United States foreign trade

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Material Information

Title:
United States foreign trade
Alternate title:
United States foreign trade. FT900, Summary of United States export and import merchandise trade
Portion of title:
Summary of U.S. export and import merchandise trade
Abbreviated Title:
U.S. foreign trade, FT900, Summ. U.S. export import merch. trade
Physical Description:
13 v. : ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of the Census
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census :
For sale by the Subscriber Services Section (Publications), Bureau of the Census
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Creation Date:
July 1979
Publication Date:
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Imports -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Exports -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Commerce -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
statistics   ( marcgt )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Issued also to depository libraries in microfiche.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Dec. 1976-
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Ceased in 1988.
General Note:
"FT 900."
General Note:
Description based on: Jan. 1979; title from caption.
General Note:
Beginning with July 1980 for sale by the Supt. of Docs., U.S.G.P.O.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Mar. 1988.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001320869
notis - AGH1745
oclc - 07222812
lccn - 81646118
issn - 0730-3270
sobekcm - AA00005268_00001
Classification:
ddc - 382/.0973/00212
System ID:
AA00005268:00033

Related Items

Preceded by:
Summary of U.S. export and import merchandise trade
Succeeded by:
U.S. merchandise trade. Seasonally adjusted imports and exports


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
IW. 960--79- 9
UNITED STATES FOREIGN TRADE

j- Summary of U.S. Export and


2 m; Import Merchandise Trade


JULY 1979
For wvre transmission 2:30 P.M. Tuesday, Augusi 28. 1979.


id Unadjusted Data
petroleum and petroleum products)


F.A.S. EXPORTS AND F.A.S. IMPORTS
Seasonally Adjusted
.T e Bureau of the Census, Department of Commerce an-
annced today that during July 1979, exports on a f.a.s.
i(fte alongside ship) U.S. port of exportation value
1asiS, excluding Department of Defense (DOD) Military
Assistance Program Grant-Aid shipments, amounted to
$.15.,668.9 million and that general imports on a f.a.s.
foreign port of expqrtation value basis, amounted to
:$1:6,776.6 million.1 3
i'Based on the above export and import figures, the
July merchandise trade balance was in deficit by $1 ,107.7
million.1 2 3
During the first 7-months of 1979 (January-July), exports
on a seasonally adjusted basis were at an annual rate
of $170,643 million, a level about 19 percent higher
than the calendar year 1978 total of $143,575 million.
.uImports for the January-July 1979 period were at an
Annual rate of $192,690 million, an increase of about 12
percent over the calendar year 1978 total of $172,026
Mil lion.
For the 4-month period, April-July 1979, exports averaged
$14,612.8 million per month, about 8 percent higher than
the $13,593.3 million average reported for the preceding
.4-month period, December 1978-March 1979. Imports on a
f.a.s. value basis, averaged $16,522.9 million per month
i. for the current 4-month period, a level about 8 percent
higher than the $15,335.6 million average reported for
the preceding 4-month period.1 2 3

Unadjusted
Exports excluding Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid
I, shipments decreased from $15,344.5 million in June to
$14,725.7 million in July. With Military Assistance
Program Grant-Aid shipments included, exports decreased
from $15,365.9 million in June to $14,731.8 million in
July. General imports decreased from $17,435.6 million
in June to $17,115.0 million in July.
Note : Footnotes 1, 2, and 3 are shown at the bottom
of page 5.


F.A.S. EXPORTS AND C.I.F. IMPORTS
Seasonally Adjusted


The Bureau of the Census, Department of Commerce an-
nounced today that during July 1979, exports on a f.a.s.
(free alongside ship) U.S. port of exportation value
basis, excluding Department of Defense (DOD) Military
Assistance Program Grant-Aid shipments, amounted to
$15,668.9 million and that general imports on a c.i.f.
(cost, insurance, and freight) U.S. Dort of entry value
basis, amounted to $17,823.2 million. 3
Based on the above export and import figures, the
July merchandise trade balance was in deficit by $2,154.3
million.1 2 3
During the first 7-months of 1979 (January-July), exports
on a seasonally adjusted basis were at an annual rate
of $170,643 million, a level about 19 percent higher
than the calendar year 1978 total of $143,575 million.
Imports for the January-July 1979 period were at an
annual rate of $204,742 million, an increase of about 12
percent over the calendar year 1978 total of $183,137
million.
For the 4-month period, April-July 1979, exports averaged
$14,612.8 million per month, about 8 percent higher than
the $13,593.3 million average reported for the preceding
4-month period, December 1978-March 1979. Imports on a
c.i.f. value basis, averaged $17 ,5r.8 million per month
for the current 4-month period, 'dp vel about 8 percent
higher than the $16 ,309 .1"millionrqerage reported for
the preceding 4-month period.1 2 3 ~

Unadjusted
Exports excluding Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid
shipments decreased from $15,344.5 million in June to
$14 ,725.7 million in July. With Military Assistance
Program Grant-Aid shipments included, exports decreased
from $15,365.9 million in June to $14,731.8 million in
July. General imports decreased from $18,507.7 million
in June to $18,182.4 million in July.


(0 U.S. Department
at of Commerce
m BUREAU OF
\ / THE CENSUS


Inquiria concerning these figures should be addrmsed to the Chief, Foreign Trade Division, Bureau of
the Census, Washington. D.C. 20233. Tel: Area Code 301. 763-5140; 763-7754; and 763-7755.
For ale by the Subscriber Services Section (Pulications), Bureau of the Qnsus, Washington, D.C.
20233, or any U.S. Department of Comerce district office. Potage tanps Not ceptable; currency
umittd at snder's risk. Remittances from foreign countries must be by international money order
or by a draft on a U.S. bnk. Price 30 cents per copy. Annual subscription (FT 900.975. 985. and 986
combined) $14.90.


(Including


,4IL,









EXPLANATION OF STATISTICS


IMPORT STATISTICS

Coverage

The U.S. import statistics reflect both government and
nongovernment imports of merchandise from foreign countries
into the U.S. Customs territory, which includes the 50 States;
the District of Columbia. and Puerto Rico. The U.S. import
statistics exclude imports into the Virgin Islands, Guam,*.
American Samoa, and other U.S. possessions; and shipments
between the United States and Puerto Rico, between the United
States and U.S. possessions. and between any of these outlying
areas. (Data on U.S. trade with Puerto Rico and the Virgin
Islands of the United States are published separately in Report
FT 800. Additional data on such trade and on imports into the
Virgin Islands from foreign countries are presented in reference
tabulations.) Data on imports of petroleum and selected
petroleum products, including shipments into the Virgin Islands
from foreign countries, are included in this report effective with
the January 1976 statistics (previously shown in former Report
FT 900-Supplement).
The U.S. import statistics also exclude American goods re-
turned to the United States by its Armed Forces; intransit ship-
ments through the United States when documented as such
with Customs; temporary shipments; transactions not con-
sidered to be of statistical significance, such as shipments of
personal and household effects; low-valued nondutiable im-
ports by mail; and issued monetary coins of all component
metals.

Inclusion of Gold in the Statistics

Effective with the statistics for January 1978. imports of
nonmonetary gold (in such forms as ore. scrap and base bullion,
nonmonetary refined bullion, etc.) which were previously
excluded, are now included in the statistics. Imports of silver mn
these forms have been included since January 1969. Additional
information regarding the inclusion of gold in the 1978 statistics
appears in the January 1978 issues of Report FT 990 and
FT 135.

General Init s/Impo.ts For Consumption

The statistics on U.S imports are presented in terms of both
"General Imports" and "Imports for Consumption." General
imports are a combination of entries for immediate con-
sumption and entries into Customs bonded warehouses, and
thus generally reflect total arrivals of merchandise. Imports for
consumption are a combination of entries for immediate
consumption and withdrawals from warehouses for con-
sumption. and thus generally reflect the total of the com-
modities entered into U.S. consumption channels.
Source Of Import Information

The official U.S. import statistics are compiled by the Bureau
of the Census from copies of the import entry and warehouse
withdrawal forms which importers are required by law to file
with Customs officials. The information as to country of origin,
net quantity, value, and commodity classification is verified by
Customs officials on entries filed for transactions valued over
$250, which are ordinarily subject to examination for Customs


appraisement purposes. The statistical copy of the entry is
corrected if it does not accurately reflect the information
called for by the statistical requirements.

Import Valuation
-J'
F.a.s. Import Value.-The f.a.s. (free alongside ship) value
*'. represents the transaction value of imports at the foreign port of
.. exportation. It is based on the purchase price, i.e., the actual
transaction value and generally includes all charges incurred in
.plaoWg the merchandise alongside the carrier at the port of
exportation in the country of exportation.

C.i.f. Import Value.-The c.i.f. (cost, insurance, and freight)
value represents the value of imports at the first port of entry in
the United States. It is based on the purchase price and includes
all freight, insurance, and other charges (excluding U.S. import
duties) incurred in bringing the merchandise from the country
of exportation and generally placing it alongside the carrier at
the first port of entry in the United States. If the merchandise
was acquired in a transaction between related parties, the
purchase price used in deriving the c.i.f. value is based on an
arm's-length equivalent transaction price, i.e., a price which
would exist between unrelated buyers and sellers.

Import Commodity Information

Import data are initially reported in terms of the commodity
classifications in the Tariff Schedules of the United States An-
notated (TSUSA). which is an official publication of the U.S.
International Trade Commission, embracing the legal text of
the Tariff Schedules of the United States together with statis-
tical annotations. The TSUSA data are rearranged and presented
in this report in terms of totals for the I-digit commodity
sections in Schedule A, Statistical Classification of Commoditiesc
Imported Into the United States, which is based upon the
Standard International Trade Classification (SITC), Revision 2,
effective with the statistics for January 1978. Prior to January
1978, Schedule A was based upon the former SITC, Revised.

Date of Importation and Import Monthly Carryover

It is the objective of the compiling procedures to include
shipments, insofar as practicable, in the statistics for the actual
month of importation (or the month of withdrawal in the case
of warehouse withdrawals for consumption). Prior to 1978, the
date of Customs official acceptance of the import entry
documents was used to determine the statistical month in which
the shipments were included. Effective with the January 1978
statistics, the date of importation as reported on the import
entries is being used to determine the statistical month.
However, since under the Customs "immediate-delivery" pro-
cedures importers may file the import entry up to 10 workdays
after the date of release of the merchandise, some documents
for merchandise imported during the last few days of a given
month ma, not be received in time for inclusion in the statistics
for that AInonth. As a result, there is a carryover, estimated at
about 15 percent from the actual month of importation Io a
subsequent month. In addition, processing problems (e.g., late
filing of documents, rejection of a shipment by the computer
because the data fail to meet certain edit criteria established to








protect the accuracy of the sjltisincs, etc ) contribute to an
additional Larr)over of dbout 5 percent (in terms ol value) of
shipments from the reported month of imporlation (or with-
drawal from warehouse) it a subsequent month. usuallN the
succeeding month. These limitations should be borne in mind
when making month-l.to-month .Lonparisons

Cumulations of data over at least 4-month periods are desir-
able to identify underlying trends. Month-to-month changes in
imports, exports, and similar series often reflect primarily
irregular movements, e.g.. exogenous events such as strikes.
differences in monthly carryover, etc.


Estimated Data for Imports Valued Under S251

The overall import and Schedule A Section 9 totals include
sample estimates for shipments valued under $251. Therefore,
they are subject to sampling error, estimated at less than
one-tenth of one percent for the unadjusted overall total and
about one percent for the unadjusted Schedule A Section 9
total. This means that we can have about 67 percent confidence
that the published unadjusted overall totals and the unadjusted
Schedule A Section 9 totals differ by less than one-tenth of a
percent and one percent, respectively, from the totals that
would have resulted from a complete tabulation. The statistics
on imports of petroleum and petroleum products included in
this report reflect fully compiled data and, therefore, are not
subject to sampling error.



EXPORT STATISTICS

Coverage
The export statistics reflect, in general, both government and
nongovernment exports of domestic and foreign merchandise
from the U.S. Customs territory (includes the 50 States, the
District of Columbia. and Puerto Rico) to foreign countries,
whether the exportation involves a commercial transaction or
not. The statistics, therefore, include Department of Defense
Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid shipments, shipments for
economic assistance under the Foreign Assistance Act and
shipments of agricultural commodities under P.L. 480 (The
Agricultural Trade Development and Assistance Act of 1954, as
amended) and related laws. The following are excluded from the
statistics: Shipments to U.S. Armed Forces and diplomatic
missions abroad for their own use, shipments between the
United States and Puerto Rico. between the United States and
its possessions (including the Virgin Islands). and between these
outlying areas: exports from U.S. possessions; intransit ship-
ments through the United States; transactions not considered to
be of statistical importance, such as personal and household
effects; temporary exports; low-valued or non-commercial
exports by mail; and issued monetary coins of all component
metals.

Inclusion of Gold in the Statistics.

As indicated above for imports, effective with the statistics
for January 1978, exports of nonmonetary gold (in such forms
as ore. scrap and base bulbon, nonmonetary refined bullion,
etc.) which were previously excluded, are included in the


statistics. Exports of silver in these forms have been included
since January 1969. Additional information regarding the
inclusion of gold in the 1978 statistics appears in the January
1978 issues of Report FT 990 and FT 410.

Definition of Exports of Domestic and Foreign Merchandise

Exports of domestic merchandise include commodities which
are grown, produced, or manufactured in the UnitedStates. and
commodities of foreign origin which have been changed in the
United States from the form in which they were imported. or
which have been enhanced in value by further manufacture in
the United States. Exports of foreign merchandise consist of
commodities of foreign origin which have entered the United
States as imports and which, at the time of exportation, are in
substantially the same condition as when imported.

Source of Export Information

The official U.S. export statistics are compiled by the Bureau
of the Census primarily from copies of Shipper's Export
Declarations which are required to be filed with Customs
officials, except for Department of Defense Military Assistance
Program Grant-Aid shipments which are reported directly to the
Bureau of the Census by the Department of Defense and
shipments by qualified exporters who have been authorized to
submit data in the form of magnetic tape, punched cards, or
monthly Shipper's Summary Export Declarations directly to
the Bureau of the Census.

Export Valuation
F.a.s. Export Value. -The value reported in the export statistics
generally is equivalent to a f.a.s. (free alongside ship) value at
the U.S. port of export, based on the transaction price,
including inland freight, insurance and other charges incurred in
placing the merchandise alongside the carrier at the U.S. port of
exportation.

Export Commodity Information
Beginning January 1978, export commodity information
is collected in terms of the commodity classifications in the
1978 edition of Schedule B, Statistical Classification of Do-
mestic and Foreign Commodities Exported from the United
States, which is based on the framework of the classification
system in the Tariff Schedules of the United States (TSUS).
In this report, the Schedule B data are rearranged and presented
in terms of totals for the 1-digit commodity sect ionsin Schedule
E, which is based upon the Standard International Trade Classi-
fication (SITC), Revision 2, effective with the statistics for
January 1978. Prior to January 1978, the export classifications
in Schedule B were based upon the organizational framework
of the former SITC, Revised.

Export Monthly Carryover
It is the objective of the compiling procedures to include
shipments, insofar as practicable, in the statistics for the actual
month of exportation. For purposes of the statistics, the month
of exportation is generally based on the date when the shipment
leaves the United States. (For vessel or air shipments it is the
date when the carrier departs or is cleared from the port of
export.) However, as indicated above for imports, because of








processing problems (e.g., late receipt ,'f a document for an
end-of-month shipment, rejection of a shipment by the com-
puter because the data fail to meet certain edit criteria
established to protect the accuracy of the statistics, etc.). there
is an overall average carryover of about 2 to 3 percent (in terms
of value) of the shipments from the actual month of exporta-
tion to a subsequent month. usually the succeeding month.
These limitations should be borne in mind when making
month-to-month comparisons
Cumulations of data over at least 4-month periods are
desirable to identify underlying trends. Month-to-month
changes in imports, exports, and similar series often reflect
primarily irregular movements, differences in monthly
carryover, etc.

Estimated Data for Export Shipments

Effective with the March 1979 statistics, the overall export
and Schedule E section and division totals include sample est.
mates for shipments valued $501-1 1.999 to Canada and for slhp-
ments valued $501.$999 to countries other than Canada. Data
for shipments valued $500 and under to all countries are also
estimated, based on established percentages of individual
country totals, and included in the Schedule E Section 9 totals
regardless of the commodity exported It is estimated that the
unadjusted overall total is subject to a sampling error of less
than one-tenth of one percent. and the unadjusted Schedule E
section or division totals are subject to sampling errors of about
one percent. In addition, the Schedule E Section 9 total is sub-
ject to possible error in the estimated data for shipments valued
$500 and under: and the overall total, and the individual totals
for sections other than Section 9, to a more limited extent.
Such $500 and under shipments represent about I percent of
the total value of exports, and about 30 percent of the Schedule
E Section 9 total. Prior to the March 1979 statistics. the overall
export and Schedule E section and division totals include
sample estimates for shipments valued 251-$1 .999 to Canada
and for shipments valued $251.$,099 to countries othiei than
Canada.


SOURCES OF ERROR IN THE STATISTICS

Monthly import and export figures are subject to the
possibility of errors which may arise from sources other than
sampling errors. discussed above. Among these are errors in the
reporting and/or processing of information as to commodity.
classification, value and other statistical factors. month of
inclusion (see paragraphs on import and export carryover.
above), and the undercounting of exports to Canada due to the
non-receipt of Shipper's Export Declarations For 1978.
the undercounting is estimated to be about $2 billion dollars.
In the case of imports the information as to value and
commodity classification (as well as country of ongin and net
quantity) is verified by Customs officials on entries filed for
transactions valued over $250 which are ordinarily> subject to
examination for Customs appraisement purposes, thus con-
siderably reducing the possibility of error. In addition, the
procedures used to compile both the import and export sta.
tistics include clerical and computer processing checks designed
to protect the accuracy of the statistics to the fullest practicable
extent.


Adjustment for Seasonal and Working-Day Variation

Monthly totals for exports and imports and major com-
modity components (Schedule E and Schedule A section totals)
are shown adjusted for seasonal/working-day variation. Effec-
tive with the release of the January 1979 statistics, the seasonally
adjusted export and import totals represent the sum of com-
modity components adjusted for seasonal and working-day
variation Previously, the monthly totals for exports and tin-
ports were adjusted independently of the components. The
procedure of aggregating seasonally adjusted commodity com-
ponents more accurately reflects the seasonal movements within
the totals Under this procedure, only those section totals that
show identifiable seasonal patterns are seasonally adjusted.


MERCHANDISE TRADE BALANCES

Two trade balances are presented in this report:
I) The balance between exports based on f.a.s. values and
imports based on f.a.s. values.
2) The balance between exports based on t.a.s. values and
imports based on c.i.f. values with adjustments for imports from
affiliated sellers abroad to reflect arms-length equivalent prices.
Both balances are useful for certain purposes. The first
balance corresponds to a measurement of the international
payments or credit flows resulting from merunandise trade
between the U.S. and foreign countries. The second balance is
based on concepts similar to those used by most foreign
countries, and therefore provides a reference for comparison
with the trade balances published by those countries.



REVISIONS TO THE STATISTICS

Under the revision policy adopted effective with the 1977
statistics, revisions to the monthly statistics for the current year
will be issued once a year. i.e.. with the reports for June of the
following year. Thus. revisions to 1979 statistics will be issued
onl) in June 1980.



SOURCES OF FURTHER INFORMATION

AJJddiiionial t-reigil r.ade statistics and iforuriiltion regarding
.stela C %.lailu ii, Jamiiri1li aiJd quafliiatloll S wlillli should
he cominidderd h\ iMsci of tlie statilstics are intntained primarily
ini te iallowing pitblh.iiimon Report FT 900. Highlts of U.S.
L ,prit aJnd limipoit Traid. FT I.15. U.S General Imports.
S.hledkdil .\ Cimmiiiamodilt h\ Counilr. FT -410. LI S. Exports.
Sih'dikl' Cmiiiiiiodl b. Couiiiir,. and lthe Guide to Foreign
Tui de Si. isc, Intlli naiiiii regarding additional sources of
.lilti '.[ tIe im-lIthodolo's u1 'd l se-auion ll, adjusting the data.
and other matters relating to10 foreign trade statistics may be
obtained from the Foreign Trade Division. Bureau of the
Census. Waslhington. D.C. 20233.











Table 1. U.S. Exports (f.a.s. Value Basis), General Imports (f.a.s. and c.i.f. Value Basis), and Merchandise

Trade Balance, Adjusted for Seasonal and Working-Day Variation, by Month: January 1978

to July 1979

fIn million of dollars. See Explanaton of Statistics for Information on coverage, date of lmportat on, definitions of export and import values and
trade balances, and sources of error tn the data)

F.a.3. [xportE: .r, .= irp ri i : F a Export. anu c.. f i-pr.r -
.Sea'oar31i l.aju.-t,:-.j (Seasonall ijUst al
Period
p rti ., r Traaj. Tra3
[sport-_ Igrt. E r '', balt-.,r


19-6

January-July........ .... ... ... .... 76,301.3 98,313P ,C0.1.9 -8, ul. 10-,22..3 -o,-. 2.u

January.. . .. .... ... h L3 1 .c 3, 8 13 L3,Q .. 63.0
February.......... .. ., L. 25.9. --. .31 :. .i .0 .- 2.8.
March......... ... ... .11 i.c 1.. 00...1 2 .;o. ll .c 1.. 893.2 -3 '-6 -
April ........... .. t, 6 .- -, -91. -2 8'.i 1 t 1 3" 1 -3-..0 -3 803.C
Ma, **. .... .. .... .. .8* 0 1. -2 22 L 11 '3 1- 1.91 .o9 3. 126.6
June... ... .... 1_. 21.2 i3,9g 0.] ,.G L 2 1 : 1-.669..- 60 .2

July.......... .... .. .. ..3 L 5... -..3 L" L-L L ". 95.. -3 i83 9
August .. ... .. .. .. .. .L ..i -. 32.o -. 839 '. 1. .3]. l .073.. -2 7'9.9
September.......... 13 2... -. L 1 13 2 0 -2.3-6.3
October... ... ....... ... .. 12 "l .l I 3. 1.6 -l L; .i.l 1 L 3.8 -2,.,.2.
Nove ,ber............ .. .. .l ... i O a 1..82..7 -1 3- I .1.-:, I -2,319.1
December... .. .... .. ... .. .13. 28.. .0. 31.8 9. A3 02.6. L .i ,'i .2 -2. -23.

19'9

January-Jul. ......... .. L -. ,, .

January ......... ... ... .. .. .. 13 to, 3 -3 i9-. 3 3 1 31.8 28I. 4 -.. L ..i
February .......... ....... .... .. -,, 6 .80 3 l .. -- I ,
March ... ....... ... . 2.0 1 73. -81.. L ,-, 2.,' I o, -1 ;6..
April .................. .... ..... L 3, 82. 1. o 3 .8 -., L53.2 0., I jj L -3, 170.5
Ma .. .. .............. ........ .. ..... .'.l O 3 i. ,-.9.8 i ,, r,' I ,j- .i = -3 ,48 .3
June .......... ... ....... ..... ............. .. .i0 b It ,9-''.- l ,9"'.J : ,0i:.a "i,') .-W -., .q.6
June . . . 1 -. .. 3 6 i L. .L. I 3q .

AUcUbst ............... .. ........ .
Sept ber .................. .....
October .. ............. .. .... ...
November ......................... ......
Deceirbe r...... .................

Export dara rspreseat doiit ic and fore *n .'erch ,ar.l i E ui r. [1 riiprr.r -[ St-nie foiI M ri iri s-I r,- Pracr .nLrar r-1 \ ri hirert.
Import dat a repre'er,[ enterrl ,pcport i erchanaIso .
'The toati shown in rh [sole are 3. rired by b nOirs, the ,ea-oriili a.3u-lteua co-a,.sit cc,,pr.oenrt a- inor, Ir. tible for exports and taDles 5 ana
6 for inporrts. Ste isornote I at the Deotomr of pare ,




Export and import Tatistlical series are adjusted lor seasonal and working-dav varialinn out not for changes in price level Refleting a ne* methodology. iritrtoduced wiln stalisics for January 1979 the
adjusted monthly export and import ltols for 1978 and 1979 presented in this report are derived by adding The seasonally adjusted components I. e SITC sections) The factors used to adjust the 1918 1979
component series represent the cambinalion of seasonal adjustment factors developed from monthly data throu,]h 1978 and the appropriate workirg-day factors. In %sues ofl th. report prior to January 1979,
monthly totals were adjusted independently of the components
'Cumulations of data over at least 4 monrn periods are desirable to identity underlying trends Montn to month changes in exports imports. and similar seiies otte-n reflect primal t irregular movements,
differences in monthly carryovr,. etc Recent monlh to month percent changes in the overall seasonally adjusted export and import series are presented in the fillowning lable ilth average percent month to-
month rise and decline over longer periods shown for companion The averages eAclude percentage changes lor Ill) the period October December 1977 because o a3bnoiralilies in the data due to elleris of
dock strikes and (2) periods when negjlgible inhnges Iero percent in the level of exporti/imports occurred

Month-to-month Average monthly rates of change


Average Average months 12 months
Series June-July May-June Apr.-May lMasr.-Apr. rise decline Mar. 1979- 1July o-
7rise decline Mlar. 1979- Jul9 %1 78-
197'9 1979 1979 1977-1978 1972-1977 July 1979 July 1979

(Percent) (Percent) (Percent) (Percent) (Percent) (Percent) (Percent) (Percent)



F.a.s. export value.. -..2 +8.5 -0,1 -3.9 +4.6 -5.4 .2.- .2,6
F.a.s. import value.. -1.0 +3.6 +1.9 +5.0 +6.4 -3.3 .i.. .1.3
C.i.f. import value.. -...9 +3.6 +1.7 +5.1 +6.4 -3.4 .. .1.-

'See the Explanation of Statistics" tor definitions of The export and import values and trade balances.










Table 2. U.S. Exports (f.a.s. Value Basis) of Merchandise Showing Department of Defense (DOD)

Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid Shipments, by Month: January 1978 to July 1979


tin millions of dollars. Sce ExTpl nation of StatlEtics for information on coverage, definition of f.a.s. export value, and sources of error in
the data. Unadjusted totals represent sum of unrounded figures and hence may vary slightly from suim of rounded amounts)

Exports excluding DOD Exports Including
Grant-Aid' DOD Grant-Aid' DOD Grant-Aid


Period Domestic Domestic Domestic
and and Domestic, ana Domestic, Western Other
seasoreign foreign, unadjusted foreign, unadjusted Total urope countries
adjusted: unadjusted rjjaajuated


19'8

r r r.. .. i' 1-3. 7 .6 1.1.008.Q 1.1.6o 9 9 141, 15-..2 85.3 -0.1. .4.9

Janu.rN- i.l ........ ... .......... .8,301.3 76,90'.6 72,501.9 '8,961.1 77,555..* 53.5 17.9 35.7

January.............................. 9,863.7 9.36-.. 9.21-.. 9.366.9 9,216.6 2.5 0.5 2.1
February............................. 9,945.0 9.il-.b Q,337.8 9,518.5 9.341.7 3.9 1.3 2.7
March ................................. 11,146.5 12.07...2 1L.830.5 12 079.- 11,83} 8 5.2 0 5 4.8
April.......................... 11.630.. 12,064 2 11.85-.1 L2.069.7 li.859.6 5 0.7 4.8
May..... .... ........ 11 786 12..76.9 12.23-.3 L2 -.9 .6 12.250.0 15.1 1.0 L..?
June..... .. .. .. .... 12,268.2 l, --. 3 12.261.' 12,-8'.3 12 271.7 10.1 6.5 3.5

July. .. ...................... 11,661.5 10.93..0 10.769.. 10.94'. 10,780.0 10.6 7.4 3.2
August ...................... 12,293.7 11.613.9 11, 21-.. 11,621.8 11,.29.3 7.9 6.5 L.4
Sepr-r.ticr ...................... .. 13,274.2 12.713. 1 12,50s.. 12,71-. 12.505.7 1.3 (Z) 1.3
October .................... .......... 12,901.1 L3. 15i.6 12.922.6 ,13. 57... 12.92o.4. 3.8 1.5 2.3
November............................. 13,450.6 13,.6 i.- 3...6.Li 13,672.3 13 .33.5 16.9 L-.3 2.6
December............................. 13,282.5 l3.531.0 13. 3 2 L 13.532.9 13.303.9 1.8 0.1 1.7

1979

January-July......................... 99,541.8 li. .: ] -6 -' i%'"', -... .-.'. u 5.. 19 3.5

January.............................. 13,131.8 12.558.1 12,3.9.- 12.561.3 12,352.i 3.2 L.0 2.2
February.......................... ... i', 046 6 1.. 6 5 i .".,.'. 1 2 1 4.0 2.0 1.9
March................................ l.-,-5 15,58-.- 1,2 97.8 15,566. 15,300.1 i.3 0.7 1.7
April................................ 13,882.6 1-,'25 1-,010.5 1-,207.3 1-.,020.8 u1 .3 8.9 1.5
May................................... 13,862.1 1- ,81 .9 l-,52q.0 1..818.9 l-.,53'.9 5.9 3.5 2.4
June................................. 15,037.6 15,l .5 i5,081.1 15,365.9 15,102'. 21.5 2.0 19.5

July................................. 15,668.9 !. .: -. o'. 1- 1 .....*.'* 0 I 1.6 .. 4
August............ ................
September............................
October..............................
November............................
December .............................

Z Less than one half of unit of measurement shown.

lRepresents only export shipments from the United Stat.s rt3 difiErs frro.i DOD Milit..ry Asitince Frograr t Crnt-Aid shipment figures under this
program as follows: (a) Transfers of the material procure.d outis 'ne I'ritea State? And lradrler, fro, DOD Der.aeas stocks from export shipments.
(b) Export value is f.a.s., whereas DOD value, in most intarces, is f o b., poinr of origin, ict Data for ahlpmens reported b) the DOD for a
given month are included in Bureau of Census reports in rn.e second month sunsequenr to the i..ontn reported by DOD.
2The seasonally adjusted totals shown in this column are derived by adding the seasonally adjusted coriF.nxlty components as shour. in table 4. See
foornore L at the bottom of page 5.
Anr.r.ual totals are not shown for seasonally adjusted dat.. Lr.ad.tutea data should be used for annual totals.











Table 3. U.S. Imports of Merchandise, by Month: January 1978 to July 1979

(In millions of dollars. See Explanation of StatisticL for information on coverage, date of importation, definitions of f.a.s. and c.l.f. Import
values, and sources of error in the data. Unadjusted totals represent sum of unrounded figures and hence may vary slightly from sum of rounded
amounts)


F.a.s. value C.i.f. value


Period General import! Imports General Imports Imports
ior for
Seasonally Lnadjustea consumption. Seasonally ULnadjusted onsumnptlon,
adjusted n ur.adju.steo aijustea un ad )u ted


l '6

January-December....................... ... 1," 2,. ,i I 1A3 [3' 3 l6., '" r.5

January-July......... .. .. .. ..... .9... .6,381. 9, -n.0 i's, 9L. l-. .I lu-,'. ; -'.S

January.................................. 3. L.)?.'. 12, .1 13 .2r l L3,3l ..9 13 39-.
February....................... ...... .. ... .1. 3.a c 13 itL -. l L3.,:. L. b2 3 1-. 160.2
March..................................... L-. .1 l- : .. ,',..j 1- .3 15,-. i. 1 -.92.-
Apr l .................................... L. 1 .8 J -. l' LS ,1 .. 0.5.., l -1).
May...................................... 1-. .....3 tV 0-9.2. i I*.. i .. '..
June...................................... .3.i -. l3, 0- 9 L- .3. -. 50.2 1 l .-

July................................... ....1..--. IL., 'A 5 554.3 1 .. L; 06'.9 H .646.3
August........................... ... ..... L. 132 t L- '-.'. L-..'3 1 l c i-.'i 9.- L-,9 ..
September................................ L.. i9 l-.-L'.i 1-. -- L. '.8 .393.0 l -AM0.O
October.................................. 1. 8:1 i. lLs.. li 1, L "3 T- 13. 'J '.3 ,I C-3-.2
November................................. .. a,... li,. I 9 li, .'' ti li 0-9.I)
December................................. 0u31.8 l-,"... 3 1. L r,,i ,. ',. o. 5i,8 3



January-Jul ...... ............ .. ........ .2 .! ..- .. .,. ,

January.................................. Lr 23L. l l5.8 o. i:. 5 .i L.281.i t .8 2 1, i 6o4 "
February................................. ._ i., b.. :. ,. -. J- -. -l. -
March.................................... L..... ., Is.- ',,. .S 5,'.-t.t it, :I, l '-: 16,597. 0
April.................................... i.. L 1 .' 5,9s- i 1 17,1 3-.. 17,01 .
Maye...................................... 6. ,I .9 I. 511. 1 ", .. I ,'.9 ." L 3 .


July ....................................... .. I L P I % l' i-
August ...................................
September................................
October..................................
November.................................
December .................................

IfThe 5eacnal iv aaiust.E ro's'r ai -horn n r .' clcui'r. arc or riena ns I.dsirw The 's.a'ona i ia iiir-ac .oc'aCi C .r.'-nI ni..- in rtsbles 5'na 6. see
footnote I st bottom '.r pace ,.
'Annual totals are not -hc.r,n lr -=e-onallv asjur.r-i atia. '.'r.1i.-i'[ cl Ja3a ;h,.ula be used tor -nnual r.ota1s.








8


Table 4. U.S. Exports (F.a.s. Value) of Domestic Merchandise, Schedule E Sections, Excluding

Department of Defense Military Grant-Aid Shipments and Foreign Merchandise (Reexports),

Seasonally and Unadjusted by Month: January 1978 to July 1979

1In .1ilnI of ..ollars. Sec Fxplan.iur. -I -:Elatitilc for Iniormanton an coverage. definition ai E.a.... export value, and source of error La the
at a una iL .'tn tota] a rep.reent c'. o't unr:*unded f figures arn hence may vary -=ightly from -n of. rounaea amount s

Schedule I[ action "


a I3 3 : 6 6 8 9: oreIgn'
(reexport s)

sea.'onral Ii aaju.teo

L' 6

Janu- arv- i .. 10,-62.3 1220 I 6,-10.0 1,929.9 v'- :- 6, '?.'. 6,791.? 32,270.1 5,55-.0 2,611.9 1,u05.7
Janu r ... ... 1.120. 1-1.- 1.069 0 2..8.r0 6 J 893.5 895.1 ..093.1 '2..0 432.3 150.3
renruiry .. 1,339.8 1 '.0 1,02 .i 1 1.0 "'.2 911.5 910 3 -. 156.0 7.2.9 236.0 176.8
Ma r .... ..... 1..31.3 11.3 1. 18.9 200.5 1.1 5 9-. .2 '60.9 -.. 56.4 7.7.9 3s9.9 2.3.7
Aprzi ....... .. ......... 78." 161.8 1,260.1 2-1.0 1-,.- 9s2." 961.2 -,8-3.7 826.2 509.1 210.1
May ..... ....... .. .. 1,69'.6 Hi.e, l. 1o.. 318.. 119.3 9"..8 1.021.6 ..,59.9 855 b 309.0 2t.4.6
e .. ...... .... ... 1. 79-.. 1B9. 1,38'.2 384.8 132.1 1,027.4 1.03k 5 .907.8 819.2 392.4 215.6
Juiy...... ..... .. ... .. 1 599.8 19'.3 1,16-..9 j2..4. 1)0.7 1 063.-. 1.003.6 4,853.2 808.2 34.9.2 164.6
Agoc. ... ... ...... .... .. l. 1 78.6 220.6 1.261.2 33. 120.9 1. 138.9 1.070. ? ..992.2 892.- 329.9 192.5
..-prewr r. .. .... ...... 1 698.3 i'8.5 1.4-0'. 33b.9 156.3 1.237.5 1.t'O.3 5,269.0 918.7 202.5 208.7
Octu o r .. ..... .. .. 1 65.0 220.8 I,.0. 1 31'0.3 113.9 1. 1.8.1 1, 106.. 5.-25.1 9-b.5 323.9 231.0
rovem.o.r .. ......... 1,..1 .. "20.2 L,)10.7 -0 0 121..' 1,228.5 1.1.8.1 5.b0-.. 931.6 625.3 238.9
Decer.r..r ..... ....... 1 .8,.4 206.O 1,l.99. -.00.3 1-7.0 1. 103.9 1, 186.6 5,676.5 940.. 407.2 228.9

1979

January-July .................. .. ... I s.9 6 : ._1 'r.' 9.2 ;' E1.87'"..'. .9. ''. I f-- U. 5 1. .6
January....................... 1.299.0 L36.0 1.533. .63 8 1-5.8 1,314.5 1.196.9 5.311.6 935.9 584.0 208.8
February...................... 1.11.; I 2 z, 4 3 !. 1-i.. 1,1 5.0 1.: 1 5.'6 6 0 96" 9 6 8 6 223.8
March.................... ... .,5-3.9 :20.6 ,bl0. 531.3 12;1.3 1.39L ..0 1,272.2 5,722.7 1,014.1 68&-. 286.6
April......................... ,531.-2 2 7.0 1,5fu. J ... 129.6 1 .277.0 1,191.B 5,65-.- 932.7 688.1 246.4
May........................... 9-.'. 212.9 ,-" -ii.. 10..-.- i. '3.? I, 5-'.6 5,535.3 1,004..- 7o-. 283.9
June........................ 1,97.1.2 11.8 1,"...7 -5-.0 167., l..63.3 l. 03.- 5,239.3 1,0J2.5 bo?7. 263.4
July.......................... .. .... .-. ,a I -. -'
August.......................
September....................
October... ...................
November.....................
December ....................

S'na:justlc

1978

January-December............. 18.333.2 1; ii2.6 3,6 6.. 1 -1.3 1. .r.L8.3 I I .: 5 .2 '. 10,1 7.1 5,0t. 8 2.505.7
January-July............. .... 10, -i' .5 1. 11.6 6.F .' L[, 8 ..0 56:.2 b,',8 '.U 6,8il.- 32,726.?7 5.6:10. 3 2,617.9 1.05.7
January.................. .... 1. 132.' 138.0 1.0-9.8 688.9 96.0 8 30. 829 8 3.851.1 665.- -32.3 150.3
February...................... 1. 271., IM .o 1.0'0 1. .0 9'.2 883.2 &8. 3.939.6 689.. 236.0 176.8
March................ ...... .. l..-0 21). 1.33 .,; t",'.2 1.1.5 1.0' 1.1 ,I 67.6 3. .0.1 86 8.2 389.9 2-3.1
April...................... .. 1 -.2 I 1- 3 1.38 .6., 26-.-. 1-j.- 3'1.3 988.- 5.09i. 85-..3 509.1 210.1
May........................ .. L..nd .i 1.3.0 1.-60 3t3 119.3 1 018.7 1,100'. .:.i 0 90 .b 309.0 2..-.6
June..................... '3' 1 1-.1 1,3 3 .-2..0 132.1 1.063. I 1 5 6b6.9 392.4 215.6
July................. .. ..... I 5.0 t 161.6 992. 321.1 130.' i.0'7.2 439.4 -'a 7. 77.5 3.9.2 L6-.6
August........................ I. 21' i : 2 1.'83.- 335.- 120.9 1, 1.4.1 1.024.' -..592.' 855.8 329.9 192.5
September................ .. l.. -;. ib26.9 ,L111.1 3-8.0 15', 3 1. 197.9 1.132.3 5.1. 1.5 891.1 702.5 208.7
October.................. L i 9'.9 ;251.3 1 ).- ..22.1 113.9 1.085.0 1.120.8 L.58-., 953.1 323.9 231.0
November................ ..... 1 L .7 12 1 1.18.. 465.9 121.0 l I;-.. 13..3 5..97.3 925.1 625.3 238.9
December................ ..... I j5 2 25.. i. .' 17.. 1.0'.0 1.137 0 186.6 5, '13.5 921.6 .07.2 228.9

1979'

January-July.................. i : -' .', ..-.** ..2-.1 ',u .. ..~ !" r u,= : I .'.6 a
January...................... 1.. 1) 1 5 i l a0.'. 340.2 i[- 1.235.6 1.121 -. .:,-i i 873.2 58..0 208.8
February................ .. i .1: i' j2' I .1' 1 f. 6 63 4, :23.6
March................... ..... 1,581.0 ;2J I, j7.5 ..j .' 17'.3 1,522.3 1,58 ..1 6,325.l 1, 13 6a-.5 286.6
April................... .. ;,'28.1 02. j ob.' -t .i. 129.6 1,289.8 1,228.5 5,8-3.9 965.3 n68.1 2.6.4
May...................... ,8l. ..6 o J I1 1,:26.7 -. 1 .' 10-.- 1,320.6 1.355.0 6,0-7.2 1,071.' e,..I 283.9
June........................ I,9 I 6 1,"- -.7 .1 .6 iB-'.r, 1,513.' 1.-66.1 5,988.1 1,07-.6 66''. 263.4
July .................... .... I :. ..-?" I .t 1. m 5 r. C.'1 6 236 4.
August ...................... .
September ................ ...
October......................
November................. ....
December .................. .



"Schedule E section de;.r ir T.r? .r :i,.-.
0. Food and live ani'-i Chaelcaal .na related rro,-.:A T, ., F F.
1. Beverages and LCC. r. Manufa,.turea guoo cla0-0illea 6hi'f1l) c l mn.erial
2. Crude material- nri.li epr 'fuel- lh43Cner) aiw tra.npcr' EqLilpm-n,
3. Mineral fuels, iur ir,.-r r-. n.n rel.red r,,r'rraI M. i-cell irecus m ur.iacrured arti.l'. n 3 P.r
4. Oils and fats--r.1-I1 r.o ,,:,: .t bl[ CO..-.ccOt,e an-. 'ranesctl.3ns rnoirn lisied eise.here

Adjusted for season .,. -i. ,,, ,, ,...,r, '..r' : .. :r I '.. ,, .ir n.t. r.. oer.
applied to data for ': r ..r .., .7 L =ea, al pattern'. he .,nthis seasonally
adjusted export total ,. ,. ., ,. .- r.. ., c '.. : ., ,r L,,t1 r. .. L z r. ,3-,. ae- tc .i- page PI
Annual totals are no- ,,, 1i J .. ]='. r,-.. .d a- I-, i.. *


Commodities entering eq


= ,r- I ,r r .,. T -f -P.- I r I.' r. ,- z C r ar.t j I I r -I :. .. ,. a., -her. r ,. r -' d












Table 5. U.S. General Imports (f.a.s. Value Basis) of Merchandise, Schedule A Sections, Seasonally

Adjusted and Unadjusted, by Month: January 1978 to July 1979

(In millions of dollars. See F'planation of Statistic! for information on co-arage. date or importation. definitIon of f.a.a. import lalue, aad
sources of error in the data. Unadjusted totals represent sume or unroundea figures and hence msay vary slightly from sul of rounded amounts)


Schedule A sections '
Period
0: 1 2 3 o' 3 6 7 8 91


Seasonally adjusted




Jaruar -Jul, ...... .. '.7 i 3 .i 5, 57.5' 2., ..) ji .3 j,r61 .. r,-,.1 2?,01-.6 l .i5 t E 5,,:f..i

January ............. .. Lt... l 1i i 68 .- -? 2 2 -" "" i 3 i.'.1 I 3i..8 329.2
February .......... ... 1 .. -.. 1 "o6..' 3,5 02 --..', ,''' -o : 3 9,c o I .8- 3.6 255.6
March .. ......... .... 25 13,.: .'' .6 3,-3i :,-- i 3 .'). 9 1 -c69.4 373.4
April.. .. .... ... .. ... 1.101.: 12. "Si.. 3.I13 -. 3 '.': -[- i 3. .8 1. 8. i 338.3
May .... .... .i.i.. 1i2. 6tis. l 1.23-. 1 :.. i7, 31i B 3 63i .3 S ,.0.1 319.7
June...................... .. .. I I.. i 1 .9 3,. 1. -6 :. 2 '. 3. 9-3.. L. Oi.3 338.3
July.............. .... i c i i87.3 ".3.' 3.3 '0.i i JS3 J 1- .3 L.ct-.9 329.7
August. ... ... .'.5.. .. 1A. P8.6 .3 .,". -3. 1 'P..A L.Io 5.9 327.5
September.... ..... ...... .-3.9 18r.3 '61.7 3.698.' 0 2' r.9 iQ.o 1. 71'.j 306.5
Ocrooer ....... .......... i32.2 2Ar. L iL .t. 3,.91.6 -0 ''. -., ;.. I oi0. I 386.8
November. ..... ..... .. I 16 ,.t -5 3.. ) 536 :.. .9.. J. J 1- '. 1, 712.6 327.2
December ..... .... 1 2.,. l 3. -Z..3 Ji '. 2 1 1i' :'l I 39.0i 386.1



Jan ary-July ...... ......... :.. 1 ..> .. ,-. l

January................ .... .i 2'8 3 2C'.3 82 .6 -,228.' A-. 11. 3 r. 3'...6 :.0 0. 1. c...- 309..
Febriary... ....... ....... .. loIc 3.. *.i r 'r : : d0 .
March... .. ......... ....... ,. .r i19-. 66o .9 3, ;4 .9 33.7 r6.. 4 :.tr.5 -.,.'.. .,, I .0 3i'.8
April........ .. ... ... ... 3r..' 1-. wu. -, 0. ..n.: -n.'' *2. -,-.3 ..t '.9 .67.0
May................ .......... .. .*-3. I b IO.c 9 9.0 -, 165.9 -..; ni." :,.-."S. -, l'...i 1. ..-. 448.3
June. .. .. .. .......... ,35",3. .j .i 'l-.: -,1 .: 01 I" -.9 -,Si .. 1,, 2.5 -06.-

Adgust .
Sept eber....................
October .....................
Novacer. ................. .
Decero.er..




is'3

Janue 2ry- c. ber........ j i. 0 1 iL i -2. i '.2 211.1 -"'." 27,' ;.. l 062.1 ..,018.1

Januir- Jul. ...... ... ., ,2 3,182.' -J,,-. 31.3 3," .5 1.,9j.' ,3C3. l, I..- -2,284.1

January.. ......... .. ...... i 1: .9 3I.I i r:6-9. 3. -2.2 .9.3 ._1.. 1 9 2.- 2.' 1.2 '.S 329.2
Fenrary..... ................. ... [.1i .- l .- 6' 3. 3 .'j.3 I.'. -9 i9 .- 3 5 3.2 1 243.- 255.6
Ma rer.... ....... ...........1'..' 3 1.2 -c.u r 2 2 3 1 '5' I 11.1 373.4
Apr l .................... ... i,., : l. 'O .? 33 8li. '2 o i r. 2 3 3.' s i. -3'. 338.3
May........................... .i., ido.: 63 .' 3 3!. 1. i 'lS.) *"0 .-O0.) 319.7
June........... ....... .... 1.- 'i : -. 3. l r.B l32 9 I l.. 338.3
Juli .L 85.3 31 l'i3 1 4 -16.3 L'-6. 9'82.: 329.7
Auguesr .... ..... ........... 2- 1) 1 0.02 .3.r 1 j" 6 1 ." .1-.V 2 .1 c 1 .:, 3. ; i5 327.5
Sepi0rber.... .. ......... 1..-6 1.. B .0 3 A. 3i.2 ]. 3 1 ... 3 EJ2. i. 306.5
October .. ... .. l r .9.9 .- .- 2 .1 386.8
December. I3.3t. 19 i. .. .- 1 .' 38627.2
Decembeer......... .......... -.1 .: i 313.' .3 386.1

19-

January-J uly ....... .. .a .. t r l Ie i l446.1

January. .......... ....... .. bl2. ,-, ... c3. 1 I 1-9 r Lc 309.4
Fenr ary... ...... ....... ';i .* ~. 283.9
March .. ................. .9 6 5. ,- -.( -,-3 350.8
4pr l ... ................. .. ,- j, n .. -, ,-0.c, --. 6 ., ,'I r. -5. %' r ,- .X 287.0
Ma .. .. .-i. l l,0:-. -;o =i-. -U.i ir .. ; 9 .- -, 09.j C 1, i- 448.3
June ... .... 1,35 1. ''.' -, .' a: ..4 6'.t c -.9.3 -, I .j 1,n0 .. 406.4

Acu.tE ...... ..........

Oct r .
Nove.-.bE r.
Decer-ber

1chEauie A 'c i an c ri rpr.mn- are ao tllo-
''. F-, ar ila aruis.al- 3 Cr. l:il- : a a r 1i.,a pr.: .:t. N .F.F.
1. Be .erae4 na z r o .,:]o Maruliir c.. iC,., i,., a r ie i nel i bimr .i raai
1. Crud, Ilitrial, natiLl ccent !.ei Mhahiner.r ir r rimnrt Fal 'P.-. In
3. aner ri toL -. I'l- rac3rt a reriaian ri.l a. hic 1iiricou? 'ari c r 0-3 drricl I ..F.0
O il dap ltit --ari.m and .egaranie 9 Ordi- "-a tr.ancrOi..i no" cla.!iv eiscoore
'Adijut-a tar ,ianal ani- rumer-a0 rar r utir.p 0-5.l .aOutF.-nm c1.or3 intrliucea r. j-a uar,1 19 Aju3t.tmrnt inc.c.r rince rot e,:n
ippiEC to can' tar bcheauln .eciuri I 3, .r,3 3 J3e t Inc ..-cf .r acenitl ile r.Gr- -rar i rI o.nmal DaltErns. Tie m.onthlb ae''.nali
anijSti impor. t, alm 1.'... o' rf !rr I. Url a-,, se 5 rl .1 j3 r: r :'..c .,.rr F: i 6l- r it 3r. ir in riT. :c. l-:e i- ce
I at tnA otin.o. ri page 3 oAn-at t:til ,r3 r..' bhn cr a-.n. ,uN at. *.n a' n.-uin oc 0 i- r tr nnuni [ait .







10

Table 6. U.S. General Imports (c.i.f. Value Basis) of Merchandise, Schedule A Sections, Seasonally

Adjusted and Unadjusted, by Month: January 1978 to July 1979
Ifn millions of dollars. See Explanation of Statistics for Information on coverage. date of importatlon, definition of e.i.f ilport value, and
sources of error In the data. Unadjusted totals represent sum of unrounded figures and hence may sary slightly from sum of rounded amounts)


Schedule A sect Ions'
Period
0. I 7 3 4' 5 6 7 8 9'


Seasonally adjusted

I78 1

Janu.ar -JIul .... ... ... ,53b.5 1 ,39.3 5,649 5 25,376.3. 333 L 3.888 5 I'.2 08 5 28.654.2 11 ,08.0 2,320.1

January. 1.19-.2 156 ) 712 1 3.623.3 31 5 -32 t 2,2t5 5 3,:21 9 1,454.9 334.3
Fenr.ary 1,163 1 ]'8 7 838.5 3,713 5 3u 1 529.9 2,t'8 2 -. 168.2 1.592 8 260.1
Mar7 h. 1,340 3 lb- I 829.. 3,626.9 1.9 3 523.1 2,429.. 3,930 e 1,571.6 378.5
April ,2-46.7 231 0 803 v 3,722 72 5 563.6 2,599.6 .,203.8 1,622.9 344.0
lay7. I,:'3:.5 200 2 BB3 I 3,127 7 1 b01 5 2,68.9 '.062 5 1,652.0 324.6
J.ne 1.12 i 212. 770.1 3.681 I 79 7 580.2 2,205.2 -.,183 a. 1,717.5 343.3
Iui 1,213.' 20c6 I 12 3,58i 5 32.3 602 8 2,561.2 -..j8.8 1,;'b.3 335.3
August 99:. 0 218.9 862 5 3.90' 3 5 "' 5'3 2.39'.6 .,00b.7 i,733.9 332.9
September l,13n 0 205.8 843 3 3.l31 5 32 2 "2-.' 2,.3..5 ..,7 I 1 6a.3 312.0
Ottobcr 1,20.6 125.0 87.. 7 i5.13 ..3 1 56n a 2,-.62.1 .,427 1,798 1 392.2
ho2vemb.r. 1,22,.0 21- .1 91-.3 J, ;6 5 55.8 521.1 2.470 5 :,.02. 1821.1 333.4
Decet r 1,3..b 7 215 5 854... -.023 6 3o.9 596.5 2,290.9 .505... 1,7.6.6 391.8

a';9

January-July.................. 9,382.1 1,531.0 6,682.5 31,723.;1 -36 ..113 1-..916 31..3-4 3 1i.652 ..48B6.8

January" .. 1,379.2 226.7 885.6 4,530.0 W,.. 5.1.0 2,526 9 &.896.8 1.886.2 316.9
Febr.ars- 1,178.4 171.8 922.3 -3.'" 55 5 .s. -.560 a... i,1.2 a 289.0
March ......................... 1,335.6 212.2 939.3 ..230 58.. 623.1 2.528.6 ..,298.5 1 .6.5.7 356.4
April......................... 1,423.6 235.6 961.2 .-,i3 .0 6 7 590.i 2...00.9 4,789.7 1.773 7 292.2
May........................... 1.339.- 230.6 1,069.2 -,431 a -2 Q1 '2-.5 2.713.3 .,56'.9 1.'75.5 454.9
June.......................... 1,465.5 216.6 983.4 ,.608.6 65 1 :09.2 2.542.4 .2,83.3 I.13'.l 412.7
July.......................... 1,260.5 231.3 921.5 5 'l 6 1 ._... 6,.< 55 I ,Ea 1 6 1.5.1 366 7
August......... .............
September...............
October.....................
November.....................
December.....................


Undjus ied

1978

January-December.............. 14,510.1 2,429.0 9,998.7 44,728." '.-.' 6.1'8 0 29,220.5 i0,.29 0 20,..i 9 .,062.5

January-July.................. 8,536.5 1,371.8 5,574.4 25,376.- 333.1 3.'91.. 17,i.2.0 29,0253. 11.li.- 2.320.1

January....................... 1,194.2 151.1 692.2 3,623.3 31.5 ..4 5 2,131.8 3,95. l,310 7 334.3
eoruarv .... 1,183.1 176.0 719.4 3,713.2 50.1 ;00 8 2,36' 5 3,793.1 1,388.9 260.1
March. 1,340.3 190.4 819.4 3,626.9 .9.3 "36.1 2,.07.1 .,307 9 1,615.6 378.5
April......................... 1,246.7 218.8 758.1 3,722.' ..5.5 u-1.9 2.i53 2 -,33B 3 1.55 6 34 ..0
May........................... 1,232.5 207.2 902.5 3,427.' 5. 'a.' 2,520.2 ..,262.7 1 ,56 I 324.6
June .......................... 1,126.1 232.9 824.8 3,681.1 .9 6 580 2 2.,57.2 ..38]. 2 1,770 6 343.3
July.......................... 1,213.7 195.3 857.9 3,581.S 52.3 586 0 2.59. 5 '. .3.8 1,9H1 7 335.3
August ........................ 995.0 187.4 882.3 3,907.1 -5.7 5-1.i 2.388 0 3i,2.4. 1,684.8 332.9
September ..................... 1,136.0 185.8 892.4 3,931.5 32 2 565 2.383 & .,072 8 16,80 312.0
October ....................... 1,240.8 230.8 884.3 3,713.. -3 I 570.6 2.501.5 4,,516.1 1.95- 5 392.2
November...................... 1,255.0 229.0 902.4 3, '76 55.6 539 9 2,5-. b 46,6-... 1,91'. O 333.4
December...................... 1,346.7 224.1 862.9 4,023. 31..9 A63 I 2,261 1 -,555.0 1,6n2 8 391.8

1979

January-July.................. 9,382.1 1,560.5 6,598.8 31,723.; 2,t 1 '.....3 5 I', ;8 .61.91. 12.72:, I .86.8

January...................... 1,379.2 224.0 869.7 4,530.3 9.. ,, n 2 ..10 5-..8 1 '31 5 314.9
February...................... 1,178.4 169.4 789.5 3,770.3! .oi.I1 1 2*.6- ...Lil 1. 19 4 289.0
March ......................... 1,335.6 242.6 911.1 4,230.-. i .. 686.7 2,5;9.2 4,62?.8 1,670.4 356.4
April......................... 1,423.6 225.2 928.5 4,539.0, .6.b 683.2 2,-03.3 5,,0'35.2 1,617.8 292.2
May........................... 1,339.4 237.8 1,076.7 4,431.'. .2.9 ?31.6 2.;70.3 4.759.8 1,681.4 454.9
June.......................... 1,465.5 234.3 1,033.6 4,808.5 65.1 702.9 2.8"-.8 -.9-8.0 1,982.3 612.7
July.......................... 1,260.5 227.1 989.7 5,413.i- IF. os. ..r.- -. !i 2.01, 5 366.'
August... ...................
September....................
October.....................
November ......................
December......................

'Schedule A section descriptions are as follows:
0. Food and live animals 5. Ch...,al. ar,. rel..tcu products. N.. .P F
1. Beverages and tobacco 6. Masuact urae, uocd: ci..r-iii s d nriefl, by .sateriai
2. Crude materials, Inedible, except fuels 7. Machr.,ers nd trsnport eqJutp.,nt
3. Mineral fuels, lubricants, and related material 8. M1'c.-iin-n,as n..nafu.aturf.i .rt.iles, N 3 P r
4. Oils and fats--animal and -s-eta..ol 9. l.ccro.aitses ar.d trnacit'n .n not clallla els Ehere
2Adjusted for seasonal and workint-a-% variati.r, using seasonally adjustment jat tra antr..lur..*3 ,n Januar. 1979 Adjustment factor nave not beere
applied to data for Schedule A sections 0, 3, 4, and 9 due to the absence of ,I-er,tiable .e..,r,l Datt.rr, Ir e ,o,,ntnl seasanall, aOju.led import
totals (c.i.f.) presented in tables 1 and 3 are derived by adding the component 1otai. pre.-ented in tIr,L abie,. fe. footnote I at the bottom of
page 5.) Annual totals are not shown for seasonally adjusted data. Unadjustee data snoul. oe u.ed for annual totals.








GENERAL IMPORTS OF PETROLEUM AND SELECTED PETROLEUM PRODUCTS INTO
THE U.S. CUSTOMS AREA AND U.S. VIRGIN ISLANDS, UNADJUSTED

Monthly and cumulative-to-dare data an general imports of petroleum and selected petroleum products into the U S Customs area
and into the U.S. Virgin Islands for the period January 1978 through the current month are presented in the tables that follow. Tables
1 A and 1 B present imports into the U S. Customs area and tables 2-A and 2-B present imports into the U.S Virgin Islands (It should
be noted that imports into the Virgin Islands are excluded from the regularly compiled foreign trade statistics and, therefore, are ex
cluded from the data presented in tables 1-A and 1-B as well as the other tables shown in the front of this report.-See "Explanation of
Statistics".

Effective with January 1979 statistics, certain changes were made in the commodity classifications (Schedule A and TSUSA) covering
petroleum products. These changes are reflected in the listing of classifications shown below. Data presented in tables I B and 2 B which
follow reflect all changes in classifications, effective January 1979.


Schedule A and TSUSA Commodity Numbers Used in Compiling the Petroleum
Information Presented in This Report


Energy products

Schedule A No.


Nonenergy products

Schedule A No.


TSUSA No.


Crude petroleum and deriv-
atives to be refined
333.0020
333.0040
334.5440


475.0510
475.1010
475.6510


Lubricating oils
334.5410 pt.

Lubricating greases
334.5410 pt.


475.4500



475.5500, 475.6000


Crude petroleum
333.0020
333.0040

Gasoline
334.1500

Jet fuel
334.1205

Kerosene
334.2000


Distillate fuel oil
334.3021

334.3045

Residual fuel oil
334.4050
334.4060

Propane and butane gas
341.0025

Liquid derivatives of
petroleum, n.e.s.
334.5430 pt.


475.0510
475.1010


475.2520, 475.2560


{475.2530
475.2550

475.3000


475.0525
475.0545
475.1015
475.1025

475.0535
475.1035


Paraffin and other mineral
waxes
335.1225 pt.
335.1245


Naphthas
334.5420

Asphalt
335.4500


All other petroleum products
(pitch of tar coke, non-
liquid hydrocarbon mix-
tures, and calcined petro-
leum and coal coke not for
fuel)
335.3000 pt.
334.5430 pt.
598.5020 pt.


475.1525, 475.1535,
475.1545


475.6530


TSUSA No.


494.2200
494.2400



475.3500



521.1100


401.6200
475.7000
{517.5120
517.5140
















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14


Table 2-A. Summary of Imports of Petroleum and Selected Petroleum Products into the U.S. Virgin Islands from Foreign Countries,

Unadjusted, by Month (f.a.s. Value Basis): 1979

I e E telontrior. of ilatisfin. for i.'t.ro'lor on o .e etrfir.ttlon of tioe r.e.. -iporn ve.lb, and Soitri e of error In tos ntde. rot.ln represent tu of unrounded figures. hence my firy
tilgblnl frim nu of rounded -OaLO)


Comondt de Teitrtito 'J1 d.- j0rory Feorurt Morcn 4pril MHy Juoe Jtuly Augul Sptemher October Naoreber Dcnbn r


Set quantity iThouer-dn of barreles


Total petroleum aid 0 l cl te pro.cts..

Inergl prod.ut .... .... .

Cr-ude troleum aOii e.&Lves to in

Crude l.etr iL....................


ero ene. ...... ....... .....
DtltIllate fuel .l. ..
Aeildual lauel 0... ...
Propane rd butr.e ........ ...
PeIroleua oerivaties. iquit n e s. .

noan nerif pri duc.ts ...... ..... ...

L-bictin. il .....
L.brictt In t'.. ...
Paraffin a0n osfnr tinero1ol. e .uu ...
rop tb lss .... ...... ... ... ..........
brhel t .. .' 1 ............. ......
P tffl -ed tole rO in t .......






rtinet ... .... ... .. ......


1r1de petrol.D DJ. ......................
-enl ter, o ...... .. .. .. .. ...

J d fue r ............... .....


rttsttnl e .. .. .....


Prc. e ud nie s.. ........
Fetroleumi durtvat.et. Iold v.r......

Fncenerg prodct ... ..............
Lum ncr n l [ 1 1 ? ... ... .... ............
Lbt -icti f ello i..........
Psbra ti o %ther ..lr r =. 1 -'. .......
ph t. ..... .. .. .... .....


4it other pelroi-n prou ............


-i 6 t 1 ,1 8-29 IE .4 I ia l-
i. s J l 5.6 i, j I s 8.-. I9 iL -'8 i 8I. .





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8d 0 valuee titouo andS at o ll|r I

"I r $ L 4 ,* Y'JI.1I 2,, ;cy ii'21i Ari 7b.. ?T 2T'.0) .- ,

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See pge II rfor i .ts of toe .r.eotot n o L ',f Itailr noi.toe of the iJted St.te M.nae tnaedcml S Mo lee included to marh line ILem
Mintcv ei motor fut ls, ,.e.t.
*Qouantity tntn 1n-ir. are eported Ir, either c0urdS.t ir.o.' tcn.., ir ton I in.r ir. n. toil or import ntnttot.oS nave Oeen cnoverted in barrels to this report on the bsons of 200 potIade per IIhrn.


























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U.S. Department
of Commerce
BUREAU OF THE CENSUS
Washington, D.C. 20233
Official Business


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

3 1262 08686 2562
First Class Mail 4
COM-202




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