United States foreign trade

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Material Information

Title:
United States foreign trade
Alternate title:
United States foreign trade. FT900, Summary of United States export and import merchandise trade
Portion of title:
Summary of U.S. export and import merchandise trade
Abbreviated Title:
U.S. foreign trade, FT900, Summ. U.S. export import merch. trade
Physical Description:
13 v. : ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of the Census
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census :
For sale by the Subscriber Services Section (Publications), Bureau of the Census
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Creation Date:
August 1979
Publication Date:
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Imports -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Exports -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Commerce -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
statistics   ( marcgt )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Issued also to depository libraries in microfiche.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Dec. 1976-
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Ceased in 1988.
General Note:
"FT 900."
General Note:
Description based on: Jan. 1979; title from caption.
General Note:
Beginning with July 1980 for sale by the Supt. of Docs., U.S.G.P.O.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Mar. 1988.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001320869
notis - AGH1745
oclc - 07222812
lccn - 81646118
issn - 0730-3270
sobekcm - AA00005268_00001
Classification:
ddc - 382/.0973/00212
System ID:
AA00005268:00034

Related Items

Preceded by:
Summary of U.S. export and import merchandise trade
Succeeded by:
U.S. merchandise trade. Seasonally adjusted imports and exports


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
'. ,' / v /

UNITED STATES FOREIGN TRADE


6 I^ Summary of U.S. Export and

Su merchandise Trade


AUGUST 1979
transmission 2:30 P.M. Thursday, September 27. 1979.


Seasonally Adjusted and Unadjusted Data
(Including unadjusted data on imports of petroleum and petroleum products)


r....F.A.S. EXPORTS AND F.A.S. IMPORTS
Seasonally Adjusted

Bureau of the Census, Department of Commerce an-
.jpod. today that during August 1979, exports on a f.a.s.
HzWp alongside ship) U.S. port of exportation value
e, excluding Department of Defense (DOD) Military
Instance Program Grant-Aid shipments, amounted to
,S20.7 million and that general imports on a f.a.s.
14sign port of exportation value basis, amounted to
117.3 million.1 Z

1%Bsed on the above export and import figures, the August
merchandise trade balance was in deficit by $2,356.6
Na: lion.1 2 3

~ ing the first 8-months of 1979 (January-August),
*prts on a seasonally adjusted basis were at an annual
d:teo of $173,044 million, a level about 21 percent higher
'than. the calendar year 1978 total of $143,575 million.
..%Apprts for the January-August 1979 period were at an
qual rate of $195,870 million, an increase of about 14
i* feent over the calendar year 1978 total of $172,026
=4 lion.

the 4-month period, May-August 1979, exports averaged
j|i.ji*5,097.3 million per month, about 10 percent higher than
i iSp $13,743.3 million average reported for the preceding
|-oia6nth period, January-April 1979. Imports on a f.a.s.
:: -ue basis, averaged $17,058.3 million per month for the
current 4-month period, a level about 9 percent higher
ftan the $15,586.6 million average reported for the
-preceding 4-month period.1 2 3
Unadjusted

sportss excluding Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid
hipments increased from $14,725.7 million in July to
$14,975.1 million in August. With Military Assistance
rIIgram Grant-Aid shipments included, exports increased
::t0rm $14,731.8 million in July to $15,009.4 million in
Ai gut. General imports increased from $17,115.0 million
Ap July to $17,931.0 million in August.

:bt.e : Footnotes 1, 2, and 3 are shown at the bottom
of page 5.


F.A.S. EXPORTS AND C.I.F. IMPORTS
Seasonally Adjusted

The Bureau of the Census, Department of Commerce an-
nounced today that during August 1979, exports on a f.a.s.
(free alongside ship) U.S. port of exportation value
basis, excluding Department of Defense (DOD) Military
Assistance Program Grant-Aid shipments, amounted to
$15,820.7 million and that general imports on a c.i.f.
cost, insurance, and freight) U.S. 2ort of entry value
basis, amounted to $19,275.4 million.1 35

Based on the above export and import figures, the August
merchandise trade balance was in deficit by $3,454.7
million.1 2 3

During the first B-months of 1979 (January-August),
exports on a seasonally adjusted basis were at an annual
rate of $173,044 million, a level about 21 percent higher
than the calendar year 1978 total of $143,575 million.
Imports for the January-August 1979 period were at an
annual rate of $208,063 million, an increase of about 14
percent over the calendar year 1978 total of $183,137
million.

For the 4-month period, May-August 1979, exports averaged
$15,097.3 million per month, about 10 percent higher than
the $13,743.3 million average reported for the preceding
4-month period, January-April 1979. Imports on a c.i.f.
value basis, averaged $18,106.4 million per month for the
current 4-month period, a level about 9 percent higher
than the $16,570.8 million average reported for the
preceding 4-month period.1 2 3
Unadjusted

Exports excluding Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid
shipments increased from $14,725.7 million in July to
$14,975.1 million in August. With Military Assistance
Program Grant-Aid shipments included, exports increased
from $14,731.8 million in July to $15,009.4 million in
August. General imports increased from $18,182.4 million
in July to $19,016.9 million in August.


U.S. Department
of Commerce


THE CENSUS


Inquiries concerning these figure should be ddressed to the Chief. Foreign Trade Division, Bureau of
the Census, Washington. D.C. 20233. Tel: Arme Code 301. 763-5140; 763-7754; end 763-7755.
For sale by the Subscriber Services Section (Publications), Bureau of the Census, Washington, D.C.
20233, or any U.S. Daptnimt of Conmmere district office. Postage steps not acceptable; currency
Mibmitted at mMndr's risk. Remnittnc from foreign countries must be by international money order
or by a draft on U.S. bank. Pr 30cnt per copy. Annual subscription (FT 900. 975, 985. and 86
combined) $14.90.







EXPLANATION OF STATISTICS


IMPORT STATISTICS

Coverage

The U.S. import statistics reflect both government and
nongovernment imports of merchandise from foreign countries
into the U.S. Customs territory, which includes the 50 States,
the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. The U.S. import
statistics exclude imports into the Virgin Islands, Guam,
American Samoa, and other U.S. possessions; and shipments
between the United States and Puerto Rico, between the United
States and U.S. possessions, and between any of these outlying
areas. (Data on U.S. trade with Puerto Rico and the Virgin
Islands of the United States are published separately in Report
FT 800. Additional data on such trade and on imports into the
Virgin Islands from foreign countries are presented in reference
tabulations.) Data on imports of petroleum and selected
petroleum products, including shipments into the Virgin Islands
from foreign countries, are included in this report effective with
the January 1976 statistics (previously shown in former Report
FT 900-Supplement).
The U.S. import statistics also exclude American goods re-
turned to the United States by its Armed Forces; intransit ship-
ments through the United States when documented as such
with Customs; temporary shipments; transactions not con-
sidered to be of statistical significance, such as shipments of
personal and household effects; low-valued nondutiable im-
ports by mail; and issued monetary coins of all component
metals.

Inclusion of Gold in the Statistics

Effective with the statistics for January 1978, imports of
nonmonetary gold (in such forms as ore, scrap and base bullion,
nonmonetary refined bullion, etc.) which were previously
excluded, are now included in the statistics. Imports of silver in
these forms have been included since January 1969. Additional
information regarding the inclusion of gold in the 1978 statistics
appears in the January 1978 issues of Report FT 990 and
FT 135.

General Imports/Imports For Consumption

The statistics on U.S. imports are presented in terms of both
"General Imports" and "Imports for Consumption." General
imports are a combination of entries for immediate con-
sumption and entries into Customs bonded warehouses, and
thus generally reflect total arrivals of merchandise. Imports for
consumption are a combination of entries for immediate
consumption and withdrawals from warehouses for con-
sumption. and thus generally reflect the total of the com-
modities entered into U.S. consumption channels.

Source Of Import Information

The official U.S. import statistics are compiled by the Bureau
of the Census from copies of the import entry and warehouse
withdrawal forms which importers are required by law to file
with Customs officials. The information as to country of origin,
net quantity, value, and commodity classification is verified by
Customs officials on entries filed for transactions valued over
$250. which are ordinarily subject to examination for Customs


appraisement purposes. The statistical copy of the entry iW
corrected if it does not accurately reflect the information
called for by the statistical requirements.

Import Valuation

F.a.s. Import Value. -The f.a.s. (free alongside ship) value
represents the transaction value of imports at the foreign port o
exportation. It is based on the purchase price, i.e., the actual
transaction value and generally includes all charges incurred i
placing the merchandise alongside the carrier at the port of
exportation in the country of exportation.

C.i.f. Import Value.-The c.i.f. (cost. insurance, and freight)
value represents the value of imports at the first port of entry in-
the United States. It is based on the purchase price and includes
all freight, insurance, and other charges (excluding U.S. imports
duties) incurred in bringing the merchandise from the country!
of exportation and generally placing it alongside the carrier at
the first port of entry in the United States. If the merchandise:
was acquired in a transaction between related parties, the
purchase price used in deriving the c.i.f. value is based on an
arm's-length equivalent transaction price, i.e.. a price which]
would exist between unrelated buyers and sellers.

Import Commodity Information

Import data are initially reported in terms of the commodity1
classifications in the Tariff Schedules of the United States An-
notated (TSUSA), which is an official publication of the U.S.'
International Trade Commission, embracing the legal text of
the Tariff Schedules of the United States together with statis-
tical annotations. The TSUSA data are rearranged and presented
in this report in terms of totals for the I-digit commodity
sections in Schedule A, Statistical Classification of Commodities
Imported Into the United States, which is based upon the
Standard International Trade Classification (SITC), Revision 2,
effective with the statistics for January 1978. Prior to January
1978, Schedule A was based upon the former SITC, Revised.

Date of Importation and Import Monthly Carryover

It is the objective of the compiling procedures to include
shipments, insofar as practicable. in the statistics for the actual
month of importation (or the month of withdrawal in the case
of warehouse withdrawals for consumption). Prior to 1978, the
dale of Customs official acceptance of the import entry
documents was used to determine the statistical month in which
the shipments were included. Effective with the January 1978
statistics. the date of importation as reported on the import
entries is being used to determine the statistical month.
However, since under the Customs "immediate.delivery" pro-
cedures importers ma) file the import entry up to 10 workdays
after the date of release of the merchandise, some documents
for merchandise imported during the last few days of a given
month may not be received in time for inclusion in the statistics
for thai month. As a result, there is a carryover, estimated at
about 15 percent from the actual month of importation to a
subsequent month. In addition, processing problems (e.g., late
filing of documents, rejection of a shipment by the computer
because the data fail to meet certain edit criteria established to







protect the accuracy of the statistics. etc.) contribute to an
additional carryover of about 5 percent (in terms of value) of
shipments from the reported month of importation ior wih-
drawal from warehouse to a subsequent month. usually the
succeeding month. These limitations should be borne in mind
when making month-tu.-month comparisons

Cumulations of data over at least 4-month periods are desir-
able to identify underlying trends. Month-to-month changes in
imports, exports, and similar series often reflect primarily
irregular movements, e.g., exogenous events such as strikes.
differences in monthly carryover, etc.


Estimated Data for Imports Valued Under $251

The overall import and Schedule A Section 9 totals include
sample estimates for shipments valued under $251 Therefore,
they are subject to sampling error, estimated at less than
one-tenth of one percent for the unadjusted overall total and
about one percent for the unadjusted Schedule A Section 9
total. This means that we can have about 67 percent confidence
that the published unadjusted overall totals and the unadjusted
Schedule A Section 9 totals differ by less than one-tenth of a
percent and one percent, respectively, from the totals that
would have resulted from a complete tabulation. The statistics
on imports of petroleum and petroleum products included in
this report reflect fully compiled data and, therefore, are not
subject to sampling error.



EXPORT STATISTICS

Coverage
The export statistics reflect, in general, both government and
nongovernment exports of domestic and foreign merchandise
from the U.S. Customs territory (includes the 50 States, the
District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico) to foreign countries.
whether the exportation involves a commercial transaction or
not. The statistics, therefore, include Department of Defense
Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid shipments. shipments for
economic assistance under the Foreign Assistance Act and
shipments of agricultural commodities under P.L. 480 (The
Agricultural Trade Development and Assistance Act of 1954. as
amended) and related laws. The following are excluded from the
statistics: Shipments to U.S. Armed Forces and diplomatic
missions abroad for their own use; shipments between the
United States and Puerto Rico, between the United States and
its possessions (including the Virgin Islands). and between these
outlying areas; exports from U.S. possessions. intransit ship-
ments through the United States; transactions not considered to
be of statistical importance, such as personal and household
effects; temporary exports: low-valued or non-commercial
exports by mail; and issued monetary coins of aU component
metals.

Inclusion of Gold in the Statistics.

As indicated above for imports, effective with the statistics
for January 1978, exports of nonmonetar. gold (in such forms
as ore, scrap and base bullion, nonmonetary refined bullion.
etc.) which were previously excluded, are included in the


statistics. Exports of silver in these forms have been included
since January 1969. Additional information regarding the
inclusion of gold in the 1978 statistics appears in the January
1978 issues of Report FT 990 and FT 410.

Definition of Exports of Domestic and Foreign Merchandise

Exports of domestic merchandise include commodities which
are grown, produced, or manufactured in the UnitedStates, and
commodities of foreign origin which have been changed in the
United States from the form in which they were imported, or
which have been enhanced in value by further manufacture in
the United States. Exports of foreign merchandise consist of
commodities of foreign origin which have entered the United
States as imports and which, at the time of exportation, are in
substantially the same condition as when imported.

Source of Export Information

The official U.S. export statistics are compiled by the Bureau
of the Census primarily from copies of Shipper's Export
Declarations which are required to be filed with Customs
officials, except for Department of Defense Military Assistance
Program Grant-Aid shipments which are reported directly to the
Bureau of the Census by the Department of Defense and
shipments by qualified exporters who have been authorized to
submit data in the form of magnetic tape, punched cards, or
monthly Shipper's Summary Export Declarations directly to
the Bureau of the Census.

Export Valuation
F.a.s. Export Value. -The value reported in the export statistics
generally is equivalent to a f.a.s. (free alongside ship) value at
the U.S. port of export, based on the transaction price,
including inland freight, insurance and other charges incurred in
placing the merchandise alongside the carter at the U.S. port of
exportation.

Export Commodity Information
Beginning January 1978, export commodity information
is collected in terms of the commodity classifications in the
1978 edition of Schedule B. Statistical Classification of Do-
mestic and Foreign Commodities Exported from the United
States, which is based on the framework of the classification
system in the Tariff Schedules of the United States (TSUS).
In this report, the Schedule B data are rearranged and presented
in terms of totals for the I-digit commodity sections in Schedule
E, which is based upon the Standard International Trade Classi-
fication (SITC), Revision 2, effective with the statistics for
January 1978. Prior to January 1978, the export classifications
in Schedule B were based upon the organizational framework
of the former SITC. Revised.

Export Monthly Carryover

It is the objective of the compiling procedures to include
shipments. insofar as practicable, in the statistics for the actual
month of exportation. For purposes of the statistics, the month
of exportation is general) based on the date when the shipment
leaves the United States. (For vessel or air shipments it is the
date when the carrier departs or is cleared from the port of
export.) However, as indicated above for imports, because of







processing problems (e.g., late receipt of a document for an
end-of-month shipment, rejection of a shipment by the com-
puter because the data fail to meet certain edit criteria
established to protect the accuracy of the statistics. etc.), there
is an overall average carryover of about 2 to 3 percent (in terms
of value) of the shipments from the actual month of exporta-
tion to a subsequent month, usually the succeeding month.
These limitations should be borne in mind when making
month-to-month comparisons.
Cumulations of data over at least 4-month periods are
desirable to identify underlying trends. Month-to-month
changes in imports, exports. and similar series often reflect
primarily irregular movements, differences in monthly
carryover, etc.

Estimated Data for Export Shipments

Effective with the March 1979 statistics, the overall export
and Schedule E section and division totals include sample esti-
mates for shipments valued $501 -S 1,999 to Canada and for ship-
ments valued $501-5999 to countries other than Canada. Data
for shipments valued $500 and under to all countries are also
estimated, based on established percentages of individual
country totals, and included in the Schedule E Section 9 totals
regardless of the commodity exported. It is estimated that the
unadjusted overall total is subject to a sampling error of less
than one-tenth of one percent, and the unadjusted Schedule E
section or division totals are subject to sampling errors of about
one percent. In addition, the Schedule E Section 9 total is sub-
ject to possible error in the estimated data for shipments valued
S500 and under, and the overall total, and the individual totals
for sections other than Section 9. to a more limited extent.
Such $500 and under shipments represent about I percent of
the total value of exports, and aboul 30 percent of the Schedule
E Section 9 total. Prior to the March 1979 statistics, the overall
export and Schedule E section and division totals include
sample estimates for shipments valued $251 -$ 1.999 to Canada
and for shipments valued $251-$999 to countries other than
Canada.


SOURCES OF ERROR IN THE STATISTICS

Monthly import and export figures are subject to the
possibility of errors which may arise from sources other than
sampling errors, discussed above. Among these are errors in the
reporting and/or processing of information as to commodity
classification, value and other statistical factors. month of
inclusion (see paragraphs on import and export carryover.
above), and the undercounting of exports to Canada due to the
non-receipt of Shipper's Export Declarations. For 1978.
the undercounting is estimated to be about $2 billion dollars.
In the case of imports the information as to value and
commodity classification (as well as country of origin and net
quantity) is verified by Customs officials on entries filed for
transactions valued over $250 which are ordinarily subject to
examination for Customs appraisement purposes, thus con-
siderably reducing the possibility of error. In addition, the
procedures use(' to compile both the import and export sta-
. tistics include clerical and computer processing checks designed
to protect the accuracy of the statistics to the fullest practicable
extent.


Adjustment for Seasonal and Working-Day Variation

Monthly totals for exports and imports and major com-
modity components (Schedule E and Schedule A section totals)
are shown adjusted for seasonal/working-day variation. Effec-
tive with the release of the January 1979 statistics, the seasonally
adjusted export and import totals represent the sum of com-
modity components adjusted for seasonal and working-day
variation. Previously, the monthly totals for exports and im-
ports were adjusted independently of the components. The
procedure of aggregating seasonally adjusted commodity com-
ponents more accurately reflects the seasonal movements within
the totals. Under this procedure, only those section totals that
show identifiable seasonal patterns are seasonally adjusted.


MERCHANDISE TRADE BALANCES

Two trade balances are presented in this report.
I) The balance between exports based on f.a.s. values and
imports based on f.a.s. values.
2) The balance between exports based on f.a.s. values and
imports based on c.i.f. values with adjustments for imports from
affiliated sellers abroad to reflect arms-length equivalent prices.
Both balances are useful for certain purposes. The first
balance corresponds to a measurement of the international
payments or credit flows resulting from merenandise trade
between the U.S. and foreign countries. The second balance is
based on concepts similar to those used by most foreign
countries, and therefore provides a reference for comparison
with the trade balances published by those countries.



REVISIONS TO THE STATISTICS

Under the revision policy adopted effective with the 1977
statistics. revisions to the monthly statistics for the current year
will be issued once a year. i.e.. with the reports for June of the
following year. Thus. revisions to 1979 statistics will be issued
only in June 1980



SOURCES OF FURTHER INFORMATION

.,ddilmolinl foreigii tride statistics and intoriatlion regarding
L .'Oragc. valijilltn. saimpling. and t.iUial'JIti. IiiS which should
bc coniidcrcd b\ users of tilh statistics are contained primarily
in tile tollhinig publications Report FT990. Highlights of U.S.
Export and Import Trade. FT 135. U.S. General Imports.
Schedule .\ C'1iiinonditl b Couintr): FT 410. U.S. Exports.
Schedule F Com'imuodin. b Countilr. and the Guide to Foreign
Tiade Statisiitc lilirmiuation regarding additional sources of
l.itistic,,. thel iie liodolog. uied in .easoliallh adj Listing the data.
and other matters relating to foreign trade statistics may be
obtained from the Foreign Trade Division. Bureau of the
Census. Washington. D.C. 20233.












Table 1. U.S. Exports (f.a.s. Value Basis), General Imports (f.a.s. and c.i.f. Value Basis), and Merchandise

Trade Balance, Adjusted for Seasonal and Working-Day Variation, by Month: January 1978

to August 1979

(In millions of dollars. See Emplanatlon of St.tlclti for Information on coverage. date of importation, deflnotionu ol export and import values and
trade balances, and sources or error In the datal


Period


Januaryv-Aui ... .


January..
February..
March.. .
April.
May ..
June ... .


July ..... .. ... ..
Augu .. ... ..
Sept ember. .
Oc on r.... .. .. .. .... .
November..
December ... ... .



January-Augu t .. .

January
February .. .
March .. ... .
April .... ....

June .. .. .. .. .

July .. .. .. ... ... ....
August .... ..... .
eptober .... .. .

Nove.- ber ... .. ....... .. .
Dece ber .. ....... ....


F. i i F pcE r, .i ia .. in..irr '
-e --o. ll, i l luslej I


E p rt S


*' Bri. '
9 9-. ,
11 n -


l "l ,3 :


t? ?q3 7
i i'JIl I










l l 131 1 >
1 .h .. -




ii -9o '.

I .' 8 : i
II isv 2











1 ^ 0 3'

I 068 2
-, v_., -


lilp .rt









1, 5-',5


L-,,,8
13. ',' 3

1'..- 7
1-. 132.o
i-. l1 l.
I- n? ri
-. 82.'
15.031.8


. 31 1


in O. 3
to 03. J



It. .


cal since


-3 23Ai
-- i.

-2.:-I:

- "n2 1

-2.88n i
-1.83 8


- I. I -',
-1.'.' 3


-5 i

-4: I
-~ I:.



.1


I .-. Eorit na c1 1 I .por is
ti Vll aJjulsti a


4 ___________


cODtn


S130

11 '40.11
1' 268.21

Il cit 5-



II .[5 ir
12 .-` 3.

I -90













I n, r


i 1o-h v


Ie-port


13 92' '
i5 193 ,j
i .. i3 <
1>,,-. O
1.,912 h
1- 869 -

I i.. 1. 3 .
ij.'073 6
15.d2i '
li. 'h)3 8





I 'I




I ?.28 .
* 2D.. I



IT4 ,2'


Tradkl
I,.[ancie


-2 : .J-'

-- 'i. 3
- 2-8
- '-6
-3.803 6
-3 12, 6
-2 601 ,

- i 833.9

-2..46.5
- 862.
-2 31i .I
-2.723






-., .. 1

-I. 'b




-2. t,
-;. li.1


tExport data repri,--nt d.em'sEt: an d inr-m n *errcr.ar.]al e .- ul, inG p.art.n. ..r f L< '-'rn,:e i(.L'j A, ,r ) A' F Tae FPror i., %.rant -r A -1 s hpment .
Import dlts reore-ent general -,,port. :if .r.r. rnl:
ITre totals r.n3 ri, ir this toai. arr. ucr l 0c. u5 -.Jjn~ tre ia ijurll, taju-t. c**.. Olry c.'.ponin a- -h..r, inr Leae fr prta and tadles arid
b for lrporr eer fornote L a i nC: L.It, r. I: pst




Eport and Import slatisTical series are adjusted for waonal and ank.nqg die vdr.al.on but ni tor chna.ges .n pie level Raeliecing a new methodology introducedd aih stalsinc ftor January 1979 the
adjusted monthly export and import lolals tor 1978 and 1979 presented in Ins report are derived by ado.ng tne seasonallv odjusled components li e SITC eclionsi The factors iaed to10 adust The 1918-19 79
component series repent the comDinat.on of seasonal adjustment factors developed traom monthiv data Through 1978 and the appropriate wAoking- y actors In issuesOl lh.sreporl pior tO January 1979,
monthly totals were adjusted irndependenlyv 01 Ihe components
SCimulaltions of data over ar least 4 month pliod a are deitabl lto idenify underlying Irerds Montli to moninth ranges in eiporis moin arilai sp. oltn trelet primarily .rr regular mnovemlents,
dittlrences in monthly (.airyovet eIc REceni irtonih tO rr.onTh percent (ranges ,n [he nierall easonaliv adjusted export and import series are Drseanied nr the iniloing able wilh average percent month to-
monrh ise and decline over longer periods qsown toi companion The avefages e[icdilp percr.rnage changes lor 11t) ther p0hoid Dctibea Dpeember 1977 because or abnormalities in the data due to effect of
dock tlrikesand 12) peliodsihen negligible riitnges fier pealetlrnili ih level nl eIpoirtin .,ipoirti occurred

Mont n-to-montn Average monthly rates of change



Series JuIv-Aut. Jurie-Julv rM.e -June %pr. -Mta Average Average montrie 12 iraonthz
19 9' I19 9 19"9 19"'4 rise dec i ne April 1979- Aug. L978-

1 l?-1978 1972-1977 Aug. 19 Aug. 1979
(Percenti (Percent) (Percent (Percent) (Percent) (Percent) (Percent) (Percent)


P.a.s. export value..
r.a.s. import value..
C.i.f. import value..


L 1
-l.


'See the Explanation ol Slatasiis For definbions of the sport and imponr values and trade balances










Table 2. U.S. Exports (f.a.s. Value Basis) of Merchandise Showing Department of Defense (DOD)

Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid Shipments, by Month: January 1978 to August 1979

tin millions of dollars. See Ewplanatlon of Statistics for Information on coverage, definition of f.a.s. export value, and source of error in
the data. Unadjusted totals represent aSm or unrouaded figures and hence may vary slightly from amu of rounded amounts)

Exports excluding DOG Exports including DOD Gr
Grant-Ald' DOD Grant-Aid' DOD Grant-Ald


Period Domestic Domestic Domeatic
and and Domestic, and Domestic. Western Other
foreign, foreign. unadjusted foreign, unadjusted Total Europe countries
seasonally unadjusted unadjusLed
adjusted,


1978

Janur -r e.ner ....... 1.3.57. 6 1-1.068.9 1.3.69 9 1- 15..2 85.3 .O.6, i. .9

JanuAry-t uilst .. ... q.0.5 0 90.521.51 88.923.3 90.562.9 88,984..' bi 2' 3 37.1

Jnuar ... .. .. .. .... 9.863. 7 9. 36b.., 9.21.. I 9.36 .9 9.216.6 2.5 0 5 2.1
Febru. .. 9 9.5.u 9q. 1. o 9,337.8 9,518 5 9.341 7 3 9 1.3 2.7
March ... 11 10.5 12.07. 2 11.830.5 12 079.: 11.835 8 5 2 0.5 .8
April .. .... .b30.. 12.06 11.85. I 12.069 7 11.859.b 5 4 0.17 .8
ay. .. .. .. 11.786 0 12.-.78 9 i2.23..3 12..94.6 12.250.0 1S. 7 L.0 14.7
June 12.268 2 i... 12.261.' 12,.87.3 12.271 7 10 1 6.5 3.5

Jult .... 11.661.i 10.93..0' 10. 769.. 10.9.s.2 10, 780 0 10.b 7.. 3.2
Aug .t ... 12.293 7 11.613.9 11.-.21.- 11.o21.8 11,.29 3 7.9 6.5 L.4
Septemb r .... ... 13,2 12 713.1 12 30SC-.. 12.71,... 12. i0i.' 1.3 iZI 1.3
October ... ...... .. .. 12.901. 1 13. i l o 12. 22.6 13. 157.,. 12.926.. 3.8 1.5 2.3
November.. ... .. .... ..... 13..50.b 13.655. i 13.-16 5 13.672.3 13 ,33.5 L6.9 1-.3 2.6
Decevn er.. .. ....... .. .......... 13.282.5 13.531.0 13.302 1 13.532.9 13,303.9 1.8 0.1 1.7

1979

IJnu.ry-uguL .. ........ Ii..'*. I l. i I i! 5 5.iS. : l 1 3 .. .I .

January.. .. .. ... .. ....... 13.i'1 12,558.1 12. 3.9.. 12,561.3 12.352.5 3.2 1.0 2.2
February. .. .... l.., a I..... j I..] i.1 4 .93-' -, I :.', 4 0 2 0 1.9
March. ..... ....... .. ... I .52.0 1 56. L'. 21 '.8 1i 580.7 15 300.1 2 0 7 1 7
April ............ ........... 13 882 b 1- 25 TI 1. 010.s 14 2,7.3 1..020.8 10.3 8 9 1.5
ayV ..... ...... ...... ......... 13.8b2 1 I.812.9 .5 9.0 1- 818 9 I- 53-.9 5 9 3.5 2.4
June .. ... ...... 15 0.' 75 3-...' 15 081.1 15 365.9 15.102.6 21.5 2.0 19.5

July ... 68 9 .. 1 7 l- -64 r 1. "31 8 1. '.96.0 0.1 1.6 6.t
August .. g... I. I 1.. I I iC'I' -S ; N 2- A'
Sept ember .... .
Oc ,ber ..... ..
M -vember
D-eceber.

Z Less than one half of unit of measurement shown.

'Represents only export shipments from the United States and differs from D1) Military Assistance Pr.,cram Grar.-Aid shipeient figures undEr this
procrem a, follo-s lai Transfers of the material procured outside the United States and transfers from DOJD versep s stocks from export abspmsents.
Iai Ebport value is fr.B.., -hereas DOD value, in most instances, is f.o.b. point of origin. IcI utata for 5uilpienis reported by the 0DD for a
glten monin :.re included in Bureau of Census reports In the SEcrno month subsequent to the month reported by M1OO.
The -asonally adi.strl totals .hoon in th- cQluman are o.rived by adding the seasonally adjusted con caodity components as shown in table 4. See
I,.iitnote 1 at tne b.lti n of page 5.
3Annual totals are not shown for seasonally adjusted data. Unadjusted data should be used Ilr annul utotals.










Table 3. U.S. Imports of Merchandise, by Month: January 1978 to August 1979

(In millions of dollars. See Explanation of Statistics for information on coverage, date of importation, definitions of I.a... and c.i.f. Import
values, and sources of error in the data. Unadjusted totals represent sum of unrounded figures ann hence may vary slightly from i3m of rounded
amounts)


F.a... value C.I.f. value


Perid General imports orts General Imports Import.
for for
Seasonally onaajunte cnumptl on, Seasonally Unadjusted conumption.
adju-tea' unadjusted anju-ted' Ua .djusted




January-December ......................... i 1 2 u. I l .23 i 183 13j .3 182 'A6 ..

Januar)-August .......... ..... ..... .11 519 3 A 11 '.i].'.J I i "9'. il 6 9 I). '

January...................................... ... li I 1- 0'. .. i 3 ].' 13,l.'I-. 9 L3.39'.
february ......... .................................. ... 2. 9.5 i t.. L)3 u I-. 12.3 1-. 180 2
Marchl.............................. ... I. ..i 1- -'.. L. t. l. ll -" 9. '. '..1 9? -
Maypril.............................. .... ...I.. .I 0 1, 5 iI.. .| l. i L .'- i 3 -.

June..........................-... .. .. .....i .'1 3 1-. .:1 .3.f I.-3. Ai 1 ... *.2 1- 396.4

July..................................... l. 5-- 1- '193. 1V-.881 1. ,i .. t 3 6o7 9< 15. a.3
August..................................... .. I. 132 .. -.. 1 i'] lr ,-,i 9.s. l.r.,3u. 3
September................................ lI..l. I. .1- '- I j ;I. 39 '' 0 1i .00.6
October .................................. L- .l- I' 1 .L ni 1-. ''.. l o.0. .3 I .03..
November................................. .- 2- 1: I J- L- 99 2 li. '64.' i6.0l5 1 15,9-9.0
December................................. ..V 1 L., .c 3 L-..8 I 1.i 1a 92o. tI 625.3

1.'9

January-August ............ ..... ..... :'. I i : I' -

January ................................ .l 231 I 1 3. l.3i 13.3 1:.281.9 1 9.8!2.b I 6529 3
February. ............ ............. l.. l:, c.3 l r -r I I l I .r..- i- !. 3
March. ............ .... ........... 1 i 6 is b2L*.a i ? c, b ILb .9'.u
April..................................... It, 1'.1 I1 I 1 2. Ii J -., 1 3.l2 I-' 8 012. L .
MaJuny ..................................... 16 ..- 1- .. i .' .- 1 's I I o.6 I ,.2" o.- I
Juln ..................................... .I "-. II ".. .-. I" i I .. t lO

July....................................... ; 6 ,I I 06..2 '1.2 I8 %1'3t. 491..
August..................................... I I I
September...............................
Oct ober.. .................. .............
November.................................
December.................................

,Thne seasonal ly a 1 ,uutm to a1- arsu- r. th :ulur.i r .:.u Cs 3r' rrse -raarnalII a51.'f 0 C:..-.dtl c -ipjneutc'ri -nu- n Eables 5 and b. Fce
footnote 1 dt botn i -1 aDr .
Annual ic.tal .;rt not .rr5.r 'rr fral Is 4lusrj, r, at <-d laI .-h:uld a- *.- f- r ir ura !l -51-.








8


Table 4. U.S. Exports (F.a.s. Value) of Domestic Merchandise, Schedule E Sections, Excluding

Department of Defense Military Grant-Aid Shipments and Foreign Merchandise (Reexports),

Seasonally and Unadjusted by Month: January 1978 to August 1979

tIn millions or dollars. 9Pr Explanntton of Startlrica for information on coverage, definition of f.a.s. export value. and sources of error in the
data. Inanj,,ted total. repretnt nI s of anrourned figures and hence may vary slightly Froam sum of rounded auountlst

Schedule E sectioni t


S 2 3 '6oreip: k9

Seasonally adjusted



J'nua)r-u,; ,9 ........ .. 1..il I 1 .1..0 9 9 671.2 2.265.3 983 1 7.916.3 ;.862 L 37.262.3 b.-ab... 2.947.8 1.598.2
January. ... ... 1.120.- 1] 1. 069 A 2,8.6 90.O 893.5 895.1 .,093.L 72.0 .432. 3 L50.3
February .. ..... ... 1.33'.8 170.0 1.023 5 181.0 97.2 911.5 910.3 L56.O 1742.9 236.0 176.8
March. ... ...... ..... 1.-31.3 21L.3 I 188.9 200.5 141.5 94 -.2 960.9 .656... 777.9 389.9 243.
April ... ... .. .. ... l..-78. 161.8 260 1 271.0 145.. 962.6 961.7 4.843.7 826.2 509.1 210.1
ay ......... .. ... 1.691.8 166.t 1 316.4 118.. L19.3 97 8 1.021.6 4,759.9 855.6 309.0 26.6
June .... ..... 1. 9..5 169 1. 387.2 385.8 132.1 1,027.4 1.03b.5 4.907.8 819.2 392.4 2L5.6
July ... ..... ... .. 1. QQ.. 199.3 1 16u.3 32-.6 130.7 L.063.. 1.003.t .,8A3.2 808.2 3,9.2 164.6
,ug' .... ........... 1. 138.8 22 .8 1 261 2 335 .. 120.9 1,138.9 1.070.7 4.992.2 892.4 329.9 192.5
hcpte .ber. .... 1 98.3 178.5 1.07 5 36.9 156 3 1.237.5 1,160.3 5,269.0 918.7 702.5 208.7
Oc t' r .... ..... 1.5s0 0 220.8 1.L 50 1 370 3 113.9 1.1.8.1 106.4 5.625. 1 946.5 323.9 231.0
Novembrr..... ...... .. ... 1.- 220 5 1,510.1 .08 0 121.0 1.228.5 1.8.1 5,604.6 931.6 625.3 238.9
Dl.ccnoer ....... .... .)1,8i... 20b.8 1,499.5 400. 1.7.0 103.4 1. 186.6 5,676.5 940.- 407.2 228.9

1979

Janujrs-Aui-u 1.. ........ 1.I. t. 6 i. C7 : '. u : I I 5.. 1.) E l. : l.. I9 ... S .013 5.62' 8 2.009.7
Januar- ... ....... ....... 1,299.01 138 0 3 333 5 463.B 14.8 1.31.-.5 1,196.9 5,311 6 935.9 584.0 208.6
Fnoruary... ..... ..... .... 1,3.. 3 1 l..- 3 1 -1 .1 L?5. .. .. 1's C 98' 3 63B 6 6 223.8
Marcn.. ... ...... ... .. I 5*3 3 2'U.6b I 1 ,11.. .]1 3 121.3 L.39q 0 1.272 ? 5 722 7 1.01..5 684 5 286.6
Apr!l .... .. .. ... 1.531 22 27 1 I 50,.3 ... 3 129.6 1,277 0 1 IlL.b 5 b -... 932.' 688.1 246.4
May.. ........ ....... .... I 9. 212 ') -21 3 11 2 10. 1.27. 3 7 I 254 6 5J5 3 1.00 ... 764.1 283.9
June .. .. I .2 11.8 b 1.- u- 0 18' 1.66: 3 1.0i3 5 3 7J3).3 1.ri3" 5 667.4 263.4
July ................... ... 1 .. 21- '. I '- 1 2); 8 1 L I 31.8 1.299.2 6 039 8 1.0-' I 821.8 235.8
August ....... ................. ..'4 I1h t. I 611i L .. I. 1 I 5.i'- ;. ,,1.. h b i9 I.,- '.16 3 261 0
Sept Ember .. .............
October ......................
November ......................
D.Ce.iloer ........ ..

Linad jua, ea



Jar.uaryv-[ce,rer 1~ L,333.2 e 15.552 8 3.876 3 1.521.3 12.618.3 \I ..iu 59 252.91 10,177.1 5.006.8 2.505.

J.Inuar -'utua .. ... ... .. 12,02J.' I 131 9 S 35 5 2 '2. 98B 1 60 I 1 3' 321 ...86. 2 947 8 1.598.2
January .... .. ... .. 132. .38.0 L1.0,49.6 1o8 9 96.0 830.1 829.8 3.851.1 t65.4 432.3 150.3
February ...... ......... 271.;. Ls8. 1,0r31.4 LuIl.0 97 2 883 2 8-8.. 3.939.6 689.4 236.0 176.8
Mar.h. ... ... .. ... ,i. i1.o 1.337., 163.2 1.1.5 1.031.1 l.06'., ,. 10.1 878.2 389.9 263.7
tpr L .. .... 7 .8 ....3 .388.6 281.5 1.5.4 971.3 988 9 5 095.1 854.3 509.1 210.L
MIv ..... .... .. .. .. 8-.2 l3.b .-66.5 313 6 119.3 1.U18. 7 10 00.. 1 5. l 908.6 309.0 244.6
June .. ... ... 37.1 1.11 ,3.9 2-.'.0 132.1 1,063 4 1...: .* 3' ? B56.9 392.4 215.6
Jul1 .... .......... ...... I %..') 141 n t*2 321 7 130.7 1.077.2 939.. -8 9 777.5 349.2 166.6
L u .. .. .... 2 :1: 1 1.153 33 ..- 1211.9 1. 149.1 1 02 7 ... ,592.' 855.8 329.9 192.5
:eprc.n ,cr. .. .. ... 0. .. 176 1.111 3.8.U L56.3 1.191.9 1.132.5 5.. 1.5 891.1 702.5 208.7
Octooer.. .. .. 9 251.3 1..'1]. .22 1 113.9 1.085.0 1 120.8 ,.284.4 953.1 323.9 231.0
.Nvehb r .......... 3. 281. i 1. 78.. .hi 4 121.0 1.17... 1. 134.1 5 ,.97.3 925.1 625.3 238.9
D.. rinber .. ... .2551 2 251.7 1.'' ., -17.9 1.-7.0 1. 117 0 1,18 ..6 5. 13.5 921.6 407.2 228.9

1979

J nuari-1u.h u-i .. i -. t .': .- ]..uj r. i.ui I ,-. .. ..t 8..I. O, .. / 5.r2'. 2 6 2.09.,
la.uar, .. L.]l) 3 15 I t('.. 3.:>. 1-5..8 1 235.t 1.121 i 5 0-1. 873.2 584.0 208.8
coru- ry ...... .. .,16. i r i ; 1 = .-. .:. i ; i : i i 4. 1 16 111 6 2;3 B I
Marc .. i .81.0 .2 I A. -s, i ] 1 3 1.5: I I 384..1 b6.325 I 1, 133.2 68-.5 286.6
A.rl .. .... ... .. .. 1I '.:i 2"02. L I ,n8 r' -6' 0 12'.b I 28' o1 I 2 z 6. 5 8.3 q1 Yb5 3 688.1 246.4
lat ... ...... I 8 163 I i 6'-." i --2 ]. 1 320 a 1I 35.0 6.00; 2 1.071 7 '6 28 Z3.9
JuIe ..... ... ... I W 5 2 1'5 i 05.2 -l 3 6 b I' 6 1.513 I .B 1 5. 98. I 1 07. 8 66' 263.4
'l.i ... .. .. .', 1 Il't. I .. 6 157.6 1 -. 3 2 I 230 13 6 1..0 99" 6 821.8 235.8
Auiu r . ., I L : i i l .--r M I '".1 "'.'i I 9 h \ 261 '3
;epl .npr .. E- -
cyuiteb.er .... ....


dullo r .. S .... -j, r, r l I. l

tict,..,ult E sen-t i-. it .c- rio t ru arc .t ', l. '
F.a l-- id lIt i ais 1 -he.ticals a.o relate oroaucr 3 P F.
I rt. raltS inU 'Jitcli ut.r,..facr.urea od CL' ll t 1d1 iLhtelv Cl na..tI.ral
tr.in ttAl, t, initotl. et,'e. ,' !u 1t1 Machir,'rN anr tran- porl r.q,,pierlt
1 r>ral f.?l. l- ur'. nt E ir.a rciare.) nFr riai 8. Lla cel Imneous manufactur-d arriacie N P.F
.,. :'l e.na aitrs--.arin l n i -I.table q -:..eiaditteP and cranda..actions r...; class i n ea elsewhere

J I 1 -. ,, J .. .l n .-e-[ rt i ir r i. -rr a .. ,' .l r i '14 LiJu. r .. t c t rs ha.? ne c E en
'' r. ,, F .. 3.- l. 'h t ... 1 i ;. ,.- ea Ira t Ia e rns. The nonth y seasonally
S' .r .r .3, n Jd.l i ,.r.e C 'l e.,r : i.r .- ., '. r. le I e I'.Aj.rnort -page .


] ..* .* .r .,-- i .' '. r ,,, rt I Cr,* .' L- ,,*rt. coren l port






Al'








9

Table 5. U.S. General Imports (f.a.s. Value Basis) of Merchandise, Schedule A Sections, Seasonally

Adjusted and Unadjusted, by Month: January 1978 to August 1979

(In lions of dollars. See Explanation or StatLstles for Information on coverage, date of ImportaLlon, definition off.a.a. Import value, and
sourc-s of error La the data. Unadjusted totals represent sun of unrounded figures and hence way vary slightly from su of rounded amounts)


Schedule A sect ions'
Period
0- I 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 92


Seasonally adjusted


19 'is

Jar.uar/-Ab u:t .... .. ... .... 8 8'" s1 I .3- r ui 8 o oi I Ji 16 2t 3 30 12 C11 I I I I

Januar).. .. I .' 1-3 I 8 3., i 1 .. 1"' 2 3 1 I I 3396 i 29 2
February I Li.. 1-. 9 ';'- 02. 3 942'r.6 1 -.3 r ? 6
March........ ........... ... i:.7 1 0 6 3 3,.31.2 -.3 ..' 3 n9, 0 L... 9 ? j' 4
Apr l .... ... ... .. ... 1 L 1 2 212 8 .213 :,3.'.s .- .8 3 *'8 8 1 in i 3) 8 i
May.. ....... .. ... ... ..... I 1-3 18.: 6 9 ,23..1 1.7 2 2 310.6 86b.3 I )..0 1 .,I 7
June...... ..... .. ....... 1 '-i 19-..1 'lI 3. I -c. 7 -'. ." 1 9 3. b I ill 3
July... .. .. ........ .. ..... .. I 1 6.1 L 3. 80 l A .. V 5.l 2. 387 1 '. 3 2..9 a.7
August ........... ..... ... .. 92-.0 198.8 3 3.b l 0 5... .2 3. .17 8. I.8.l .9 3I'" 5
September..... ........... 1 .8.9 Llt. '81 .b 6..9 iu. s9 i2.9 192. 1, L 7 '.5 3nb 5
October ......... ...... .. 1 152 2 .i 1 3..1 5 .' .. ,- .' n.. '.. .. l.. .8U.9 386 8
houember .. ...... I IbB. 2(00 3.8 3 536 51.' .9.. 34. 1:9.8 l. '2.6b .2' 2
December .. ...... .. 1 ..1 19. :.. 2 3 7.3 t. 3 ]3 .0 .* l i I -. 27L.7 1. 9.0 ) lo 1

14'-9

J.nuary-A gus t .. ... ....... 7 i ~ i .- l 7

January... .. .2 8 J 20 3 61 .. ..'8.0 i9 ill.2 2. 3b... .s u 8 1 '"-... 309 4
February ......... ,. -. I ., r .r. i '!.8 9
March.. .. ... .. .... r .1. I .. .. ,i 5 2 3 0 I i ji' 8
AprIl. .. .. .. 3. .n 2 8 6 o .s I n 9 i8' 0
May...... .. .. ... .. 2 1 21 6 : Ic -0 o 68?3 2 ; 3 i 3. 5 I 'l ? -1 6 3
June.. .. ...... .. .. .. I 1 '. '2 -' M o s 9.o .2-. .. I 5 -n06 5
Jul ...... .. .0 -25 I 8 .
August .. ......... .. .
September... ... .. .. ....
Oct ober ...................
November...................
Decembe r..............

LTIs J r eo




Janru ry- ecemb r. ........... 13. ... '. l; 2 11.i -1' 27.2 ". --' .25.6 I .0.o2.1 e 1

JanuarI-uuul t.... ............ 8 6.. 1 -' I 99 o j I ,- 1 3- J 1 'j 14o r 3' -, 2." I 2 1 i

January .. ...... .... ....... i.. 12 .9 136. 1 -9 3 -22 2 3' .3 -18.4 L 982.9 3 392.7 1 22'.9 "4 2
Februir ... .... ......... 1.11 .. 1t 2. :. I J in2 .c o -.' j 19A..- 3 573 2 I 293.2' 2 6
March..... ................... 1.2.'. -. 7' t-r 3 -11. .o.11 h')..d 3.i ...1 .',0 ? L l .l 3 ) 4
April .... ............ ...... I .L1.-, 201. uo 3 53 3.3 .' 611 c 83.0 -.018. 1..3i). 338 3
a\ .... ... ... ... .. ... i.. i.3 89. .. I 1. 8i. .35''4.3 u20... 1. co.0 1 7
Ju e ......... I ,.i (4 213. '. s,- l. -c.c 7 2 2 0l .0 .132.9 l oil.3 i 38 3
July............ .. ... l. li. 1 l'.. 6i 3. 380.1 .9 .. .9 2 -18.3 108.2 1. 782.5 329 7
Au st. .. ..... .. ..... 9 ...il is 2 1 3 ?- .1 3.. ( .0 5l-." 2 118.t 3. 78. L, 716.5 12. 5
aep'emer ... ........... .. .. u0.8 9 ta.2 8 J, t'.9 31.2 2 .Il.. 3 832 0 1. 1'5L.9 i'6.5
October .... 15;:.2 211 2 3 .91 t .0. 5i. 2 3 .. 2- ..i 1.22' I 38b 8
Nose..ner..... ........... I'. 20..'. j C36.2 t1.7 'I'. 2 3'.- -38 3 L. '99.9 32' 2
December .... ... L 2. 1 2'' .*" 3 ,r .3 33." 535.3 '.I1 1 ..38.7 1..60. 3 j8A 1





Janu r,. ...... .. 8.3 2'.. 8 55'. -. 08 532. 3 ;. 1 309 4
February .. ... ....... l' '. 9
M brch .. ..... ". 1 3 a 2 3 ir.. 2 1 1 8
A p r i l . .. I ., 6" 0 1 0 0 0 .I .-9 2." ,
May ...... .. .. I : I I "'t 6 b '9 504 I 3
June.. ... ..I j 0 9 9)'' .2n 2 il b) 6 2 a ". 3 I 8n 1 13.06 4
July .. .. I I .. ',' 0 3 31 2 rI I 3 i' L 60 2
August ... ... .. .
September .. ......
October ... .. ... ..
November .... .....
Decemoer ....

IScheaule A section dtescrpt ior.- arr a. i'-11 5T
0. Fci aon' 1 nnin r.a L rn-i..-l i>n rel r --a Nrzlr. u N .P.F.
L. Be% r r s e ag rd ron3ceC &*. "aru r.:rureo .1a ct uislri ed chl. ,'L r h, &: tertal
2. Cruoe .t[ riil rnedLs l e -cepr fu l- '.l n, inerv ana t[r.ao port r. iu c nt
3. qirnee-l fjels Lorcant and relF-Lc ...ren al a. J sc,? l'!anec .j anuf crur-vi orticle-, N.: P.F.
-. Oils indl fats--nir.el anc .neetcDle CCmr.c.-.-.tiei sn. Erun-:.. n r- Ci.:. li-1ie. cise-here
A u ti.--ted for i ei -oial and ..or- K nl -al r, a t. r, u ntrg .a. onr. l a .lT.ert lct r iri troducei in Jinu,.ri |L'9. Iaju rn.rsn[ factor h;.e not been
applied to oata for ichedul A .ect nri i 3 m a.. ) ue r3 a c ) the i _r.. o cntif I le a mI ?n. 'ibl 5. .r,.I p rr.err. The r.or.tihly ea.ionv ]ly
adjuSted sport 'c, a!'= ( .a r-*.'.= '., ,. ta1 l.e-; I ar,', are t r j, r. ,.i r,,; 1t '1 .r r..'l t7 a r. ,-,r..'- IDr, rI t : l te. I .: ..tul c
I at rne bort.., 'o pitge 3.1 A annual corak ar' not a .,,-r, for .a rr..,l, .'ju t.d ,ltt linia.viE e .liat. sn-ulio re u-erJ flr ar.nr,. l 1 til3L










Table 6. U.S. General Imports (c.i.f. Value Basis) of Merchandise, Schedule A Sections, Seasonally

Adjusted and Unadjusted, by Month: January 1978 to August 1979

fin millLone of dollars. See ExpLanaLlon of StstlstICE fur inforiatIon on coverage. date of liportatlon. definition or c I.F. Import value, and
sources of error In the aata Unadjusted locals represent asm of unrounded figures and hence may vary slightly reo. sum of rounded amounras

Schedule A sections1

Period -
0' I Seasonal' 5 6 7 8 9


Seasonally adjusted


J anusry -Au u r .. .. .


Libruar,
Marth.
April
9a\

pul.
Augi..'
Sceptimnjr
ic tobe r
J.r s...ner
Decemn.r .

19 9

Januar Suguir

lar.uar,
February,
March ...
4pril .

June .


pteiriber
cOc t u .b r

Nov mber








January-December.............

January-August...............

January

March .......................
April .......................
May.......... ... ......... .....

Jul,
Aucu: [

..btrauber
november .......... ............
December........................

1979

January-August................

January .......................
February......................
March........................
April.........................

June.........................

August
September. .... ...
October.. .................
November .....................
December


9 i31 6

1 1.. 2
1.183 1
I.o-0 3
I 2.. '
l 2 3 i
1.23: 2
i.129 1
1.21. "
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'Schedule A section descriptions rC ,li- :
0. Food and live animals : Cntr.avli and rlzt'. a pr .--aui P F
1. Beverages and tobacco t. ..raJ.acure. i,-C.=: la. G,a it 'n ,5f sv aiatle al
2. Crude materials, inedible .,.t r..I- Mfihar.er% an3 tran-prt .rEulpnr.ent
3. Mineral fuels, lubricants, rja ,iacir -.r,-ria.i 8 it- llunt .u .aruliacturra irticlec, % i P F
4. Oils and fats--animal anc ,.,- r- I.. I ,a'mofit.' o r l.a 'asi-- rtn' J I rlasSIe1 .-lE'heere
2Adjusted for >. ,...-n l jnd .'rkirl, -g as warl.,-l.l. u*. nc Esasiunall\ 3njuEt."ier-3 f actt rs inrruo ac. r. .ip .nuuars I1'l AajJu s m-enit factors have not been
applied to data .r F rIf.Li at 1 .c '',s 3 ,. 3n,jl tuI. [(i tI.. absr,.p. of i dt ntifaf ijDl taonal c..tt ern: Tb" oincthi seasonali) adjusted import
totals (c.l.tf.) pr..'r.teo in idles I ar.. 3 are a-rm.eo ., adding the co.iporent tovals presentea in Fr.j. taal. ISee footnote I at the bot toi of
page 5.) Annual ttlaln= .ar not shr.n for -easonali,. iaa.ted nats. nsbajiustea data -n.auld be usai fur ar,r.,,a totals.


Unadj I =d







GENERAL IMPORTS OF PETROLEUM AND SELECTED PETROLEUM PRODUCTS INTO
THE U.S. CUSTOMS AREA AND U.S. VIRGIN ISLANDS, UNADJUSTED

Monthly and cumulative to-date data on general imports la petroleum and selected petroleum products into the U.S Customs area
and into the U.S. Virgin Islands for the period January 1978 through the current month are presented in tne tables that follow Tables
1-A and 1 B present imports into the U.S Customs area and tables 2-A and 2-B present imports into the U S Virgin Islands. (it should
be noted that imports into the Virgin Islands are excluded from the regularly compiled foreign trade statistics and, therefore, are ex-
cluded from the data presented in tables 1 A and 1 8 as well as the other tables shown in the front of this report.-See "Explanation of
Statistics".

Effective with January 1979 statistics, certain changes were made in the commodity classifications (Schedule A and TSUSA) covering
petroleum products. These changes are reflected in the listing of classifications shown below Data presented in tables 1 B and 2 B which
follow reflect all changes in classifications. effective January 1979.


Schedule A and TSUSA Commodity Numbers Used in Compiling the Petroleum
Information Presented in This Report


Energy products

Schedule A No.


Nonenergy products

Schedule A No.


TSUSA No.


Crude petroleum and deriv-
atLves to be refined
333.0020
333.0040
334.5440


475.0510
475.1010
475.6510


Lubricating oils
334.5410 pt.

Lubricating greases
334.5410 pt.


475.4500


475.5500, u75.6000


Crude petroleum
333.0020
333.0040

Gasoline
334.1500

Jet fuel
334.1205

Kerosene
334.2000


Distillate fuel oil
334.3021

334.3045

Residual fuel oil
334.4050
334.4060

Propane and butane gas
341.0025

Liquid derivatives of
petroleum, n.e.s.
334.5430 pt.


475.0510
475.1010


4'5.2520, 475.2560


f475.2530
475.2550

.75.3000


475.0525
475.0525
475.1015
475.1025

475.0535
475.1035


Paraffin and other mineral
waxes
335.1225 pt.
335.1245


Naphthas
334.5420

Asphalt
335.4500


All other petroleum products
(pitch of tar coke, non-
liquid hydrocarbon mix-
tures, and calcined petro-
leum and coal coke not for
fuel)
335.3000 pt.
334.5430 pt.
598.5020 pt.


475.1525, .75.1535,
475.1545


475.6530


TSUSA No.


494.2200
494.2400



475.3500



521.1100


401.6200
475.7000
517.5120
517.5140












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