826.2
855 6
819.2
808.2
892 4
918. 1
9.6. 5
931.6
9.0..,



IU.11 ,. '

935 9
98 .2'
i,0I..1,
33;.7


1.031 .
1.05 '.9
1.01 6

1 .131.4


3.9;,...

-32.3
23b.0
389.9
509.1
309.0
392..,
349.2,
329.9
702.5,
323.9
6,5.3
.07.2




'.30i .3

58- 0

v8-.. 5
688 1
764.. I

821.8
?30.3
635.0
64 i !.


2. 037.9

150. 3
176.8
263.7
210.1
244.6
215.6
164.6
192.5
208.1
231.0
238.9
228.9




?,"47.5

208.8
223 8
286.6
266.4
283.9
263.1.
235.8
261.0
253.3
284.5


I. 3_ _3_ _. _


iran jti.1C9


1i2. 618 3

10 u0'.0
13', 1

I 3 I.
9"1.3
1- 18.
1.1118
L .Or.3 -
,.' 1.2


L O'a
1 I'-.
I li3 0A





I 23.

l 2o, J



I ..- .
L 3 : V


10. 9...


8-8.-

968.9
L 10) -




1. 132 5
1, 12' 8
1. j1-.
t l'b.





I 121



I.].5 n
I 3A. ,
1 1.


59 27? 9

-8 J?.73

3 851.
3.939.6
.16.0 I
5.093.


- 6 ,.



3.8-. -
.97.3






.49 3

32..
.9.3.9
t0.'




3 ").. '
i'-a.r


10.17 7. l

8.330.


od8 .-.
8;8.?2
85-. 3
908.0 ,
836 9
?'7. 5
655 8
891. 1
953. l
92'. 1
921.o





8'' 3.2

I 133.2

1.031. 9



1. 036.9
L 08' IJ
I.J,; l


5,006.8

3,9 .. 2

-32.3
236 0
389.9
09. 1
3u9.0
34 2..
3-9.2
329.9
'03.5
323.v
625 3
-07.2




.8.0. 7


`S,. l



8-1.8

3:; 11
1 .0 3 :


2.505.7

2.03 .9

150.3
176.8
243.7
210.1
244. b
215.6
164.6
192.5
208.7
231.0
238.9
228.9




'.5 1.5
208.8
723 8
286.6
2e.6.4
283.9
263.4
235.8
261.0
9i3.3
384 .


I ~l1' ''7.1.,'., I II


l ar.i L L1 .r r. I a pr- -u -,r *t I .
r ''drin i 'urii tr a- 1 1" 1- T f 1e3 1 o- .$ a-r a


I ; P.F


Si'.r, ln iit rand tr.ania r 1 ,.ni r7,r i -zi- Li d else.rere


S 1 Ir i '. ,,, I d I :r. 2 hP .t eao ayr.
S' .7 ,11 -e7,;r pst r s. Th7.nontl. ea o ally


3 r r s a a r o n r*. ~ r s


r iUllE eloI ireou, ; rN u jc IdeF J AiTl c


I ,











Table 5. U.S. General Imports (f.a.s. Value Basis) of Merchandise, Schedule A Sections, Seasonally

Adjusted and Unadjusted, by Month: January 1978 to October 1979

(ID millions of dollars. See arplanatlon of Stlatstles for irormation on coverage. date of Impartation, defInIttonof f.s.a. Import value, and
sources of error La the data. Unadjusted totals represent sum of usrounded fLgures and hence may vary slightly from sum of rounded aasontsl)


Schedule I sections ;
Period
0' I 2 1 1S' 5 6 7 5 92


SeaasoaiIy aajusted




J r.s .ary-Octoa er .. i.0 t 1 :'.. c 1 l- o-..- tr. ) .i '-'. ). 14c l 1.. 0,' 8

January .. ..1. .. -j 1 '.4 .- 3 -. 1 : 't, 2 3. 12 1 I 3,t.8 9,
February ...... .. 1 111... 1.. ? .. r j -8 3 2 1 i -83 1.
March ... .. it.2;' i 1'r., ". 1. .3 '. -o 0 -. 2 2':.. 3 nit, I -.9. ) -
April .. ...... .. .. .I i ] .'.B 1I .i ll -i".,: ; -Llt,. i '1i a i.8.1 I1 8 1
MB .. 1-3 1; S t f ) ] -. l 6[ 1.;,j 3 ) 7l.:,.d J 6l. 3 -0.1 111. '
JunApr ... .... .. .. 0.'1.5 22. .'1. -i.2. 5 ] 9.] b 1 558 i3 8

July.... .. .. 1 12b I 17.j '. 3 3" i ., I. 31' 3 I-i .3 .1 .t. I i
Aulu t ...... ........ .. .. ...0 .6. 1i 2 1 L 7 i -3.0 3...' 2. ; 5 3, 83 8 L -.I 2 -.
September. ..... .. 08. i c.] 'i.' 3. i 3 30.5 .- c2.9 16- 71 d'. L0.
October .. ...... .... 1.2 '':..1 i.n ) .L.. 0.4 .5'. 2.. 3.7. 2l0. iO.4 J86.B
Novenoer.. .. .. .. .. I 18.' '200. 3 33- 2 1- '..3 6 'l .D 3 .
Dee- br. r ... .... .. .... .1) 1.6 ..- 2 13 3.1 1. 639.0 ]At l

1379

January-Oc tob r .. : : J : .' *. i i i ...; -

Jainuari.. ... ..... L 78 2 2.7.3 82"'. 22 3 9 5 i l. 2.'. 3-.6 ii.8 1 Po? 309.4
February. .. 1 : l *: r 3r3 -, i r n j !
March. ...... .. 1.2.2 q i 1 45 .' .-- ." 2 ; .. u'l.) .. '' i30
pr t....... ...... 1 1.) 21'.. 0O 6.0.0r. ...2 .0 1.8 8 I r .9 8'.1]
May... .. .. ... .... I 2- 2 10 c '' .. .. .,) t3 2 .3 -, -.): -. i. --6. i
June....... ..... ... .... 3 ? 1 n r -. 3. 1 l. ; -',t .. I
July. ........... .. .... .. ,I'.. 3. :.. 2 0 3); 0 O :.. l '". 1. 26 -". l5. ) '.
u u t ... .. ........ .. I''. 213.6 935 .. C .) ""., ..2o-.- I t.9 ,; r -.33.
September ... ... I .2 '. *".- I U -... 5 6' .; ..' .1 .'. i.L 6- I
October.. .... ... .. 1r.1 p a .... -.' : 4 ., I, .. J3 -
hovember .. ...
December .. .






Jandard -Leceo- r .. .. 2 1 e'4 ,, 1. .1. 1. .3. .r 62,.. 19, 62' 1 )016

Januri -Ocr 3I .r I .. -. r ... .i L. .'

Janu ry. ..... 1 ,t 1 4 a I 2. 21.3 .9 -n'2 J.3 2. I .2'.9 ') .
Feon ar ... ... Ill. l 2 I 3 3-.r' "2. 2 )5.- 3 5'3.2 293.' ; i.
Match..... .. 1 '., I'-. i 31 -e .. ,".. c .1 1 ...O, :. .i 3' 3..-
April ...... ... .. .... ..tll. 2'1.'~ 0 3 it -2 bi '. .3 3.0 ~..O :.. t .39.' i23 3
Ma .. .. .. 1 -3.- 184.2 6 i '. 3 51 i J 3. 2 351 .3 i. 020 1. 00.0 k.
June. ... ... ... .9 212.' 3 ..'L. -r. .' .' 301 ...132.9 L0 1.5 )38.
July.... .. ... L 1. .1 1 ... .) 3 I8., .- .".. 2. 18 3 4. I17 2 1 .i5 I3.4
August ....... .... .. ..... 42.-0 170.2 8 J n" 1 -3.) i.. 2 IBl .t 3 L'8.- L 7"i..a 3."'
Septe.bEr .... 8 3 8 2 3 2 .- i.832 u 1 7 1.3 "L
October 0 7 1 E. i -it1 -0.9 i l.- 3 J5 .2' .h 1.827.1 386.
Novemn. er. .... .. .. 168 2 .0 3 r. 1. 512. 238.3 1, '09.i9 3 .
December .. I ;5- L 20 3c.3 3'.' 35. I :. a 318.7 L 5'n0).3 )86 .'



January-Octooer ... I 4. 33 : I I "- l 1. 4

January .. .. .. L ; 8.) 0.. 6 812.' 2 7.[ 9.5 3.. 8 -.., l ) 9 tA 9 30').+
Fenruarv. ... 5. .. .
March. .. .. ..... I,;.2. 2 L i .3 ,-t :. .1 .. A8 J : : v'J.8
Ap r i l I 3 '.. -'. '-) : 0 1 i 2 2 5 1. 1. 1 I .
May ........ ... .. .4. 217 1 0 ,, l 0 ~ a :. i ; *4 .. 'O I 3 I --6.3
Jure .... 3 i -On
July ... I 72 o ..) -- i .0 3 ) .1 321" t t 1.- 3c,.2
l -.....-. I .. 1 9 1. .. .3 .. 1 1 -. L363 3 ':- .~3 '
September. .. r lii.. -'i .. -.. r O r .1 .* O 181 S'I 3 ..
Ccr ob r .. .... .i I ,.. l .4

No.e-noer ....
lece.4oer.... .... .. .

Schedule L -. cri :.r.- .:r. r i s re ic iau.
S Foa ai n i irta. a r-. Cr .. a ir.j r 1 i-.3 pic-u- IN. P.
1. Bevera -'- na r n3 cc:' cMar.utarrurr-.i c .3. 1 .it, clr t4( l b .' mairrIal
2. Lrude t- er. l .iL -i. L iMble. e cepr [ li 1- ". Pl. .rnrcn ani rri.r=orrl .1 1u1m. nl
J. 42r9er-i lueI luotrcirtz and ret olted iii-rial it il 1 jnr uu^ *-.n aclur-a .Irticle- N. : .F.
-. 3k11 I rF o ?it -- 1r, l1. ain .erge able V. C.C. dt a .[ x Ir.u 4r3-..- c, )n; 4 r Clai litL.d e. e .herd
A ju'. ted for an. i.-d.al aid .Arn in6-17y rai.rd. u lri. -'arL. dI .d.4ur.r i r. lt r' r .r i.-e-- in Janu. -- 14'4. Adjustifnt factor, 1n n.i beien-i
appl.l a to o aI i ,r Schedule A :ec'la.n= '.i 1 a'rd 1' aue tj ii e ani-er.7e o0 tzan l l en ,,n-t r -.l i...t Lr. r. l paa terr' r lhe 3 3rt. v pac 4 .sn 1alLy
adjusted ki.p.ort trai4 f PI re .l .c .a ir -. I a a I rI .-3 a -jl.-, '1. L. .: ~.. .'e t r t_ crT-e- rrri I.. rr;i tarIe C-e i,' tp t-
1 at The no0 o 4m I page 3. 1 A nual tr.I- : rt r .t r.:.r I4r e.-.'.nr .hi ..iu .. 1 a '. i ,i. L -- d.13ra sn.uI I e u *1 f.,r anr,nJal jt.1









10

Table 6. U.S. General Imports (c-i.f. Value Basis) of Merchandise, Schedule A Sections, Seasonally

Adjusted and Unadjusted, by Month: January 1978 to October 1979

1n million_- i dollars 4ee Explanation or Ltatistics for Informatlon on coverage. date of Importation. deflnition of c I.. Lamport value, and
sources of error in the data Unadjustea totals represent asu of dnrounded figures and hence may vary gligntly from aum of rounded amount)

Schedule 4 seCtians'


0- 1 2 3 5 6 1 8 9'


Seal.n.al ly na Justed

1978

January-October............... I QI. n.- I9-. S. :30. 2 j68. 6 ,- ." 5,b"'2.S ?!.50.' 1.5.5 5 16, "83.5 3,1357.

I nuarv .... ...... I 19. I 1 z' 12.1 J.i,623 3 31 32 '. 5 3.'?1 9 1. -- 9 334.3
FebrJ.'r, ............. I 1,13 I 8 938.i 1.13 2 50 I 5299 2,678 2 -,]68 2 1,592 8 260.1
March........ ............... .0 3 lo I 929.. 3..2r 4 -9 i':i I .2... 3.930 6 b 1 6 378.5
April........................ i, .t, 'il l 803.' 3.222.7 -5 5 ib3 t. 2..99 b -.,03 B 1.672 ) 364.0
May.................... .. ...... 1, 2 88 .1 1,-2.' 5- 60 .-,8.9 -.067 1,6e" 0 326.6
June... ... .... .. .............. .I, I: 3, .l 80 2 ,20 ". ., 18.1. 1.717 5 3 .,.3
July...... ....... ... ........ 1 u ?.- .81 5 b"'' 8 2,61 2 *,.1)B. I,.46 3 J35.3
August........................ 0 -IS t2 5 j. '17 3 -5.2 3 2 :.2i' 6 -.006.7 1.733 9 331.9
September..................... 1I, LJ" LI 'i 8.3 3.931 5 31 2 65. .".31. -... 7 1 i i3.5 312.0
October..................... .,. 6 ..5.s 8" ,'13 1 -. I 5, -S 2,.62 1 ..2'1 5 1 .798.81 392.2
No',,',r I 1 .iL.. 3,';r. : 9 I2 ( i 0.5 .,.02.8 1 .2!.1 33 3.
D1C. .-. r I l..-b ,1 38'-..- ...,3 3 -.9 5-, 5 2,290.9 -.503 l .;6 6 391.5

1979

January-October............. l .- ., 4.. 1 .,. 1.1 ,:,4.- 4,. r. _"; ..t :..- t,.' e.) 1 .tIi 3 3,891.3

J.n.-.ars .2 :o r 5 t ., .u f. *ul t i .,56' .8 1 .886.2 31.. 9
FebruIr; -. ..2 -.3 '. 1 t 9 iI t 269 0
March......... .......... ..1.. 3. 35.6. .- 9I1 -., ?3C'.4 38.- v23.1 ,528.6 98.5 1,b6-5.' 356.4
April............. ........ .... ,-? .F ? .b 6 ...2 ,5 9.':' -6.7 590.5 0 .i 9 -. 89.' I.'73.? 292.2
May ........ ... .. ... ...... i. q.- u30.6 ,C1 9.O .,-3 ... .31 2.9 -.5 .'1' 3 3] ,5*7.4 1, 75.5 454.9
June.............. ..... ...... ,-05.5 23I.t 383.- ..,808.6 t..1 'ug. ,n592.9 -.,85 3 1.93' I 412.7
July.................. .. .... I| ,e0.i 3-'.l 921.- i,..13.8 36.9 miS.=. 0.'5.1 s..66.v 1,891.2 366.?
Aug ,, l .ib. 6.' ? ..' [,0l.ul .. 5,' 7.' '0.. '30.' ;',83:' .5 i ., '66. l 1,998.3 439.6
S;pt .-bir [, 75u.' 'b.) 96?.? 6,-58." bO.O "2v., ;'.?8.1 -.6-'.. 1,980.1 462.6
October ..................... ..-. 1 ,, r 1.. r: l ,9 14. 502.2
November ......................
December......................




1978

January-December.............. i-.l'.i I'.r.m' --,'28 1 .,' 4,2(I. 5 50.-.29.0 20,.15 9 .,082.5

January-October............... I.iI.,e.- I. 1.9".' 6,:.j 3s.' r ..5-.0 r,h'5.0 J2.u...1 -l,-09.t 16.8,9.1 3,.57.3

January............... .... ... .a.- 15. I 6:.:1 ',23 31.3 --- 2,JL 6 3,59 1,316 33...3
February. ......... ............ 1I I I 6.0' "9. .,;7i3 2 0 i ,,' 8 2,367 5 3,i 93.1 1.388 9 260.1
March......................... 1.. .' i 10 9 19.- 3,.- 4 3 .'rc I .0'0 I -.30' 9 1.615 6 378.5
April............. ......... .. ,-'. "lb ':.8.1 l,'22 -..: -I 9 2,'l3 2 -,338.3 1.5-5 68 b4 .0
May........................... L .i' u .- ? '.1 '. 2 6. -.,2'2 ? 1 .56, 1 32..6
June......................... i, I .32 i0..l 3,E 1 -2 '0 2 ,- 2 -,36- 2 1. 3'0 6 3-.3.3
July.... .... ................. ,2 .. i4 5 3 7 1,581 2 I ,59. 3 -,3. .8 1,91) 6 335.3
August................. ..... ,u 18' r1s 6. 3 i Q 2 1.38 0 3, Q- 1,68 8 3132.9
September............ ...... ... 1,13 ': 1 69 3 I1 2 5 2,383 4, 3 b i .88'.' 312.0
October....................... .. I. -. 21' 5 ., ,71 .3 I ,7,J n 2. 01 5 -,16b 1 I 95. 5 392.2
November........ .... ...... .. .n. ': r,,; 3,7'. 5 8 sQ 9 ,:.- t. ....n- 1,91. 333.'
December.................... .. ..0. ..- 1 3r.. 3- 9 .r.: I nl I -.b.5.0 1,-'2 b 391.8

1979

January-October.. ...... ....... i ..- ." ii ,, 1 -.41 .r 3., >7 ,- : .. 3,891.3

January....................... '- ebb '.3. ii i' .3 2r) ,.-1i 7 -.3 e ..'31 5 31..9
February.................. ..... .I i. I '.- "A : .:s .'.- 1 .. -.il 1 I 289 0
March......... .... ...... ... 1,3i -. '. -,' .- 38.- oR e..'9.: ..6,."6.9 1.670 -. 356.4
April................ ... ..... I,-: 2 5.5 'A -,il .r 1 bn].2 ',4,- 3. 5,005 2 1.6,7.8 292.2
May... .......... ....... ...... i, 1 i. 8 i, 'r..- -,.]1..- .- .9 t :.?'0.3 -,1'5 8 1.681.& -54.9
June......................... ..i -. -,tea.t "5.1 "i-?. ,8:-.8 -.'9 8.. 1.2482 3 -12.7
July.......................... r .- :- .1 'i .,-1. .4 .8 O- ,is8.) ,rSq.d 366.7
August........ ............... '., ,0'8. ,. 8'. -0. Ai.'. 2.811 9 -,515 .2 2 172.2 4]9 .6
September..................... .. I:*,. .--.i' 1 0l '. .. t, r .u t- iU. r 2 2.51 .,Q38e. I .'86.0 .62.6
October.................. .... 1 1 r r 02 ..' .: 4 .i "I.' 02.?
November...................
December....................

1Schedule A section description :.r. .11.
0. Food and live animals ) Lr.,'r.., i '..3 i..i'.o pr.,,JLtt., r p F
1. Beverages and tobacco r M.nufct ured C C,-. cl I .ll.i cIh fl bL. maternal
2. Crude materials, inedible V 1.LI. ; ,,r. r.er: r..i tr.srp..ir .:.-u L-,...nt
3. Mineral fuels, lubricant na r r.raJ a M :L'-il-ne.os -.ariul'turei* atiir ', N P F.
4. Oils and fats--animal an-I *.,.:t |. .y ..ii-tlleE. ir iral. aus- n r'7 lass ill.ld ?elteir.re
2Adjusted for seasonal and worki..-J.. .. i.ti-... ,r,. .o.-..l1] s.10.1 ti.nt f.atur intr-o ct .. J.n_.rr i1 4ajusrimr.r tIfacrirs have nnr been
applied to data for Schedule A secnt'.: I,', .1, ., i ur I. to' .D.n0ce tc ijdrctitrai s'cri.il c.f &-1.. Fr.a- .rinthli .ca.,nIi adjusted -nport
totals (c.i.f.) presented in table- i na i ore oiens.- is ajdin, thue o..paner.lt orll mr.-sent-d in tirI tale. Ste footnote I at the lot ton of
page 5.) Annual totals are not st.r. lor :A;a.o..iI. ..iaui--n .-oI. rvial-u.ter astr M'-ii3 0r uSea armrial tonal4.








GENERAL IMPORTS OF PETROLEUM AND SELECTED PETROLEUM PRODUCTS INTO
THE U.S. CUSTOMS AREA AND U.S. VIRGIN ISLANDS, UNADJUSTED

Monthly and cumulative to-date data on general imports of petroleum and selected petroleum products into the U.S. Customs area
and into the U.S. Virgin Islands for the period January 1978 through the current month are presented in the tables that follow. Tables
1-A and 1 B present imports into the U.S. Customs area and tables 2 A and 2 B present imports into the U.S. Virgin Islands. (It should
be noted that imports into the Virgin Islands are excluded from the regularly compiled foreign trade statistics and, therefore, are ex
eluded from the data presented in tables 1-A and 1-B as well as the other tables shown in the front of this report-See "Explanation of
Statistics".

Effective with January 1979 statistics. certain changes were made in the commodity classifications (Schedule A and TSUSA) covering
petroleum products. These changes are reflected in the listing of classifications shown below. Data presented in tables 1-B and 2-B which
follow reflect all changes in classifications, effective January 1979.


Schedule A and TSUSA Commodity Numbers Used in Compiling the Petroleum
Information Presented in This Report


Energy products

Schedule A No.


Nonenergy products

Schedule A No.


TSUSA No.


Crude petroleum and deriv-
atives to be refined
333.0020
333.0040
334.5440


-75.0510
475.1010
475.6510


Lubricating oils
334.5410 pt.

Lubricating greases
334.5410 pt.


475.4500


475.5500, 475.6000


Crude petroleum
333.0020
333.0040

Gasoline
334.1500

Jet fuel
334.1205

Kerosene
334.2000


Distillate fuel oil
334.3021

334.3045

Residual fuel oil
334.4050
334.4060

Propane and butane gas
341.0025

Liquid derivatives of
petroleum, n.e.s.
334.5430 pt.


475.0510
475.1010


475.2520, 475.2560


{475.2530
475.2550

475.3000


475.0525
475.0545
475.1015
475.1025

475.0535
475.1035


Paraffin and other mineral
waxes
335.1225 pt.
335.1245


Naphthas
334.5420

Asphalt
335.4500


All other petroleum products
(pitch of tar coke, non-
liquid hydrocarbon mix-
tures, and calcined petro-
leum and coal coke not for
fuel)
335.3000 pt.
334.5430 pt.
598.5020 pt.


475.1525, 475.1535,
475.1545


475.6530


TSUSA No.


494.2200
494.2400


475.3500



521.1100


401.b200
475.7000
517.5120
517.5140

















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U.S. Department
of Commerce
BUREAU OF THE CENSUS
Washington, D.C. 20233
Official Business


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
III 111111 1 11|1 1111111 li| 11 111111111
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