United States foreign trade

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
United States foreign trade
Alternate title:
United States foreign trade. FT900, Summary of United States export and import merchandise trade
Portion of title:
Summary of U.S. export and import merchandise trade
Abbreviated Title:
U.S. foreign trade, FT900, Summ. U.S. export import merch. trade
Physical Description:
13 v. : ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of the Census
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census :
For sale by the Subscriber Services Section (Publications), Bureau of the Census
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Creation Date:
March 1979
Publication Date:
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Imports -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Exports -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Commerce -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
statistics   ( marcgt )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Issued also to depository libraries in microfiche.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Dec. 1976-
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Ceased in 1988.
General Note:
"FT 900."
General Note:
Description based on: Jan. 1979; title from caption.
General Note:
Beginning with July 1980 for sale by the Supt. of Docs., U.S.G.P.O.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Mar. 1988.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001320869
notis - AGH1745
oclc - 07222812
lccn - 81646118
issn - 0730-3270
sobekcm - AA00005268_00001
Classification:
ddc - 382/.0973/00212
System ID:
AA00005268:00029

Related Items

Preceded by:
Summary of U.S. export and import merchandise trade
Succeeded by:
U.S. merchandise trade. Seasonally adjusted imports and exports

Full Text
C, 5 6 / :y --7 3


UNITED STATES FOREIGN TRADE K


FL LI. summary of U.S. Export and

Se Import Merchandise Trade
S,.0-.



u.s. DEPOTOMY MARCH 1979
FT900-79-3 For vure tiansm;ssion 2 30 P M Friday. April 27. 1979


Seasonally Adjusted and Unadjusted Data
(Including unadjusted data on imports of petroleum and petroleum products)


F.A.S. EXPORTS AND F.A.S. IMPORTS
Seasonally Adjusted

The Bureau of the Census, Department of Commerce an-
nounced today that during g March 1979, exports on a
f.a.s. (free alongside ship) U.S. port of exportation
value basis, excluding Department of Defense (DOD)
Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid shipments, amount-
ed to $14,452.0 million and that general imports on a
f.a.s. foreign port of exDortation value basis, amounted
to $15,273.3 million.1 2 3
Based on the above export and import figures, the
March merchandise trade balance was in deficit by $821.3
million.' 2 3

During the first quarter of 1979 (January-March),
exports on a seasonally adjusted basis were at an annual
rate of $164,362 million, a level about 14 percent
higher than the calendar year 1973 total of $143,575
million. Imports for the January-March 1979 period were
at an annual rate of $185,243 million, an increase of
about B percent over the calendar year 1978 total of
$172,026 million.
For the 4-month period, December 1978-March 1979, exports
averaged $13,593.3 million per month, about 5 percent
higher than the $12,979.9 million average reported for
the preceding 4-month period August-November 1978.
Imports on a f.a.s. value basis, averaged $15,335.6
million per month for the current 4-month period, a
level about 5 percent higher than the $14,657.2 million
average reported for the preceding 4-month period.' :
Unadjusted

Exports excluding Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid
shipments increased from $12,928.5 million in February
to $15,584.4 million in March. With Military Assist-
ance Program Grant-Aid shipments included, exports
increased from $12,932.5 million in February to $15,586.7
million in March. General imports increased from
$13,776.3 million in February to $15,764.8 million
in March.

Note : Footnotes 1, 2, and 3 are shown at the bottom
of page 5.


F.A.S. EXPORTS AIND C.I.F. IMPORTS
Seasonally Adjusted
The Bureau of the Census, Department of Commerce an-
nounced today that during March 1979, exports on a
f.a.s. (free alongside ship) U.S. port of exportation
value basis, excluding Department of Defense (DOD)
Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid shipments, amount-
ed to $14,452.0 million and that general imports on a
c.i.f. (cost, insurance, and freight) U.S. port of entry
value basis, amounted to $16,228.2 million.' -: 3
Based on the above export and import figures, the
February merchandise trade balance was in deficit by
$1,776.2 million." 3
During the first quarter of 1979 (January-March),
exports on a seasonally adjusted basis were at an annual
rate of $164,362 million, a level about 14 percent
higher than the calendar year 1978 total of $143,575
million. Imports for the January-March 1979 period were
at an annual rate of $196,920 million, an increase of
about 8 percent over the calendar year 1978 total of
$11 3,137 million.
For the 4-month period, December 1978-March 1979 exports
averaged $13,593.3 million per month, about 5 percent
higher than the $12,979.9 million average reported for
the preceding 4-month period, August-November 1978.
Imports on a c.i.f. value basis, averaged $16,309.1
million per month for the current 4-month period, a level
about 4 percent higher than the $15,607.0 million average
reported for the preceding 4-month period.' 2 3
Unadjusted

Exports excluding Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid
shipments increased from $12,928.5 million in February
to $15,584.4 million in March. With Military Assist-
ance Program Grant-Aid shipmgLL included, exports
increased from $12,932..5 mill to $15,586.7
million in March. Gen eased from
$14,627.6 million in f I y to. i I million
in March.


1W" U.S. Department
N af of Commerce
BUREAU OF
\ 2/ THE CENSUS


Inquiri concerning these figure should be addressed to the ChhiM' IT tQb on. Bureau of
the Cnius. Wahington. D.C. 20233. Tel: Arm Code 301. 763-5140;7 d 6'3-7756.
For ile by the Subsriber ServiceM Section (Publications). Bureau of the Cmnsus, Wmahington, D.C.
20233. or any U.S. Department of Commerce district office. Postmae tamps not accueptble; currency
submitted at mnder's risk. Remittanc from foreign countries must be by international money order
or by a dreft on a U.S. bank. Price 30 centsper copy. Annual subcription IFT 900, 975.985. end 986
combined) $14.90.







EXPLANATION OF STATISTICS


IMPORT STATISTICS

Coverage

The U.S. import statistics reflect both government and
nongovernment imports of merchandise from foreign countries
into the U.S. Customs territory, which includes the 50 States,
the District of Columbia. and Puerto Rico. The U.S. import
statistics exclude imports into the Virgin Islands. Guam,
American Samoa, and other U.S possessions" and shipments
between the United States and Puerto Rico, between the United
States and U.S. possessions, and between any of these outlying
areas. (Data on U.S. trade with Puerto Rico and the Virgin
Islands of the United States are published separately in Report
FT 800. Additional data on such trade and on imports into the
Virgin Islands from foreign countries are presented in reference
tabulations.) Data on imports of petroleum and selected
petroleum products, including shipments into the Virgin Islands
from foreign countries, are included in this report effective with
the January 1976 statistics (previously shown in former Report
FT 900-Supplement).
The U.S. import statistics also exclude American goods re-
turned to the United States by its Armed Forces-. intransit ship-
ments through the United States when documented as such
with Customs, temporary shipments; transactions not con-
sidered to be of statistical significance, such as shipments of
personal and household effects; low-valued nondutiable im-
ports by mail; and issued monetary coins of all component
metals.

Inclusion of Gold in the Statistics

effectivee with the statistics for January 1978. imports of
nonmonetary gold (in such forms as ore, scrap and base bullion,
nonmonetar) refined bullion, etc.) which were previously
excluded, are now included in the statistics. Imports of silver in
these forms have been included since January 1969. Additional
information regarding the inclusion of gold in the 1978 statistics
appears in the January 1978 issues of Report FT 990 and
FT 135.

General Imports/Imports For Consumption

The statistics on U.S. imports are presented in terms of both
"General Imports" and "Imports for Consumption." General
imports are a...a of entries for immediate con-
sumption a ;ntit.e, Te'.tFi.oms bonded warehouses, and
thus gen,,rtflect tolaT"~w~,i of merchandise. Imports for
consu nAti'lare a combine ion1.of entries for immediate
consu riftir-- and withdrawal rm warehouses for con-
sumpt l(fand thus. generally te51t the total of the com-
modit te'ied Thlb tJ.S7 cohsuOQin channels.

Source Of Import:Ipformation

The ofhkil-U .Sfipmpori statistics are compiled by the Bureau
of the Census from copies of the import entry and warehouse
withdrawal forms which importers are required by law to file
with Customs officials. The information as to country of origin.
net quantity, value, and commodity classification is verified by
Customs officials on entries filed for transactions valued over
$250. which are ordinarily subject to examination for Customs


appraisement purposes. The statistical copy of the entry is
corrected if it does not accurately reflect the information,
called for by the statistical requirements.

Import Valuation

F.a.s. Import Value.-The f.a.s. (free alongside ship) val
represents the transaction value of imports at the foreign port
exportation. It is based on the purchase price, i.e., the actual
transaction value and generally includes all charges incurred in
placing the merchandise alongside the carrier at the port of%
exportation in the country of exportation.

C.i.f. Import Value.-The c.i.f. (cost, insurance, and freight)y.
value represents the value of imports at the first port of entry if.
the United States. It is based on the purchase price and includeal
all freight, insurance, and other charges (excluding U.S. import:
duties) incurred in bringing the merchandise from the country
of exportation and generally placing it alongside the carrier at.
the first port of entry in the United States. If the merchandise&
was acquired in a transaction between related parties, the
purchase price used in deriving the c.i.f. value is based on anII
arm's-length equivalent transaction price, i.e., a price which
would exist between unrelated buyers and sellers.

Import Commodity Information

Import data are initially reported in terms of the commodity-d
classifications in the Tariff Schedules of the United States As|
notated (TSUSA), which is an official publication of the U.S.:,.
International Trade Commission, embracing the legal text o0 i
the Tariff Schedules of the United States together with static: I
tical annotations. The TSUSA data are rearranged and presented. I
in thus report in terms of totals for the 1-digit commodity
sections in Schedule A. Statistical Classification of Commoditiesd
Imported Into the United States, which is based upon the.
Standard International Trade Classification (SITC), Revision 2,"'.
effective with the statistics for January 1978. Prior to January I
1978, Schedule A was based upon the former SITC, Revised.

Date of Importation and Import Monthly Carryover

It is the objective of the compiling procedures to include
shipments, insofar as practicable in the statistics for the actual
month of importation (or the month of withdrawal in the case
of warehouse withdrawals for consumpiloni Prior to 1978, the
date of Customs official acceptance of the import entry
documents was used to determine the statistical month in which
the shipments were included. Effective with the January 1978
statistics, the date of importation as reported on the import.
entries is being used to determine the statistical month'.
However. since under the Customs "immediate-delivery" pro:-
cedures importers mia, file the imniport entry up to 10 workday
after the dale of release of tie merchandise, some documents
for merchandise imported during the last few days of a given
month ma, not be received in time for inclusion in the statistics
for that month. As a result, there is a carryover, estimated at
about 15 percent from the actual month of importation to a
subsequent month. In addition, processing problems (e.g., late
filing of documents. rejection of a shipment by the computer
because the data fail to meet certain edit criteria established to






protect the accuracy of the Statitics. etc J onlribulte to dn
additional carryover of about 5 perLent (in terms of \alu'| of
shipments from the reported month of imporltalon (or with-
drawal from warehouse) to a subsequent month. usually the
succeeding month. These limitations should be borne in mind
when making month-to-month Lomparisons

Cumulations of data over at least 4-month periods are desir-
able to identify underlying trends. Month-io-month changes in
imports, exports, and similar senes often reflect primarily
irregular movements, e.g., exogenous events such as strikes,
differences in monthly carryover, etc.


Estimated Data for Imports Valued Under S251

The overall import and Schedule A Section 9 totals include
sample estimates for shipments valued under $251 Therefore,
they are subject to sampling error, estimated at less than
one-tenth of one percent for the unadjusted overall total and
about one percent for the unadjusted Schedule A Section 9
total. This means that we can have about b7 percent confidence
that the published unadjusted overall totals and the unadjusted
Schedule A Section 9 totals differ by less than one-tenth of a
percent and one percent, respectively, from the totals that
would have resulted from a complete tabulation. The statistics
on imports of petroleum and petroleum products included in
this report reflect fully compiled data and, therefore, are not
subject to sampling error.



EXPORT STATISTICS

Coverage
The export statistics reflect, in general. both government and
nongovernment exports of domestic and foreign merchandise
from the U.S. Customs territory (includes the 50 States, the
District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico) to foreign countries,
whether the exportation involves a commercial transaction or
not. The statistics, therefore, include Department of Defense
Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid shipments, shipments for
economic assistance under the Foreign Assistance Act and
shipments of agricultural commodities under P.L. 480 (The
Agricultural Trade Development and Assistance Act of 1954, as
amended) and related laws. The following are excluded from the
statistics. Shipments to U.S. Armed Forces and diplomatic
missions abroad for their own use, shipments between the
United States and Puerto Rico. between the United States and
its possessions (including the Virgin Islands). and between these
outlying areas; exports from U.S. possessions; intransit ship-
ments through the United States; transactions not considered to
be of statistical importance, such as personal and household
effects; temporary exports; low-valued or non-commercial
exports by mail; and issued monetary coins of all component
metals.

Inclusion of Gold in the Statistics.

As indicated above for imports, effective with the statistics
for January 1978, exports of nonmonetary gold (in such forms
as ore, scrap and base bulbon. nonmonetary refined bullion,
etc.) which were previously excluded, are included in the


3

statistics. Exports of silver in these forms have been included
since January 1969. Additional information regarding the
inclusion of gold in the 1978 statistics appears in the January
1978 issues of Report FT 990 and FT 410.

Definition of Exports of Domestic and Foreign Merchandise

Exports of domestic merchandise include commodities which
are grown, produced, or manufactured in the UnitedStates, and
commodities of foreign origin which have been changed in the
United States from the form in which they were imported, or
which have been enhanced in value by further manufacture in
the United States. Exports of foreign merchandise consist of
commodities of foreign origin which have entered the United
States as imports and which, at the time of exportation, are in
substantially the same condition as when imported.

Source of Export Information

The official U.S. export statistics are compiled by the Bureau
of the Census primarily from copies of Shipper's Export
Declarations which are required to be filed with Customs
officials, except for Department of Defense Military Assistance
Program Grant-Aid shipments which are reported directly to the
Bureau of the Census by the Department of Defense and
shipments by qualified exporters who have been authorized to
submit data in the form of magnetic tape, punched cards, or
monthly Shipper's Summary Export Declarations directly to
the Bureau of the Census.

Export Valuation
F.a.s. Export Value. -The value reported in the export statistics
generally is equivalent to a f.a.s. (free alongside ship) value at
the U.S. port of export, based on the transaction price,
including inland freight, insurance and other charges incurred in
placing the merchandise alongside the carrier at the U.S. port of
exportation.

Export Commodity Information
Beginning January 1978, export commodity information
is collected in terms of the commodity classifications in the
1978 edition of Schedule B, Statistical Classification of Do-
mestic and Foreign Commodities Exported from the United
States, which is based on the framework of the classification
system in the Tariff Schedules of the United States (TSUS).
In this report, the Schedule B data are rearranged and presented
in terms of totals for the 1-digit commodity sections in Schedule
E, which is based upon the Standard International Trade Classi-
fication (SITC), Revision 2, effective with the statistics for
January 1978. Prior to January 1978, the export classifications
in Schedule B were based upon the organizational framework
of the former $1TC, Revised.

Export Monthly Carryover

It is the objective of the compiling procedures to include
shipments, insofar as practicable, in the statistics for the actual
month of exportation. For purposes of the statistics, the month
of exportation is generally based on the date when the shipment
leaves the United States. (For vessel or air shipments it is the
date when the carrier departs or is cleared from the port of
export.) However, as indicated above for imports, because of





4
processing problems (e.g., late receipt of a document for an
end-of-month shipment, rejection of a shipment by the com-
puter because the data fail to meet certain edit criteria
established to protect the accuracy of the statistics, etc.), there
is an overall average carryover of about 2 to 3 percent (in terms
of value) of the shipments from the actual month of exporta-
tion to a subsequent month, usually the succeeding month.
These limitations should be borne in mind when making
month-to-month comparisons.
Cumulations of data over at least 4-month periods are
desirable to identify underlying trends. Month-to-month
changes in imports, exports, and similar series often reflect
primarily irregular movements, differences in monthly
carryover, etc.

Estimated Data for Export Shipments
Effective with the March 1979 statistics, the overall export
and Schedule E section and division totals include sample esti-
mates for shipments valued $501 -$1,999 to Canada and for ship-
ments valued $501-$999 to countries other than Canada. Data
for shipments valued $500 and under to all countries are also
estimated, based on established percentages of individual
country totals, and included in the Schedule E Section 9 totals
regardless of the commodity exported. It is estimated that the
unadjusted overall total is subject to a sampling error of less
than one-tenth of one percent, and the unadjusted Schedule E
section or division totals are subject to sampling errors of about
one percent. In addition, the Schedule E Section 9 total is sub-
ject to possible error in the estimated data for shipments valued
$500 and under; and the overall total, and the individual totals
for sections other than Section 9, to a more limited extent.
Such $500 and under shipments represent about 1 percent of
the total value of exports, and about 30 percent of the Schedule
E Section 9 total. Prior to the March 1979 statistics, the overall
export and Schedule E section and division totals include
sample estimates for shipments valued $251-$1,999 to Canada
and for shipments valued $251-$999 to countries other than
Canada.


SOURCES OF ERROR IN THE STATISTICS

Monthly import and export figures are subject to the
possibility of errors which may arise from sources other than
sampling errors, discussed above. Among these are errors in the
reporting and/or processing of information as to commodity
classification, value and other statistical factors, month of
inclusion (see paragraphs on import and export carryover,
above), and the undercounting of exports to Canada due to the
non-receipt of Shipper's Export Declarations. For 1978,
the undercounting is estimated to be about $2 billion dollars.
In the case of imports the information as to value and
commodity classification (as well as country of origin and net
quantity) is verified by Customs officials on entries filed for
transactions valued over $250 which are ordinarily subject to
examination for Customs appraisement purposes, thus con-
siderably reducing the possibility of error. In addition, the
procedures used to compile both the import and export sta-
tistics include clerical and computer processing checks designed
to protect the accuracy of the statistics to the fullest practicable
extent.


Adjustment for Seasonal and Working-Day Variation

Monthly totals for exports and imports and major corn-.
modity components (Schedule E and Schedule A section totals).
are shown adjusted for seasonal/working-day variation. Effec-i
tive with the release of the January 1979 statistics, the seasonally
adjusted export and import totals represent the sum of com-
modity components adjusted for seasonal and working-day .:
variation. Previously, the monthly totals for exports and im-::.
ports were adjusted independently of the components. Thew
procedure of aggregating seasonally adjusted commodity com-:1
ponents more accurately reflects the seasonal movements within
the totals. Under this procedure, only those section totals that.!
show identifiable seasonal patterns are seasonally adjusted.


MERCHANDISE TRADE BALANCES

Two trade balances are presented in this report:
1) The balance between exports based on f.a.s. values and.
imports based on f.a.s. values.
2) The balance between exports based on f.a.s. values and I
imports based on c.i.f. values with adjustments for imports front
affiliated sellers abroad to reflect arms-length equivalent prices.
Both balances are useful for certain purposes. The first
balance corresponds to a measurement of the international
payments or credit flows resulting from merchandise trad&
between the U.S. and foreign countries. The second balance is
based on concepts similar to those used by most foreip
countries, and therefore provides a reference for comparison:
with the trade balances published by those countries.



REVISIONS TO THE STATISTICS

Under the revision policy adopted effective with the 1977
statistics, revisions to the monthly statistics for the current year
will be issued once a year, i.e., with the reports for June of the
following year. Thus, revisions to 1979 statistics will be issued
only in June 1980.



SOURCES OF FURTHER INFORMATION

Additional foreign trade statistics and information regarding
coverage, valuation, sampling, and qualifications which should
be considered by users of the statistics are contained primarily
in the following publications- Report FT990. Highlights of U.S.
Export and Import Trade, FT 135. U.S. General Imports,
Schedule A Commodity by Country, FT 410, U.S. Exports,
Schedule E Commodnt by Country: and the Guide to Foreign
Trade Statistics. Information regarding additional sources of
statistics, the methodology used in seasonally adjusting the data, i
and other matters relating to foreign trade statistics may be ,
obtained from the Foreign Trade Division, Bureau of the
Census, Washington, D.C. 20233.









Table 1. U.S. Exports (f.a.s. Value Basis), General Imports (fa.s. and c.i.f. Value Basis), and Merchandise

Trade Balance, Adjusted for Seasonal and Working-Day Variation, by Month: January 1978

to March 1979

(Ina million of dollars. See Explanation of Statistics for Information on coverage, date of Importation, definitions of export and import values and
trade balances, and sources of error in the data)

TF. .s. Eiports and I a.E. Itr.pcrrt F Exports ana c.i f imp.-_.rtat I
iSeasonally avju.steli I' isonally adjustedJ
Period
rprtde Fcrc irporTrade
p lieoane. on tclance


19'8

January- March ............................ :. 'r, -'. 41, :ar. -'l. 1.u :' l, -i,', :

January ........ ... ....... .. 9.863.' l3 102 o -3.238 9 9 803 13 926 --.063.C,
february ............... .... ... .. ..... 9 9-5 0 14,2,9 S t. 31.., '.9.. 0 I i"3.C' -i 2..1.0
March.................. ................. II 11o.o 1-.1O. 1 -2. '. l l.l b.b I.. 893 2 -i 7-b.
April .................. ............ ... ll.oi l:..3 l ..91.. -2 Sol 1 1i b '".. It.,3. '3 -j 803.
7 ................ ........... .. .... 11 ;86.0 L-. ,-O 5 -2.222.5 i, L ,7 .'' 1..912 i i126.t
June........................... ........ .L. 12 2 8.2 13.970 3 -1. 702 I 12 2 1. 869 -2 bOi .2

July................... .. ... .. 61. L4I ... 4-. 7 -2 883 2 il ovil .. -3 833.9
August .................. .. ... ...... 1 293. 1-.132.6 -1.838 Q l2 233.7 15 ')73 o -2 '79.9
September.. ............ .... ..... .....13,. ..819.7 -1 5..! .. 1l3. ". 2 1i.82i 2 -2. .,6.5
October........ ............ .......... 12.. 9 1. 901.r1 i ,8 1 -1 L0. L -'.1' 1 l ,76b 8 -2 8t 2.'
November............ ....... .... 13. 50.o i 2. -1 3'-. 1 13. -.5. o '69 314 L
December....... .... .. ... .3. 82.5 15,031 8 -1 '.. 1 3.282 5 1 ,0'. 2 -2. '23.'

1979

January-March............................. 1,090.. .,, r'. : -' .'. .1. r, 4 .'. -, ".4

January............... ......... .... .1 131.8 b1 .'31 1 -3 J 3 13.131.8 17 261.9 --., 50.
February. .. ............ .......... .i, s,. ,- .. I I' 1 i .' i' -, :i I
March................................ 1 ,41452.j I :. 5. .1.' 1J, : ..Q 16, ;. -1 ..'
April ........................... ........
May......... ......................... .
June .................. .............

July...................................
August ......................... ........
September ........ ....... ....... ... ..
October..................... ........
Movembe r........... ....................
Decembe r .................. ....... .....

tExport data represent domestic and foreier, iercharlai -e v~icuding DEpartruEnt r5f Defi- tr-e I Oii MliitI ar, .A -ilarce Proarra"'m rart-4id 'ni r,.ents.
Import data repre-ent general irrportE ri merrhandi se.
IThe totals shown in this table are denied by dairng tne seasonallyy adjusted c-rnr.liL, ':c.-:-ponents 3.r ohu*r in, Ltole -. or exports man tiaoes 5 ana
6 for imports. See footnote I at the bottom oif naee 3.




SExport and import statistical wries are adjusted for seasonal and working day variation but not lor changes in price level. Relectiing a new methodology. introduced wiin sitastiic for January 1979 The
adjusted monthly export and import totals for 1978 and 1979 presented in this report are derived by adding the seasonally adjusted components li.e SITC sections) The factors used io adjust the 1978 1979
component series represent the combination ol seasonal adlusiment factors developed from monthly data through 1978 and the appropriate working-day lactot In issues of this report pror to10 January 1979,
monthly totals were adjusted Independently of the components
Cumulatins of data over al least 4 month periods are desirable to identity underlying Irends. Month to month changes in exports imports and similar series often reflect primarily irregular movement,
differences in monthly carryover, etc Recent month io month percent changes in the overall seasonally adjusted export an import series are presented in the toiioA.ng table with average percent monin to-
month rim and decline over longer periods shown for comparison The averages exclude percentage changes for (I11 the period October December 1977 because o1 abnormahlites in te data due to elleclsof
dock strikes and 12) periods when negligible changes lhero percent) in the level of eportslmponrts occurred

Month-to-month Average monthly rates of change

I
Average Average 'i _r i- mirth.
Series Feb.-Mar. J.ar. -Feb. Dec. 19u- o..-Dc. Average ene. i M 9-8-
1919 1 I9 Jar,. 1 rise 1decIne Ma r-8 a. ,
1977-Qr78 1972-1977 relr. 1' rMar. I'_"
(Percent) (Percent) (Percent) (Percent) (Percent) (Percent) (Percent) iPercent)


F.a.s. export value.. +7.'6 .- -1.1 -1. '4.6 -5.4 -1 9
F.a.s. import value.. .3.2 -8.8 *5... .a. .6.4 -3.3 .'J-i -'Q 0
C.l.f. import value.. +3.2 .- .8.0 +1.5 +6.4 -3.4 .,,.- ., 5

'See the "Explanation of Statistl S" for definllons of the export and import values and trade balances


PT 900 effective January 1979 statistics.










Table 2. U.S. Exports (f.a.s. Value Basis) of Merchandise Showing Department of Defense (DOD)

Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid Shipments, by Month: January 1978 to March 1979


(In millions o1 dollars. See Explanation of Statistics for information on coverage, definition of f.a.s. export value, and sources of error to
the aata. Unadjusted totals represent sum of unrounded figures and hence may vary slightly from sum of rounded amounts)

Exports excluding DOD Exports including
Grant-AidA DOD Grant-Aid G -Ad


Period Domestic Domestic Domestic
ana and Domestic, and Domestic. Western Other
soreasogna foreign, unadjusted foreign, unadjusted Total urope countries
.dJus Itea unadjusted unadjusted


Lq 8 "


Jarn ari- f-ce-.o-r.... 'I Li3. 7-..6 1 1. 8.9 1.3,659.9 I l.1 5 .? 85.3 ..0.5 44.9

j3nuarv- Mar..h................... .. i,-0 0 S. 3 ,, 3 .3I. 5 ,96..- 3 -.. I I I. .2. 9.5

J.ar.u.ars .. .9. .. .83. 9.36-.... 9,2L-.1 *9.36.9 9. 'l.b 2.5 0.5 2.1
F.~bruar q 9 9.'4-.. 9.337.8 9.518 9.3..1 7 3.9 1.3 2.7
Ml rch I.l .. 12.07- 2 LL 830 5 12.079 w 11 835.8 5.2 D 5 4.8
A r,- l .. 11 ttJ.'.'" 12.0' 2 11.85.. 12,Ju69. 11 85'9.6 5 1 0.7 4.,
M v .. .' i2.. 8.9 12 2.'-.3 12,9.. b 1.t 2,50 15.' 1.0 14.1
J .-e .. .. 12, 2 8 2 w..2. 12 ;',L 7 12...87 3 L2.271 10.1 6.5 3.5

ul ... ll.9L.5 10 93-.0 10 '69... 10.94-..7 10. 780.0 10.6 7 3.2
Aug .. 12 293 L ,L. 3.9 11i.-21 11.621.8 Li,-29.3 7.9 6.5 L.4
Sept-rber .. .. .. 13.2 ..2 1J 7L3.1 12.5t-..-. 12,.71.. 12.'.S ,. 1.3 ,i) L.3
Octoon-r ..... ... .. 12.911. 1 13.153.o0 2.Q22.0 13.157.-. 12.926.- 3.8 L.5 2.3
N i n r ... 13. -..).6 13,1 55.- 13 -16.5 13.n72.3 13.-33.S 16.9 1..3 2.4
rceeboe r .. ... .... 13.282.5 1i. 31 .0 13,302.1 13. 32.9 01 303. 1.8 0.1 1.7

19 '

inuar, iur r............... ......... 1 ,l) I j. ,' 1.CI 10, 1 41 "L.." 40, 1.3 .4 3.7 5.7

. anuarv.. ... ... ... ... ... I :1 12 558.1 12 3.'9.-. 2.56l.3 12. 352.5 3.2 .0 2.
F hrul.ar .... .. .. ..... .. b L J. 1.
i rcn. .. .. .. .. I I6.- .. 14.5H 1 ,. I 0.3 0.7 .
April .


" . .. .

1A. e r .. .. ...
pt e ro .. .... .... ..
,-Ft 'er .
t11 ber


S L.-; rth.i n: rn l r urnt ,T,,?I-_'urEm nf ;n.-r,

krpr, r~ient -rtL -prt _r ,prnenr s r),-, the 1.nito r it.- and ifers ITr,.,. DOD tili tarv As-si -ance Prigr-m Grart-Aid shipment figures under this
prnioram i: 1il-' -; Trar.'lPr= -f the -aterinai procured outzlcde the united States and transfers iro L01u overseas stocks from export shitupments.
Gi Epor, valu- i' z -rer a- Cr L' iue. in mo r. n.'tar,.ces. k- i.o.D point of origin. (c) Data (or -hitments reported by the DOD for a
jilen -n tri re intluaeio In, Bureai of Cenu.s repo:.rt; Inr tE second ,oonth suD:sequent I, tne month reporteO by ODD.
'The -;3:-"orii 'tu5elu [tL- -r-ai.r. l in thi-: _':.llusr, are t3ri'e:-' b idadine [the seasonsli) ajusteu c-maur, aiity components as shown in table 4. See
:-tn:.- te L it Itr.e Ut t t of pa. e .
Annru i-',raS lI -r r.11 itri.n r r seasionally id .iurted data. 1.niajusten a .ia acr.ula be u-ed for annual total .










Table 3. U.S. Imports of Merchandise, by Month: January 1978 to March 1979

(in millions of dollars. See Explanation of Statistics for information on coverage, date of importation, definitions of f.a.s. and c.L.i. import
values, and sources of error in the data. Unadjusted totals represent sum of unrounded figure, and hence may vary slightly iroa sum of rounded
amounts)


F.a.s. value C.I.f. value


Period General imports Impartc General imports Imports
for for
Seasonally unadjuste1 consumption. Seasonally nad td consumptIon,
adjusted Unadjuste unadjusted d justed' Unadjusted unadjusted


19 8

January-December........................... J o 0 i 183. l ".3 1682' .

January-March ................. ........... J I .c ,. I.. ,.ij. ,, I., l 4 'r 10 ,' -.4

January.................................. 1. 2 l l.. .- L L3, 2 LJ. '..i- 13,39 .7
Pebruary............................. ... ... .. L -n.9.5 L 'r L) 3 L3 Lv S0 1- .. 52 3 1- 180.!
March .................................... ;-,0 ,-- 1 :.... ~. 93 : l I 69 -..92 -
April.................................... ...... .. 'l ".i. .-a- 5.0 li 3; -.
May......................................... I .19. l .,.. 91[ l 1" ,. 1. l I.. o
June ..................................... .... 13 0 ,,.] 3L -. -i j -., 9 1'. ;. 2 La 368 +

July..................................... .. --. 1 9 | i"' : L .6 -I [, L 1 89S. i
August................................... I -32.n 1- 'j'- -.' 'i I-,' .. l-..et,' L
September................................ 1- 8L 4-. -[l I- -. ..- I .' 1l 9v u 15 .0, 6
October.................................. 8.. 1 .r 1l. IL6 I. I;. '' 3 In. 1 3 1 ."3- .2
November ................................. L... t -. .,.. L .- 'a. It 01 I i .y-I.
December................................. i. .'L. 1- ''', 3 1 .. 3 1, ,. 2 L: L ,.81',.3

19'9

January-March ....................... ..... c I .. ., I 1 I 4;', .r

January.................................. l..2 L. L 1 .I' A j> I ., 2,.'i 1 : l.- n 1i '2 .- In 'a,9 3
February................................. i 1 r. I I- I. I
March.................................... i ,' .. L .-. I I i ,c .', .. Ic, I :- .
April ....................................
May........... ..........................
June...... ............................

Julu t.....................................
August....................................
September................................
October..................................
November .................................
Decemoer.................................

'The ea 'onal ly .a ju-re, r, ~ir i .-"'r, i -, n, ,lnluI. r r l .eran 1 l a.i r rl, r 1z' ., :u..rk -." '[ r, .; *..D,'.'n nr : an,--r. 1t t .a iir 3nr. 1. rE
footnote I at Cot to. *.. pP.'4 5.
Annual total are nor =h.:.-oI n i r z--'= oniliy .rjua ai ar l,'j :n ,-_ ,3 1 cr.:,i.3 r.e ,.E d I.r "- '- ua L -taI .








8


Table 4. U.S. Exports (F.a.s. Value) of Domestic Merchandise, Schedule E Sections, Excluding

Department of Defense Military Grant-Aid Shipments and Foreign Merchandise (Reexports),

Seasonally and Unadjusted by Month: January 1978 to March 1979


I]n "Iaillons of dollars. See Explanation of
data. .r. ad juted ot ilc represent sum of


Statistics for irnformarton on coverage, definition of f.a.s. export value, and sources of error in the
unrounded figures and hence may vary slightly from sum of rounded amounts)


Schedule F section.'

Period 2 1---- S 1 = --
0 2 3 4' 5 6 7 8 9 Foreitn'
(reexportal


1978

January- March ..............
January .......................
February .... .. .....
March ... ........ .
April ... .. ........ ...
Ma..... ....................
juH e .. .... .... .

July..........................
August ........................
September.....................
October.......................
November......................
December......................

1979

January- March ...............
January.......................
February......................
March..........................
April................. .......
May..........................
June...........................
July .........................
August ........................
September .....................
October ......................
November......................
December.....................



1978

January-December..............
January-1 arch ..............
January. ......................
February......................
March.........................
April.........................
May ...........................
June.........................
July..........................
August........................
September.....................
October......................
November......................
December......................

1979

January- march ...............
January.......................
February.......................
March .......................
April ........................
May...........................
June .........................
July ... .....................
August........................
September.....................
October.......................
November......................
December......................


Seasonally adjasred


3,R91.5

L. 120. 4
1.13i9.8
1.431.1
L.-78.
1,.697.8
. 79-.5
1.599 8
1. 738.8
L.698. 3
1. 565.0
1. 13.4






L,299 0C

1, ',. *. ,


522.7

[.l.4
L'0.0
211.3
161.8
i66. 6
169. 7
199.3
220.8
176.5
220.8
220 5
20b. 8





138.0

?'20.o


1,0o9.0
1.023.5
1 188.9
1.260.1
1., 16..
1,187.2
1, 164.9
1.261 .2
1,407.5
1, .50.1
1.510. 7
1. 499.5



4..60'.4
1, 33.5
I .49.5s
1,.10.'.


6)3.1

2.8.6
181.0
200.5
27i.0
118..
385.8
32-.6
335.4.
331.9
370.3
..08.0
400. 3



1,371.4.
463.8
5'6 3
531.3


334.7

96.0
97.2

145.0
119.3
132. 1
130.7
120.9
156.3
113.9
121.0
107.0



14.?
145.8
l?l'. l


2,719.2

893.5
911.5
9-4.2
962.6
974.8
1.027.4
1.063.Z.
1.138 9
1.237.5
1. 148.1
1.228.5
i.103.9



* 90:.5
1. -1..5
L.19 .. r
1,394.0


2,766.3

895.1
910.3
960.9
961.7
1.023. 6
1,036. 5
1,003.6
1.070.7
1, 160.3
1, 106.4
1,148. 1
1,186.6


1. 196.


!. 19 ..9

1,272.2


12,905.5

4,.093.1
.. 156.0
0,656.4
..843 7
-. 759.9
4.907.8
4.853.2
1.,992.2
5, 269.0
5. .25. 1
5.nOO.6
5,676.5



1'i, 710. 3
5,311.6
5.676.0
5,722-.7


2,21.. 8

724.0
742.9
771.9
826.2
855.6
819.2
808.2
892.6
918.7
9.6.5
931.6
940.6



2,938.)
935.9
98 1'.
1.014..5


1,058.2
432.3
236.0
389.9
509.1
309.0
392.4
349.2
329.9
702.5
323.9
625.3
407.2



1, '7.1
584.0
638.6
681..5


__________ S 5 __________ .1. __________ J __________ J __________ I. __________ j __________ J __________ I __________
in adj us ten


18. 133.2


L 132. 7
1,271.5
1 6.5.7
1 .;2 8
1. 768.
[.73).1
I 5..0.6
1. TLib. 2
1, r.5.
1 597.4
L 513.2
1.555 2





1.313. 3

1,581.0


51-.5
138.0
168.0
-1).6
1[4.3
1-1.6
1-1 -,
ImL .t,

176.9
2ii.3
281 1
219.7



529."3

135."
1 .1 .-


15,I552.8

?,.53.8
k.049.8
1.063..
1.33'. 5
1,388.6
L.466 5
1.353.9
992.5
1.083. .
L. 111.9
I.e 0.-
1,b78..
1.556.5



4, '01.4

1.510.3
I ..13
i,R;7. 5


3,878.3
1.95. ?
188.9
141.0
165 2
28-.5
363.6
.2-.0
321. 7
335.4
3.8.0
.22. 1
.65.9
.11.9



1.?77?.

350.2
.252.0
'.35.?


1.521.3
134.7
96.0
97.2
1i41.5
1..5.-
119. 3
132.1
130. 2
120.9
156.3
113.9
121.0
147.0



'90.2

145.8
71- :
171. A


12.618.3
2,7",L.4
830.1
883.2
1.031. I
97i.3
1.018.7
1.063..
1.077.2
1,149.1
1. 197.9
1,085.0
1, 17..-
1.137.0



1.013.46

1.,23.6
S1. I 6
1I522.3.


2,745..
829.8
8-8..
1.067. 6
968.b
1.100.4
I 3- 2
939..
1.024. 7
1, 132.5
1, 120.8
1,134.3
1,186.6



3,640.9

1,121.5
1.I384.1


59,257.9
12,910.8
3,851.1
3,939.b
5, 1"0.1
5.095. 1
5. 12 .6
5. ,31. 1

4.592. 7
5, 14 .5
5,584.4
5,497.3
5. 713.5



16,759.5

5.040.1
5.394. 1
b, 325.1


10.177.1
2,233.0
665..
689.
878.2
854.3
908.6
856.9
777.5
855.8
891.1
953.1
925.1
921.6



2,923.2

873.2
916.8
1,1)3.2


5,006.8
1,058.2
a32.3
236.0
389.9
509.1 L
309.0
392.6
349.2
329.9
702.5
323.9
625.3
407.2



1,907.1

584.0
638.6
084.5


___________ ___________ a ___________ ___________ a ___________ i ___________ .'. ___________ 5 ___________ 1 ___________ 2 1..-


'Schedule E section descriptions are as ioiiaas
0. Food and live animals
1. Beverages and tobacco
2. Crude materials, inedible. escepr fuel
3. Mineral fuels, lubricants. and rFl.rea s.aternal
4. Oils and fats--animal and s-o.etiule


j. Chemicals anr related product., N.S.P.F.
6. Manufactured goods classified chiefly by material
2. Machinery and transport equipment
8. Miscellaneous manufactured articles. N.S.P.F.
9. Cctuodities and transactions not classified elsewhere


Adjusted for seasonal ar, .ra. ,-.. ar. a ,. ,,. -Q 6.3-,1 'a,.r. mn ,.:t-rs .,r,.deu.-d ,r .jar....-r Ii, Adju'r.ernt factors hase not been
applied to data for Schedule E r.r. ,.a *. r. ,r. iAe-p.,'. I au. tc. Th- sa.-r.... ci ,i,-nt f..l1. .ebsonal patterns. The monthly seasonally
adjusted export totals prese.t-. ,e ,41i. I r, a r, -.ad 0,. .. rr. cI ,::pn-r.t total. resn,-a ... table ISee foacnote I, page 51.
Annual totals are not shown I :r .. mn.il, ,.- .-d 2..s 'unad.itda oaim r.:uLd cc u-ea for ar.r.ual tcer.Is
3Coodities entering the U. .-.r.. d ., ,, f .., .r .r, .ai I a .. tn hr imorte.
Commodities entering the U.E ia, watad.r..:r, 3L r- ?am- af Excr-vnE-r. are .r. ur'nal the sarre ca.,diE-sn as whan ilrpor-en.


570.8


150.3
176.8 ...
263.7
210.1
2 ":
215.5 6 '
164.6
192.5
208.7
231.0 I
238. 9
228.9



719.2
208.8
223.8
286.



i.










.505.7.
570.8


150.3
176.0
243.7
210.1


2


244.6
215.6
L64.6
192.5
208.7
231.0
238.5
228.9



719.2

208.8
223.5
286.6


21 .6
21..5.6
L54.6
lgz.5
20B. 7
231..0
238.9
228.9



719.2

2011.8
223.B
286,6


"::,










Table 5. U.S. General Imports (f.a.s. Value Basis) of Merchandise, Schedule A Sections, Seasonally

Adjusted and Unadjusted, by Month: January 1978 to March 1979

(In m*illona of dollars. See ExplanatIon of StatLstlcs for information on coverage, date of mlaportatllon, deflnitionot f.a.s. Import value, and
sources of error in the data. Unadjusted total. represent sum of unroundec figures and hence may vary slightly from aum of rounded amounts)


Schedule A sections1 '


0' 1 2 3 I' 5 6 7 8 9'


Seasonally adjusted


1978

January-f arc ................. ,- ..... i...i I 1.' I .. :'. r'., .. I1. .'i. .' ., I

January.... .................. 1.126.9 L-3 I 669.L 3 .22 2 29.3 0 2 LO? 2 3 i 12.1 1 356 8 328...
February ..................... L L11.- 10o .9 76. 49 502.3 .6.6 Au ..-83 5 3,92,6.6 .83.6 253.5
March. ............. .. L.25' 5 150.c ''7 68 3 -31.? -..0 5 .] ..sl.7 J 695.9 1.b9.9 369.2
April............ .. ....... 1.Lol.5 212.8 7,.. 3.5i3.. .2.7 537.0 2 .8 3 958.6 1.358.1 33-..8
May..... .. ... .. .. ...... 1.1.3.' 182.8 823.3 3 23-. 51.5 570.2 2 310.6 3 836 3 1 540 1 310.0
June..................... .')-5. 19-. 1 716.8 .'1. 'b6.7 ,.2.2 2 065.S 3 953.1 1.nO 1.8 335.2
July...... ....... ... ... .. 1.126.1 187.3 7-6.2 3 3' V 1 .9.. '5.1 .3 '.3 1-1.3 1,624.9 327.0
August........................ 92-.0 1)8.8 799.u 3 r.'i. .. 0. 5...9 2,227.5 3. 7'8.68 1615.9 323.b
September...... ...... ... 1.08.4q 186.3 783.8 3 d8.9 30.2 19q 2 262.9 192.6 1. 217.5 304.2
October....................... 1.152.2 206.1 822 2 3 1 6 "0.9 Sin 2. 3'7.,. '..210.- 1680.9 383.3
November......... ....... .... 1.168.7 200 6 8 -,.. 3.536 2 51.7 .9..7 30. -.3 '. 179.8 1 712.6 321.4
December .. ...... .. .. L 25-.. L98 0 748.q '.6.3 13.0 S'A.l 5 13i.3 -.2 1 1 b39.0 38-..

1979

January-MHarch..... .. .. .. i.02).- .. -. 11 I .' .1-'. I -, -r. *--

January... ................... 1.278.3 207.3 827.o .. 228..0 89 5 5tL.2 2 36..6 ..650.8 1. 64.. 309.4
February ......... ...... ..... 1.102 .; I. 2 $? a I -E ;2 3 38 i : I j J '..a 2b81 9
March......... ...............
April ............... ...... .
MayJ ............. ....... ...
July.... ................ ...
July gust............. ...... .....
August ....... ......... ..
September................... .
October r................. .....
November......................
December......................

lUnid lusted


1978

January-December .............. 13.520.i 2 221.4 '1.333.3 ..; L05 2 511.1 L.. i.j 27 237.3 .'.625.6 1Q.l062.1 3.981.1

January-March.... ..... ... ..' ,..'.., i.... .. I;I .- .. .1.- L. oic. -.')- '" 1.

January.. .............. ...... 1. 126.9 138.1 oi0.. 3...22 2 29.3 -18.9 1.982.9 3. 392.7 1,227.9 328.4
February............... ..... 1.111.4 lo2.- b6' .2 3 50:.3 -6.6 .'.i 2.195.'. 3,573.2 1 293.7 253.5
March..... ................. 1,2 7..5 174.7 .68.7 3 -.1.2 .6.0 o0".2 2.33.. L .,050.7 1. 511.1 369.2
April......................... i.161.5 201. 712.. 3.513.5 U2 7 611.. 2. 383.0 .,085.5 L..39.7 33..8
May............ .... ...... 1.L.3.. 189.2 8.1.- 3.23..1 51.5 563.9 2. 359.3 ... 20.'. 1.'60.0 316.0
June.......................... 1. 045.9 212.7 769.8 3..'t. .6.7 5i-'.2 2.301 0 '..132.9 ,n5LI.5 335.2
July.. ... ..... ... .......... 126.1 177.. 788.0 3. 380. 1 -9.- .. .9 2.-18.3 -. 108.2 782.5 327.0
August .............. ........ 92...0 170.2 817.. 3. '7. 1 -3.0 i '..rQ 2.218.6 3.578.5 1. 75 .5 323.6
September. ....... ............ .10~ .8.9 168.2 829.3 3.c,98.9 30.2 537.9 2.215.- 3.832.0 751.9 30..2
October ... .... ... ...... 1. 152.2 211.5 831.2 3..Q1.6 '0.9 i '1.- 2 3-..5 ... 29-.b L.82'.i 383.3
November.... ............ ...... L.168.7 209.6 6e.3 3.536.2 3i1. 5L2.5 2.373.'. -.23B.3 1,. 'q .) 321..
December.... ................. 1.254.1 20 .9 806.9 3. 7.-6 3 33.0 535.3 2. 111 5 4.318.7 1.500.3 38'...

1979

January-W.arch...... .......... 2.... ".. .u I .. IQ ... 6 1.y" r.6,c,.5 1 ,i_ .'. 4--.

January ................... 1. .1 78.3 20-.8 B12.7 .226.0 89.5 532.2 2.255.8 ..515.9 1.619.7 309..,
February......... ....... ... I, 0 .. : 6 E '56 '-.. 4 W, ... 5 "I 0 '.) l.-.1t 56l 9
March..... ................... .... 1 .2 .n j.9 .- '. .5. ". .1 2.-2*..0 -. 8. 1.56'".2 3,0.
April ................. .......
May................. .. ...
June.........................
July ................. ........
August ........................
September. ........... .....
October .......................
November....................
December .....................

ISchedule A section decript iorns are as follows
0. Food and live animals '. Cnemricai; ano relEeao proluctsi 'I.S.P.F.
1. Beverages and tobacco 6. Manufacturer goods classitieO chiefly by material
2. Crude materials, Inedible, except fuels 7. Machinery and transport equipment
3. Mineral fuels, lubricants. ans related material 8. Miscellaneous manufactured articles N.S.P.F.
.. Oils ana fats--animal ann vegetable 9. Cormoditles and transactions not classified elsewhere
'Adjusted for seasonal and worklng-auy variation using seasonal adjustimer.t factors Introauced ir- January 1979. Adjustment factors have not oeen
applied to data for Schedule A sections 0, 3. .. and 9 due to the absence of Inentiflable demonstrable seasonal patterns. The monthly seasonally
adjusted Import toals if.a.s.) resented In taoies I and 3 are derived by adding the component total. presented in tnts table. tSee footnote
I at the bottom of page 5.) Arnual totals are not shoan for seasonally adjusted data. Unadjusted data should be used for annual totals.







10

Table 6. U.S. General Imports (c.i.f. Value Basis) of Merchandise, Schedule A Sections, Seasonally

Adjusted and Unadjusted, by Month: January 1978 to March 1979

IIn millions of dollars. See Explanation of Statistics for Information on coverage, date of LmDortation. definition of .tl.r. import value. and
sources of error Ln the data. Unadjusted totals represent sum of unrounded figures and hence may %ary slightly from sum of rounded amounts)


Schedule A Eectionsl

Period
)* I 2 3' .* 5 6 7 8 95


Seasonal I ao )justed


19'8


Januarr-. Ma ,P. .. ...

Feoruar

MarCnh
fars,
'pr lI

June.


Cseptet-r r


Decenember




Januar.- Marcr.

Juruar-,

Marcn
April.

Jane.
JulIV
Au.gu.t



S..5-r'r-r


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1.183 I


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321. .




1, -5 .



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2,265 5
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2. 9 .6
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1,821 1
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Jonu.r, -Leqtcoer

Jnudar March

January ,
Febru-r.
March r
Apr I .

Jun-
Jul3
Au.gUt
.:pte-rbc r
Qc t obh r
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Dcc ember




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Martin.
Apr il
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329.0
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390.1


',CI' iJI 11 r.:r >. :c' cr, i fd r.' .. r ..r i l'.
S a. an i a ICn-.t iais alna rI la '.r t prraucts, P F
I t.ri-n:. :-na 'c&.s 1-anufazoruCa 'c-i clasinite, :r.eiiy b'. -a-rial
L ru. mi t r i a ii c, -. t i ie 1 Machin.:ry .nu trrn-p:rt qu>pr.-nt
j 'imn r l r1ij lubri-an a., related ..iteral 80 'i.cellanc.:u- s Ia'irrn articles, r -. F.F.
U Is ar o itar--anil n.i n tcia < c ua L. -,ditic ando transactions not classiiied else-here
:Aaju."ta for =aor.ln3i 3ar -orn irg-las .rit;tio. using -5ason 1l 3d iu- t-ir.ci 3tacEr in[ C(ruceJ n JanJsi, 1 P'9. AOjustent factors have not beer.
app, eq tc.G .jta I.r fr:quile A sCrCton ',6', .. andv due to the abience of identiflaDic oer3onal p3ttern-. The r.monthly seauonall aajustea import
t[oalE ic. .f.) presented in table- I ana i are oert.eo ti anoinrg tre component total presented in this taDle. iSee footnote I at the bot om of
page I.1 JAnual total are rot 'hor. lor m-em.ornall, adju'tea asia. Unadjusteo sata .1anola one aEa ior annual totals.








GENERAL IMPORTS OF PETROLEUM AND SELECTED PETROLEUM PRODUCTS INTO
THE U.S. CUSTOMS AREA AND U.S. VIRGIN ISLANDS, UNADJUSTED

Monthly and cumulative- to-date data on general imports of petroleum and selected petroleum products into the U.S. Customs area
and into the U S. Virgin Islands for the period January 1973 through the current month are presented in the tables that follow. Tables
1 A and 1 B present imports into the U S Customs area and tables 2-A and 2-B present imports into the U.S. Virgin Islands. (It should
be noted that imports into the Virgin Islands are excluded from the regularly compiled foreign trade statistics and, therefore, are ex-
cluded from the data presented in tables 1 A and 1-B as well as the other tables shown in the front of this report.-See "Explanation of
Statistics"

Effective with January 1979 statistics, certain changes were made in the commodity classifications (Schedule A and TSUSA) covering
petroleum products. These changes are reflected in the listing of classifications shown below. Data presented in tables 1-B and 2 B which
Follow reflect all changes in classifications. effective January 1979


Schedule A and TSUSA Commodity Numbers Used in Compiling the Petroleum
Information Presented in This Report


Energy products

Schedule A No.


Nonenergy products

Schedule A No.


TSUSA No.


Crude petroleum and deriv-
atives to be refined
333.0020
333.0040
334 54"0


Crude petroleum
333.0020
333.0040

Gasoline
334.1500

Jet fuel
334.1205

Kerosene
334.2000


Distillate fuel oil
334.3021

334.3045

Residual fuel oil
334.4050
334.4060

Propane and butane gas
341.0025

Liquid derivatives of
petroleum, n.e.s.
334.5430 pt.


475.0510
.75.1010
.75.6510


.75.0510
475.1010


475.2520. 475.2560


f475.2530
475.2550

475.3000


475.0525
475.0545
475.1015
475.1025

475.0535
475.1035


475.1525, 475.1535,
&175.1545


475.6530


Lubricating oils
334.5410 pt.

Lubricating greases
334.5410 pt.


Paraffin and other mineral
waxes
335.1225 pt.
335.1245


Naphthas
334.5420

Asphalt
335.4500


All other petroleum products
(pitch of tar coke, non-
liquid hydrocarbon mix-
tures, and calcined petro-
leum and coal coke not for
fuel)
335.3000 pt.
334.5430 pt.
598.5020 pt.


475.4500


475.5500, 475.6000


494.2200
494.2400



475.3500


521.1100


401.6200
475.7000
517.5120
517.5140


FT 900 Effective with February 1978 statistics


TSUSA No.








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14

Table 2-A Summary of Imports of Petroleum and Selected Petroleum Products into the U.S. Virgin Islands from Foreign Countries,

Unadjusted, by Month (f.a.s. Value Basis): 1979

Snr ini.a.. ser. .9 :tiastticS fr I r.faora1o.1 on Cr.pr*re j-firtoti of re ft s. port .. lu.e Bad -sourcB of error in IIthe oaot. ro. li rep1 s rt e of urroa. ded Ilrf heae -u v.ry
sligloI from s* of ro.ded a. ot sI

C.qaito,. .- .riion' r ;.,.rtr Fbrain 0.-c prti 1 ary Jue *.lw.y toe-at SepteIe-r Ortoor IoS.i5eer .DerFter

met q ianilr r I uGsang &r -urrliJ

T;rn p rOei u rwrtr r-J *el. r wl IA l' wh i .



Crelde ...ttro u.3 .a 4. a-'i.. r-e. e, lrio n

erudle -ar 1ea.. 5 o r

Je r el ..
Ie -se-.E





iotonnergy products..................

Lubrtcatt.g oils.........................
tLbricattag grease .1.. ............
Paraffin aod other iloteral xeto....








i *' r i7o .r r .. .. .


pfireo c ..i i i t 1 i ,J



















iSt pge I for a list of the Schadule A and t SUSA (TarI Scl of the United S.t.a Annotated) cauodties Included In .xc0 line ItB
,r 3- 1e.030i.n tr ...o L", I I


e f r fuels,
ier ie .I





o rIe ere. ;Trr u:tr ... II


lobr mi -.13,, :it .. .. .. |






Represents zero. 2 less thin one hilo of unit of neoaurerent shoot.
'eo pope 11 for a list of the Schedule A and TSUSA (TorAtH Stedlnles of the United States Aontototed) m eodtoo ttcluded tn pock liot toem.
Irnctudes sttor toeos, 0.e.s.
Quintzty dot. tltch are reported 00 either pounds, short ions, or lto t0ns to the rglotor taport stoo.ottno hove ees conooeed to barrIo to this rp' 3s 05 the hates at JtO ptiodo poP oa rl.












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U.S. Department
of Commerce
BUREAU OF THE CENSUS
Washington, D.C. 20233
Official Business


... .. .


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

3 1262 08586 2564
First Class Mail -
COM-202


4=i~


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