United States foreign trade

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Material Information

Title:
United States foreign trade
Alternate title:
United States foreign trade. FT900, Summary of United States export and import merchandise trade
Portion of title:
Summary of U.S. export and import merchandise trade
Abbreviated Title:
U.S. foreign trade, FT900, Summ. U.S. export import merch. trade
Physical Description:
13 v. : ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of the Census
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census :
For sale by the Subscriber Services Section (Publications), Bureau of the Census
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Creation Date:
May 1979
Publication Date:
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Imports -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Exports -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Commerce -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
statistics   ( marcgt )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Issued also to depository libraries in microfiche.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Dec. 1976-
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Ceased in 1988.
General Note:
"FT 900."
General Note:
Description based on: Jan. 1979; title from caption.
General Note:
Beginning with July 1980 for sale by the Supt. of Docs., U.S.G.P.O.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Mar. 1988.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001320869
notis - AGH1745
oclc - 07222812
lccn - 81646118
issn - 0730-3270
sobekcm - AA00005268_00001
Classification:
ddc - 382/.0973/00212
System ID:
AA00005268:00031

Related Items

Preceded by:
Summary of U.S. export and import merchandise trade
Succeeded by:
U.S. merchandise trade. Seasonally adjusted imports and exports


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
_ 3. /iq; 900-79-5


UNITED STATES FOREIGN TRADE


Summary of U.S. Export and

Import Merchandise Trade
-UNIV. OF FL LIB.



S' | "*" MAY 1979
n-_ u W anin mission 2 30 PM Wednesday. June 27. 1979
ti nl I > r> <^irn h'r-


FT900-79-5


(Including


Wtted and Unadjusted Data
on imports of petroleum and petroleum products)


F.A.S. EXPORTS AND F.A.S. IMPORTS
Seasonally Adjusted
The Bureau of the Census, Department of Commerce an-
nounced today that during May 1979, exports on a f.a.s.
(free alongside ship) U.S. port of exportation value
basis, excluding Department of Defense (DOD) Military
Assistance Program Grant-Aid shipments, amounted to
$13,862.1 million and that general imports on a f.a.s.
foreign port of exportation value basis, amounted to
$16,341.9 million.1 3
Based on the above export and import figures, the
May merchandise trade balance was in deficit by $2,479.8
million.1
During the first 5-months of 1979 (January-May),
exports on a seasonally adjusted basis were at an annual
rate of $165,205 million, a level about 15 percent
higher than the calendar year 1978 total of $143,575
million. Imports for the January-May 1979 period were
at an annual rate of $188,852 million, an increase of
about 10 percent over the calendar year 1978 total of
$172,026 million.

For the 4-month period, February-May 1979, exports
averaged $13,925.9 million per month, about 6 percent
higher than the $13,191.5 million average reported for
the preceding 4-month period, October 1978-January 1979.
Imports on a f.a.s. value basis, averaged $15,614.3
million per month for the current 4-month period, a
level about 2 percent higher than the $15,234.8 million
average reported for the preceding 4-month period.1 2 3

Unadj usted
Exports excluding Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid
shipments increased from $14,257.0 million in April to
$14,812.9 million in May. With Military Assistance
Program Grant-Aid shipments included, exports increased
From $14,267.3 million in April to $14,818.9 million in
May. General imports increased from $16,172.0 million
In April to $16,511.5 million in May.
tate : Footnotes 1, 2, and 3 are shown at the bottom
of page 5.


F.A.S. EXPORTS AND C.I.F. IMPORTS
Seasonal ly Adj usted
The Bureau of the Census, Department of Commerce an-
nounced today that during May 1979, exports on a f.a.s.
(free alongside ship) U.S. port of exportation value
basis, excluding Department of Defense (DOD) Military
Assistance Prograi.i Grant-Aid shipments, amounted to
$13,862.1 million and that general imports on a c.i.f.
(cost, insurance, and freight) U.S. ort of entry value
basis, amounted to $17,349.6 million.1 3
Based on the above export and import figures, the
May merchandise trade balance was in deficit by
$3,487.5 million.1 2 3
During the first 5-months of 1979 (January-May),
exports on a seasonally adjusted basis were at an annual
rate of $165,205 million, a level about 15 percent
higher than the calendar year 1978 total of $143,575
million. Imports for the January-May 1979 period were
at an annual rate of $200,718 million, an increase of
about 10 percent over the calendar year 1978 total of
$183,137 million.
For the 4-month period, February-May 1979, exports
averaged $13,925.9 million per month, about 6 percent
higher than the $13,191.5 million average reported for
the preceding 4-month period, October 1978-January 1979.
Imports on a c.i.f. value basis, averaged $16,587.7
million per month for the current 4-month period, a level
about 2 percent higher than the $16,205.4 million average
reported for the preceding 4-month period.1 2 3

Unadj usted
Exports excluding Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid
shipments increased from $14,257.0 million in April to
$14,812.9 million in May. With Military Assistance
Program Grant-Aid shipments included, exports increased
from V14,267.3 million in April to $14,818.9 million in
May. General imports increased from $17,194.8 million
in April to $17,529.2 million in May.


U.S. Department
of Commerce
j BUREAU OF
THE CENSUS


Inquiries concerning these figures should be addressed to the Chief, Foreign Trade Division, Bureum of
the Cesus, Washington. D.C. 20233. Tel: Are Code 301. 763-5140; 763-7754; and 763-7755.
For srle by the Subscriber Serce Section (PUictMions), Bureau of the Census, Washington, D.C.
20233, or amny U.S. Dwpbnnuin of Conmmwce dimric office. Pomag stunp not meIble; cuwency
emittedd at sndv's risk. RwnittnMe from forei countries must be by international money older
or by a draft on a U.S. bank. Prim 30 cent pr copW. Annual mnbcripton (FT 900, 975, 985, and 6
conainbud) 1430.




2

EXPLANATION OF STATISTICS


IMPORT STATISTICS appraisement purposes
corrected if it does a
Coverage called for by the statistic

The U.S. import statistics reflect both government and
nongovernment imports of merchandise from foreign countries
into the U.S. Customs territory, which includes the 50 States, F.a.s. Import Value. -
the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. The U.S. import represents the transacti
statistics exclude imports into the Virgin Islands, Guam, exportation. It is base
American Samoa, and other U.S. possessions; and shipments transaction value and
between the United States and Puerto Rico, between the United placing the merchandi
States and U.S. possessions, and between any of these outlying exportation in the coun
areas. (Data on U.S. trade with Puerto Rico and the Virgin
Islands of the United States are published separately in Report C.i.f. Import Value.-
FT 800. Additional data on such trade and on imports into the value represents the val
Virgin Islands from foreign countries are presented in reference the United States. It is
tabulations.) Data on imports of petroleum and selected all freight, insurance, a
petroleum products, including shipments into the Virgin Islands duties) incurred in brir
from foreign countries, are included in this report effective with of exportation and gei
the January 1976 statistics (previously shown in former Report the first port of entry
FT 900-Supplement). was acquired in a tr
The U.S. import statistics also exclude American goods re- purchase price used in
turned to the United States by its Armed Forces; intransit ship- arm's-length equivalent
ments through the United States when documented as such would exist between ur
with Customs; temporary shipments; transactions not con-
sidered to be of statistical significance, such as shipments of Import
personal and household effects; low-valued nondutiable im-
ports by mail; and issued monetary coins of all component Import data are init
metals. classifications in the T
notated (TSUSA), whi
Inclusion of Gold in the Statistics International Trade C
the Tariff Schedules o
Effective with the statistics for January 1978, imports of tical annotations. The
nonmonetary gold (in such forms ad ore, scrap and base bullion, in this report in tern
nonmonetary refined bullion, etc which were previously sections in Schedule A,
excluded, are now included in ihe statistics. Imports of silver in Imported Into the U
these forms have been included since January 1969. Additional Standard International
information regarding the inclusion of gold in the 1978 statistics effective with the stati
appears in the January 1978 issues of Report FT 990 and 1978, Schedule A was
FT 135.

General Imports/Imports For Consumption Date of Importat

The statistics on U.S. imports are presented in terms of both It is the objective
"General Imports" and "Imports for Consumption." General shipments, insofar as pi
imports are a combination of entries for immediate con- month of importation
sumption and entries into Customs bonded warehouses, and of warehouse withdraw
thus generally reflect total arrivals of merchandise. Imports for date of Customs off
consumption are a combination of entries for immediate documents was used to
consumption and withdrawals from warehouses for con- the shipments were in
sumption, and thus generally reflect the total of the com- statistics, the date of
moditles entered into U.S. consumption channels. entries is being used
However, since under
Source Of Import Information cedures importers may
after the date of relea
The official U.S. import statistics are compiled by the Bureau for merchandise impor
of the Census from copies of the import entry and warehouse month mai, not be rece
withdrawal forms which importers are required by law to file for that month. As a
with Customs officials. The information as to country of origin, about I 5 percent from
net quantity, value, and commodity classification is verified by subsequent month. In
Customs officials on entries filed for transactions valued over filing of documents, re
$250. which are ordinarily subject to examination for Customs because the data fail tc


. The statistical copy of the entry is
not accurately reflect the information
cal requirements.

Import Valuation

-The f.a.s. (free alongside ship) value
on value of imports at the foreign port of
d on the purchase price, i.e., the actual.
generally includes all charges incurred W.
se alongside the carrier at the port of
try of exportation.

The c.i.f. (cost, insurance, and freight)
ue of imports at the first port of entry in:
based on the purchase price and includes
nd other charges (excluding U.S. import
nging the merchandise from the country
nerally placing it alongside the carrier at
in the United States. If the merchandise
ansaction between related parties, the
deriving the c.i.f. value is based on ai
t transaction price, i.e., a price wh
related buyers and sellers.

Commodity Information

ially reported in terms of the commodity;
ariff Schedules of the United States An.
ch is an official publication of the U.S.
commission, embracing the legal text otf
f the United States together with statit
TSUSA data are rearranged and present
is of totals for the 1-digit commodity
Statistical Classification of Commoditi
united States, which is based upon
Trade Classification (SITC), Revision 2
stics for January 1978. Prior to Janua .
based upon the former SITC, Revised

ion and Import Monthly Carryover ,|

of the compiling procedures to include:
racticable, in the statistics for the actual::
(or the month of withdrawal in the case
als for consumption). Prior to 1978, the.
icial acceptance of the import entry:
determine the statistical month in whichis
eluded. Effective with the January 19781:
importation as reported on the import
to determine the statistical month..:
the Customs "immediate-delivery" pro-.
file the import entry up to 10 workdays I
se of the merchandise, some documents
ted during the last few days of a given.
lived in time for inclusion in the statistics
result. there is a carryover, estimated at
the actual month of importation to a
addition, processing problems (e.g., late
sectionn of a shipment by the computer
Meet certain edit criteria established to






protect the accuracy of the statistics, etc.) contrihute to an
additional carryover of about 5 percent (in terms of -alue) of
shipments from the reported month uf imnportatiin (or with.
drawal from warehouse) to a subsequent month. usually the
succeeding month. These limitations should be borne in mind
when making month-to-month compdrnsons.

Cumulations of data over at least 4-month periods are desir-
able to identify underlying trends. Month-to-month changes in
imports, exports, and similar series often reflect primary
irregular movements, e.g., exogenous events such as strikes,
differences in monthly carryover, etc.


Estimated Data for Imports Valued Under $251

The overall import and Schedule A Section 9 totals include
sample estimates for shipments valued under $251. Therefore.
they are subject to sampling error, estimated at less than
one-tenth of one percent for the unadjusted overall total and
about one percent for the unadjusted Schedule A Section 9
total. This means that we can have about 67 percent confidence
that the published unadjusted overall totals and the unadjusted
Schedule A Section 9 totals differ by less than one-tenth of a
percent and one percent, respectively, from the totals that
would have resulted from a complete tabulation. The statistics
on imports of petroleum and petroleum products included in
this report reflect fully compiled data and, therefore, are not
subject to sampling error.



EXPORT STATISTICS

Coverage
The export statistics reflect, in general. both government and
nongovernment exports of domestic and foreign merchandise
from the U.S Customs territory (includes the 50 States, the
District of Columbia. and Puerto Rico) to foreign countries,
whether the exportation involves a commercial transaction or
not. The statistics, therefore, include Department of Defense
Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid shipments. shipments for
economic assistance under the Foreign Assistance Act and
shipments of agricultural commodities under P.L 480 (The
Agricultural Trade Development and Assistance Act of 1954, as
amended) and related laws. The following are excluded from the
statistics: Shipments to U.S. Armed Forces and diplomatic
missions abroad for their own use; shipments between the
United States and Puerto Rico, between the United States and
its possessions (including the Virgin Islands), and between these
outlying areas: exports from U.S. possessions, intransit ship-
ments through the United States; transactions not considered to
be of statistical importance, such as personal and household
effects; temporary exports: low-valued or non-commercial
exports bv mail: and issued monetary coins of all component
metals.

Inclusion of Gold in the Statistics.

As indicated above for imports, effective with the statistics
for January 1978, exports of nonmonetary gold (in such forms
as ore. scrap and base bullion, nonmonetary refined bullion.
etc.) which were previously excluded, are included in the


statistics. Exports of silver in these forms have been included
since January 1969. Additional information regarding the
inclusion of gold in the 1978 statistics appears in the January
1978 issues of Report FT 990 and FT 410

Definition of Exports of Domestic and Foreign Merchandise

Exports of domestic merchandise include commodities which
are grown, produced, or manufactured in the UnitedStates, and
commodities of foreign origin which have been changed in the
United States from the form in which they were imported, or
which have been enhanced in value by further manufacture in
the United States. Exports of foreign merchandise consist of
commodities of foreign origin which have entered the United
States as imports and which, at the time of exportation, are in
substantially the same condition as when imported.

Source of Export Information

The official U.S. export statistics are compiled by the Bureau
of the Census primarily from copies of Shipper's Export
Declarations which are required to be filed with Customs
officials, except for Department of Defense Military Assistance
Program Grant-Aid shipments which are reported directly to the
Bureau of the Census by the Department of Defense and
shipments by qualified exporters who have been authorized to
submit data in the form of magnetic tape, punched cards, or
monthly Shipper's Summary Export Declarations directly to
the Bureau of the Census.

Export Valuation
F.a.s. Export Value. -The value reported in the export statistics
generally is equivalent to a f.a.s. (free alongside ship) value at
the U.S. port of export, based on the transaction price,
including inland freight, insurance and other charges incurred in
placing the merchandise alongside the carrier at the U.S. port of
exportation.

Export Commodity Information
Beginning January 1978. export commodity information
is collected in terms of the commodity classifications in the
1978 edition of Schedule B, Statistical Classification of Do-
mestic and Foreign Commodities Exported from the United
States, which is based on the framework of the classification
system in the Tariff Schedules of the United States (TSUS).
In this report, the Schedule B data are rearranged and presented
in terms of totals for the I-digit commodity sections in Schedule
E. which is based upon the Standard International Trade Classi-
fication (SITC), Revision 2, effective with the statistics for
January 1978. Prior to January 1978, the export classifications
in Schedule B were based upon the organizational framework
of the former SITC, Revised.

Export Monthly Carryover
It is the objective of the compiling procedures to include
shipments, insofar as practicable. in the statistics for the actual
month of exportation For purposes of the statistics, the month
of exportation is generally based on the date when the shipment
leaves the United States. (For vessel or air shipments it is the
date when the carrier departs or is cleared from the port of
export.) However, as indicated above for imports, because of






processing problems (e.g.. late receipt of a document for an
end-of-month shipment, rejection of a shipment by the com-
puter because the data fail to meet certain edit criteria
established to protect the accuracy of the statistics, etc.), there
is an overall average carryover of about 2 to 3 percent (in terms
of value) of the shipments from the actual month of exporta-
tion to a subsequent month, usually the succeeding month.
These limitations should be borne in mind when making
month-to-month comparisons.
Cumulations of data over at least 4-month periods are
desirable to identify underlying trends. Month-to-month
changes in imports, exports, and similar series often reflect
primarily irregular movements, differences in monthly
carry over. etc.

Estimated Data for Export Shipments

Effective with the March 1979 statistics, the overall export
and Schedule E section and division totals include sample esti-
mates for shipments valued $501 -$1999 to Canada and for ship-
ments valued $501-S999 to countries other than Canada. Data
for shipments valued $500 and under to all countries are also
estimated, based on established percentages of individual
country totals, and included in the Schedule E Section 9 totals
regardless of the commodity exported. It is estimated that the
unadjusted overall total is subject to a sampling error of less
than one-tenth of one percent, and the unadjusted Schedule E
section or division totals are subject to sampling errors of about
one percent. In addition, the Schedule E Section 9 total is sub-
ject to possible error in the estimated data for shipments valued
$500 and under; and the overall total, and the individual totals
for sections other than Section 9, to a more limited extent.
Such $500 and under shipments represent about 1 percent of
the total value of exports, and about 30 percent of the Schedule
E Section 9 total. Prior to the March 197' statistics, the overall
export and Schedule E section and division totals include
sample estimates for shipments valued $251-$1,999 to Canada
and for shipments valued $251-5 99 to countries other than
Canada.


SOURCES OF ERROR IN THE STATISTICS

Monthly import and export figures are subject to the
possibility of errors which may arise from sources other than
sampling errors, discussed above. Among these are errors in the
reporting and/or processing of information as to commodity
classification, value and other statistical factors, month of
inclusion (see paragraphs on import and export carryover,
above), and the undercounting of exports to Canada due to the
non-receipt of Shipper's Export Declarations. For 1978,
the undercounting is estimated to be about $2 billion dollars.
In the case of imports the information as to value and
commodity classification (as well as country of origin and net
quantity) is verified by Customs officials on entries filed for
transactions valued over $250 which are ordinarily subject to
examination for Customs appraisement purposes, thus con-
siderably reducing the possibility of error. In addition, the
procedures used to compile both the import and export sta-
tistics include clerical and computer processing checks designed
to protect the accuracy of the statistics to the fullest practicable
extent.


Adjustment for Seasonal and Working-Day Variation

Monthly totals for exports and imports and major com-:i.
modily components (Schedule E and Schedule A section totals)..
are shown adjusted tor seasonal/working-day variation. Effec-':
tive with the release of the January 1979 statistics, the seasonally::
adjusted export and import totals represent the sum of com-rn:
modity components adjusted for seasonal and working-day:.
variation. Previously. the monthly totals for exports and im-rn:
ports were adjusted independently of the components. The
procedure of aggregating seasonally adjusted commodity cornm-
ponents more accurately reflects the seasonal movements within
the totals. Under this procedure, only those section totals that
show identifiable seasonal patterns are seasonally adjusted.





MERCHANDISE TRADE BALANCES

Two trade balances are presented in this report
I) The balance between exports based on f.a.s. values and::
imports based on f.a.s. values.
2) The balance between exports based on I.a.s. values ani.
imports based on c.i.f. values with adjustments for imports front
affiliated sellers abroad to reflect arms-length equivalent prices."
Both balances are useful for certain purposes. The first
balance corresponds to a measurement of the international
payments or credit flows resulting from merLnandise trade!
between the U.S. and foreign countries. The second balance iS
based on concepts similar to those used by most foreign.
countries, and therefore provides a reference for comparison,
with the trade balances published by those countries.



REVISIONS TO THE STATISTICS

Under the revision policy adopted effective with the 1977
statistics, revisions to the monthly statistics for the current year
will be issued once a sear, i e.. %ith the reports for June of the
following year. Thus. revisions to 1979 statistics will be issued
only in June 19 0.



SOURCES OF FURTHER INFORMATION

Addiinl ial lrcvigi irde t.,tji.bl' and informatlluion regarding
coverage. ajlilationii ll s lllil1 Jiid LiudlillLtillUlis which should
be cont i derT'd h iieise ul tihe sijiistics .ire cointljied primarily
in the I'flliL'~ug p1iihlkilntiin Reporl FT "90. Highlights of U.S.
Expor .iiid Impoirt Trjad. I-T 135. L; S. General Imports,
Schedil.- \ (imniiin :, h\ ('.Cuntr', FT 410 U.S. Exports.
Schedilkc 1 ( ,iiir, h, C('ntiiiii, and lihe Guide to Foreign
Trade Si.iiiuil'- [liiii in inindlo reojrdin aidditlUinal sources of
'lalit ii.. ili rmeilh dolo,:2. used in sJeas iall, adjillilng the data.
and other matters relating to foreign trade statistics may be
obtained from the Foreign Trade Division. Bureau of the
Census. Washineton. D C. 20233.












Table 1. U.S. Exports (f.a.s. Value Basis), General Imports (f.a.s. and c.i.f. Value Basis), and Merchandise
Trade Balance, Adjusted for Seasonal and Working-Day Variation, by Month: January 1978

to May 1979

(In millions of dollars. See Explanation of Statistics for Information on coverage,. date of Importatlun. definitions of export and import values and
trade balances, and sources of error In the date)

F.n.s ti ports ani1 .. Ip.rn i I I |.-rtls i ad -.L f imp.irr1
I Seasona:i JL J lujti.il i I Lnsunally adrju ttd i
Period
Fp.,rr,. .import- l i r..n [ -,ports t Ti


1978

January-May....... .. ....... ...... .. 71.6 ti n .- 17.I 'b- 5- lq ql7'.Q

January... ... .... ... 9.8n3. 13 102.s. -3 238. A ) ." 13 92o 7 -= 063.0
aF bruary.. ....... .... ... ..... 9.t .5 0 1. 259.5 3- l. i. 1.. 193 0 -5.24.B 0
March.. .. ...... .... I 1 b.5 .. 00. 1 -2 '. I I ..h 5 L. 893 2 -3 7.6 7
Aprl.. ... ........... ... ........... .l. 30.. I- .9L 5 -2 81 L 11 i' 15..3. 0 -3. 803.b
May........ .. .... .. ... .. ...... L 'EB .O -. I 008 5 -2. 2 I 'Br. 1'.' ..912 b -3 126.b
June.. .. ... ..... 12 208 2 1.970. I. 702 L 12..' 2 I ..859 1. -2 601 2

July...... ........ .. .... .. ... LI obl.5 14 i4..? -2.883.2 11 n l.) 15 c.5.,. -3 833 9
August .... ......... .. .... 2.293.7 1- 132 6 -1.8 8 1 2 3.' 15 C73 b -2 779 9
September.............. 13 27-.2 1-. 81q. -1.n .:. 13.2'-. 2 15 820 7 -2.5..6.5
October. ..... .. .. .. .. .. 2 V.L. I L 851 -1.q9 12. i01 I LS..763 B -2 862.1
Nlovember.... ........... ... .. .... .13. 50. l..,82..7 -l. ....I i ) i t L5 70 7 -2.319 1
December......... .. .... .. 13 282.5 15 .031.8 -1 ..9 3 3.282.5 1',0136.2 -2. 723 7

1979

Januarr-May ...... ... ', i *-

January.. .............. .. 1 3).1 .8 1bo.231 1 -3 09c 3 L3. L31.8 17.281.9 -4,150.1
PFebruary ........ .. ... r.,,, I ...--jr. -I : ur. 1 I-'V. ..- 9 -.', I
March................ .. ..... ..... .. 1 .- 2 0 li 2') 3 -a 1 j II -52 0 I1 228 2 -1 '76 2
April .................... .... .. .. .. ...1 682 In D 3): 0 -. 153 1 3. 82. I' 053 1 -3.170 5

June ............. .... ...... ..

July...... ... .. ... ......... ..
August ...................................
SeB ptember...................... .........
October.. ......... ....... ..... .
November ........ .... .... ... ......
December ..... ................ ..........

iExporl data represent domestic and foreign ,irrchannlis excluding apartmentt 3t [-fcense ilil'i Military %ssistance. Program Grant-Ald anitprents.
Import dats represent general Imports -)I nr-rchanrise
The totals shown in n this ladle are derilea by adding the scasunall\. adjusted c,.xia-iXty c.-.n.ponenis as sho*n in table 4. for exports ani tales 5 and
6 for Imports. See footnote 1 at the bott ini of pace







Expagr and import statistical series are adjusted for seasonal and working day variation but not for changes in police level Reflecting a new methodology. introduced with slallticilor January 1919 the
adpjuled monthly export and import Iolals for 1978 and 1979 presented in this report are derived by adding the seasonally adjusted components li e SITC eclions). The factors used to adjust the 1978-1919
companeent gras represent the combination ol seasonal adjuslmenl factors developed Irom monthly data through 19789 and the apppriate working-day lators. In issues of this report prior to January 1979.
mionsily total were adjusted independently of the components
'Cumulations of dais over at least 4-month periods are desirable to identily underlying trends Month to month changes n etportl imports and similar series often reflect olumarily irregular movements.
difteeonces in monthly carryove. etc Recent month to month perattcent changes in the overall seasonally adjusted export and import series are presented in the lolloing table with average percent month io
mioth rise and decline over longer periods shown for comparison The averages exclude percentage changes lor Ill the period Ottober DeOember 1917 because ol abnormaliies in the data due to etlects of
dock trilkes and (21 periods when negligible changes liero percenil .n the leiel of exportl/imporls occurred

Month-to-month Average monthly rates of change



Series Apr.-May Mar.-Apr. Feb.-Mar. Jan.-Feb. Average Average 4.--months 12 months
1979 1979 1979 1979 rise decline Jan. 1979- May 1978-
1977-L978 1972-1977 May [979 May 1979
(Percent) (Percent) (Percent) (Percent) (Percent) I(Percent) (Percent) (Percent)



F.a.s. export value.. -_.,.l -3.9 +7.0 *2.Q -4.6 -5.4 .I." -1 5
F.a.s. import value.. .j.9 *5.0 +3.2 -8.0 6'.4 -3.3 -'3 1 -
C.l.f. import value.. .- +5.1 .3.2 -9.0 *6.4 -3.4 .u 1.4

)Sea the "Emplanalion of Satistics" for definitions ol the export and import values and trade balances.















Table 2. U.S. Exports (f.a.s. Value Basis) of Merchandise Showing Department of Defense (DOD)

Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid Shipments, by Month: January 1978 to May 1979


(In millions of dollars. See Explanation of Statistics for information on coverage, definition of f.a.s. export value, and sources of error in
the data. Unadjusted totals represent sum of unrounded figures and hence may vary slightly from sum of rounded amounts)

Exports excluding DOD Exports Including
Grant-Aid' DOD Grant-Aid' DO Grant-Aid


Period Domestic Domestic Domestic
and and Domestic, and Domestic, Western Other
foreIgn, foreign, unadjusted foreign, unadjusted Total Europe countries
seasonally
3d justeall unadjusted unadjusted





January- Ecember .......... ....... i I L.3.574.6 1.1.068.9 143.359.9 141. 15... 85.3 -0.4 44.9

January-May........ .. .. ...... S. -1., 55.- 96.3 i5 e. 70.8 55.529 I 54 503.6 32.8 3.9 28.9

January .. .... ..... ... ...... 9 863.7 9 364.. 9,214.1 9,366.9 9.216.r, 2.5 0.5 2.1
Feoruar) .. .. .. 9.9.i 0 9.514.6 9.337.8 9,518.5 9.341. 7 3.9 L.3 2.
March ....... ..... .. ... ... .. .. 1,16., 12.074 2. 11.830.5 12.079.. L1.835.8 5.2 0 5 4.4
April .... ..... ........ ... .. 11.630. 12,06.. 2 11. 8,4.1 12.069.7 11.859.6 5 0.7 6.8
Ma .... ....................... [1. 786.0 12.478.9 12.23..3 L2.-9. 6 12.250.0 15.7 L.0 14.7
June.. .... .. .. .. .. ....... 12.268.2 I ,.-'. 12.261.7 12.487 3 12.271 7 10.1 6.5 ]3.

July. ... .. 11 661.5 10.934..0 10.769.- 10,964.7 10, 780.0 10.6 7.4' 3.2
huguat ....... .. .. .. ....... .. 2. 93.7 11.613.9 11,.21 11 621.8 11,.29.3 7.9 6.5 1.4
Septea.ber..... .. ... .......... 1..27 ..2 12. 7i3.1 12 50... 12. 714.,. 12.505.7 1.3 (Z) 1.3
Octoner.. ... ... ... ....... ... 12.901. 1 13.153.6 12.922.6 L3, 15?.- 12,92 ..- 3.8 1.5 2.3.
november. ..... .... ......... ... 13.-50.6 13,6j5.- 13.-16.5 13.672.3 13..33.5 16.q 1-.3 2.14:
Dece er .. ........... .. 13,282.5 13,531.0 13.302.1 13.532.9 13,303.9 1.8 0.1 1.7'

1979

January-M ay. .. ................ ... '. 1 V 5 "' 16 I 9.7

January.. .. ........................ ...i .' .8 12.558.1 12.349.4 1 b 5Bl.3 12,352.5 3.2 1.0 2.2
February................. ............ .S..u 6 1 ,? b. 1 '0. 7 1 ,? 1,"'u 0 0 1.9.
March... ..... ... ... 1- ." 15 I 8. 1 97.8 1.~ 6." 15.300.1 2.3 0.7 1.7
April ..... .. ...... .... I.Si.s b -.25.0 1- 010.5 1-. 27.3 1. 020.8 10.3 8.9 1.5
M ay ..... ..... .... ... .. r i i ... .. .l a ... "3' a .' 3 2 .4
J une .... ...... .......... ... ....

Ju ly .. .. .. ... .. ...... ... ......
August .... .... ............... ....
Sept,.sber ....... ....................
October ............. .. ...........
Nr.emrber ..... ... ...............
De c eiber ... .......... ...... ......

LE thin one hafir :r unit of ,casuremenr ahon.

'Repr-.enr only export ship.,ents iro,:, rhe trtc.- "tires ara ailfers from DOD Military Assistance Program Crant-Aid shipment figures under this
pra raim ; i ll*s 'a' Transfers af the material procured Gut ide the I.nited States and transfers from DODJ overseas stocks from export shipments.
ibi Export taiue f ra. whereas LOU sluee, Ir, most instances, is f o.b.. p-:int of origin. (c) Data for slupments reported by the DOD for a
giver month ar in The seasonally iolu_'td rotals shnit in This column are derived by adding the seasonally aajusted coanmodty components as sibon in table 4. See
footnote I at the bottom ri page 3
tAnual totals are not shoan for seasonally adjusted data. Unadjusted data should ne used for annual totals.













Table 3. U.S. Imports of Merchandise, by Month: January 1978 to May 1979

(I. millions of dollars. See Explanation of Stalltsics for Information on coverage, date of importation. definitions of f.e.a. and c.l.f. Import
ualse, and sources of error In the data. Unadjusted totals represent sum of unrounded figures and hence may vary slLghtly from mum of rounded
mounts)


Period


1978

Jlanu ry-December.........................

January-May........ ........ .. ...

January..................................
February.................................
March....................................
April....................................
May......................................
Juane.....................................

Jul y.....................................
August...................................
Septembe r................................
October ..................................
November .................................
December .................................

1979

January-May............... .. ........

January ..................................
February..................................
AM arch....................................
April. ...................................
aty ........ ........ ......... .........
Aami .....................................

Jil ......................................
August...................................
noptember................................
October ................................
November r............. ...................
December ................................


F.a.s. value


General imports


Seasonally
adjusted'


I,,

,4. dOt.

13. 1U2.6b
I... b2.5
L- 0(.. I
I- -ell 5
L.. 008.5


1 .5.. .. 7
1.. 132 6
1'..BLY
-.83 8 '
1... 82..
15 031 8






l 231.1


1, 5.8
l t,,l1 .' .
".n'.>


Unadjusted


S7.7. 125 ,

''4 23.3. o

L2 '[1 7
13. 28- ,.

1.. 4.7 3

1. L-.5

1-. '03.9
1- ':2, 0'





h.l..l )


b.i.**, n

15 8.b.3
13, 77b. :'


C.I.f. value


Imp
f
Cunibi


sorts General Imports
or
aptlon, easonnlly
justed ad)u.te.d Unadjusted




S) ,'I 183 137 3

8 t 1 '. 1 71 6h' 3

12.l0..1- 13..26b. 13.51..9
1) 31', i. 1. l3 0 1 152.3
L.- 1rv I. 893 2 15.L 5l.5
1 ..-1I l ..3...) h1 ..25.0
1 .- ... 1..'412 B 1 .l 1 i
1-. -35. 1...869 1I .50 2

I..8AR9 ) 1 -95 15 667 9
L..'J23 *. l ) 13., l .959.
i...'-. .82U. 1i. 393.0'
15' I10b 2 1 '3 8 16.0.'.3
I..'"- 2 15 '709. 16.015 1
14.8." 7 1l.006 2 l1.926.1


15.651 "

1. 3d. ,
L ;, 'q )


L 281.9

in 226 2


'.. H

b. 8 72. 6
. h. 1. ,
I I'. 7' .
I' I 8.
1 ? r.;*-,


I I_ 1 I_ I


Imports
for
consumption,
unadJuuted


182 78' 5

73 310.2

13 397 7
14. 180.2
15. 92.4
15. 3.i.0
l-.97...B
15.368. 4

15.858.3
l-.960.5
15s.00.6

1o,03. 2
15,9..9.0
15.825.3



n..k.0 1

16.669.3
1<. :I. .3
lb.592 0
1 '.U 1 S
I' '.'. j).1


'Ile seasonally aaju3ta. ttals Shhon in n hi' column are derived by aacian.. ih. svuounall aalu-ltr t"m,.Lt11y co.lpnents shown in tsbles5 and 6. See
footnote I at boitoml of padr 5.
'Annual totals are not shosr. for sasuonall ddjusr-.d aOB[a. Un.aJlustea data shoula be used for annual tIals.











Table 4. U.S. Exports (F.a.s. Value) of Domestic Merchandise, Schedule E Sections, Excluding

Department of Defense Military Grant-Aid Shipments and Foreign Merchandise (Reexports),

Seasonally and Unadjusted by Month: January 1978 to May 1979

IJl wrlli.on- ot dollar.. Se. Frplitntlon of S3tlStIlc. for information n nn coverage, drfinitlon of fr .s. cxport value, ana sources of error in the
1ta. T.nidju'Ie,1 i...ita. r.pr--nm suiLm of unroundc.a ftgures ano hence may w.ry .Ltghtly from sun of rounded amount I

Schedule P sectioni ?


P. riad








Januryv-rl. .. ... .... .

Janu ry . .
Febru'.i r ...........
March. ... .... ... ..
April ... ...
M y ....... ...... ..... .
June ... ..... ... .... .. .
july. .
July-.. ... .. ...... ... ..

Sept em"ber .. . .
October .. .. ..........
S pove boer .... .... .......
Decent r- ..... ........ .....



Jsnu3r -M. . ... .

January ..... ..... ..
February ... .... .
arch ..... ... ..
April ... ... .. .... ... .....
May .. .... ..................
July........ .......... ... .

Auus .. ......... .
Sep emt. r ....... .. .....
Oct ooer ......................
Noe-r.b, r...... ... .........
DEcemDer. ..... ... .. ...






January- cc.b..r..... .. ....


JMa r ch ....... ............


Aprl .. ... .. .. ......
M.rl u .... ..... .... ......
ruar .... ...... .........

Muarc...... ............
Aprter... .. .

robe ... .. ....... .
June .ber .... ... ..
Sc r oer ... ... ...
Coriber

inoveu -ber .... ... ...






wen r.hr .. ......
Deca r e .... ........ .... .




Apn r .... .
J ,,n.-n .. .. ..


Au u:r .
S.. p .: -r .
Q .- r ..i. r .. ... .
,, .. .. r ... .

n ..nnr


8


92 Foreigni 3
Ireexports)


I I I I I I I


0. 6.0
l 12'l'. -
1.334.8
. -31.3
L 7-" '-

S79..
,9a 8
L. 58 8
L 098 3

1. -13.-
1-. 8,





1. 99.0
1. .

1 ,- 3.
I *i, 1 1 "
I .. ..


B I 1 5, :t7 '
1-1. 1.0o9.'"0
1 0.0 1,023.5
21 3 1 188.
1-.[ 8 1 2 '6).
10b 1 1. 316.,
io0'. 1.387.2
1 .3 1. 1-, .9
220.3 1. 261.2
L 8.5 1. 07.5
220.8 I.-50 1
221- 5 1 51l.
20O. l.9. 5


18 0


' J' n


1.533 ,

I r,0. -
1. 5'i. 3


1 i 9. 5.
2-8 r

200. 3
.'1.0
118..
385.8
32..."
335.-.
B', 9
3 ;'1. 3
'.08.0
-.)0. 3





-03.8

L. t 3
,tJ 3


.ii. -

97.2
L 11.1. 1
14,3...
119.3
132. 1
130. 7
120.9
156.3
113.9
121.0 .
1i7..







171.3
12".r


( jet.. o

893. ,
911.5'
9-.. 2
9 r,2..
97-.8
1,027...
1.0 ,3...
1. 138.9
1, 23'. 5
1, 1-8. 1
1.228. 5
1, L03.9





1, 31-..5


I .2 L


eieiuonall I d )Ud s.Ic 1


09,. 1
91 3
c-0. 9
9B1. I
I 023.o
1.03o.
1 i003. .
1.r170. 1
1. 160.3
. 10f.4
1. 1-.. l

L. L1b.6



1.1"9,.

1, L9o.9
I I ,
1 ?7' 2
1 1 1. ,


22 }3 I

.,093. 1

-.. b. .
4. 8-]. 7
,. 759.9
..9907.8
4.853.2
4.992.2
3. 2b9.0
5..z25.1
5.6LO.b
5.676.5





5.311.6
i.o' ,;


6J .


.i lI 1 1.87?h. 1
72-.0 .32. 3
742.9 236.0
;77.9 389.9
82b.2 509.1
855 6 309.0
819.2 392..
808.2 3*9.2
89... 329.9
918.7 702.5
9. .6.5 323.9
931.6 625.3
9"0... .07. 2


..a. .

935
981'
I 01.
932.
1 '..1


584.0
6 38 .
v0848
P88 1


.1 ______ 1 ______ 3 ______ .1 ______ a ______ a ______ I. ______ ______ ______ -


i8. 333.2

7,02; .9
1 02 ri. '
L Il-.


1 .72 8

L I' 1

1. 716.
I ..

1 13. 7






1.. 1 .

I. l i i

I. < *


.13.7

l--."

2l -





-81 1






'05


Li 52.8

o. 303.


l, iM.3. -
1.33'.
L. 388.t,
1, .-:.6. 41
1. 3I 3.q
'}92 i,
L ')83. -

L '0I
1 .0. -







I


Iicr Ilu lP i ,, r h -, r afa, ,, .r .1 I. ii,. -

I W i. r u l. tr, 1 I "


.. 1 r i I .i I -- .r., ,,.I 1 l.l .fe r 1r .1 .


3 878.

1, 1 3.
188.9
1il .0
165 2
28-. 5
3t.3 .
-2-. 0
321
335..
3-8.0

.65.9






350. 2


. 521. 3

i99.-
96.0
97.2
1-1.5


119. 3
132. 1
130. 7
120.9
15G. 3
113.9
121.0
1-7.0






I .
I-1.i


12. b8. 3

. 7) ...
83U. 1
883.2
1, 031. L

1.010. 7
S.063 -
1.077.2
1-.9. 1
1. 197. .


1.137.01
I. 131. '




.


I 23.b

I : .1*'


-63'.6

829.8
8-8.-

988. 1
1 100...

939...
1.02.. i
I. 132.
1. 120.8
1. 13. .






L 121 -
I. i

I 2 .2 ,,


59 257.9

23. 1 .
3.6851.
3.939 0
5. 140. 1
5,- '95, .
7. i ,


..592.1
5. 1.1.5
5. 584...
5.497. 3
5. 213.5



2 8.4, 1



h 3.5. 1
i .4.)
t,.04' .


10 L177.1

.4'5. 9

665.4
689.4
878.2
854. 3
908. 0
856.9
777.5
855.8
891.1
953.1
925. 1
921.6





873.2


1 1 3.
.63 3


5,00b.8

1.876. 3
.32.3
236.0
389.9
509.1
309.0
392.-
349.2
329.9
702.5
323.9
r,25.3
1.07.2





584.0
E-. -.
6 8.1
b68. I


1.025.5
150.3
176.8
243.7
210.1
244.6
215.6
164.6
192.5
208.7
231.0
238.9
228.9


2.505.

1,025.5
150.3
176.8
243.7
210.1
264.6
215.6
166.6
192.5
208.7
231.0
238.9
228.9


7, rh .r..35 aIr.1 r- ..tea pr.'U il ..T P F.
i. Var.aul a ture.l .-r., I- l I .-'ii k rl .r ily by matErnal
7 1,.: iPr,. r -a Id r an- p.,r' I u p.'' l
5 ii 1 n.e u i arii.i in i r a. if l I rr .P.F
e- r.miten 5r.a mtr ni a 1i ..- -" 3 -\I Cled Pieahere



.p 1, r. .r I. i .1 ,.. i --.-onal pattern-. The monthly seasonally
i -l 'r I I i ,, i i bI I i 1t .,rt I r(a% I


'


L u10 ju. T ed


.*


7


LI


3 1


S 1 1 l, I r i t I .r ._ lr J. t r i r p.. .r 1 .
S .p, r I .v ,, r. ,. r iP r.1 il ;1 i .. th a a h i i.Tmpo L ] .











Table 5. U.S. General Imports (f.a.s. Value Basis) of Merchandise, Schedule A Sections, Seasonally

Adjusted and Unadjusted, by Month: January 1978 to May 1979

(In millions of dollars. See gExplanaton of Scaretiics for Leforminlaon on coverage. date of lmportatlon. deflotl onof f.a.m. Import value, and
sources of error In the data. Unadjusted totals represent sum of unrounded figures and hence may vary lightly from mum of rounded amount)

Schedule A sectionoa'
Period
0' 1 2 3' .' 5 6 7 8 9'


Seasonally adjusted


1978

January-May....... .. 5.800." 8. .' 3 '.' L1' 1 ]3 21.. l 1 11 5801 1 II Qq 7 ? S.0lt 1 h h1.1

January...... .... .... .. 12b0.9 1k] 1 obd 3-.*22 2 24.3 -.7? 2 107'.2 3.512 1 1.356.8 1 1 2"
February .... ..... .... ...... L L111.- 1n..9 '8.. 3 502.3 .30.: 2 .813 5 3.926.6 I..83.6 255 6
arceh.......... ...... L 257 5 150.6 17j (; 3 -31.2 ..'1 5-. .3 2 .1.' 3.695.Q 1.-b9 9 3' 1 "
April........... .. ... L161.5 212.8 751 7 3 513.5 7..7 537 .-16.8 3.958.8 1.558.1 338 3
Iay .......... .. ....... 1.l14). 182.8 Bl 3.23...1 51.5 517 .i 2 310.8 3 836.3 1 5.0.1 319.'
June........ .... .......... 1.0-5.9 19...1 71 9. 3. 71.5 L.- ? .- 2 065. i 3.9-3 6 1.601.8 338.3
July................... .. ... 1 126.1 187.3 7,. 7 3 380 1 .9.. 5 ,75.1 2 387.3 ...1.1.3 1.62.. 9 3:' 7
August ............. .... .... .. 92... L8.8 7 5.3 3 677.1 .3.0 5...- 9 2.227.5 3 778.8 1. 15.9 327 5
September......... ......... ... 1 0.n.9 186.3 781.7 3 698.9 30.2 54. 2.2o2.9 -.192.6 1. 717.5 30.5
October...................... 1.152 2 206.1 818.0 3 0.1.6 -0.9 45b 2 30?.6 4 210.4 1.080.9 318.8
November ..... .. ..... .......... 1.l 8.7 200.3 8-.. 3.536.2 51.7 -7.. 2 330. 3 ,179.8 1.712.6 3 7.2
December ...................... 1 254.1 198.0 i. 3. 746.3 33. 1 b3 '. 1 2 139. 3 -.271.7 1, 639.0 186. 1

1979

January-May...................... I i i Ih..t' ti j

January.. ...... ..... .... .. 1,278 3 207.3 827.6b -.228.0 89 5 ill.' 2. 36 .6 4- 650 8 1,76-.. 309.4
February ... .. .. ........ ... .6.f.' I .... ... .. .6 i l 3$I 8 28a .9
March......... ..... .... .. I 2.2 6 .1'.. .88 ,.' 3.1-7.q 75 7 .'-.5 .3'b6.5 O' '. 1 546 0 35I 8
April............... .... 1.325 7 21..' 90C0 7 2 0 .. 60.7 2.2-.8 I f 7 ?87 0
Mly ... .. .. ..... ... .5 '. ... 1 .. -
June ......................
July....................... ..
August ... ........ ..........
September...............
October............ .... ....
November .. ..........
December .... ...............

Lnadjusted


1978

January-December........ .... 13. 20. 2.221.. 9.2qB. o .2.105.2 511.1 6.-.27.- 27.237.3 -7.625.6 19.062.1 018.1

January-May.......... ... .... .. .800 7 8btS. 1 633. I'1 10).- 'i .1 2 691.3 11 :I2 1I14 22 n M ]32.. I bl6 I

January............... ..... 1.126.9 138.1 9.' 3 t.22.2 29.3 .18.9 982.9 3.392.7 1.227.9 129.2
February.... .......... .... .. 1.111.4 lb2.4 .1 3. .502 3 kb.6 .72.7 2. 195.a 3,573.2 1.293.7 255. -
March........ ............. .. 1.257.5 1-..7 'r,'-. i 3 .31.2 b.6.0 60-..2 2 33..l .,050.7 1.511.1 31' .-
April.................. ....... 1.161.5 201.5 7, 9 i. .3 513.5 1.2.7 611.b 2 383.0 .,085.5 1,- 9.' 338.3
May.................. ... ... 1.143.. 189.2 P', 3 23...1 51.5 583.' 2. 159 3 ..020.. 1 .60.0 319 7
June ............. ..... ..... L.0,5.9 212.7 ?nt 0 3 .k71.5 ..6. I 507.2 2 301 0 .. 132.9 1.651.5 118.3
July.................. ...... 1. 126.1 177.. 7J5.3 3. 80. 38 1 9.. 5.b.9 2 1.18.3 .., 108.2 1.782.5 32 7
August.... ......... ......... 924.0 170.2 813 3.77.1 -3.0 51 ..9 2 218.6 3.578.5 1. 756.5 327.5
September.................. ... L..04 .9 168.2 86;7.0 3698.q 30.2 537.9 2 215.. 3.832.0 1. 151.9 30b.5
October ........ .............. 1 152.2 211.5 827.o 3 .91 6 '.0.9 5-1.. 2. 34...5 4.29' .6 I 1.827 1 38i 8
November.... ............... 1.168.7 209.6 831? 3 516.2 21.7 512.5 2.373.. 4..238.3 1, 799.9 12' ?
December ......... ............ 1.254.1 205.9 80'.. 7 .',.3 33.0 535.3 2 LI 5 -.318.7 L.560.3 386.1

1979

Jamu iry- iy ........ I -. .. -. .- .- .

January .. ....... .... ........ .1,278.3 20&..8 812. 7 ..228.0 19 5 5132.2 2,255.8 4.515.9 1. b19.7 309.4
February. ................ I :B. PS A -6'S
March......... ..... ............ 1 .2.s 221.9 8"'S .1 3 1 '.** 5 ,.1 2 2-.'..0 -18 3 1 St' 5'.8
April. .... .. .... .. .... 1.325." 2 .3 87u' 1 I. 7-0 6 -* 2 .'J8.$ 2 2 2'qi 0 I 5. *. 287.0
M y . . . 1 i ." 1
June ... .. ... .......
July .........................
AugusT ............ ..........
September. .... ..............
October........ ..... .. .
November......................
December ......................

1Schedule A section descriptions are as forll*s
0. Food and live animals 5. rhemti.lA ind rl-.iirul prnldu'ctb. %.S.P.T.
1. Beverages and tobacco h ttanuiacrurrt.d ,mdd c.lj. iftld chletly by material
2. Crude materials. inedible. exccpi fuels 7. tiachiner) and tronopurr .-ilppenL
3. ittneral fuels, lubricants, and related material 8. iLtactllanrout manufaclurcl articles '.S.P.F.
6. OIl@ and fels--animal and vegetable Q. rCoiri r' rm; and transa.ct nns not classified pelathere
'Adjusted for seasonal and working-day variation usine seasonal adjustient [c tors tr.r-nuctd in Janu'ar. 1979. Adjustment factors hlae not been
applied to data for Schedule 4 sections 0. 3. 4. and 9 due to the absence of dernt llable demonslrable rn-...Nal patterns. The monthly seasonally
adjusted import toals (f.a.5. I presented In tables I and 3 are derived b) adriinl 'r.: r pint.nt t .ad[ [.r. .in'ft. n In s table. iSee fo,'jnote
I at the boltoc of page 5.1 Annual totals are not shown for seasonally adjusted jte. I nadluSir1 d.laa -h.uld be used for annual totals.









10

Table 6. U.S. General Imports (c.i.f. Value Basis) of Merchandise, Schedule A Sections, Seasonally

Adjusted and Unadjusted, by Month: January 1978 to May 1979

(In millions of dollars. See Explanation of Statistics for Information on coverage, date of itportation, definition of c.I.f. Import value, and
sources of error in the data. Unadjusted totals represent aum of unrounded figures and hence may vary slightly from sum of rounded amounts)

Schedule A sectionst

Period
0' I 2 31' 6' 5 6 7 8 6'


Seasonally adjusted


1978

Januar -May ......... ... ...... b,196.8 930.6 -,067.u 18,113.6 231.1 2,700.5 12,4.41.6 20,092.0 7,944.2 1,641.5

January 1,19-.2 156 6 712.1 3.b23.3 31 5 -32.4 2,265 5 3,721 9 1,.54.9 334.3
February. 1,.183 1 178.' 83.5 3,713 2 50 1 529.9 2,068.2 ',168.2 1,592.8 260.1
Marcn.. ,3.0 3 1-. 829.- 3,62b.9 .9 3 573.1 2,.29..4 3,930 6 1,571 6 378.5
April .. .2-6 231.0 803.9 3,22.7 -.5 5 503 6 2,599.6 .,203 8 1,672.9 344.0
May... 1. ,232 5 200.2 863.i 3,.27.' 5-.? 601 .5 2,-68.9 -.067 5 1,652 0 324.6
June .. ,12b.1 212 5 7 01 3,b61.1 .9 2 580.2 2.205.1 4,183.4 1,717.5 343.3
July .. ... 1,213.7 206 2 812.4. 3,581.5 52.3 607.8 2.561.2 ..,378.8 1,76.3 335.3
August .... 995.0 218.9 862.5 3.90'.3 45.7 573.2 2,397.6 .,006.7 1,733.9 332.9
September .. 1,130.0 205 8 843.5 3,931 5 32 2 62- 7 2,434.5 4,-57.1 1,843 5 312.0
October .. .. 12..0.8 225.6 87..7 3,713., .3.1 58o 2,462.1 4,'27.5 1,798.1 392.2
November. ..... .. .. 1,25,.0 219.1 914. 3 3,776.5 55.8 521 1 2,070.5 4,.02.8 1,821.1 333.4
December. .. 1.3- .' 215 5 85'..- '.023 6 3..9 59b.5 2,290 9 .,505., 1,746.6 391.8

1979

January -Mav .... .. ........... 6 5.f, 1 '-6 .4 '" '.6 aJ ..,I I : ', : l 'i .- "?, ,9- 1 8 8 23 3 1,70 7 .4

January....................... 1,379.2 226.? 885.6 .,530.0 94.6 5-1.0 2,526.9 4,896.8 1,886.2 314.9
February.. .... .. ...... 1,1'8 4 1"1.6 ?22. 5 .'0 !. _91.6 2,,60.' L.,53 9 i.72.4 289.0
March .. .. ..... 1.335.6 212.2 939.3 -,230.- 58.- 623.1 2.528.6 ..298.5 1.6-5.7 356.4
April ... ... ... .. 1 -23.6 235.6 9bl.2 -,539.0 'o.7 590.5 2,400.9 .,789.7 1,.773.7 292.2
May. *. ...c. 6 ,l 1 .f '. 1 ..9- 9 .' 5.5 454.9
June. .............
July.....................
August ........................
September.....................
October.......................
November ......................
December.....................

Urnad ju ted

1978

January-December.............. 2-,510.1 .,-29. i 9,998,7 --,.28.7 5-..? 6,77? 0 29,220.5 50,-29.0 20,.15.9 4,082.5

January-May................... ,196.8 94..o 3,891.6 18,113.8 231.1 2,839.2 12,090.3 20,297.4 1,.33.0 1,641.5

January....................... 1,19..2 15i.1 o92.- 3,623.3 : 1.5 .- 5 2,131.8 3,595.4 1,316.7 334.3
February...................... 1,183.1 176.0 719.. 3,'13 2 50.1 500.8 2,367.5 3,i93.1 1,388.9 260.1
March ......................... 1 ,3- .3 190.. 619.- 3,626.9 -9.3 636 I 2,50: .1 ,307.9 1,615.6 378.5
April......................... 1 ,21'b.7 21o 8 758.1 3,722.7 -5.5 -.. .9 2,5o3.2 u,338.3 1,545.8 3"4.0
May........................... 1 ,232.5 20' 2 902.5 3,.-2 .7 5..7 5 7 1 2,520.7 ..,262.7 1,566.1 321..6
June.......................... 1,126.1 232.9 82-.a 3,681.1 -9 ;- 560.2 2,-5; .2 4,384.2 1,.770.8 343.3
July........................... 1,2i3.7 i95.3 57.9 3,581.5 52.3 57'6 0 2,59- 5 .,3-3.8 1,915.2 335.3
August........................ 995 0 18; 882.3 3 .90:.3 5.7 5-1.? 2,368.0 3,79. 4. ,88..8 332.9
September..................... 1,136.0 185.8 892.1 3,931.5 32 2 565 2,363.. .,073 8 1,880.. 312.0
October....................... 1 ,2-U0. 230 8 884.3 3,713.-. -3.1 530.. 2,501 5 &,516 1 1,95-.5 392.2
November....................... 1 ,255.0 229.0 902.. 3,776.5 55.8 "39.9 2,5,.4.6 4,.6... 1,914.0 333.4
December...................... 1 ,3-0.7 22-.1 86.9 -,023.6 3-.9 563 1 2,261.1 1,555.0 1,662.8 391.8

1979

January-May.................. .. ,.5. : 1 O.c- 1 [,'S.. .56! 29..j 7.1!.7 fl ,'..;' 1 :332' 9 8,250 6 1.707.4

January....................... 1 ,:2'9 2 22-.0 un9.7 -,530.0 9- 6 2.t3 2 2,-10 -,754.8 1,731.5 314.9
February..................... I 1 .- 169.4 "' 1m. ( *L .. .. .,263.' -,'1 1 7 1.519.. 289.0
March............... .......... 1, 335.3 2.0 911. i 230.o. 56.. 066..' 2.5.' 9.2 4,676.8 1,670.-. 356.
April......................... 1,. 3.t. 225.2 Q-8.5 -, 39.0 4b.b b83.2 2.403.3 5.005.2 1.6,7.8 292.2
May.... ... ............. 7 .. i,- i. ..-3 -; .6 ., ,'9. ** 1.681 4 ..5 .9
June ........................
July..........................
August........................
September .....................
October.......................
November......................
December................... .

'Schedule A section descriptionE ar a toii,).-
0. Food and live animals i Cnemical-: an, related products, N S.P F
1. Beverages and tobacco t Manufactured good classiflea crleiely by material
2. Crude materials, inedibi,-, =ept luels ? Mar.itricr) ana transport *,qulpment
3. Mineral fuels, lubricants, and rIlated material 6 Ma-ceilanFou. manufactured article-, N. S P.E.
4. Oils and fats--ar,, ai ana ve-,etable 9 CorT..ndlt-.1 and transactiunm not classified elsewhere
'Adjusted for -easonsl and working-aay variation using seasonally adjustment factors intro-Juced .n JanuarN 1979. Adjustment factors have not been
applied to data for Schedule A section's i, 3, arnd 9 oue to tha absence of laeritiltable eat-on.l Dartern-. Tnf monthly seasonally adjusted Import
totals (c.i.f.) presented in tables I and 3 are derived bv adding the component totals presented in this table. (See footnote I ar the bottom of
page 5.) Annual totals are not sno n for seasonall, adjusted data. Unadjusted data should be used for annual totals,









GENERAL IMPORTS OF PETROLEUM AND SELECTED PETROLEUM PRODUCTS INTO
THE U.S. CUSTOMS AREA AND U.S. VIRGIN ISLANDS, UNADJUSTED

Monthly and cumulative-to-date data on general imports of petroleum and selected petroleum products into the U.S. Customs area
and into the U S. Virgin Islands for the period January 1978 through the current month are presented in the tables that follow. Tables
1-A and 1 B present imports into the U.S. Customs area and tables 2-A and 2-B present imports into the U.S. Virgin Islands. (It should
be noted that imports into the Virgin Islands are excluded from the regularly compiled foreign trade statistics and. therefore, are ex-
cluded from the data presented in tables 1-A and 1-B as well as the other tables shown in the front of this report.-See "Explanation of
Statistics".

Effective with January 1979 statistics. certain changes were made in the commodity classifications (Schedule A and TSUSA) covering
petroleum products. These changes are reflected in the listing of classifications shown below. Data presented in tables 1-8 and 2-8 which
follow reflect all changes in classifications, etlective January 1979.

Schedule A and TSUSA Commodity Numbers Used in Compiling the Petroleum
Information Presented in This Report


Energy products

Schedule A No.


Nonenergy products

Schedule A No.


TSUSA No.


Crude petroleum and deriv-
atives to be refined
333.0020
333.0040
334.5440*

Crude petroleum
333.0020
333.0040

Gasoline
334.1500


475.0510
475.1010
475.6510


475.0510
475.1010


475.2520, 475.2560


Lubricating oils
334.5410 pt.

Lubricating greases
334.5410 pt.

Paraffin and other mineral
waxes
335.1225 pt.
335.1245


475.4500


475.5500, 475.6000



494.2200
494.2400


Jet fuel
334.1205

Kerosene
334.2000


Distillate fuel oil
334.3021

334.3045

Residual fuel oil
334.4050
334.4060

Propane and butane gas
341.0025

Liquid derivatives of
petroleum, n.e.s.
334.5430 pt.


S475.2530
475.2550

475.3000


!475.0525
475.0545
475.1015
475.1025

475.0535
475.1035


Naphthas
334.5420

Asphalt
335.4500


All other petroleum products
(pitch of tar coke, non-
liquid hydrocarbon mix-
tures, and calcined petro-
leum and coal coke not for
fuel)
335.3000 pt.
334.5430 pt.
598.5020 pt.


475.1525, 475.1535,
475.1545


475.6530


FT 900 Effective with February 1978 statistics


TSUSA No.


475.3500


521.1100


401.6200
475.7000
517.5120
517.5140














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U.S. Department
of Commerce
BUREAU OF THE CENSUS
Washington, D.C. 20233
Official Business


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
1111IIIIIHilil|IRIIHHI
3 1262 08566 2286
COM-202
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