United States foreign trade

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
United States foreign trade
Alternate title:
United States foreign trade. FT900, Summary of United States export and import merchandise trade
Portion of title:
Summary of U.S. export and import merchandise trade
Abbreviated Title:
U.S. foreign trade, FT900, Summ. U.S. export import merch. trade
Physical Description:
13 v. : ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of the Census
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census :
For sale by the Subscriber Services Section (Publications), Bureau of the Census
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Creation Date:
January 1979
Publication Date:
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Imports -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Exports -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Commerce -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
statistics   ( marcgt )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Issued also to depository libraries in microfiche.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Dec. 1976-
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Ceased in 1988.
General Note:
"FT 900."
General Note:
Description based on: Jan. 1979; title from caption.
General Note:
Beginning with July 1980 for sale by the Supt. of Docs., U.S.G.P.O.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Mar. 1988.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001320869
notis - AGH1745
oclc - 07222812
lccn - 81646118
issn - 0730-3270
sobekcm - AA00005268_00001
Classification:
ddc - 382/.0973/00212
System ID:
AA00005268:00026

Related Items

Preceded by:
Summary of U.S. export and import merchandise trade
Succeeded by:
U.S. merchandise trade. Seasonally adjusted imports and exports

Full Text
3. i:9qo-00 -79-I


UNITED STATES FOREIGN TRADE,


Summary of U.S. Export and


U mport Merchandise Trade




U.S. DEPOSITORY JANUARY 1979

'...J O-79-1 For Release February 28, 1979 2-00 P.M.


Seasonally Adjusted and Unadjusted Data

(Including unadjusted data on imports of petroleum and petroleum products)


SPEED I AL MNollt.jiCf 4FE i
Effective with the January 1979 itast itc. adjusted export and
import totals represent the sum of ,orumod t cr1mp.-ner: i I.
SITC section total) aajuEtea for ea:,.rl and work.rg-da,' ir-
Litiorn. In December 1978 and earlier pers.ca, the moErtri, t.,-
jals for exports anrd imports were ada .ted aindepender.t i of the
components. For more details on the revised aethoaolog for sea-
-onally adju'tar.g eKports and iiport', see the special luppleaer,t
to Report FT-9f O issued February 2.7. 197,. In table I ,f thit i-
sue of Report FT-gOO, the seaonril.v adiu:ted totai: for export:
and imports are shown us r.g the "ret-e-' ana the ".:-id' da-ornal
adjustment methods.


F.A.S. Es-ORTT AND F.A.S.' i-POPT,.

Seasonally Adjusted

The Bureau of the Cer-ur, Departmrent of Cimmerc:e anrn'nc -
ed today that based or a re.iaed sei-unal addj.-1 rert et.h-
odology, January 1979 exprts on a r.a.. free sl.:.rsc-ae
ship U.S. port of exportatiorn value ba3s, excludoing
Department of Defense 10DCD Mlitary :-i' trace Programs
Grant-Aid shipmentit, amounted t.o $!3,133.3 iior. and
that general imports on a f.a.s. roreignri port i exporta-
thon alue basis amoun'iited t il,'31.1 iii lc.ri. Bs eid ori
the "old,.seasonal adju stment methlcol .gy expert tot lled, I
$13,303.1 million and imports totalled itl5,16.4 mm llun.

Based on the above export and impart figures. the Januar1
merchandise trade balance was an deficit b) 3.,092.9 t.i]-
lion, using the re.stEd zeaconal adjustment methodol y,
and S1,875.3 million under the old adjustineet method.

For the 4-month period, October 1978 January 1979 exports,
on a revised adjusted basis, averaged $13.192.0 million per
month, a level about 7 percent above the average of $1',34.*4
million for the preceding 4-imotn period, and impcrrt a.-
averaged 515,234.8 million during the lsteit 4 .se.nth, s
percent above the average of 514.3E6.8 million for the
earlier 4-month period. ul.nder the olo adjustment method.
the monthly average for exports during tne inteit 4-ar, th
period were 6 percent above the average frte earlier
period and imports were 5 percent higher.
bUnadjisted

Exports excluding Military Assi'tance Prograir Grant-Aid
shipments decreased from $13.5S1.0 million in December
1978 to 512,558.1 million ir. Jaruar) 1979. With Militar,
Assistance Program Grant-Aid -hipments included, export:
declined from SII,532.9 to t12,.61.3 mill;nr. Leneral .m-
ports increased From $14.956.3 million in December 1978 t.3
$15,846.3 million in Januar,' 1979.
Note* Footnotes L. ,e ana 1 are :hon at ine oDit:.: or
page 5.


F.A. -. fAfiOi AND C.i.j. iMf-'rit

.e.aune ly Adlu:ted

IT ur .:,j .. r. :. I [p rt. rt ,I *rm =r. i .



it i .i1 1 "1 'It1 i S. ra n E
,r .. l : .,. -prr. t .. ..e- ..r r,

r os i l l ,. 1 i l r,' ,- -
bde ti or. he D.r sxporrt an.d port fig-re', the Jar.nur.
.ri.rCnridi e tr'dc baI anice .3; in dfi Ci at b, 14,14a.b miliiaon,
-.,e the rs :e e 'l 3iad iUwtis.ent mer'hoi.:..lnri, ena
l,9A56.4l 'ili, 'n r.der the old Adjo tient settihd.

For the 4-i-t-nth period, tOctber 197T .inuar: 197r export',
or. a re ed ailu.ted b :. average 13. 19- i.. or pter
ii'r.,th, a le.-cJ at'out 7 per-:enr. abc-%e the average of r I.1 7I4.4
Sll irn F-or the prredine 4-mtranth per, od, and rCport ta -
a.e'r3ed lc,e'ua.4 i.Illi. an during the iate-t 4 im nrths,
6 percent boie 'the '.er.g r..f hi t ,3i4.6 ir-illiori f-r the
earlier 4.i-mintr period. I'nder rhe old idju .mrint method.
the aonrthli ,.-erae f.ar ip-orr' d -lri the I .test '1-orthn
period u ere o percent ab:. 'e the a erage Ir the earlier
period and imports were 5 percent higher.

LInadjuo red

Exports .ac lding Militarv Aiatanrce Prograou CrAnt-ALd
:hopment: Jecreased from 13,531.0 mi lion r.i December 1978
re i '.: .1 ir lliorn r. .1 Jinu rv 1979. With Miltar,
A ? i: rance Fregra- Lrant-Aid :ri.pments ir, lauded, epp)rt .
dec i'r ea fr.... 113.531.9 to l12. .l.3 million. General ii-
port' ir.crea3ed frrem liS,-6.l Smil-rin ri DeceMeber 1978 tO
i11 ,e :'.6 mii i'on irn .ianuJ r, 1 9.


(* I U.S. Department
I of Commerce

BUREAU OF
mm my, THE CENSUS
Mo


Inquirim concerning these figures should be addressed to the Chief. Foreign Trade Division, Bureau of
the Census. Washington. D.C. 20233. Tel: Area Code 301, 763-5140; 763-7754; and 763-7755.
For ale by the Subscriber Services Section (Publications),. Bureau of the Census, Washington, D.C.
20233, or any U.S. Department of Commerce district office. Postage stamps not acceptable; currency
submitted at sender's risk. Remittances from foreign countries must be by international money order
or by a draft on a U.S. bank. Price 30 cents per copy. Annual subscription (FT 900,975, 985, and 986
combined) $14.90.







EXPLANATION OF STATISTICS


IMPORT STATISTICS

Coverage

The U.S. import statistics reflect both government and
nongovernment imports of merchandise from foreign countries
into the U.S. Customs territory, which includes the 50 States,
the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. The U.S. import
statistics exclude imports into the Virgin Islands, Guam,
American Samoa, and other U.S. possessions; and shipments
between the United States and Puerto Rico, between the United
States and U.S. possessions, and between any of these outlying
areas. (Data on U.S. trade with Puerto Rico and the Virgin
Islands of the United States are published separately in Report
FT 800. Additional data on such trade and on imports into the
Virgin Islands from foreign countries are presented in reference
tabulations.) Data on imports of petroleum and selected
petroleum products, including shipments into the Virgin Islands
from foreign countries, are included in this report effective with
the January 1976 statistics (previously shown in former Report
FT 900-Supplement).
The U.S. import statistics also exclude American goods re-
turned to the United States by its Armed Forces ;intransit ship-
ments through the United States when documented as such
with Customs; temporary shipments; transactions not con-
sidered to be of statistical significance, such as shipments of
personal and household effects; low-valued nondutiable im-
ports by mail; and issued monetary coins of all component
metals.

Inclusion of Gold in the Statistics

Effective with the statistics for January 1978, imports of
nonmonetary gold (in such forms as ore, scrap and base bullion,
nonmonetary refined bullion, etc.) which were previously
excluded, are now included in the statistics. Imports of silver in
these forms have been included since January 1969. Additional
information regarding the inclusion of gold in the 1978 statistics
appears in the November and December 1977 issues of Report
FT 990.

General Imports/Imports For Consumption

The statistics on U.S. imports are presented in terms of both
"General Imports" and "Imports for Consumption." General
imports are a combination of entries for immediate con-
sumption and entries into Customs bonded warehouses, and
thus generally reflect total arrivals of merchandise. Imports for
consumption are a combination of entries for immediate
consumption and withdrawals from warehouses for con-
sumption, and thus generally reflect the total of the com-
modities entered into U.S. consumption channels.
Source Of Import Information

The official U.S. import statistics are compiled by the Bureau
of the Census from copies of the import entry and warehouse
withdrawal forms which importers are required by law to file
with Customs officials. The information as to country of origin,
net quantity, value, and commodity classification is verified by
Customs officials on entries filed for transactions valued over
$250, which are ordinarily subject to examination for Customs


appraisement purposes. The statistical copy of the entry is
corrected if it does not accurately reflect the information
called for by the statistical requirements.

Import Valuation

F.a.s. Import Value. -The f.a.s. (free alongside ship) value
represents the transaction value of imports at the foreign port of
exportation. It is based on the purchase price, i.e., the actual
transaction value and generally includes all charges incurred in
placing the merchandise alongside the carrier at the port of
exportation in the country of exportation.

C.i.f. Import Value.-The c.i.f. (cost, insurance, and freight)
value represents the value of imports at the first port of entryin
the United States. It is based on the purchase price and includes:
all freight, insurance, and other charges (excluding U.S. import
duties) incurred in bringing the merchandise from the country
of exportation and generally placing it alongside the carrier at
the first port of entry in the United States. If the merchandise
was acquired in a transaction between related parties, the
purchase price used in deriving the c.i.f. value is based on an
arm's-length equivalent transaction price, i.e., a price which
would exist between unrelated buyers and sellers.

Import Commodity Information

Import data are initially reported in terms of the commodity
classifications in the Tariff Schedules of the United States An-
notated (TSUSA), which is an official publication of the U.S.
International Trade Commission, embracing the legal text o
the Tariff Schedules of the United States together with static
tical annotations. The TSUSA data are rearranged and present.
in this report in terms of totals for the 1-digit common
sections in Schedule A, Statistical Classification of Commoditf
Imported Into the United States, which is based upon th
Standard International Trade Classification (SITC), Revision
effective with the statistics for January 1978. Prior to Januati
1978, Schedule A was based upon the former SITC, Revised

Date of Importation and Import Monthly Carryover

It is the objective of the compiling procedures to include
shipments, insofar as practicable, in the statistics for the actul
month of importation (or the month of withdrawal in the case
of warehouse withdrawals for consumption). Prior to 1978,.t
date of Customs official acceptance of the import enif
documents was used to determine the statistical month in wh=.
the shipments were included. Effective with the January 197:
statistics, the date of importation as reported on the impoft
entries is being used to determine the statistical month
However, since under the Customs "immediate.delivery" pO
cedures importers may file the import entry up to 10 workday. 4
after the date of release of the merchandise, some documents
for merchandise imported during the last few days of a given
month may not be received in time for inclusion in the statistics
for that month. As a result, there is a carryover, estimated at
about 15 percent from the actual month of importation to a
subsequent month. In addition, processing problems (e.g., late
filing of documents, rejection of a shipment by the computer
because the data fad to meet certain edit criteria established to





protect the accuracy of the statisliLs, etc.) contribute to an
additional carryover of about 5 percent (in terms of value) uf
shipments from the reported month of importation (or with-
drawal from warehouse) to a subsequent month, usually the
succeeding month. These lirutations should be borne in mind
when making month-tou-month comparisons.

Cumulations of data over at least 4-month periods are desir-
able to identify underlying trends. Month-to-month changes in
imports, exports, and similar series often reflect primarily
irregular movements. e.g., exogenous events such as strikes,
differences in monthly carryover, etc.


Estimated Data for Imports Valued Under $251

The overall import and Schedule A Section 9 totals include
sample estimates for shipments valued under $251. Therefore,
they are subject to sampling error, estimated at less than
one-tenth of one percent for the unadjusted overall total and
about one percent for the unadjusted Schedule A Section 9
total. This means that we can have about 67 percent confidence
that the published unadjusted overall totals and the unadjusted
Schedule A Section 9 totals differ by less than one-tenth of a
percent and one percent, respectively, from the totals that
would have resulted from a complete tabulation. The statistics
on imports of petroleum and petroleum products included in
this report reflect fully compiled data and, therefore, are not
subject to sampling error.



EXPORT STATISTICS

Coverage
The export statistics reflect, in general, both government and
nongovernment exports of domestic and foreign merchandise
from the U.S. Customs territory (includes the 50 States, the
District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico) to foreign countries,
whether the exportation involves a commercial transaction or
not. The statistics, therefore, include Department of Defense
Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid shipments, shipments for
economic assistance under the Foreign Assistance Act and
shipments of agricultural commodities under P.L. 480 (The
Agricultural Trade Development and Assistance Act of 1954, as
amended) and related laws. The following are excluded from the
statistics: Shipments to U.S. Armed Forces and diplomatic
missions abroad for their own use, shipments between the
United States and Puerto Rico, between the United States and
its possessions (including the Virgin Islands), and between these
outlying areas; exports from U.S. possessions; intransit ship-
ments through the United States, transactions not considered to
be of statistical importance, such as personal and household
effects; temporary exports; low-valued or non-commercial
exports by mail; and issued monetary coins of all component
metals.

Inclusion of Gold in the Statistics.

As indicated above for imports, effective with the statistics
for January 1978, exports of nonmonetary gold (in such forms
as ore, scrap and base bulhon, nonmonetary refined bullion,
etc.) which were previously excluded, are included in the


statistics. Exports of silver in these forms have been included
since January 1969. Additional information regarding the
inclusion of gold in the 1978 statistics appears in the November
and December 1977 issues of Report FT 990.

Definition of Exports of Domestic and Foreign Merchandise

Exports of domestic merchandise include commodities which
are grown, produced, or manufactured in the UnitedStates, and
commodities of foreign origin which have been changed in the
United States from the form in which they were imported, or
which have been enhanced in value by further manufacture in
the United States. Exports of foreign merchandise consist of
commodities of foreign origin which have entered the United
States as imports and which, at the time of exportation, are in
substantially the same condition as when imported.

Source of Export Information

The official U.S. export statistics are compiled by the Bureau
of the Census primarily from copies of Shipper's Export
Declarations which are required to be filed with Customs
officials, except for Department of Defense Military Assistance
Program Grant-Aid shipments which are reported directly to the
Bureau of the Census by the Department of Defense and
shipments by qualified exporters who have been authorized to
submit data in the form of magnetic tape, punched cards, or
monthly Shipper's Summary Export Declarations directly to
the Bureau of the Census.

Export Valuation
F.a.s. Export Value. -The value reported in the export statistics
generally is equivalent to a f.a.s. (free alongside ship) value at
the U.S. port of export, based on the transaction price,
including inland freight, insurance and other charges incurred in
placing the merchandise alongside the carrier at the U.S. port of
exportation.

Export Commodity Information
Beginning January 1978, export commodity information
is collected in terms of the commodity classifications in the
1978 edition of Schedule B, Statistical Classification of Do-
mestic and Foreign Commodities Exported from the United
States, which is based on the framework of the classification
system in the Tariff Schedules of the United States (TSUS).
In this report, the Schedule B data are rearranged and presented
in terms of totals for the 1-digit commodity sectionsin Schedule
E, which is based upon the Standard International Trade Classi-
fication (SITC), Revision 2, effective with the statistics for
January 1978. Prior to January 1978, the export classifications
in Schedule B were based upon the organizational framework
of the former SITC. Revised.

Export Monthly Carryover
It is the objective of the compiling procedures to include
shipments, insofar as practicable, in the statistics for the actual
month of exportation. For purposes of the statistics, the month
of exportation is generally based on the date when the shipment
leaves the United States. (For vessel or air shipments it is the
date when the carrier departs or is cleared from the port of
export.) However, as indicated above for imports, because of








processing problems (e.g., late receipt of a document for an
end-of-month shipment, rejection of a shipment by the com-
puter because the data fail to meet certain edit criteria
established to protect the accuracy of the statistics, etc.), there
is an overall average carryover of about 2 to 3 percent (in terms
of value) of the shipments from the actual month of exporta-
tion to a subsequent month, usually the succeeding month.
These limitations should be borne in mind when making
month-to-month comparisons.
Cumulations of data over at least 4-month periods are
desirable to identify underlying trends. Month-to-month
changes in imports, exports, and similar series often reflect
primarily irregular movements, differences in monthly
carryover, etc.

Estimated Data for Export Shipments

The overall export and Schedule B section and division totals
include sample estimates for shipments valued $251-$1,999 to
Canada and for shipments valued $251-$999 to countries other
than Canada. Data for shipments valued $250 and under to all
countries are also estimated, based on established percentages of
individual country totals, and included in the Schedule B
Section 9 totals regardless of the commodity exported. It is
estimated that the unadjusted overall total is subject to a
sampling error of less than one-tenth of one percent, and the
unadjusted Schedule B section or division totals are subject to
sampling errors of about one percent. In addition, the Schedule
B Section 9 total is subject to possible error in the estimated
data for shipments valued $250 and under; and the overall total,
and the individual totals for sections other than Section 9, to a
more limited extent. Such $250 and under shipments represent
about 1 percent of the total value of exports, and about 60
percent of the Schedule B Section 9 total.

SOURCES OF ERROR IN THE STATISTICS

Monthly import and export figures are subject to the
possibility of errors which may arise from sources other than
sampling errors, discussed above. Among these are errors in the
reporting and/or processing of information as to commodity
classification, value and other statistical factors, month of
inclusion (see paragraphs on import and export carryover,
above), and the undercounting of exports to Canada due to the
non-receipt of Shipper's Export Declarations. For 1976, the
undercounting amounted to about one and one-half billion
dollars. In the case of imports the information as to value and
commodity classification (as well as country of origin and net
quantity) is verified by Customs officials on entries filed for
transactions valued over $250 which are ordinarily subject to
examination for Customs appraisement purposes, thus con-
siderably reducing the possibility of error. In addition, the
procedures used to compile both the import and export sta-
tistics include clerical and computer processing checks designed


to protect the accuracy of the statistics to the fullest practicable
extent.

MERCHANDISE TRADE BALANCES

Two trade balances are presented in this report:
1) The balance between exports based on f.a.s. values and
imports based on f.a.s. values.
2) The balance between exports based on f.a.s. values and
imports based on ci.f. values with adjustments for imports from
affiliated sellers abroad to reflect arms-length equivalent prices.
Both balances are useful for certain purposes. The first
balance corresponds to a measurement of the international
payments or credit flows resulting from merchandise trade
between the U.S. and foreign countries. The second balance is
based on concepts similar to those used by most foreign
countries, and therefore provides a reference for comparison
with the trade balances published by those countries.


REVISIONS TO THE STATISTICS

Under the revision policy adopted effective with the 1977
statistics, revisions to the monthly statistics for the current year
will be issued only once a year, i.e., with the reports for June
of the following year. Thus, revisions to 1979 statistics will be
issued only in June 1980. Under the policy previously in effect,
revisions were issued twice a year-the current year's June re-
ports contained revisions for the prior year while the December
reports usually contained revisions for the first three quarters
of the current year.
In addition to the revisions which are made on a once a year
basis, instances may occur where a significant error in the
statistics for a month of the current year is discovered after the
statistics for that month are compiled. If the error is of
sufficient importance to require correction prior to the time
that the regular revisions are carried, the correction is made and
so noted in this report.


SOURCES OF FURTHER INFORMATION

Additional foreign trade statistics and information regarding
coverage, valuation, sampling, and qualifications which should
be considered by users of the statistics are contained primarily
in the following publications: Report FT 990, Highlights of U.S.
Export and Import Trade; FT 135, U.S. General Imports,
Schedule A Commodity by Country; FT 410, U.S. Exports,
Schedule E Commodity by Country; and the Guide to Foreign
Trade Statistics. Information regarding additional sources of.
statistics, the methodology used in seasonally adjusting the data,
and other matters relating to foreign trade statistics may be
obtained from the Foreign Trade Division, Bureau of the
Census. Washington, D.C. 20233.







5

Table 1. U.S. Exports (f.a.s. Value Basis), General Imports (f.a.s. and c.i.f. Value Basis), and Merchandise

Trade Balance, Adjusted for Seasonal and Working-Day Variation, by Month: January 1978 to

January 1979

(In millions of dollars. See Explanation of Statistics for information an coverage. date of laportation, definitions of export and import values and
trade balances, and sources of error in the data)

I ata Baacd On The "Revi*'-d" Sea-onal Data P.2aed jr. Trie '1- '"eural
Adjusraer-t Methdolog) Adiu.ltnert Mtr F.c.tlog,
Period
Exports Imports bIade Exports Imports bTrade
ba ante balance






January y........................... ......... -, 3. I 1 :. -3, 4.. 11u ,14.3 3, .,. --, l .,

March ..................................... 11,1 16., 1 ,,U4. I -' ,:.. lu,,. 1..I 13, 1.j3 ,: a7.
April ........ ........... ............... l 1,63.4 11 4, 1.1 -; 861. 1 l, 341. 1 1 t, 1 -_ ,61.
February .................................. ..' 6., I 06. ..: 1,'3.? 15 *.. -1 :-i.

Jurne..................................... -,i 6.' 14, -1 7;.., 1Y '. I3, .'.

July .................................... 11,661.5 14 ,44.? -',ed 11 'i..: 1 -1 1.=
August.............................. ..... 1-.,-:.7 14,1i -1,S.9 'i .3 l ,Ou.. -1 ,20.9
Seple ber ................................. 1 1 '. -. i I .O -1,691 .
October- -.....................- ...........-.. 1 ,- 01. 14, 7 3 .r. -I ..' L 15 1 l i .& l'.
oveL ber ................................. 3,ii .. .1. 1 '4 ..1 ., 1- l..u -1,94 0.
De ema ber .......................... ....... .. ,-l 6 1 :' i3. ,I 4 l 4 ..4 I v, IB 0 -?,040.1





January................................. 1. I .:1 L -:'- ,"'4 7.e ,1, l. 1l ,l 7. 4 -\, ~'..
february ..................................
March ..................................... 1 ,
April ..................... ............. 1
May ................... ................ 1
June ................... ..............






Jarcuar ...................... ..... ........ ,, 63." i 3, ., -4 1,1.u 1,,1014. l -], -
Febr-uar ................................ .. ,4.*, 1 1d, : 4e.. ,9. :. I I.; ,,
MHare .. .............. ................... 1 1. .. IJ ,8a 3.:, -: ; l [:. If .Ii -3, -,.

Jay ........... ......................... 1.,i l r ', I :'.., -. 10|.6. 1, .1 1 t r .. = 1.
Jure ar............................... .... i : V6. ; 4, I,'. -. ,. I. 14. ;.4 4 .
July ...................................... 1 1,661. I : ,4". 1 -,a. IIi. .; .
Atugist .................................. t. 1 l : .' e.. I 1 0: .3.
September ............................... 1 1' -4.: 6,a.8o. ; ,.. 14... I14i. -,;1.
October ................................. 1 il. l I, -63.6 7 c, 1 .ic. l 16,c, .. ,, .

Deceseer ......... ....................... 1... 3 I c, rr.36. -_ = ,; .' 1 ,148.4 It 173.. -3 ,i .-







Januar1 ................................. 13,13.:. ',-.ri!. -1,'46.6 I ,.I }.l ir r.l. ->8 a .4
Februjr .............. .... ... ....
H are | ............. ....... ....... .. .. 7
rt aQ | .......... ............ .. .. 1 .,


June ..


E l pp r lr dla t a r pr. .: *- -t I 6ad r r i r I 1 .. I- I
np.r I daI a r -, pre a.-.t i z.. r; 1 : r 1 .. r r.r : c ,-


., .l r I ir :r ,.


Adjusted for seasonal and morinLg-ay "arnaLioDus sLng revisea .roetrad lofgy ult.roduc-d La January 5.L S peciti AimdI.-.ieri.t "s pagi L.
'Cumulations of data over at least 4 monitn period deare desrable to dentitf underling trends Month Io monoit tanges in exports imports and similar sr.es otlpn retifc pi.mar.l, irregular mi.tiTer.li
differences in monottly Ldrrit ye elc Recent month lo month pe'reni changes in the overall sPsonallv ailusied eior aidr. import series are presented in the loilowing table with average percent manth to10
month rise and decline rjver longer periods shown loi comparison The average rise and average decline figure do not reflect data an nonmoneiarv gqal The aeeragesi also include percentage changesfor (1)
the period Oclober. Derembe 1971 because of abnormalities n tr.e data due to effects of dock str.ket and 121 periods wnin negligible changes eIro perCienT) .n In letel ol PNoroni/imports occurred Per
centage changes vor I a.i asnd c i import values are not available lor ppriods prDor to January 1974

Montn-to-montEh Aerage monthly rates Of change


Dec. 19'"6- i..v.- .- c. Ot.-ri-f.A t..-.: t. Average Average .i r,nt lr 1'. m.ntr.izi
Series :i' 1 "8 1[ 8 rise decline :p t. I2' 8' .arr. 19 --
.Tarn. 19 1972 -19' 7 1972-1977 ., r,. .] l an i :

IPercenti (Per(Perct (Percent) (Percent) iPercent) (Percent) (Percent) (Percent)



F.a.s. export value.. -i.2 -. -1.9 -..1 *36 -3-4 I/A I I1A
F.a.s. import value.. .8., -,. i .).5 i.1 (NA) INA) IJ4 I rAI
C. .f. import value.. -6.0 -0.', 3.- -''.5 (r'N.) (NA) rit, N lii

'See the "Explanation of Statistis for definioiuni 01o thee roori and irr.port valuess and trade balances
1A Host available.














Table 2. U.S. Exports (f.a.s. Value Basis) of Merchandise Showing Department of Defense (DOD)

Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid Shipments, by Month: January 1978 to January 1979


(In millions of dollars. See Explanation of Statistics for Information on coverage, definition of f.a.s. export value, and sources of error La
the data. Unadjusted totals represent sum of unrounded figures and hence may vary slightly from sum of rounded countss)

Exports excluding DOD Exports Including Grant-Aid
Grant-Aid' DOD Grant-Aid' DOD Grant-Aid


Period Domestic Dmestic Domestic
and and Domestic, and Domestic, Total Western Other
fore ign foreign, unadjusted foreign, unadjusted Europe countries
season unadjusted unadjusted
ad jusLeo


1978

January-December...................... (3) 143,574.6 141,068.9 143,659.9 141,154.2 85.3 40.4 44..

January- 9,863.7 9,364.4 9,.14.1 9,366.9 9,216.6 2.5 0.5 2.1

January........................ ....... 9,863.7 9,364.4 9,214.1 9,366.9 9,216.6 2.5 0.5 2.1
February.............................. 9,945.0 9, J4 6 9,337.8 9,518.5 9,341.7 3.9 1.3 2.7
March................................. 11,146.5 12,074.2 11,830.5 12,079.4 11,815.8 5.2 0.5 4.8
April................................. 11,630.4 12,064.2 11,854.1 12,069.7 11,859.6 5.4 0.7 4.8
May................................... 11,786.0 12,478.9 12,234.3 12,494.6 12,250.0 15.7 1.0 14.7
June.................................. 12,268.2 1[,477.3 1?,261.7 12,487.3 12,271.7 10.1 6.5 3.5

July.................................. 11,661.5 10,934.0 10,769.4 10,944.7 10,780.0 10.6 7.4 3.2
August............................... 12,,93.7 11,613.9 11,421.4 11,621.8 11,429.3 7.9 6.5 1.4
September............................. 13,"74.2' 12,713.1 1?,504.4 12,714.4 17,505.7 1.3 IZI 1.3
October.............................. 13,13.6 12,901 1 13,13.6 1 2 .6 13,157.4 12,926.4 3.8 1.5 2.3
November.............................. 13,450.6 13,655.4 13,416.5 13,672.3 13,433.5 16.9 14.3 2.6
December............................. 1 ,2A2.5 13,511.0 13,1502.1 13.532.9 13,303.9 1.8 0.1 1.7

1979

January- 13,133.3 12,558.1 12,349.4 1;,561.3 12,352. 3.2 1.0 2.2

January .............................. 13,133.3 12,558.1 12,349.4 12,561.3 12,352.5 3.2 1.0 2.2
February .............................
March ................................
April ................................
May..................................
June .................................

July.................................
August...............................
Septemibe r............................
October ..............................
November.............................
December r.......... .................


*Represents only export shipments from the United States and differs from DOD Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid shipment figures under this
program as follows: (a) Transfers of the material procured outside the United States and transfers from DOD overseas stocks from export shipments.
(b) Export value is f.a.s., whereas DOD value, in most instances, is f.o.b., point of origin. Ic) Data for shipments reported by the DOD for a
given month are included in Bureau of Census reports in the second month subsequent to the month reported by the DOD.
Adjusted for seasonal and working-day variation. See Special Announcement on page 1.
NA Not available.
3Annual total is not shown for seasonally adjusted data. Unadjusted data should be used for annual totals.













Table 3. U.S. Imports of Merchandise, by Month: January 1978 to January 1979

(In millions of dolLars. See ExpLanmpton of Statistics for information on coverage, date of Importation, definitions of f.a.s. and c.l.f. Import
values, and source of error in the data. Unadjusted totals represent sum of unrounded figures and hence may vary slightly from sum of rounded
amounts)


F.a.s. value C.l.f. value


Period General imports Imports General Imports Imports
for for
Seasonally Unadusted consumption, Seasonally consumption.
adjusted? Unadjusted unadjustea adjusted' Unadjusted unadjusted


19 t

January-December ......................... .'. ] "l ,'".3 ll 3.i!3 i 182, t..

January- i .f l ;.OL. 3.9 I ,'.i i ;, 1. 9

January ........................... ........ 1 2.6 i 2,60.>. l I 7. 3 .i .9 I "
February................................. 3,,- 9.5 l .. 1.,8 3 ., I 3 i t. i 1-..180.2
March.................... ................. .. .t.j''. .. Z..'9.. a .* .- i ,92.4
April ................ .... ................ ..... 'i,1 .' -,n"6u I., t9:'.' i.-.7.. i .. L., i, !zi.O
May...................................... I., 0 .. 1 .5 14.,i 9...) -5.? i '., .6 15.1 1... 1 3'..
June ........................ ..*..-0u... -3 L4.5' 4. .l t .. iL.,6' L.. 1,..z 1. i1- 6. .

July........................*.....* ....... .i', ... 2..'u .. I 8t.,l .S 15, '.. 1 ,C i .
August ................................... .,l 12.I .02.-.. 1 ..0 .E 1i ,', 3.. i .),, .. 1 S.,L..
September................................ ,. i.., li.,.. *-, 2u. ? 1. .. i .,] .6
October .................................. .. B. I '. ,. & i ..t :. ,03 .2
November................................. ,_ 2. i ., .. i ,'.. .- i _, t i 1 i-,9 9.-0
Decemberr .................................... ,.'i ." i., ..i ,9. 6 ,,,n.. i, 2 I 0 z., 25. 3



January- 1e.231. 15,84- .. 1`. 51\. I L.2 i.9 16,8':.c. i ,669.3

January.................................. -; i .. ; i .,, I .1 1,, "; .6 i 6E 3
February .................................
March ....................................
April ....................................
May ......................................
June.....................................

July.....................................
August ...................................
September ................................
October ..................................
November .................................
December.................................


Adjued for e na nd urki-i Jir
Adjusters for sea :unal and 6,arlk rg-day jan L :e


.-.pC: I r 4 1 A- gr. f F 1 I.


Annual total i r...t ir. rn,.c r j...r s ra i L .1jjI- r-a ar IIr..-,Iu -1r d3 r ,m i i be ice ir a r- I E a i


2











Table 4. U.S. Exports (f.a.s. Value Basis) of Domestic Merchandise, Excluding Department of Defense

(DOD) Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid Shipments-Schedule E Sections, Seasonally

Adjusted and Unadjusted, by Month: January 1978 to January 1979

(In millions of dollars. See Explanation of Statistics for Informatlon an coverage, definition of f.a.s. export value, and sources of error
In the data. Unadjusted totals represent sum of unrounded figures and hence may vary slightly from sum of rounded amounts)

Schedule E sections'

Period cladIF
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 IeeSai


1978

Janua ry-

January .......................
February........................
March.........................
April.........................
May.....ptee .....................
June........................
July...........................
August........................
September......................
October.......................
November.......................
December......................

1979


January-

January .......................
February......................
March.........................
April.........................
May...........................
June..........................
July...........................
August........................
September.....................
October .......................
November......................
December......................





1978


January-December..............

January-

January........................
February.......................
March..................... ....
April .........................
May...........................
June...........................
July ..........................
August........................
September .....................
October .......................
November......................
December.......................


1979

January-

January.......................
February......................
March.........................
April .........................
May...........................
June..........................
July...........................
August.........................
September.....................
October.......................
November......................
December......................


Seasonally adjusted'


1,120.
1,339.8
1,431.3
1,478.7
1,697.8
1,794.5
1,599.8
1,738.8
1,698.3
1,565.0
1,413.4
1,485.4




1,299.0

1,299.0


"O.'

111.5
In .0
io F.
166. -,
199.


15.O..

I 'ii. S







1 39.'


I .0s69.0
1. '-l.
*i.'is.


I, 1 1
1. 'L.

I,38i.2
1, 164.9
1, .501


I ,51i0."
1, '.99.




.23S.O


;-8.r.,
li?l .o
200.5 :
C"'j. -,

3i8.,.
'64.8
124.6
!35.4
136.9

-0.0 .,
.,u. 3







'-43.6

461.6


893.
6I .-:
941.4.
962. r
9"-4.6
1,02"..,
1 ,06 1..
1,1*6.9


1,2:8.5
i, '03.9





1.3i'.5

1,314.5


895.1
910.3
960.9
961.
1,023.6
1,036,6S
1,003.6
1,010.
i.160. 3
i, i06..
1.148. L





1,196.9

I ,196.9


&.093.1
4,1 56 .0
4,656.4
4,84i.-
&. 59.9
4.907.8
. ,53.2
1.,992.2
5,269.0
S.425.1
5.604.6
5,E '6.5




5,311.E

5,311.6


"24.0
742.9
-77.9
826.2
855.6
619.2
808.
892.4
918. -
946.5
931 .6
9.0.4




915.9

935.9


432.3
236.0
389.9
509.1
309.0
392.4
349.2
329.9
'02.5
323.9
625.3
40'.2




584.0

584.0


Unadjusted


18,333.2




1,132.7
1,271.5
1,465.7
1,472.8
1,684.2
1,737.1
1,540.6
1,716.2
1,645.7
1,597.9
1,513.7
1,555.2




1,313.3

1,313.3


16u.'"'


1t3.6
141
iS1 .
221.!.
1 6.

" :.1
3_ ,.





, ;'.,.


1 1. 1.


1, '6 .
1 '.66.

1, 353.9
9"2. i
.0S!.
1 .1II.'

1.6"6.-
, ,t


7,e'8. 7




i i.

165.:

3.6
e.-4.0
I-I--.L


3i -

l.A .u


*i.
i -.9


1,62*1.3




c .0
9-..

l-i .5

1',2.
1 .-' .1

i :0.= '
1 I.. 1
liZ.9


1-1.0






1-5.8,

i -.-:.


12.619.4



830.:-
be'.:
6; 1:1.1 '
I, i.

9-1.1
i ,016. -
i.063..
i.0".2
S1.149.1

10 '5. ,O

1, l'...0
i !'.0


i 3266.0e




86:9.9
8.6.
i .06 -. -




959.5
1,024. -

.120.6

L,186.


3, i 1I.9
5, 1 -.*.
5,090.2
',132.2
5,0-5.2
.. 486. 8
4.599.8
', 142.1
5,566..
549 7.






5, 0..


_____________ I _____________ ~i.~______________ I _____________ 5 L.


10,190.9 5,030.0




65.6 &431.6
689.6 237.5
876.5 390.-
65-... 511.1
908.6 312.8
85'.2 395.0
-'".9 351.6
i55.9 330.6
891.3 103.0
953.6 325.1
936.0 631.3
9 i.9 4.07.9




673.2 566.0

6- 3.2 586.8


2.505.7.1




150.3!
176.8
243.7
210.1
244.6
215.6
164.6
192.1
208.7
231.C
236.






208. .

20B.e
z.I.


ISchedule E section descriptions are as follows
0. Food and live animals 5. Chemicals and related prc.ducts, N.S.P.F.
1. Beverages and tobacco i. Manufactured goods classified chiefly by material
2. Crude materials, inedible, except fuels 7. Machinery and transport equipment
3. Mineral fuels, lubricants, and related material 8. Miscellaneous manufactured articles, N.S.P.F.
4. Oils and fats--animal and vegetable 9. Commodities and transactions not classified elsewhere
Adjusted for seasonal and working-day vari,,' .r. i. 5c-a ,1 ',rrr:ur,.. ,.t ,.r g.,.


I


E










Table 5. U.S. General Imports (f.a.s. Value Basis) of Merchandise, Schedule A Sections, Seasonally

Adjusted and Unadjusted, by Month: january 1978 to January 1979

(In millions of dollars. See EixpIanaton of Statistics for InformatIon on coverage, date of importation, definltionof f.a.a. Import value, and
sources of error in the data. Unadjusted totals represent sum of unrounded figures and hence may vary slightly from sunm of rounded amounts)


Schedule A sections'
Period
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9


Seasonally adjusted'


19'8

January- l l 2 .. 1 1 r.6 .. i ., ,;,'. 3 .. ..., 32 .-

January....................... ,1. .' 1 4 1 n4. I .- .. ..' -O 2 I, l .2 3.i. 1i .3 .t j 3...-
February...................... ."- 1 -. 3. .) .. 'i .- 3. i.. 3. .. .0
March......................... .I 2 l '.o "' 7.8 3.-.i l ... i.. l ..1 .:. 3 ... ]n..4
April .... .................. .. 2 I. .' 1 .. 3, 2-1 .1 '.. .0 2, l- .6 t ,1 .R 8.1 3 ,.
ay ........................... 1 .. e. 182 .4 2' l. 3. '. .'I''. 3, 34. -''. t )It..0
June .......................... i / .. .r. ..r :, .r. i l ,.
J. ly ......... ............... I 12 1 '. I ..2 1. J ..O.. .I- .'- .0 .'
August.... ................. 92-. o v .1 -.. .) '12 .,
September ..................... ,' b. '*-) '. l .'-. ,,. 6, 2 '. 1 "1 30'.
October....................... .. .1 '2. -,.. i .. ,. n. ; .r -, : '. ,,.' 3S ). 3
November................... ... 08 ID L -.' -. .-.. I e '. n .t i i 3 .-
December....................... I,2 -. I 1" .0 '' 4." I]. "-.t. .'' 1 2, 4'.3 X, I.t 3 .



January- i ?" 2 0'". j t" ..t .0 ?i'. : 1 I. _, r...r ...- ,'i. 'r,-... iO'..-

January....................... 1 ''i ,. 1 : '. .. 0 3 ;. 1 2 2, n-.C .. ,,'.' lb. l .. ,. 10' .-
February......................
March........................
April.........................
ay. ...........................
June..........................
July..........................
Augus t........................
September....... ...............
October .......................
November.......................
December ......................

LrnadjuSited


I Ft^

January-December.............. '. 0." .22i .- V.33 -. (..2 *1.L 1 -.'.- .2' .3 .r. '..r 2. i 3,81.1

January- .12'.- I'- .I .'.0.- ... '. 4:.- I .16 1. ..4 .. 2. i. .4 32l .-
January ....................... [. -. '14. i 0 '.'. -'.. i i 3 3 .i .-.
February...................... i,. lI.' n?'.- r -. .'.. .., .r. ., ). i. ,. 2,3.5
March......................... ..' ; .* i ... 2.3 .. -..0' I. I I1t .2
April ......................... .ti .,'I 1" ". 'i i .1 j. -.:, .r- 'l. 3 -.
ay ............................. t mt'. ( .- ). 3-. I ': .0. .':., -tO.' .0
June .......................... -: "6 .. :. -,. 1. i I I j'l .2
July ........................... i-t .. e'I .j ). .~. ..2 I ;' 1. -'.? :: .0
August ........................ !. 3. :. '..
September ..................... -o. c ..' .. ." -".:, ..
October....................... .l .. ,- .t.- .- 2. .. ...';. I ,.. )
November ...................... l -. .'.c t- I ..- 6. ? -.'- 1 .-
December ...................... ". .' ."in. I -.



Janua ry- I .2 l 2 *". ,2 .B \ .. I .t I .-

January ....................... 1 7 -.6 n [ -. .' : .2 <1 ; '). 8 l 9 .-
February......................
March.........................
April .........................
May ........ ..... ..............
Julyne .. .......... .............
August .......... .............
September ....................
October.......................
November r......................
December.......................

'Schedule A section devcripti"rns are as f.-lloIw
0. Food ara live animals 5. Cnemicals and related pr-..ducta, N.S.P.F.
1. Beverages and tobacco r. '.anul acrtured gooaa cLa9.iite.o chLefly by material
2. Crude materials, inediole, except fuels Machinrery arn trnap'-.rt equipment
3. Mineral fuels, lubricants, and related material 8. Mascellaneu5r rr.anufactured articles, N.S.P.F.
4. Oils and fata--animal and vegetable 9. Commodllies and transactions not classitf led elsewhere
AdjusEted itr :e-a r.rii a-a ..j'I'rg-ad .S risri, 7-peca i Airn...ar.:'-..-n. r pag.' i.











Table 6. U.S. General Imports (c.i.f. Value Basis) of Merchandise, Schedule A Sections, Seasonally

Adjusted and Unadjusted, by Month: January 1978 to January 1979

(In millions of dollars. See Explanstton of Statistics for information on coverage, date of imporcPtion, definLtion of c.l..f. import value, and
sources of error In the data. Unadjusted totals represent sum of unrounded figures and hence may vary slightly from sum of rounded amounts)


Schedule A sections'

Period
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 1 8 9


Seasonally adjuatet


1978

January-

January ......................
February.. ......... .... .....
March. ..... ... ......
A pril ............. ...........
May. ..... ......... .........
June............................
July..........................
August.. ..................
September ...................
October ... ...............
November r..... ...............
December...... ................

1979

January-

January.......................
February ......................
March.........................
April .........................
May...........................
June ................ .........
July ..........................
August ........................
September.....................
October .......................
November......................
December ......................





1978

January-December ..............

January-
January .......................
February......................
March.........................
April.........................
May...........................
June*..........................
July..........................
August........................
September .....................
October........................
November......................
December ......................

1979

January-

January .......................
February .....................
March.........................
April .........................
May...........................
June..........................
July ..........................
August........................
September.....................
October.......................
November.....................
December......................


1,194.2

1,194.2
1,183.1
1,340.3
1,246.7
1,:232.5
1,126.1
1, 13.7
995.0
1,136.0
1,240.8
1,255.0C
1,346.7


156.6

156.6
178.7
164.1
231.0
200.2
212.5
206.2
218.9
205.8
225.6
219.1
215.5


712.9

712.9
840.8
833.5
807.7
886.7
773.0
815.0
866.3
845.7
878.1
920.2
856.0


1,379.2 226.7 885.6

1,379.2 1 226.7 885.6


3,623.3

3,623.3
3,713.2
3,626.9
3,722.7
3,427.7
3,681.1
3,581.5
3.907.3
3.931.5
3,713.4
3,776.5
4,023.6


4,530.0 94.6

4,530.0 94.6


432.4

432.4
529.9
573.1
563.6
601.5
580.2
607.8
573.2
624.7
586.4
521.1
596.5



541.0

541.0


2,265.5

2,265.5
2,678.2
2,429.4
2,599.6
2,468.9
2,205.7
2,561.2
2,397.6
2.434.5
2,462.1
2,470.5
2,290.9



2,526.9

2,526.9


3,721.9

3.721.9
4.168.2
3,930.6
4,203.8
4,067.5
4.183.4
4,378.8
4,006.7
4,457.1
4,427.5
4,402.8
4,505.4



4,896.8

4.896.8


1,454.9

1,454.9
1,592.8
1,571.6
1,672.9
1,652.0
1,717.5
1,746.3
1,733.9
1,843.5
1,798.1
1,821.1
1,746.6



1,886.2

1.686.2


333.5

333.5
258.0
374.4
340.5
320.9
340.2
332.6
329.0
309.7
388.7
327.6
390.1


Unadjusted


14,510.1

1,'94.2
1,194.2
1,:83.1
1,340.3
1,246.7
1,232.5
1,:26.1
1,213.7
995.0
1,136.0
1,240.6
1,255.0
1,346.7



1,379.!

1,379.2


2,429.0 10,035.9

151.1 692.9
151.1 692.9
176.0 7'1.4
190.4 823.5
218.8 761.7
?07.? 906.2
23?.9 827.9
195.3 860.6
167.4 886.2,
185.8 894.8
230.8 887.8
229.0 908.2
224.1 864.6


224.0

224.')


44,728.7

3,623.3
3,623.3
3,713.2
3,626.9
3,722.7
3,427.7
3,681.1
3,581.5
3,907.3
3,931.5
3,713.4
3,776.5
4,023.6



4,530.0

4,530.0


6,778.0

444.5
444.5
500.8
636.1
641.9
651.9
580.2
578.0
541.7
565.4
570.6
539.9
563.1



563.2

563.2


29,220.5

2,131.8
2,131.8
2,367.5
. 50'. i
2,563.2
2,520.7
2,457.2
2,594.5
2,388.0
2,383.4
2,501.5
2,544.6
2,261.1



2,410.7

2,410.7


3,595.4
3,595.4
3,793.1
'..0!-.9
4,338.3
4,262.7
4,384.2
4,343.8
3,794.4
4,073.8
4,516.1
4,464.4




4,754.8

4,754.8


1,316.7
1,316.7
1,388.9
1,615.6
1,545.8
1,566.1
1,770.8
1,915.7
1,884.8
1,880.4
1,954.5
1,914.0




1,731.5

1,731.5


333.5

333.5
256.0
374.4
340.5
320.9
340.2
332.6
329.0
309.7
388.7
327.6


'Schedule A section descriptions are as follows:

0. Food and live animals 5. Chemicals and related products, N.S.P.F.
1. Beverages and tobacco 6. Manufactured goods classified chiefly by material
2. Crude materials, inedible, except fuels 7. Machinery ana transport equipment
3. Mineral fuels, lubricants, and related material 8. Miscellaneous manufactured articles, N.S.P.F.
4. Oils and fats--animal and vegetable 9. Commodities and transactions not classified elsewhere
Adjusted for seasonal and workina-as. .r,ear. .r=, 5p. ual Ar.r,uncemer.t or pag, 1










GENERAL IMPORTS OF PETROLEUM AND SELECTED PETROLEUM PRODUCTS INTO
THE U.S. CUSTOMS AREA AND U.S. VIRGIN ISLANDS, UNADJUSTED

Monthly and cumulative-to-date data on general imports of petroleum and selected petroleum products into the U.S. Customs area
and into the U.S. Virgin Islands for the period January j1978 through the current month are presented in the tables that follow. Tables
1-A and 1B present imports into the U.S. Customs area and tables 2 A and 2-B present imports into the U.S. Virgin Islands. (It should
be noted that imports into the Virgin Islands are excluded from the regularly compiled foreign trade statistics and, therefore, are ex
cluded from the data presented in tables 1 A and 1-B as well as the other tables shown in the front of this report.-See "Explanation of
Statistics".

Effective with January 1979 statistics, certain changes were made in the commodity classifications (Schedule A and TSUSA) covering
petroleum products. These changes are reflected in the listing of classifications shown below. Data presented in tables 1-B and 2 B which
follow reflect all changes in classifications effective January 1979.


Schedule A and TSUSA Commodity Numbers Used in Compiling the Petroleum
Information Presented in This Report


Energy products

Schedule A No.


Nonenergy products

Schedule A No.


TSUSA No.


Crude petroleum and deriv-
atives to be refined
333.0020
333.0040
334.5440


475.0510
475.1010
475.6510


Lubricating oils
334.5410 pt.

Lubricating greases
334.5410 pt.


475.4500



475.5500, 475.6000


'Crude petroleum
333.0020
333.0040

Gasoline
334.1500

Jet fuel
334.1205

Kerosene
334.2000


Distillate fuel oil
334.3021

1334.3045

Residual fuel oil
334.4050
334.4060

Propane and butane gas
341.0025

Liquid derivatives of
petroleum, n.e.s.
334.5430 pt.


475.0510
475.1010


475.2520, 475.2560


{475.2530
475.2550

475.3000


475.0525
475.0545
475.1015
475.1025

475.0535
475.1035


Paraffin and other mineral
waxes
335.1225 pt.
335.1245


Naphthas
334.5420

Asphalt
335.4500


All other petroleum products
(pitch of tar coke, non-
liquid hydrocarbon mix-
tures, and calcined petro-
leum and coal coke not for
fuel)
335.3000 pt.
334.5430 pt.
598.5020 pt.


475.1525, 475.1535.
475.1545


475.6530


rSUSA No.


494.2200
494.2400



475.3500



521.1100


401.6200
475.7000
517.5120
517.5140














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14

Table 2-A. Summary of Imports of Petroleum and Selected Petroleum Products into the U.S. Virgin Islands from Foreign Countries,

Unadjusted, by Month (f.a.s. Value Basis): 1979

ie Inlgraminr .f 1itilici for Ir.ormatir. on S. obtf eflilloan of Its f-.A laport value -md samrces of eror i (te dul. Toftl repenom ai of -roarmod flamn.. -Miao s y 7s
llilghJy from .a- of rounded -oours)

Co-i.l 1 s cr lptdo, t.r Jasuary FPbruary March April ay June JuL Auami toptlebr Ormbar Iinbar Doaber


Pet qumnoity fI nTrsndJ of arral.)

Tunmi perIrledu mia seect proauc I1.

..-[..i.... .................l. a

Energ. s..'auc .. ....... .... 13 6l
rfin.. .. .. ... .. L. 4 -
Crude ptrJe .. .. ..... ... .. I l


G mllol sf0 ... ......... ... ...
Per rf elt. ... .. ....
DisIllh n e fueI .l1 .................. "

Prop n re *id bt rosf a ......... .........
PNircljm
N jrer.e r f Dro a t ... .. ..... ...


biriestl olsO l.. .. ..
SriI ... .... ...

Ar..lt' ...... .
All toe, u se role. CraodCt ... ..

asd s ln iir.-.acrao at I bil rrl

otail nrerolso aa .etiesri ormwucts r i in,



Cruaf petrole.. and oar.mt.ile to e

Cliii pir' .. ....... .t.'
J I fi el .. .. .. ........ ... ..
K r.- .e ........................ ."
rJlraml flm fuis o .l......
e d l fel oil ................. .....
ropm e d ul e .s. ...............i
Amitroler deravmtLves Ilr. d. r..e ...



h mub osiIr^ contort:......... ........ -
Plrbfrio and ,rthe. r.r .l ......
tipstr..s .... .............. .... ...
Ms-r.ml It .... .. .... .
AI I iher pIIroleo pro.cti ........ ... .

er, en i ro : i. fnar one hel of ulii of rm..e t Ibsh.
ee Od II Tor a ii of tno -hea.e '.o floES I Isriff crdul- of 0.1 Ur.leer States toalnted) codttles tncluaed In each line tim.
r,luose motor fi1 ,'..e.5.
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