United States foreign trade

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
United States foreign trade
Alternate title:
United States foreign trade. FT900, Summary of United States export and import merchandise trade
Portion of title:
Summary of U.S. export and import merchandise trade
Abbreviated Title:
U.S. foreign trade, FT900, Summ. U.S. export import merch. trade
Physical Description:
13 v. : ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of the Census
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census :
For sale by the Subscriber Services Section (Publications), Bureau of the Census
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Creation Date:
April 1979
Publication Date:
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Imports -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Exports -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Commerce -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
statistics   ( marcgt )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Issued also to depository libraries in microfiche.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Dec. 1976-
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Ceased in 1988.
General Note:
"FT 900."
General Note:
Description based on: Jan. 1979; title from caption.
General Note:
Beginning with July 1980 for sale by the Supt. of Docs., U.S.G.P.O.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Mar. 1988.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001320869
notis - AGH1745
oclc - 07222812
lccn - 81646118
issn - 0730-3270
sobekcm - AA00005268_00001
Classification:
ddc - 382/.0973/00212
System ID:
AA00005268:00030

Related Items

Preceded by:
Summary of U.S. export and import merchandise trade
Succeeded by:
U.S. merchandise trade. Seasonally adjusted imports and exports

Full Text
c Z3 bq'-"oo.-q"'q


Seasonally Adjusted and Unadjusted Data
(Including unadjusted data on imports of petroleum and petroleum products)


F.A.S. EXPORTS AND F.A.S. IMPORTS
Seasonally Adjusted
The Bureau of the Census, Department of Commerce an-
nounced today that during April 1979, exports on a
f.a.s. (free alongside ship) U.S. port of exportation
value basis, excluding Department of Defense (DOD)
Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid shipments, amount-
ed to $13,882.56 million and that general imports on a
f.a.s. foreign port of exportation value basis, amounted
to $16,035.8 million.1 2*
Based on the above export and import figures, the
April merchandise trade balance was in deficit by $2,153.2
million.' 2 s
During the first 4-months of 1979 (January-April),
exports on a seasonally adjusted basis were at an annual
rate of $164,920 million, a level about 15 percent
higher than the calendar year 1978 total of $143,575
million. Imports for the January-April 1979 period were
at an annual rate of $187,040 million, an increase of
about 9 percent over the calendar year 1978 total of
$172,026 million.
For the 4-month period, January-April 1979, exports
averaged $13,743.3 million per month, about 4 percent
higher than the $13,227.1 million average reported for
the preceding 4-month period, September-December 1978.
Imports on a f.a.s. value basis, averaged $15,586.6
million per month for the current 4-month period, a
level about 5 percent higher than the $14,882.0 million
average reported for the preceding 4-month period.' 2 3
Unadjusted
Exports excluding Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid
shipments decreased from $15,584.4 million in March to
$14,257.0 million in April. With Military Assistance
Program Grant-Aid shipments included, exports decreased
from $15,586.7 million in March to $14,267.3 million in
April. General imports increased from $15,764.8 million
in March to $16,172.0 million in April.
Note : Footnotes 1, 2, and 3 are shown at the bottom
of page 5.


F.A.S. EXPORTS AND C.I.F. IMPORTS
Seasonally Adjusted
The Bureau of the Census, Department of Commerce an-
nounced today that during April 1979, exports on a
f.a.s. (free alongside ship) U.S. port of exportation
value basis, excluding Department of Defense (DOD)
Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid shipments, amount-
ed to $13,882.6 million and that general imports on a
c.i.f. (cost, insurance, and freight) U.S. oort of entry
value basis, amounted to $17,053.1 million.' 2 3
Based on the above export and import figures, the
April merchandise trade balance was in deficit by
$3,170.5 million.' 2 3
During the first 4-months of 1979 (January-April),
exports on a seasonally adjusted basis were at an annual
rate of $164,920 million, a level about 15 percent
higher than the calendar year 1978 total of $143,575
million. Imports for the January-April 1979 period were
at an annual rate of $198,849 million, an increase of
about 9 percent over the calendar year 1978 total of
$183,137 million.
For the 4-month period, January-April 1979 exports
averaged $13,743.3 million per month, about 4 percent
higher than the $13,227.1 million average reported for
the preceding 4-month period, September-December 1978.
Imports on a c.i.f. value basis, averaged $16,570.8
million per month for the current 4-month period, a level
about 5 percent higher than the $15,840.1 million average
reported for the preceding 4-month period.' 2 3
Unadjusted
Exports excluding Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid
shipments decreased from $15,584.4 million in March to
$14,257.0 million in April. With Military Assistance
Program Grant-Aid shipments included, exports decreased
from $15,586.7 million in March to $14,267.3 million in
April. General imports increased from $16,747.6 million
in March to $17,194.8 million in April.


f r U.S. Department
VC of Commerce
S BUREAU OF
\ /J THE CENSUS


Inquirim concerning their figure should be addressed to the Chief, Foreign Trade Division, Bureau of
the Csus, Washington. D.C. 20233. Td: Area Code 301. 763-5140; 763-7754; and 763-7755.
For ale by the Subscriber Serve Section (Publiations),. Buraeu of the Censua, Wahington, D.C.
20233, or ay U.S. Depnt ant of CmmCrce district office. Posag stamps not cepuble; cumrrncy
Mbnmih Mt nd mmd ri. d Ranittanc from foreign countries must be by intertional money oder
or by a draft on a U.S. bank. Prim 30 mntsper copy. Annual sasription (FT 900. 975, SS. and 9id
cornbined) $14.90.


UNITED STATES FOREIGN TRADE

Summary of U.S. Export and

SImp rt Merchandise Trade
\\ UNIV. O)FFL LIB.
DOCUMENTS DEPT

.... APRIL 1979

11 r Ba'm r,,amE ,., Fo wire transmission 2:30 P.M. Wednesday. May 30. 1979.


FT900-79-4








EXPLANATION OF STATISTICS


IMPORT STATISTICS

Coverage

The U.S. import statistics reflect both government and
nongovernment imports of merchandise from foreign countries
into the U.S. Customs territory, which includes the 50 States,
the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. The U.S. import
statistics exclude imports into the Virgin Islands, Guam,
American Samoa, and other U.S. possessions; and shipments
between the United States and Puerto Rico, between the United
States and U.S. possessions, and between any of these outlying
areas. (Data on U.S. trade with Puerto Rico and the Virgin
Islands of the United States are published separately in Report
FT 800. Additional data on such trade and on imports into the
Virgin Islands from foreign countries are presented in reference
tabulations.) Data on imports of petroleum and selected
petroleum products, including shipments into the Virgin Islands
from foreign countries, are included in this report effective with
the January 1976 statistics (previously shown in former Report
FT 900-Supplement).
The U.S. import statistics also exclude American goods re-
turned to the United States by its Armed Forces;intransit ship-
ments through the United States when documented as such
with Customs; temporary shipments; transactions not con-
sidered to be of statistical significance, such as shipments of
personal and household effects; low-valued nondutiable im-
ports by mail; and issued monetary coins of all component
metals.

Inclusion of Gold in the Statistics

Effective with the statistics for January 1978, imports of
nonmonetary gold (in such forms as ore, scrap and base bullion,
nonmonetary refined bullion, etc.) which were previously
excluded, are now included in the statistics. Imports of silver in
these forms have been included since January 1969. Additional
information regarding the inclusion of gold in the 1978 statistics
appears in the January 1978 issues of Report FT 990 and
FT 135.

General Imports/Imports For Consumption

The statistics on U.S. imports are presented in terms of both
"General Imports" and "Imports for Consumption." General
imports are a combination of entries for immediate con-
sumption and entries into Customs bonded warehouses, and
thus generally reflect total arrivals of merchandise. Imports for
consumption are a combination of entries for immediate
consumption and withdrawals from warehouses for con-
sumption. and thus generally reflect the total of the com-
modities entered into U.S. consumption channels.

Source Of Import Information

The official U.S. import statistics are compiled by the Bureau
of the Census from copies of the import entry and warehouse
withdrawal forms which importers are required by law to file
with Customs officials. The information as to country of origin,
net quantity, value, and commodity classification is verified by
Customs officials on entries filed for transactions valued over
$250, which are ordinarily subject to examination for Customs


appraisement purposes. The statistical copy of the entry is
corrected if it does not accurately reflect the informationlail
called for by the statistical requirements.

Import Valuation

F.a.s. Import Value. -The f.a.s. (free alongside ship) value:
represents the transaction value of imports at the foreign part ov
exportation. It is based on the purchase price, i.e., the actual
transaction value and generally includes all charges incurred ini
placing the merchandise alongside the carrier at the port of.
exportation in the country of exportation. I

CJ.f. Import Value.-The c.i.f. (cost, insurance, and freight)
value represents the value of imports at the first port of entry in
the United States. It is based on the purchase price and includes.
all freight, insurance, and other charges (excluding U.S. import;
duties) incurred in bringing the merchandise from the country|
of exportation and generally placing it alongside the carrier at
the first port of entry in the United States. If the merchandise
was acquired in a transaction between related parties, their
purchase price used in deriving the c.i.f. value is based on an
arm's-length equivalent transaction price, i.e., a price which
would exist between unrelated buyers and sellers.

Import Commodity Information

Import data are initially reported in terms of the commodity
classifications in the Tariff Schedules of the United States An-
notated (TSUSA), which is an official publication of the U.S.,
International Trade Commission, embracing the legal text of
the Tariff Schedules of the United States together with statis-
tical annotations. The TSUSA data are rearranged and presented
in this report in terms of totals for the 1-digit commodity
sections in Schedule A, Statistical Classification of Commoditiet
Imported Into the United States, which is based upon the:
Standard International Trade Classification (SITC), Revision 2,.
effective with the statistics for January 1978. Prior to January
1978, Schedule A was based upon the former SITC, Revised. *

Date of Importation and Import Monthly Carryover I

It is the objective of the compiling procedures to include
shipments, insofar as practicable, in the statistics for the actual *:'
month of importation (or the month of withdrawal in the case
of warehouse withdrawals for consumption). Prior to 1978, the i1.
date of Customs official acceptance of the import entry
documents was used to determine the statistical month in which
the shipments were included. Effective with the January 1978
statistics, the date of importation as reported on the import
entries is being used to determine the statistical month.
However. since under the Customs "immediate-delivery" pro&
cedures importers may file the import entry up to 10 workdays'
after the date of release of the merchandise, some documents:
for merchandise imported during the last few days of a given
month may not be received in time for inclusion in the statistics
for that month. As a result, there is a carryover, estimated at
about 15 percent from the actual month of importation to a
subsequent month. In addition, processing problems (e.g., late
filing of documents, rejection of a shipment by the computer :
because the data fail to meet certain edit criteria established to
A








protect the accuracy of the statistics. etc.) contribute to an
additional carryover of about 5 perLent (in terms of value) of
shipments from the reported month of importation (or with.
drawal from warehouse) to a subsequent month. usually the
succeeding month. These limitations should be borne in mind
when making month-tu-month comparisons.

Cumulations of data over at least 4-month periods are desir-
able to identify underlying trends. Month-to-month changes in
imports, exports, and similar series often reflect primarily
irregular movements, e.g., exogenous events such as strikes,
differences in monthly carryover, etc.


Estimated Data for Imports Valued Under $251

The overall import and Schedule A Section 9 totals include
sample estimates for shipments valued under $251. Therefore,
they are subject to sampling error, estimated at less than
one-tenth of one percent for the unadjusted overall total and
about one percent for the unadjusted Schedule A Section 9
total. This means that we can have about 67 percent confidence
that the published unadjusted overall totals and the unadjusted
Schedule A Section 9 totals differ by less than one-tenth of a
percent and one percent, respectively, from the totals thai
would have resulted from a complete tabulation. The statistics
on imports of petroleum and petroleum products included in
this report reflect fully compiled data and, therefore, are not
subject to sampling error.



EXPORT STATISTICS

Coverage
The export statistics reflect, in general. both government and
nongovernment exports of domestic and foreign merchandise
from the U.S. Customs territory (includes the 50 States, the
District of Columbia. and Puerto Rico) to foreign countries,
whether the exportation involves a commercial transaction or
not. The statistics, therefore, include Department of Defense
Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid shipments. shipments for
economic assistance under the Foreign Assistance Act and
shipments of agricultural commodities under P.L. 480 (The
Agricultural Trade Development and Assistance Act of 1954, as
amended) and related laws. The following are excluded from the
statistics: Shipments to U.S. Armed Forces and diplomatic
missions abroad for their own use; shipments between the
United States and Puerto Rico. between the United States and
its possessions (including the Virgin Islands), and between these
outlying areas exports from U.S. possessions; intransit ship-
ments through the United States. transactions not considered to
be of statistical importance, such as personal and household
effects; temporary exports; low-valued or non-commercial
exports by mail; and issued monetary coins of all component
metals.

Inclusion of Gold in the Statistics.

As indicated above for imports, effective with the statistics
for January 1978, exports of nonmonetary gold (in such forms
as ore, scrap and base bullion, nonmonetary refined bulhon,
etc.) which were previously excluded, are included in the


3

statistics. Exports of silver in these forms have been included
since January 1969. Additional information regarding the
inclusion of gold in the 1978 statistics appears in the January
1978 issues of Report FT 990 and FT 410.

Definition of Exports of Domestic and Foreign Merchandise

Exports of domestic merchandise include commodities which
are grown, produced, or manufactured in the UnitedStates, and
commodities of foreign origin which have been changed in the
United States from the form in which they were imported, or
which have been enhanced in value by further manufacture in
the United States. Exports of foreign merchandise consist of
commodities of foreign origin which have entered the United
States as imports and which, at the time of exportation, are in
substantially the same condition as when imported.

Source of Export Information

The official U.S. export statistics are compiled by the Bureau
of the Census primarily from copies of Shipper's Export
Declarations which are required to be filed with Customs
officials, except for Department of Defense Military Assistance
Program Grant-Aid shipments which are reported directly to the
Bureau of the Census by the Department of Defense and
shipments by qualified exporters who have been authorized to
submit data in the form of magnetic tape, punched cards, or
monthly Shipper's Summary Export Declarations directly to
the Bureau of the Census.

Export Valuation
F.a.s. Export Value. -The value reported in the export statistics
generally is equivalent to a f.a.s. (free alongside ship) value at
the U.S. port of export, based on the transaction price.
including inland freight, insurance and other charges incurred in
placing the merchandise alongside the carrier at the U.S. port of
exportation.

Export Commodity Information
Beginning January 1978, export commodity information
is collected in terms of the commodity classifications in the
1978 edition of Schedule B, Statistical Classification of Do-
mestic and Foreign Commodities Exported from the United
States, which is based on the framework of the classification
system in the Tariff Schedules of the United States (TSUS).
In this report, the Schedule B data are rearranged and presented
in terms of totals for the 1 -digit commodity sectionsin Schedule
E, which is based upon the Standard International Trade Classi-
fication (SITC), Revision 2, effective with the statistics for
January 1978. Prior to January 1978, the export classifications
in Schedule B were based upon the organizational framework
of the former SITC, Revised.

Export Monthly Carryover
It is the objective of the compiling procedures to include
shipments, insofar as practicable, in the statistics for the actual
month of exportation. For purposes of the statistics, the month
of exportation is generally based on the date when the shipment
leaves the United States. (For vessel or air shipments it is the
date when the carrier departs or is cleared from the port of
export.) However, as indicated above for imports, because of








processing problems (e.g.. late receipt of a document for an
end-of-month shipment, rejection of a shipment by the com-
puter because the data fail to meet certain edit criteria
established to protect the accuracy of the statistics. etc.). there
is an overall average carryover of about 2 to 3 percent (in terms
of value) of the shipments from the actual month of exporta-
tion to a subsequent month, usually the succeeding month.
These limitations should be borne in mind when making
month-to-month comparisons.
Cumulations of data over at least 4-month periods are
desirable to identify underlying trends. Month-to-month
changes in imports, exports, and similar series often reflect
primarily irregular movements, differences in monthly
carryover, etc.


Adjustment for Seasonal and Working-Day Var


nation


Monthly totals for exports and imports and major com-
modity components (Schedule E and Schedule A section totals)
are shown adjusted for seasonal/working-day variation. Effec-
tive with the release of the January 1979 statistics, the seasonally
adjusted export and import totals represent the sum of com-
modity components adjusted for seasonal and working-day
variation. Previously, the monthly totals for exports and im-
ports were adjusted independently of the components. The
procedure of aggregating seasonally adjusted commodity com-
ponents more accurately reflects the seasonal movements within
the totals. Under this procedure. only those section totals that
show identifiable seasonal patterns are seasonally adjusted.


Estimated Data for Export Shipments


Effective with the March 1979 statistics, the overall export
and Schedule E section and division totals include sample esti-
mates for shipments valued $501 -$S 1,999 to Canada and for ship-
ments valued $501-$999 to countries other than Canada. Data
for shipments valued $500 and under to all countries are also
estimated, based on established percentages of individual
country totals, and included in the Schedule E Section 9 totals
regardless of the commodity exported. It is estimated that the
unadjusted overall total is subject to a sampling error of less
than one-tenth of one percent, and the unadjusted Schedule E
section or division totals are subject to sampling errors of aboul
one percent. In addition, the Schedule E Section 9 total is sub-
ject to possible error in the estimated data for shipments valued
$500 and under; and the overall total, and the individual totals
for sections other than Section 9, to a more limited extent.
Such $500 and under shipments represent about 1 percent of
the total value of exports, and about 30 percent of the Schedule
E Section 9 total. Prior to the March 1979 statistics, the overall
export and Schedule E section and division totals include
sample estimates for shipments valued $251-$1,999 to Canada
and for shipments valued $251-$999 to countries other than
Canada.


SOURCES OF ERROR IN THE STATISTICS

Monthly import and export figures are subject to the
possibility of errors which may arise from sources other than
sampling errors, discussed above. Among these are errors in the
reporting and/or processing of information as to commodity
classification, value and other statistical factors, month of
inclusion (see paragraphs on import and export carryover.
above), and the undercounting of exports to Canada due to the
non-receipt of Shipper's Export Declarations. For 1978.
the undercounting is estimated to be about $2 billion dollars.
In the case of imports the information as to value and
commodity classification (as well as country of origin and net
quantity) is verified by Customs officials on entries filed for
transactions valued over $250 which are ordinarily subject to
examination for Customs appraisement purposes, thus con-
siderably reducing the possibility of error. In addition, the
procedures used to compile both the import and export sta-
tistics include clerical and computer processing checks designed
to protect the accuracy of the statistics to the fullest practicable
extent.


MERCHANDISE TRADE BALANCES

Two trade balances are presented in this report:
I) The balance between exports based on f.a.s. values and
imports based on f.a.s. values.
21 The balance between exports based on l.a.s. values and
imports based on c.i.f. values with adjustments for imports from
affiliated sellers abroad to reflect arms-length equivalent prices.
Both balances are useful for certain purposes. The first
balance corresponds to a measurement of the international
payments or credit flows resulting from mer.nandise trade
between the U.S. and foreign countries. The second balance is
based on concepts similar to those used by most foreign
countries, and therefore provides a reference for comparison
with the trade balances published by those countries.



REVISIONS TO THE STATISTICS

Under the revision policy adopted effective with the 1977
statistics, revisions to the monthly statistics for the current year
will be issued once a year, i.e., with the reports for June of the
following year. Thus, revisions to 1979 statistics will be issued
only in June 1980.



SOURCES OF FURTHER INFORMATION

Addlliolnil foreign tride statilicss and information regarding
coverage. v-liillion. s-mpling. and LluililfiClations which should
be considered by users of tlh stmJIIsIns ire contained primarily
in the I'olhlov Ag piiblicalilons Report FT 990. Highlights of U.S.
Export and linpori Trade. FT 135. U.S General Imports,.
Schedule A Cmmiiiodut hb Countr). FT 410. U.S Exports.
Schedule E Coinuoditl by Country. and the Guide to Foreign
Trade Statisilcs. Inloriatiuin regarding additional sources of
statistics, ilte iuetiodolog, used in eeaisonially adjusting the data.,
and other matters relating to foreign trade statistics may be
obtained from the Foreign Trade Division, Bureau of the
Census, Washington, D.C. 20233.







5

Table 1. U.S. Exports (f.a.s. Value Basis), General Imports (f.a.s. and c.i.f. Value Basis), and Merchandise

Trade Balance, Adjusted for Seasonal and Working-Day Variation, by Month: January 1978

to April 1979

(in millions of dollars. See Explanation of Statistics for Informatlon on coverage, date of importation, delinltIons of export and import values and
trade balances, and sources of error In the data)

r a .. Ecpor, t- it., f i lT.-,,;r i : i xpi-'r : ar, c t ImIpcr'.r1
i .as,.n ails adoiu t r- l i' easona!ly alj..-t al
Period
Tr ajc Trade
i porrl, i rl"t r re imp-t ..p L'nte


1978

January-April....... -..., t. 5i ,' -13,2 2. 1 -2,ic'.t S',.--6 9 -16,861l.

January. ... .. .) 13. 103 r -3 J. i 9.O l3 7 3i d2o. -. 061.0
February 9 9. 0 I. ?9 9 -). l1,. 9 .., :1 1".. l9 .') -5.2.8.0)
March.. .. 1. -r,.. i-u.. 1 B, I. 11. 5 1-, 93.2 -3). 7.
April.... ....... ... ........ .... LI c'. -L v Ao L 11 ii': l,-i. Li -3.803.o
May. .. 11 'is.0 1- :"'i 1 -. '.6 12b 6
June. .. 12..'68.2 13.9",. -I 79.1 I I: h 2 1- 6o-.- -2.60L 2

July .. .. ,-- -2 111 -It. '., 1,0...~... -3 833 9
August ........ ... .. .. 12 2 3 1. 1[ l -1 83 9 L2 2; 3. ; 1) '3.6 -2 '!9.9
September... ... 13 I 1 -1 i 13 2--.? 15,620 -2.i.6.
October...... .. .. .. .12 9ul 1 I..9i.n -1 95' I.O1 L 3, 7b3 8 -2,862.7
November .. .. 13,..50 .82-.' -1 3'- 1 1 -..0 li b -2. 319.
December.. .. ... 13 j l[i 3 -- '3 1. 11 282 b 6 .0.2 -2. 723.7



January-Aprtl .. -, -11.3 9 9

January 13 131 8 Lt. 13 1 -3 9 3 13. 131 .8 12?ai.o i-. I.

March 0 .l...;.]'l .9'' -til 3 I.5.fS1 6...?. -, -'6

May .. ..... ................. ....
June ....... ....... .. .............

July .. .. .... .... .. .....
Auguat ...... .. ....... .. .. .
September. .
October ... ................ .. ..
Novemo r . .
December . ..

Export asta represent oeinetilc arin tfor, in r. .ricaniu -. cl3,ing epartmIrr : ij'r.-i, ii1 M itiary A'-i -ra ce Pro3 ram Granrt-Aia -hiptrEnts.
Import data repre-ent general import If mercrAn-aiie
1The tot als _hctn in tht [,cle 3 ire erlv-d t. 3r.iir.- trbe ea%.inal l d. uSte .1" aitt a. 1 '.-or.er,.r i- ';ho;. -a thl.e lor AIport i Ana table 5 arM
6 for imports. See footnrie I ar the D-.rtor. '1 raf e 4,


'Export and import statistical series are adjusted Ior seasonal and work ing day vatlin but not lot changes i.r. price level Rellecling a new melaiodology introduced with staislics fo January 1979. the
adjusted monthly export and import totals for 1978 and 1919 presented in this report are derived by adding the seasonally adjusted components 11 e SITC sections) The factors used to adjust the 1978 1979
component series represent the combination of seasonal adjustment factors developed from monthly data through 1978 and the appropriate workir.gda factors in issues of this report prior to January 1979,
monthly totals were adjusted independently of rne components
'Cumulations of dala over al least 44Aonth periods are desirable TO identity underlying trends Month tornionih changes in exports imports and similar Iet.es often relle- pi.matr.l iiegular movements.
differences in monthly caryover, etc Recent month to month percent rlinges in the Overall seasonally adjusted export and mponrt series are presented ir, the following table with average percent month to
monTh rige and decline over longer periods shown fIr comparison The averages exclude pryCentage changes lor ll the period October December 1977 because of abnormalities in the data due to effects of
dock strikes and 121 periods when negligible changes (iero percenll in the level of exports/iiponrs occurred

Month-to-month Average monthly rates of change


Series Mar.-Apr. Feb.-Mar. Jan.-Feb. Dec. 1978- Average Average months 12 months
1979 1979 1979 Jan. 1979 rise decline Dec. 1978- Apr. 1978-

1977-1978 1972-1977 Apr. 1979 Apr. 1979
(Percent) (Percent) (Percent) (Percent) (Percent) (Percent) (Percent) (Percent)



F.a.s. export value.. -1.9 +7.0 +2.9 -1. 1 .4.6 -5.4 1.2 *1.6
F.a.s. import value.. ,5.0 +3.2 -8.8 +8.0 *6.4 -3.3 -.' 1.0
C.i.f. import value.. .*.1 +3.2 -9.0 +8.0 +6.4 -3.4 -1.68 0.9

'See the "Explanation of Sttistics" for definitions of the export and import values and trade balances










Table 2. U.S. Exports (f.a.s. Value Basis) of Merchandise Showing Department of Defense (DOD)

Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid Shipments, by Month: January 1978 to April 1979


(Ir millions of dollars. See Explauation of Statistics for Information on coverage, definition of f.r.a. export value, and sources of error in
the data. Unadjusted totals represent susm of unfounded figures and hence may vary slightly from sum of rounded amounts)

Exports excluding DOD Exports including
Grant-Aidl DOD Grant-Aid' DOD Grant-Aid


PerDio Domestic Domestic Domestic
and
f and Domestic, and Domestic, ot Western Other
fo rei n, foreign unadjusted foreign, unadjusted Europe countries
eason edy unadjusted unadjusted


1978

Jauary-Cecembs-r............. .... .....I-3..6 1.1 068 9 1-.t50.9 l.Li-n2 81.3 .0.4 44.9

Januarv-Apri I.... ....... .... ... .. 2,5B5.6 -3,017.- 2.236.5 -3,l3O.6 42,253.b 17.2 3.0 14.3

Ja uar .. ....... .. .. .863.7 9.3o.-. i. 9.21 1 9 3b6.9 9.21t.. 2.5 0.5 2.1
February .. .. .. .. .945 0 9.51.6 9.337 8 9 ,L8 5 9 W11 7 3.9 1.3 2.7
March .. 11. I.o 7..2 11 830.5 12.079.. 11 63c5 a 2 0 5 4.8
April .. ...... ...... .. 11. 3 L 2.'1.6-..2 11 5s..l 12 06 7 CL.859 I 5 0 7 4.8
. .y ...... .. ... ...... 11 i86 ) L. 478.9| 12.23...] 12 -9 o 12 250.0 15 7 L.0 14.7
June ............ .. 12,268.2 2.4'.' I 12 261 12.-87.3 12.211.7 10.1 6.5 3.5

July. ......... .... ........ .... 11. .5 10,934.0 10, 769 z 10 9.4. 7 10. 780.0 10.6 7.. 3.2
Au u t ........ .... .. .. 12. 293.' 11,613.9 11. 21.. L b2I a 11.-29.3 7.9 6.5! .4
Sept .ber ......... .. .. 13,2'-.; 12. 'l I l2. 0. ... 2. 7L 12, 0 7 1.3 I ) 1.3
October................. ......... L. 2.401.1 13.153.6 12.922.6 13.157. 1i2.926.-. 3.8 1.5 2.3
November ............ .... ... 13,.30. .6 13.655. 13.i.l b ; 1 n672.3 L3 &33.5 16.9 14. 3 2.6
Lecem.ber .... .... ...... ... 3.23 2. 13.531.0 13.302 1 13.532.9 13,303.9 1.8 0.1 1.7

1979

January-April...................- 3 .- .' 5. .- 7: H I- a I. 5 7.

Janu ry. .. ........ ... .. ........ I'.0 1 A 12..58.1 12.3.9... 12,5 1. 12. 352.4 3.2 1.0 2.2
February.. ........ ..... ..... b i'.. .j I 1 1 H J ."* 0 2 0 1.9
March ... ..... ....... .. I ,52.0 15,58.. 15,297.8 l5,586.7 1i5,300.1 2.3 0.7 1.1
April .. .. ....... ... .. ..... .. 1.5
May.- .... ... ..
June ..............................


August ..... ....... ...............
Oept Lnb r. ............... .. .
cve-toner ................ .........
DoveobEer .......... ........... ...
December

Z Less than one half of unit of measurement shown.

1Represents only export shipments from the United States and differs from DOD Military Assistance Program crint-lad shipment figures under this
program as follows: (a) Transfers of the material procured outside the United States and transfers from lylu o:-.ereas Erocks irion export shipments.
(b) Export value is f.a.s., whereas DOD value, in most instances, is f.o.b., point of origin. (c) Data :.3r .hipmen[s reported by .ne DOD tor a
given month are included in Bureau of Census reports in the second month subsequent to the month reported by DOD.
2The seasonally adjusted totals shown in this column are derived by adding the seasonally adjusted commaooet c-.nor.ents as nhocr, .n table L. See
footnote 1 at the bottom of page 5.
'Annual totals are not shown for seasonally adjusted data. Unadjusted data should be used for annual totals.











Table 3. U.S. Imports of Merchandise, by Month: January 1978 to April 1979

(In millions of dollars. See Fxplanatlon of Statlstlcs for Information on coverage, date of importation, definitions of f.a.s. and c.l.f. Import
values, and sources of error in the data. UladjusLed totals represent sum of unrounded figures and hence may vary slightly from sum of rounden
amounts)


F.a.s. value C.i.f. value


Perid Coeneral imports General Imports laports
for for
seasonally anadjuntuo consumption. Seasonally consumption.
adj-utedt unadjusted aojuleaL ntad juaed




January-December ......................... ': 2 2:.. 1. 183 I 3 12 '16 5

January-April ........... 55,857 7 5,03.* .900.J 59,-c,. 9 s8,ic.i.6 58,415.3

January .................................. I* 102 o 1 17. 7 1 '0)- 1i 3.92 l3 i5i. 9 L3. 3) .
February.................................* ,S l 26.oct. L3 1 L L* L93.0 I L,'.) 1.. 180.2
March....................... .............. -,O) .i I.. a. i' L 81. 3 li, '..' 1. 1.4,
A r l . . . . I. 1 l I 1 64
Way................... .................. .-')6 l L.- l .'I l-. l' !- I--. i .-8
June .................................... I. L. L-.- l ? L...5 *. Il .3" .3 4


August................................... l132 -. )I ) -..*J~) '3 o 1- '.*9 l. 9.' .5
September................................... '. l .8 a-1 1-. -* A 829J 15 343 0 15 -.01.6
October................... . ..... 1.. L l8 3 II I'' 1 '1 8 I,.1 8. J 16 03-.2
November............................ .... l.. 8 L ..051. 1 '')9 2 1 ; 4 Li 0l1. 1 l ) 4 9.0
December................................. L. 3 1.8 l-. SI... i -.8.', i" 't"a 2 13 q2s. 15.8.5.3

19i9

January-Apr i .... ... ..... .... *.. .. I .. -- -, .'. i

January.................................. ,2.. i .I .I .. -.. l il..9 L'.2 4 l ,872.n Ih f 6c6 3
February ................................. ,, a lar:, 1 51 3
March .................................... L ... i,.'r.. L. .. r 6... I r' .0

May ......................................
June....................................

July....................................
August...................................
September................................
Octoo r ..................................
Novembfr.................................
December .................................

1The seaionall 1 ia -re a ct2 h -r ir T.rd. .:Iur.n ,r. r b ai' I -e :a -ri i1 a .i. b3 I c-rot : ntc 4.n-"..r.n I ir e a .l 5 ".3 S e
aootno.e 1 it bo1.o e r pai- :".
'Anr.-al orals are nor n.y-r. I.r r..' i.rn ll .0 .:re' a.lt I i J1. iJ r. O a, : r..:u r. u .- ] I .r -ar--,=iL r r.aL








8


Table 4. U.S. Exports (F.a.s. Value) of Domestic Merchandise, Schedule E Sections, Excluding

Department of Defense Military Grant-Aid Shipments and Foreign Merchandise (Reexports),

Seasonally and Unadjusted by Month: January 1978 to April 1979

Itn millions o,? aoilrs. See E.pl.ranatton or Etatnir c for inlorrmation n co-erage. definitLon of f.a.s. export value. and sources of error in the
.a,. Lnt.ju.toEa torafl represent u.n or unr'naJea -fgtrcs and her.ce -a5 a..ry rEightly fro' stun of rournea au.ou lnts

Scbeaule E section2 :


SI ; 3 5 7 8 9 rroreignr'
reexporla)

Sea soal I adiusiea

19 8

J r.u.r,--pril ......... ... .. 5, 3-0.2 06-.. ... 1 .5 911.1 ..81. ,*71l 8 3,'78.) '.' -9 2 3. 071.1 1.316 .3 780.9
Ja.r.u.ry.............. .... ... L 120.- 1.1..- 1,069.0 2-8.6 96.0 B93.5 69:..1 ..093.1 72..0 0.32.3 L50.3
February .. .... ... L. 33 .8 I',.) .023.5 181.0 1'.2 l l. 1io. 3 -. 1.a.0 74.2.9 236.0 176.8
March. .. .. ....... ......... I.-3. .3 211.3 188.9 200.5 141.5 9...2 Q60.9 .-.656.- 722.9 189.9 243.7
April ............... ....... .. 1[..C' 161 8 L.2b0. L 271.0 14 ..- 962.6 96bl.' 4.843.? 826 2 509.1 210.1
May .. .... ... ...... I 69 .8 Iio.o I.31o... 31d.- 119.3 9-'..8 1.023.o -. '59.9 855.6 309.0 244.6
lane. ... .... ... I. 7-.5 lo 1.38:.2 385.8 132.1 1I.027.- 1.036 3 u,907.8 819.2 392.1. 215.6
Jul ... .. .. .. .1 I 9.8 199. 16..9 32-4. 13i''. 7 1 063.. L.003.C ..843.2 808.2 3.9.2 164.6
Aug ia ... ....... ...... I 738.8 220.6 1 261.2 i35.o 120.. 1.13 .9 1.070.7 .. 92.2 892.- 329.9 192.5
Sepite. er............ .... ... I '98. 3 178.5 1, 07 5 33,.9 156.1 1.23.'.5 1.1b0.3 .269.0 918.7 702.5 208.7
:ctober. .. .. L 6).1( 220.8 1 S'.0 1 3'0.3 113.9 1, 148.1 1.106.- 3.-25.i 9-6.5 323.9 23L.0
No.e.ber.. ......... .... I ll].. 2."0.3 5 1 i.50. 7 08.0 121. ) 1.228.5 1-8.i 5. br0..6 931.6 625.3 238.9
becent.er. .. .. -85.a. !0m.8 1..99 5 l00 3 I7.0 1. 103.9 L. B1 .6 5,676.5 940.. ..07.2 228.9



lar,.in'-4 C l.... .... c. I .l I s .6 0 5 65.6
nur ...... ... ....... .. .29v.11. 8 11 1 533.5 u63.8 1-:.6 1.31-.5 1,196.9 5.311.6 935.9 584.0 208.8
Fe r. ar) .. ........ ... 1.. I l .- rr, i l l I. i: 1.n- -- C' 6 i3 F' k.6 223.8
Marcr,.. .. .. 1.53 9 :'.1 riO.- >1 3 I 1 'l .39-.u 1.272.: 2. IuI.5 ai..5 286.6
April l.. ... ....... ... .... 51 -.I 3 1. i I.:' ." .31 r.' .. ,7. *' a6 I 2 16.4
May ..... ..... .....
June .. .. .... .... ... .
Jul- .... ...... ... ..
Auc-. t. ..............
Seaoenber.. ....
Oct o. e r .... ..................
.overmber ....... .... .. .
Dle e oer ..............

trio mus ed



Janary-De e .ber .............. 18.333.2 : .. n I .5.2 8 3.3'8.3 1.521.3 12.616.3 i .7 I i9 2. 7.9 Ifr. 17'. ,006.8 2.505.7
Januar.-4pr i .... .. ... :.. 6r 4' .,'.l 3. 3j.'I.. 8..8 1,56b;.) 780.9
ar.uary .. ... .. ....... .... I L3 L38.0 1,0-9.8 188.9 96.0' 830.1 82 8 3 .51. 665.4 -32.3 150.3
Feoruor. .. ... .. .. 1.2 .I L, r..u [. oI .. 1l1 0 ? 7.2 883.2 8-8.- 3.939.6 o69.. 236.0 176.8
3arcn. ......... .... ". t 1' li t. L t37. itt. 1-1.,> I. i .l L.0n6 .n 5.1.0. 1 878.2 389.9 24.3.1
.ril .. ....... .. ...... .. 1 :. l...i I. )8.6 2B-.n Lt.. 1.3 966 c 5.095.1 85-.3 509.1 210.1
May .... ........ .. .... .. .. -. 1.3.6 L.'o.5 3J3l. Ll9.3 l.n .; I I L l : f. 908.6 309.0 2;. .6
June ...... .... ... .... .']' i L l 5 1,3 ] .9 -2; 0 L32.1 1.0 3.0 I 5 103 856.9 392.4 215.6
Jul .. l. ri lrl.'r 49 2. 121 L3r. 1.07'.2 )9 2.- 8' c 777.5 349.2 164.6
l u-u .. .... ........ 6 2 : 1. 83.- 335.- 120.9 I, 1-9.1 .02. 2 ..592. 8,5.8 329.9 L92.5
cpremn r.. ... .. .n. 9 1. ltl.9 .-8.0 lin 3 .19.; 1 I 3.. i. 11.5 891.1 L02.5 208.7
Oc' ct.er..... ... .. li'.V 1.3 .- :'0 : 2 l 11 .9 1.08 0 I 12':,. .. i8 ...- 03.1 32).9 231.0
ott% rber ... .. .. .... .. .1 I l.r ?8.. .6i.4 1.1.0 l.17-.. l 1.13-.) .49i.3 925.1 bN5.3 238.9
. ter ... 239. L. 19. i 1i7.9 14..0 .13 l I] .I.186. 5 713.5 921.6 .-07.2 228.9



isnu s, or l.. ... .-. '. 0 0. ,- n.0 L .: ., *. n o. s0 1' c.
Janu.ar' .. ... .. ... ... 3 .. 3 2 -.5.8 1.235.a l 121 I .-, Ii 8'3.2 ,8..0 208.8
reoru r .. .. I I : c. : [ l .. O 6 638.6 Z23.8
rcr .. ... .. .. ol81 a > I.'' 11 1.5.:: 3 1.s L .. > i i.L33. .6. 5 286.6
pril I I .. I I .. I

lJn-... ........
... .. .. ... ... .
ul.' .. .... .. .


. o-er .. ..... .........





I r,-ie r.aer .ri o c are a- i.L .i
u ?F .3 1. rn1 C1h c.al- ara rcl lci.e praoucl L.i F F
1 be.a r5i : r'a, t0 o ar : eari aC ur'- d .ods clias t ri.n c-h.,r1I oV materl al
:r, ,u -aler al !n,.a o l, ep fuel -.cr, iu rt e r, .r ir, r- pr' LQulpmer-i
3 Mirere l Luei luE.r rcrr r re -lte ma..'eri -l 3j aceL i ane usa .Tauna..crur-d irT cl-= N ;.P.f
',l l r. I E- riL 3,3 ,,C r.Die Cor'. alb l na tran3acr i n-. r ii -as'i e elase here

S : 1 i ,_ r ,, -J .. i r l- .r, irl r. 1. .i .1 ..u- .-u a tlent r' :. :. :, n n. i r.: r ae r.
-3 r r. ''i- ... ,, t .r r r l .l t.i-. :a-r,.1 patterr The moninly .ea or. ally
*J '-- 3 r I 1 Ir 1 ,. r r. -, C rr,. : i-,-,.,, r, i .. .I .1 fr.- r le fo r. t I p e ,
-'r 1 I r j1 -r J -r rr j 1 1 r.. J3 C al .2 I I-, .. r .L= l=

as .r, r wr, ..g~r ar ie =2 a isa l Er a .:1.. s r s Ma~. a u r e











Table 5. U.S. General Imports (f.a.s. Value Basis) of Merchandise, Schedule A Sections, Seasonally

Adjusted and Unadjusted, by Month: January 1978 to April 1979

(In millions of dollars. See Explanation of Statistics for infornat Ion on coverage, date of Importation, defInltion of f.e.. import value, and
sources of error In the data. Unadjusted totals represent sum of unrounded Frgures and hence may vary slLghtly from sum of rounded amoimts)


Schedule A sections'
Period
0' 1 2' 3 5 5 6 7 B 91 3


Seasonally adjusted


i976

January-April ... ... t., i i t .. 41, I 4 t,. c 1 4e9 ,: i oi3 ra 3 .. ,21'..

January .. .. .... 1. 126.9 1-3.1 ht, ... ,-?.2 .29.3 .0'. 2.l, 2:'.: 0.. : 1, c.2 35 .
February .... 1,111 .i. I 2B'. i 3.l0: J b.,o 0S 2.s.ni I.e, o l .813.r. A .
March .. .. .. .. .. .. I 5" 1It0 t j I I.-I -1r." ... J :L 1, ..n I .t1 < 3"j -
April ... .. .. i 161.. l : I I ,-l1 .. i u .'.2 -I" 4 ,Sn 1, O.' I JJ .i
May.... .. .. 11..3 B16 .S l9 J.:l il. 'I. 2. 1 .8 3.83b. j 1I .. 1 319.
June.. ............ .. I .9 I 'i .t 1. .20 .. ,9-3.t. I .Ol 6 336
July. ... ..... .. .. ... 1 ['t 1 16 ,3 it 4.3 I .. C. ..'i. 1 i 1 .'1:- s .? Q."
August. ...... ......... '- i o .b I -I .-... 2c A.. .8 I li 9 32'" ..
SeptemTber. .. ... ... I1 'Is r 1 ''.3 'I-i :'. .9 .. ?.Iv .9 -.. 1 .6 I 'I' 5 30oa
October...... ........ .. I It 1 ..04 b E..'. ib.- 2.M3 .t ... tI 1 ,80 9 JAt 8
November..... .. .... I .' .. t '1 .- 3.3t l. ..-.' i-. 3 .. l '. 1 32'
December. ....... .... ... 1. l I .6 J 3 ?. 1- I l,bjt' i t.L



January-April..... ... -. .... .I ,!v6 6 I f. S I I 3 1!

January... .. ..2'h. :O i 1 r -. :.6.0 69.: ll ? 2.Ib-.t. ..o3'.b IA.'. 309.4
February ... .. .. ........ I i t -t 2.34t. ., 1 r. 4,t.j, 8 o3 .q
March........ .... .. .. .. 1,2-' i.. n8'.w 3.- 3 .'2 t..)' I 1 .c.' 130 a
April c .. ..... .... .. .. .. .. 1 .-
May. .. .. .. .. .... ..
June. .. ... .
July ... ........ .... .
August ...
September ... .. .
October r. .. ...
November .... ... .
December.......... ..

,.',..,i j u 'i- 9


19 -

January-Decesber. ... 1. l .,2 .1 9 ...., 1 I r..._ '. ~ .c2 .t 4.'.',2 I .,)1 .I

Isrwory-Aprl ............. ..... ..65 4 t. ., 1 L..r LIu' r. 6,63.-3 1 J -'0 I. '9b -

January ............ ....... ... L.12 .9 13i .I b. ,.... 29.3 .16.9 1.982 9 3. 2. 1. 9 I3 9.
Tebruary.. .. ,111. ib .- b'S l .id .3 i.6. '-..' 2.145 .. 3. 3. I 3 ?;.e.`
MarchI .. .. .. ... ," t "t-.. ,-jL 1: rIu..: ,3 -.1. .. ''i. ,.. t 1 i ..
April ....... .......... ...... .. 9 .. 61 2b. syi .A 1 C 3A 3
May ..... ... .. 1.1-.i 1i '33 ," :-. l Si 561. .h3 .9. 3 ..''='4 '.J.I a .
June.. .. .. .. .0- n 3... I i.t. .'. 2.301 0 -.132.9 .c: ii .3
July .... .. l l' "8..) a.3. .l -9.- i-.c.. :.. n .l .....[. 1 1 9.!
August .......... .... .. .. 9 .ri II 2 13. .l .' 51 ...9 ', S.6 8., I. c.) 32
September ... .... ....... .08.9 lt8 86'. 0 j.r'.9 '.2 i .1 :,. 1.. 3. 832.11 1. i.9 30b.i
October. .. .. .. ..... .l. :. '. 1 S.-9i.' ,0 -1 ,-1. 2.3-- :4. A. i.- I 36b.6
November. ... .......... 3.l .- ,' I j .. ,,).. 1l i3l.. 2. 3- 3 .3 1.'4.9 )?'..
December........ .. ... ..1 680 f, i 3. 0 i3 .' ?.111 t 3..l6, 1 .56',., 3in.

19'9

January-4pr I ...... .. .. i r r i. r i l '

January. .. ... .. ........' u. 91. -, .3 69 5 32. ,1 .': .515.. I.n.t ly..
February. .. .. ,.10 1L6.. -6 9 '' r I ..... .1,X.' .'i32.c l.- o 2a3.9


y .. .... .. .. ..
March .. ............... ...... I 3..

Apurl. .. .... .... ......
May........
JunSepe... r.. ... .. .. .
July .......
August .. .. ..... .
Sep relber.. ..
October..
November... ......... .
December.. ... ......

'Schedule 4 aiection deacrzpt :n- are as I ollo%.
0. Fooa ann liv aninals 5 C-rm.ic1ia and rli.ted proaucts r.5..p F.
1. B .cer..gen Ina tobcca c. Manulucturca '?d ..lai-i4.J '.hitfly b) materlai
2. Cruoe .aIerzils rIediole. except buela Machinter uri. iranvhurt .quipir..rt
3 Mneral fuels. lubricants, and related .rateral 8. MIci l us er..Ifa.icli rtiJ artile. N.a.P.F.
Oti ana tars--anir.al arin vegetable 9. LCo.mnodities ana [ransactiorns not ciauaiiied else-here
1Adjusted for seasonal and sorhinR-oa5 .a.riBtion urine seasonal sajustnmr. Flctore introauceJ in jnaruy 91). Adjustment isctors naSe not been
applied to data for Schedule 4 ;actions 0. 3. adJustea import to.l- .a.' .I presented Ir. tat1Le I and 3 are derivea ny andinr tnre compeent total- Dre .ent.l in i-ni table. .3Ee fo-tnote
I at the botIom of page 5.) Annual trials are not -hn for sea 'r.nilly adjusted da. Inadju ted .E at' riould U USed for annual total .

de le[ n) i reo .a ,'t, .r. 7 i rrci. l I .. rn- r I I --- r ,l -= J .-.. .r, r, rI .r [, a .. r. -rJ I r r.
deleted Irom -:-- h-dul- A _e- z', r.. '...3 -r -.'l. ,r _r1 -,1.I. =, ",







10

Table 6. U.S. General Imports (c.i.f. Value Basis) of Merchandise, Schedule A Sections, Seasonally

Adjusted and Unadjusted, by Month: January 1978 to April 1979

tl. millions of dollars. See Epplanaton of Statitstics for Infomalton on coveragBe date or importation, definition of c.1 r laport value, and
sources of error in [he data Unadjusled totals represent sum of unrounded figures and hence may %ary sllgntly from sum of rounded ameounts)

Schedule A sections'
Per tod
0I 2' 3i 5 s 7 B 9'


Seasonally aajustea




.u'. ipr il .. ..'u-. 3'.-.. l, I-.. a I' .. '. .' lb.02..5 0. 92.. 1.31b 9

Jsna r, I 1- I t.b '1: 1 z I. 31... -i. I,65 5 3. 721.9 1 .**a5. 334.3
It'bruar 1,183.1 178.7 638. 13."2 0 L 529 1 6,b78 ..IB8.: 1.592.8 260.1
A r. r, .3-'] J it....I 829 .) .9 t_ .;j.1 ..:'9.. 82t, b 571.6 3178.5
Ipril l.3-t, 1 0 '1).4 3. 7 5 St.) .b L 99.. ..ui.8 1. 2.0 q 3 w.0
Mr., I 1,3'.2 i', 83 1 l.a2) .i' 01. 6 8.9 a.,0' 2.5 1, 5..0 32u.6
June l. t.b I 212. :70 I 3.681.1 ..9 580.. 2.:u' 2 ..183 l 1.711.5 34.3.3
July L ?L) ". 81 81t I ,.S 5t u ;. 8 .3'', bl. -.,3 8.6 l.;!b6.3 335.3
A lcuit I95 u0 .18 86 .. .i407.. )'3.5 .'i .6 -.l3Iiib l ii 9 332.9
*ept1 ,1,r 1 13it.: "' 8 8. 3,ll 3 512 .). .. J ...i .1 1.8-3.5 312.0
,3tc t.ber I 'ali 225.4. .a ..713.- 1. .1 86.- 12, b42.1 .4.. 27.5 I.798.1 392.2
u2..3'noar ll 1 41. 3 3. t.. 521. 1 ,.'>) -,aO 8 1 .621.1 333.4
'cenoD-r I t 'i 1 -,i3 f i1. 9 9b.' 2.290.9 -, ... l.'-o. i391.8

1979

January-April...... ........... U. -' :;c .F '' O li ;. 9 I .B 1.886. 11-. 9

January ................ ........ 8l6. 2 1 '.6 -., B.- t j.1 l .Q.9 a.Q8 1.886.2 3156.
February.......... ............. I 9X 3 ,' 3 1." .91 qa 'J. 5.4 I.. .. 289.0
March........................ 112.. -3 h.Q 1.- .' 356.
April........ ..... ... .... .. 29.
ayugus ..... .... .
JunSepte ........ .........


September.......
October ....... ..
November...................
December .... ......... ...

'srad jue te.,


1978

January-December.............. 1-. :', I 2.-29 ,.8 --.- .5.' .... t, '" .. :'0 alu 29.u ;,).]5 9 -.082.5

January-April ........... .. -..t- IJV 2 963 i l-.t66.1 1't. .- :. :, ,-b .o, lI.3j. t .8otb.' l.il .9q

January........................ 11.01. 4 .. :. l3 i I .. :,131 98 3, 9 ,.- I 316.' 133 .3
February.... .................... i l .L l I' j. l) I P.8 2,36.' 3 93 ." 3 ) 260.1
March. .. .. ..... .. .... ...... J 9' 8i9.-. .o.. .9.) lri I .,y0" 1 ..3. lI.ti.t 378.5
April................... .... n. .c. t 18 'iB 3 1. '_.' l o.i :' ., 63.2 -..33 3 1 ,3.' 8 3.4.0
May........................ .. ? > "" 9' : j '.' h,) 9 ?, '520.' -..b2 7 i sa 1 32..6
June..... ....... ........ 1.6. 23 l -.. i.51 I 9 ,r 2.-'. -.8- .. 1 "'.B i3.3.
July....................... .. I. 'l 9 : 5 i. .. j I l.' .I -.i. -.. .8 I,915.' 335.3
August.................... ... 9. J 18; 2 i.9 '', I .L :. 8 I. 9. ."- 1 I. -..B 332.9
September..................... 1 ..0 18 I I' ),'i i : : .b' .. 2,3 .- -.''3 8 1,880 312.0
October ................. .... .. B : .'',.8 M8- 3 3. l 1'. 0 ..51 L i ,9)-. 392.2
November ....... .. ... ......... j.. ?A. 9 l. ,.5 .' I ..5 c -.. -.... 1,91. 0 333.f
December ................ .. I 3t I lT ..9 ..' t. i- 163.l 'f1. ., : ., l ,b6;2.B 391.8

1979

January-April ............ ,. ., : .i r I .rI' i.- I 1..1.

January ................ .... 1 Ir ..30 .. n ,3. ..-l .' 8 1. 1. 5 31...9
February ........ ............. L I' 3 .. 63 .,lj I..,19.a 289.0
March................. '. -2 I -3.. 8 2 t 0.4 356.
April................. .. ... I .: ..., *. -v _. ... O I .-" 9 292
May........ .... ....
June... .....
July.......
August... ............
September.. ..
October ....... .. .. ....
November.. .. ....
December.... ...........

'Schedule A section descripts.... rl =- f.11->
0. Food and live animals ,r,..-u i: r.1 i l-lit ri --ur [. F
1. Beverages and tobacco r Manulacr r-.d e v -u- Icia,; ie .. LelI tv\ ,. reral
2. Crude materials, inedir.'. r tt i.,i-1 ac.ai r.r, ana transp- rt .-,ulp-,v-r-t
3. Mineral fuels, lubrica.n'[ an ,- lal.1 ..atrrial 6 M9 s.i ne-u=.. u *,'nu.lo. ture- articles, I P "
4. Oils and fats--animal .r, .*i.- a' '- j. ,a3.m.I,.]3tie. inr.a tr .r.sact Lons nr r c i a l' else-here
'Adjusted for seasonal and '-.r-r-c avrr. irrr.,- ul.g ea-n:au'., ad,,,.T-r.t rALt ,r- rtru.acd ar lanuar\ 19's 4AJlusLstm.nt fsactc r.s ne nor oeen
applied to data for Schedule A ":-. n- l, )I -in.] au.. to. th- abt=nc. .i idenfLilabl, 4-3., naral attr. ime i.r.rthl, aeaionall adjusted portt
totals (c.i.f.) presented in taEle' I .nd J a.r arlse s /r a.lir.iq [he cam.ponent totals pr-'er, ned in ini. tatlc. iSee footnote I at the bottom of
page 5.) Annual totals are not -r.r. Sor =ea.r.ai5, auh dotts O va. er.l. lte-, us.a shO.LL be -use lor cnr uri tatais.
3Effective oith April 1979 s'.', *' i r, .., .r. r. ...r I. .,il : L. Ir. r ." .C r .4 r- i, c ul Ic r. I
and gold content of precious-men' i .. ,.,, ,r r.-r r.r .j.-.., .'' ..,'" i. .-r 3 r .-, .C .'i t '' ,l rF r l rr i s rr.
schedule A section 2 and insert r ,








GENERAL IMPORTS OF PETROLEUM AND SELECTED PETROLEUM PRODUCTS INTO
THE U.S. CUSTOMS AREA AND U.S. VIRGIN ISLANDS, UNADJUSTED

Monthly and cumulative-to-date data on general imports of petroleum and selected petroleum products into the U.S. Customs area
and into the U.S. Virgin Islands for the period January 197a through the current month are presented in the tables that follow. Tables
1 A and 1 B present imports into the U.S. Customs area and tables 2-A and 2-B present imports into the U.S. Virgin Islands. (It should
be noted that imports into the Virgin Islands are excluded from the regularly compiled foreign trade statistics and, therefore, are ex-
cluded from the data presented in tables 1-A and 1-B as well as the other tables shown in the front of this report.-See "Explanation of
Statistics".

Effective with January 1979 statistics, certain changes were made in the commodity classifications (Schedule A and TSUSA) covering
petroleum products. These changes are reflected in the listing of classifications shown below. Data presented in tables 1-B and 2-B which
follow reflect all changes in classifications, effective January 1979.


Schedule A and TSUSA Commodity Numbers Used in Compiling the Petroleum
Information Presented in This Report


Energy products


Nonenergy products


Schedule A No.

Crude petroleum and deriv-
atives to be refined
333.0020
333.0040
334.5440


Crude petroleum
333.0020
333.0040

Gasoline
334.1500

Jet fuel
334.1205

Kerosene
334.2000


Distillate fuel oil
334.3021

334.3045

Residual fuel oil
334.4050
334.4060

Propane and butane gas
341.0025

Liquid derivatives of
petroleum, n.e.s.
334.5430 pt.


TSUSA No.


475.0510
475.1010
475.6510


475.0510
475.1010


475.2520, 475.2560


475.2530
475.2550

475.3000


475.0525
475.0545
475.1015
475.1025

475.0535
475.1035


Schedule A No.

Lubricating oils
334.5410 pt.

Lubricating greases
334.5410 pt.

Paraffin and other mineral
waxes
335.1225 pt.
335.1245

Napnthas
334.5420

Asphalt
335.4500

All other petroleum products
(pitch of tar coke, non-
liquid hydrocarbon mix-
tures, and calcined petro-
leum and coal coke not for
fuel)
335.3000 pt.
334.5430 pt.
598.5020 pt.


TSUSA No.


475.4500


475.5500, 475.6000


494.2200
494.2400



475.3500



521.1100


401.6200
475.7000
517.5120
517.5140


475.1525, 475.1535,
475.1545


475.6530


FT 900 Effective with February 1978 statistics











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U.S. Department
of Commerce
BUREAU OF THE CENSUS
Washington. D.C. 20233
Official Business


First Class mailn
COM-202
":Ii