United States foreign trade

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Material Information

Title:
United States foreign trade
Alternate title:
United States foreign trade. FT900, Summary of United States export and import merchandise trade
Portion of title:
Summary of U.S. export and import merchandise trade
Abbreviated Title:
U.S. foreign trade, FT900, Summ. U.S. export import merch. trade
Physical Description:
13 v. : ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of the Census
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census :
For sale by the Subscriber Services Section (Publications), Bureau of the Census
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Creation Date:
November 1978
Publication Date:
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Imports -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Exports -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Commerce -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
statistics   ( marcgt )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Issued also to depository libraries in microfiche.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Dec. 1976-
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Ceased in 1988.
General Note:
"FT 900."
General Note:
Description based on: Jan. 1979; title from caption.
General Note:
Beginning with July 1980 for sale by the Supt. of Docs., U.S.G.P.O.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Mar. 1988.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001320869
notis - AGH1745
oclc - 07222812
lccn - 81646118
issn - 0730-3270
sobekcm - AA00005268_00001
Classification:
ddc - 382/.0973/00212
System ID:
AA00005268:00024

Related Items

Preceded by:
Summary of U.S. export and import merchandise trade
Succeeded by:
U.S. merchandise trade. Seasonally adjusted imports and exports


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
C3. [ti : 900 O- 7y- /I


!V. OF FL LB. summary of U.S. Export and

p111 aSa Import Merchandise Trade


ER 1978
lcember 28. 1978


Seasonally Adjusted and Unadju,,
(Including unadjusted data on imports of petroleum and r


F.A.S. EXPORTS AND F.A.S. IMPORTS


F.A.S.


Seasonaly Adjusted
The Bureau of the Census, Department of Commerce an-
nounced today that during November [978, exports on a
f.a.s. (free alongside ship U.S. port of exportation
value basis, excluding Department of Defense iDODi Mili-
Cary Assistance Program Grant-Aid shipments, amounted to
..3,261.5 million and that general import; on a f.a.s.
Foreign port of exportation value basis, amounted to
$11,207.0 million. 1 3

Based on the above export and import figures. the Nion-emer
merchandise trade balance was in deficit by il,945.5
miTlion, as compared to the deficit of $2.127.5 million
rebprded in October.' 2 3

During the first ll-months of 1978 (January-November).
exports on a seasonally adjusted basis were at an annual
rate of $142,174 million, a level about 17 percent higher
than the calendar year 1977 total of $121,150 million.
Imports for the January-November 1978 period ,ere at ar.
annual rate of $171,345 million, an increase of about 16
percent over the calendar year 1977 total of $142.685
million.

For the 4-month period, August-November 1978, exports
averaged $13,042.6 million per month, about 10 percent
higher than the $11,826.7 million average reported for the
preceding 4-month period, April-July 1178. Imports on a
f.a.s. value basis, averaged $14,888.8 million per month
for the current 4-month period, a level about 5 percent
higher than the $14,247.6 million average reported for the
preceding 4-month period.'

Unadiusted
Exports, excluding Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid
shipments, increased from $13,153.6 million in October to
$13,655.4 million in November. With Military Assistance
Program Grant-Aid shipments included, exports increased
from $13,157.4 million in October to $13,672.3 million in
November. General imports decreased from $15,118.3 million
in October to $15,054.9 million in November.

Note: Footnotes 1, 2, and 3 are shown at the bottom of
page 5.


Seasonally AdJUWE'or
The Bureau or the Census. 'epairtmerit of Commerce announced-
toda) that during No.ember 1 .-,, exports or, a f.a.: t ree
SlI.ngs ide Al L ..I 11.S. purt uo e po.rta i..n j value laJti r_ x-
.ludi'J' gi (, Cepartment of LDe e eni e i r'.D P rli l t r. As ataLr- c
Program urarit-Aid shipment r amounted to I13,201 .5 m i ltor,
and that general iiripurtE on 3 i I co c iniuran.:-e. and
f right ; U1.'S,. port ot entry .alue b.a :- mounted to
. t, i ,m I i c 2

Raied on the abo.' expc, rt and import I i.ures the No-.errter
TImerchand se trade balir.e i i nr, J,3' f0 c r bv i' 2, .- million,
as -ompared to the de f i.: it r 3J .Li m i II ion re worded i r
Octobr.) ? r

Lurini the t r-it I I-mn.r h" i c i,.ariu 3 r', o.mbe r,
eXports jr a seasonall, ad l- c d bas13 ,-rc at in annual
rate $1 .1 7- i ll iOn, a le.e I boujt I percent htgher
than rthe a lender ,'ear I'r ''" total cr 1i 1 1 S1;' ii1 I i. 'n .
impo rE tor the Januasr, -[Uc e imt. r 1'I per i:d were, at a n
annr ual rate of i l 2, L l ll i:n ar. nc re ae of iboeut t r
percent over the calendar ,e r 1'477 total or $ 157 ,56
ml I ion.

For r he --mionth period, Augus t-o,.,ovember 1978, expo.r t
a3.eraged $13 ,-2 .6 mill ion per munth. about 10 percent
higher than the $1t .62r.7 ,r, l l i n average reported for the
preceding --month period, April- July I 78. Imports or, a
,.. ..'aluC basis averaged 1 i M,i5-.7 mitl ion per moi nth
ror the current -.-mr, th peri[o a lel about 5 percent
higher than the 15,171 .< m I I ion average reported For the
preceding w-month period. 3

Unadjusted
Export, excluding Military A t. i 1ance Program ',rant-riid
shipment ; irncrea-ed from $13 ,l13.0 million in October to
$513. 55. mi l iron in i Nc.'e.-ember. Wi th MI i itar', a s'E instance
Program CranE-Aid shipments included, exports increased
rrom $i3. 1 57.- million in October to 113,hb'2.3 mi llion in
lc,.ember. General imports decreased from $16,'-7.J ni ll ion
in C, tober t.- $ bI .'Jl .I mill ion in No embE r.


U.S. Department
S of Commerce
t BUREAU OF
\ o THE CENSUS
aetna,


Inquiries concerning these figures should be addressed to the Chief, Foreign Trade Division, Bureau of
the Census. Washington. D.C. 20233. Tel: Area Code 301. 763-5140; 763-7754; and 763-7755.
For le by the Subscriber Services Section IPublications), Bureau of the Consua Washington, D.C.
20233, or any U.S. Department of Commerce district office. Posg stamps not acceptable; currency
submitted at sender's risk. Remitances from foreign countries must be by international money order
or by a draft on a U.S. bank. Price 30 cents per copy. Annual subscription (FT 900.975, 985. end 986
combined) $14.90.


UNITED STATES FOREIGN TRADE







EXPLANATION OF STATISTICS


IMPORT STATISTICS
Coverage

The U.S. import statistics reflect both government and
nongovernment ipqmorts.-bftnechandise from foreign countries
into the U.S. Customs terribory.'ihich includes the 50 States,
the District 'f Cblumbia. and, Po Rico. The U.S import
statistics exclude imports inti t?. Virgin Islands, Guam,
American Samoa. and other U.S' plsessions, and shipments
between the United States and. Pueyto Rco, between the United
States and' .S. possessions, and bet1bit any of these outlying
areas. (Dara on U.S. trade with Piktto Rico and the Virgin
Islands of the United States apphbflished separately in Report
FT 800. Additibual,dita On such.ifade and on imports into the
Virgin Islands from' torei s.cfinitries are presented in reference
tabulations.) Data on imports of petroleum and selected
petroleum products, including shipments into the Virgin Islands
from foreign countries, are included in this report effective with
the January 1976 statistics (previously shown in former Report
F T 900-Supplement).
The U.S. import statistics also exclude American goods re-
turned to the United States by its Armed Forces; transit ship-
ments through the United States when documented as such
with Customs; temporary shipments: transactions not con-
sidered to be of statistical significance, such as shipments of
personal and household effects; low-valued nondutiable im-
ports by mail; and issued monetary coins of all component
metals

Inclusion of Gold in the Statistics

Effective with the statistics for Januan 1978, imports o1
nonmonetary gold (in such forms as ore. scrap and base bullion,
nonmonetary refined bullion, etc ) which were previously
excluded, are now included in the statistics. Imports of silver in
these forms have been included since January 19b9. Additional
information regarding the inclusion of gold in the 1978 statistics
appears in the November and December 1977 issues of Report
FT 900.

General Imports/Imports For Consumption

The statistics on U.S. imports are presented in terms of both
"'General Imports" and "Imports for Consumption." General
imports are a combination of entries for immediate con-
sumption and entries into Customs bonded warehouses, and
thus generally reflect total arrivals of merchandise. Imports for
consumption are a combination of entries for immediate
consumption and withdrawals from warehouses for con-
sumption, and thus generally reflect the total of the com-
modities entered into U.S. consumption channels.
Source Of Import Information

The official U.S. import statistics are compiled b\ the Bureau
of the Census from copies of the import entry and warehouse
withdrawal forms which importers are required by law to file
with Customs officials. The information as to country of origin.
net quantity, value, and commodity classification is verified by
Customs officials on entries filed for transactions valued over
$250, which are ordinarily subject to examination for Customs


appraisement purposes. The statistical copy of the entry is:
corrected if it does not accurately reflect the information
called for by the statistical requirements. j

Import Valuation

F.a.s. Import Value. -The f.a.s. (free alongside ship) value
represents the transaction value of imports at the foreign port of,
exportation. It is based on the purchase price, i.e., the actual
transaction value and generally includes all charges incurred in:l
placing the merchandise alongside the carrier at the port ofj
exportation in the country of exportation. I

C.i.f. Import Value.-The c.i.f. (cost, insurance, and freight
value represents the value of imports at the first port of entry inl
the United States. It is based on the purchase price and includeI
all freight, insurance, and other charges (excluding U.S. import'
duties) incurred in bringing the merchandise from the country
of exportation and generally placing it alongside the carrier atl
the first port of entry in the United States. If the merchandise
was acquired in a transaction between related parties, the!
purchase price used in deriving the c.i.f. value is based on a.
arm's-length equivalent transaction price, i.e., a price whicT
would exist between unrelated buyers and sellers.

Import Commodity Information

Import data are initially reported in terms of the commodity
classifications in the Tariff Schedules of the United States
notated (TSUSA), which is an official publication of the U.
International Trade Commission, embracing the legal text
the Tariff Schedules of the United States together with statl
tical annotations. The TSUSA data are rearranged and present'
in this report in terms of totals for the I-digit commodity
sections in Schedule A, Statistical Classification of Commoditi
Imported Into the United States, which is based upon
Standard International Trade Classification (SITC), Revision 2
effective with the statistics for January 1978. Prior to Janua
1978, Schedule A was based upon the former SITC, Revi

Date of Importation and Import Monthly Carryover i

It is the objective of the compiling procedures to inclui:
shipments, insofar as practicable, in the statistics for the actual'
month of importation (or the month of withdrawal in the cam:
of warehouse withdrawals for consumption). Effective with tW::
January 1978 statistics, the date of importation as reported 0o
the import entries is being used to determine the statistical,
month in which the shipments are included. However, since
under the Customs "immediate-delivery" procedures importer t.
may file the import entry up to 10 workdays after the date of
release of the merchandise, some documents for merchandise
imported during the last few days of a given month may not
be received in time for inclusion in the statistics for that month.
As a result, there is a carryover, estimated at about 15 percent,
from the actual month of importation to a subsequent month.
In addition, processing problems (e.g., late filing of documents,
rejection of a shipment by the computer because the data fail
to meet certain edit criteria established to protect the accuracy
of the statistics, etc.) contribute to an additional carryover of
about 5 percent (in terms of value) of shipments from the re.
Al






ported month of importation (or withdrawal from warehouse)
to a subsequent month, usually the succeeding month. These
limitations should be borne in mind when making month-to-
month comparisons.
For 1977 and previous years, the date of Customs official
acceptance of the import documents was used to determine the
statistical month in which the shipments were included. How-
ever, in certain annual publications for 1977 and in 1978 re-
ports which also present 1977 data le.g.. FT 900. FT 990, etc.),
the 1977 data are recompiled on a date of importation basis

Cumulations of data over at least 4-month periods are desir.
able to identify underlying trends. Month-to-month changes in
imports, exports. and similar series often reflect primarily
irregular movements, e.g.. exogenous events such as strikes,
differences in monthly carryover, etc

Estimated Data for Imports Valued Under $251

The overall import and Schedule A Section 9 louk in clhide
sample estimates It r shipments valued under $251 Therefore.
the) are sublei. lu sampling error, estimated at less than
une-lenth of %-ne peri.enl for the unadjusted overall total jnd
about one percent for the unadjusted Schedule A Section 9
total. This means that we can have about 67 percent Lonfidenc,
that the published unadjusted overall totals and the unadjusted
Schedule A Section 9 totals differ hy less than one-tenth of a
percent and one percent, respectiel, from the totals that
would have resulted from a complete tabulation. The statistics
on imports of petroleum and petroleuin products included in
this report refle,. fully compiled data and. therefore, are not
subject to sainpling error.

EXPORT STATISTICS
Coverage
The export slatisiics reflect. in general. boih government and
nongoverninlent exprlis of domiesi. and foreign mnerlihndise
fruim he U.S. Cusiumns territor' (minludes the 50 States,. the
District of Colunbia. and Puerto Rico) to foreign couintrjie.
whether lthe exportation involves a commercial transaction or
nor. The statistics, therefore. include Department of Defense
Military, Assistance Progrdnm Grant-Aid shipments. shipments lor
economic assistance under thlie Foreign Assistance Act and
shipments of agricultural commodilies under P.L 480 (The
AgricuLltural Trade Development and Assistance Act of 1954. as
amended) and related laws. The following are excluded from the
statistics: Shipments to U.S. Arnied Forces and diplomatic
missions abroad for their own use. shipments between the
United States and Puerto Rico. between the United States and
its possessions (including the Virgin Islands). and between these
outlying areas: exports from U.S. possessions: inlransil ship-
ments through the United States: transactions not considered to
be of statistical importance, such as personal and household
effects: temporary exports, low-valued or non-commercial
exports by mail: and issued monetary coins of all component
metals.

Inclusion of Gold in tlre Statistics.

As indicated above for imports. effective with the statistics
for January 1978, exports of nonmonetar, gold (in such forms
as ore. scrap and base bullion. nonmonetarN refined bullion.
etc) which were previous. excluded, are included in the


stitistics. Exports of silver in these forms have been included
since January 1969. Additional information regarding the
inclusion of gold in the 197,8 statistics appears in the November
and December 1977 issuesof Report FT 990.

Definition of Exports of Domestic and Foreign Merchandise

Exports of domestic merchandise include commodities which
are grown, produced, or manufactured in the UnitedStates, and
commodities of foreign origin which have been changed in the
United States from the form in which they were imported, or
which have been enhanced in value by further manufacture in
the United States. Exports of foreign merchandise consist of
commodities of foreign origin which have entered the United
States as imports and which, at the time of exportation, are in
substantially the same condition as when imported.

Source of Export Information

The official U.S. export statistics are compiled by the Bureau
of the Census primarily from copies of Shipper's Export
Declarations which are required to be filed with Customs
officials, except for Department of Defense Military Assistance
Program Grant-Aid shipments which are reported directly to the
Bureau of the Census by the Department of Defense and
shipments by qualified exporters who have been authorized to
submit data in the form of magnetic tape, punched cards, or
monthly Shipper's Summary Export Declarations directly to
the Bureau of the Census.

Export Valuation
F.a.s. Export Value. --The value reported in the export statistics
generally is equivalent to a f.a.s. (free alongside ship) value at
the U.S. port of export, based on the transaction price,
including inland freight, insurance and other charges incurred in
placing the merchandise alongside the carrier at the U.S. port of
exportation.

Export Commodity Information
Beginning January 1978, export commodity information
is collected in terms of the commodity classifications in the
1978 edition of Schedule B, Statistical Classification of Do-
mestic and Foreign Commodities Exported from the United
States, which is based on the framework of the classification
system in the Tariff Schedules of the United States (TSUS).
In this report, the Schedule B data are rearranged and presented
in terms of totals for the 1-digit commodity sections in Schedule
E, which is based upon the Standard International Trade Classi-
fication (SITC), Revision 2, effective with the statistics for
January 1978. Prior to January 1978, the export classifications
in Schedule B were based upon the organizational framework
of the former SITC, Revised.

Export Monthly Carryover
It is the objective of the compiling procedures to include
shipments, insofar as practicable. in the statistics for the actual
month of exportation. For purposes of the statistics, the month
of exportation is generally based on the date when the shipment
leaves the United States. (For vessel or air shipments it is the
date when the carrier departs or is cleared from the port of
export.) However, as indicated above for imports, because of








processing problems 4e.g.. late receipt of a document for an
end-of-month shipment, rejection of a shipment by the com-
puter because the data fail to meet certain edit criteria
established to protect the accuracy of the statistics, etc.), there
is an overall average carryover of about 2 to 3 percent (in terms
of value) of the shipments from the actual month of exporta-
tion to a subsequent month, usually the succeeding month.
These limitations should be borne in mind when making
month-io-month comparisons.
Cumulations of data over at least 4-month periods are
desirable to identify underlying trends. Month-to-month
changes in imports. exports, and similar series often reflect
primarily irregular movements, differences in monthly
carry over, etc.

Estimated Data for Export Shipments

The overall export and Schedule B section and division totals
include sample estimates for shipments valued $251-$1,999 to
Canada and for shipments valued $251-$999 to countries other
than Canada Data for shipments valued $250 and under to all
countries are also estimated, based on established percentages of
individual country totals, and included in the Schedule B
Section 9 totals regardless of the commodity exported. It is
estimated that the unadjusted overall total is subject to a
sampling error of less than one-tenth of one percent, and the
unadjusted Schedule B section or division totals are subject to
sampling errors of about one percent. In addition, the Schedule
B Section 9 total is subject to possible error in the estimated
data for shipments valued $250 and under; and the overall total,
and the individual totals for sections other than Section 9, to a
more limited extent. Such $250 and under shipments represent
about 1 percent of the total value of exports, and about 60
percent of the Schedule B Section 9 total.

SOURCES OF ERROR IN THE STATISTICS

Monthly import and export figures are subject to the
possibility of errors which may arise from sources other than
sampling errors, discussed above. Among these are errors in the
reporting and/or processing of information as to commodity
classification, value and other statistical factors, month of
inclusion (see paragraphs on import and export carryover,
above), and the undercounting of exports to Canada due to the
non-receipt of Shipper's Export Declarations. For 1976, the
undercountting amounted to about one and one-half billion
dollars. In the case of imports the information as to value and
commodity classification (as well as country of origin and net
quantity) is verified by Customs officials on entries filed for
transactions valued over $250 which are ordinarily subject to
examination for Customs appraisement purposes, thus con-
siderably reducing the possibility of error. In addition, the
procedures used to compile both the import and export sta-
tistics include clerical and computer processing checks designed


to protect the accuracy of the statistics to the fullest practicable
extent.

MERCHANDISE TRADE BALANCES

Two trade balances are presented in this report:
I) The balance between exports based on f.a.s. values and
imports based on f.a.s. values.
2) The balance between exports based on f.a.s. values and
imports based on c.i.f. values with adjustments for imports from:
affiliated sellers abroad to reflect arms-length equivalent prices,.
Both balances are useful for certain purposes. The first
balance corresponds to a measurement of the international.
payments or credit flows resulting from merchandise trade
between the U.S. and foreign countries. The second balance is
based on concepts similar to those used by most foreign
countries, and therefore provides a reference for comparison.
with the trade balances published by those countries.


REVISIONS TO THE STATISTICS

Under the revision policy adopted effective with the 1977
statistics, revisions to the monthly statistics for the current year
will be issued only once a year, i.e.. with the reports for June
of the following year. Thus, revisions to 1977 statistics will be
issued only in June 1978. Under the policy previously in effect,
revisions were issued twice a year-the current year's June re-
ports contained revisions for the prior year while the December,
reports usually contained revisions for the first three quarters
of the current year.
In addition to the revisions which are made on a once a yeasj
basis, instances may occur where a significant error in thai
statistics for a month of the current year is discovered after the
statistics for that month are compiled. If the error is o4
sufficient importance to require correction prior to the time
that the regular revisions are carried, the correction is made and"
so noted in this report.


SOURCES OF FURTHER INFORMATION

Additional foreign trade statistics and information regarding
coverage, valuation, sampling, and qualifications which should
be considered by users of the statistics are contained primarily
in the following publications: Report FT 990, Highlights of U..
Export and Import Trade; FT 135, U.S. General Importsh
Schedule A Commodity by Country, FT 410, U.S. Exports,
Schedule E Commodity by Country; and the Guide to Foreign
Trade Statistics. Information regarding additional sources of
statistics, the methodology used in seasonally adjusting the data,
and other matters relating to foreign trade statistics may be
obtained from the Foreign Trade Division, Bureau of the
Census, Washington, D.C. 20233.










Table 1. U.S. Exports (f.a.s. Value Basis), General Imports (f.a.s. and c.i.f. Value Basis), and Merchandise

Trade Balance, Adjusted for Seasonal and Working-Day Variation, by Month: January 1977

to November 1978

(In millions of dollars. See Explanation of StatLstic- for infornmaior, on coverage, date of importation, deftnioions of export anD import values and
trade balances, ana sources of error In the data)

F.a.3. Exports and i.a.s. Import F.a.a. Export. and c.I.f. Imports 1

Period
Trade Taroe
Exports Import, balance Exports Imorts balance


1977

January-Nfc..es.o r ................ ... .10 21t I8 1 ji. --. io-.9 LiQ 210, 6 L _.. i ,'i 1

January.................................. 9,r0o. 1,,--3.9 '' 9,rttt. 1i. lr-.6 -1,503. 3
February............................... .. ),89'. 12.612.. -2, 1' .2 .89" 5 13..-ot -3,56-.
March.................................... 10, In-.2 l2,-2-.. W6I.0 i i .. 1 21'.1 i,0'. "
April l.................................... ,9 0. r 1 1.:- -. -1 '- -, '*.i' l ",3 --. 7,, ..
May...................................... i.,, 26.. l'.lr? -. j -6b i,). ,l..o ll ,8 .,) i13i -
June ..................................... 1 1 -3 2-13 0 iI., 901.t1 1-, 3j -, 1-1."

July..................................... L0,i"2.3 ,-i2. -j,, 1 IlO b 1,. 3 2. 13, 33b.t -=2,t '6o.l
August ................................... ,663.2 i'.lIi .- 12.- ,' -l -12,,l 6 '
September ................................ i 0l ii t. C i. I.'. -1, I'i.,j I I ji'. 5 *,j. l -', -' .
October.................................... .. .. .J l ,3]..9 -3.12 E, ii .- IJ.-j i.5 -,0 .
November................................. i..- '.' 2.-O'.t. 1, 9,- .' 2:i. '2-.6
December.............................. .. 10.999.J 1 3, -.- -2 I ,'i; -. .-, r. 3, '.6

1978

January-%.. oe -. ......................... .... j. .. -.,.:. .. .'. 1 l

January.................................. .,01-.3 12, --.00 i ", l .. I -1,1.2.'
February................................. ... 9,9' :. 1- --J. 2 1 361. ) '.
April ........................................ 1.1.i3 -.'il s ,r-q,. j -",. .: I'I i .j- '. l ,,- .i ] ,-S,. .

May...................................... .. .i "+J. ii'i2. L j.. I I,'7S l-,B3-. i, i-..
June ........................................ .. .... 1 ." --, l. j'-. l -, ]'. ,- 1 .
JulyMarch ............................. ...... 1 2. I-. 3 1 l '2. '- 2 ., .
August .................................... -'.j .*.. .. "3". -2", "
September................................ ...... .' I l I -..i 10 -. ..O
Oc tober .................................. 1 'Jlu I !) t" 5 t. ca -1 "
November................................. .. .. ., .
December.................................

'Eprt dant; r.-preE-.r[ *, ai i i c Pi r S-r. 0' '--r.d-e eCIudfLr Iiprij r.i.i t i .i-r-- iL irar. in an- i rcra .r ir-f i.j rripr.rr r -]
Inp.rt data represent general .,p..,i5 :- t r'r..r-di;.
'Beginning -*kth tnv iInuiar l i ~ 4 .-i- r-t '4 r. I, I:p rt im. a.-. 'Ir r ,i I- no 1E r. In- .11 .-. [i rf l rs.!c e r, I
in ihc tt-" of t. r cr clrcntrat t crp r. i ., OW s r. -I, E i r. r .. a 3 .. .r -4 *1.1rit ,A l s .ir -.. 11 .
Adju.astd for ceir.r r ina sr .r r -i1ing-Ja ariT jr- Iu -.a! i r ntar a a.O,;i-'[a r- s -1...:re 7 r lt." rrni i -, 2 .


Export and import statistical series are adjusted foi seasonal and working-day variation but noI for changes in price level Factors used to adjust 197 and 1978 data represent the combination l seasonal
adustment tactoars derived Ionm monthly data through 1917 and the appropriate working dad actors These laclors were implemented Ior the adjuilcmenI ot export data with The release rl the January 1978
statistics, and for the adjustment of import data with the Apil 1978 statistic. In issues of this report Ior January through March 1978 the 1977 import data were adjusted by actors derived from monthly
data through 1976 Interim farlors derived from monthly data through 1977. were used to adjust January March 1978 import data
'Cumulations of data over at least 4 month periods are desirable to iidentif underlying trends. Monh TO month changes in exportons imports. and similar series often reflect pirmanly irregular movements.
differences in monthly carryover, eic Recent month to month percent changes in the overall seasonally ad|u led export and import series are presented in the lollowAinij able with average percent month to
month rise and decline over longer periods shown lotr comparison The average ise and average decline liqures do not rell-cl aria on nonmanelary gold The averages also exclude percentage changes for 11
the period October-December 1977 because of abnormalities in the data due to effects of dock strikes anrd (2) periods when negligible changes (zero perrenll in the level ol expons/imporisoccurred. Per-
centage changes for f.a.s. and c.i f. imparl values are not available for periods prior to January 1974

Month-to-month Average monthly rates of change



Series Oct.-Nov. Sept.-Oct. Aug.-Sept. .Juli-Aug. Average Average months 12 months
1978 1978 1978 19-8 rise decline. o. 1977-
1972-1977 1972-1977 19"8 Nov. 1978
(Percent) (Percent) (Percent) (Percent) (Percent) (Percent) (Percent) (Percent)



F.a.s. export value.. +1.9 -3.1 +?. *5.7 *3.6 -3.4 .3.1 '3.0
F.a.s. import value.. ,0.5 0.1 +7.3 -.7 (NA) (NA) ,I,.8 I..0
C.i.f. import value.. ,0.7 -0.5 +7.- --.6 (NA) (NA) d.- ..0


3See the "Explanation of Statistlcs" lot definitions ol the export and import values and trade balances










Table 2. U.S. Exports (f.a.s. Value Basis) of Merchandise Showing Department of Defense (DOD)

Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid Shipments, by Month: January 1977 to November 1978


fir, .illlons of' ollars. See Explanation of Staititics for ir.iormation on coverage, defilititon of f.a.s. export value, and sources of error in
the data. Unadjusted totals represent sum of unrounded figures and hence may vary slightly from sum of rounded amounts)

Exports excluding DOD Fports Including O Grant-Ad
Grant-Ald' DOD Grant-Aidt DOD Grant-Aad


Period Dorestic DmestEic Domestic
and and Domestic, and Domestic, Western Other
or n foreign, Lnadju-ten foreign, unadjusted Europe countries

dj- nteal unad ja tea unadjusted




Jaruary-fecimber ..................... 12l, l .- 113,9 3. 1,212. 3 119,005.5 61.9 3.1 58.?

Jaruarn-';jo ,.,,r .............. ...... 10 21b. In0 .. 3 fI %.6 0 109 812... 10; 80...1 8.1 2 3 55.8

Jar.urc .............................. 4.cib,.5 9.120. 3 ,961.9 4,132'.0 8,978.6 lb.8 0.1 16.6
Tebrua ry ............................. 9,9" ,- 337.0 9, ..9 o1, 3-2.0 i.0 0.3 4.7
Marcrh......... .. ..... ........ ... ..... 10, t-. i ,0 10, -. 2 11,058.3 '10,n 2.0 ;.8 0. 3 1.5
Apr i ............................ .... ,9-3.0 1O0, .- 10, 330. i 10,533.9 10, 33 1 5.6 0. 5.5
Ma.0 .................................. 10. A26. 6 0,969. iO, ?., c. -.I 10, 76 5 5. 0. 3 4.8
J.iF .............. .............. .... i0,0 O. 10, 9. 3 10,0 6-* iO,282.- 10,306'. 3.1 0. 1 3.0

July................................. 0,3, 1 3 34.6 9,5'8. .-2. 9,5l1.3 j.2 0. 1 3.1
August .......... .... ............... 9," b 3.2 m.58.. I ,60b. 2 n,968". 6 ,80 1 ? 9 0.. 2.6
,rpf. e be r ............................ L L ,)38. l b .5 10,31. 1. l 9 I' 3 1.1 10, 15 ) 3.f6 0.2 3..
r moner... ..................... .... 9, 3; .- 55-.8 9, 36 l1 ,5 .- 9,36-.- 2.6 0.2 2..
Nosmbr ..r. .................. .... 9,- .1 9,090.2 ,, 20. 9,692.b 9,522.8 2. 0.3 2.2
'-ece.b r ............................. 10,99 .0 LL, 6. i 11, ''. 1 399.9 11,201 5 3. 0.8 2.9

197B

anuary- -J..-I .. ........ ............ 1 ... I '- rr | .l .' I *. .I 2 .*3.2

anuar.y .............................. .I', i-. 3 5, > .. 9,. -. I 9 ,3 t. 9,2 16. 2. 3 0. 5 2.1
- bruary.............................. 4,4;.. -, 1-. 6 9, s.'.l 9, 18. 9, 3-1.' 3.4 1.3 2.7
March ................................ 10, li I .. ...2 311 3 ,0 3.- 1 835.8 5.2i O. S .8
April ......... ........ ................ I 11 .0u.2 1,1,2-. i2,009. 11,559.t 5.- 0.- -.8
Mau .................................. 11 3 ` 12.- '.9 L2,23-. 3 L2, .t, 1 250.0 li.; 1.0 14.7
lune ................................. 1 2,1 2,- .3 2,2t, 12 ,-6'.3 12,2']. 1 L ,. 5 3.5

Tuiy. ................ ... . 1 ,93-.ln lO, .. L0,9-. 10, -0. 0 10.6 1- 3.2
August................................ 2 II 13.4 IL -21 .- .621.8 1 1.29.3 7.9 i i 1.4
Geptemb r............................... | .') i -1 I ~ i. 12 .2 12 50 1 I3 1 i, 1.3
October .............................. I. np1 I3 s 3 9 2 6b ) 1 2' 12 21 .1. 3 8 i 5 2.3
*-.iIestI2r.. ... ... .......................i' I I.-. H i.. I. ii. i1 1 I'.. i. ..b
?DJ be r.............................

'Bgignni- .itn January 197b -t..tasti1s, total] include data on shtpients of nonmonetary sold. See table 1, footnote 2.
:RLpre -cnts onlr export .hipse-r iroui.. hh I.nintea itatet' ari alifer- from DOD Military Asssltance Programi Grant-Aina shipment figures under this
program. -. f-,1l-.- -a Tran-f r --1 irn material prcaured .u-ie the Lrntea States and transfers from. DOD overseas stocks from export shipments.
bi EsyTort value i: f.a.-., -nereau- OOr value. in mi't instance., is f.o.b., port of origir.. Ifc) Data for shipments reported by the DOD for a
ciehn rontn are included in Bur ,d ;I C.nsus report; in thf ce :3rso month subsequentt to the month reported by the DOD.
Adjuatea ior -teaanal ar d *rrK,,a-3jy variation. See footnote I 3n Ine sott'i oI page 5.
"nrujal tutal 1. not snown for :e'-onally adujj-.tcd ,J.ta. Lra.a oltead ata isould be ueo lfor annual totals.









Table 3. U.S. Imports of Merchandise, by Month: January 1977 to November 1978

(In millions of dollars. See Explanation of Statistics for Information on coverage, date of importation, definitions oz f.a.s. and c.l.f. import
values, and sources of error in the data. Unadjusted total. represent su- of unrounded figures and hence may vary lightly Irom oum of rounded
amounts)

F.a.s. value C.l.f. value'


Period General imports General Imports Imports
for f [or
Seasonally najuted ption. Seasonally consumptIon,
adjus led' ur aa s ra adjusted UnadJute unajusted


19'?

January-December......................... '. i l ',t.8... 1-6, ,*.. 5 l-, ti) I '93 6

January-lioverber.................. ........ i.. l 1 31 1i)3 '8 13 288 l .99 1-2 53 1

January.................................. 10,-- .l l0, -i.i.. 10,'.6,5. l ], ] 9. 1 li. 8 J L 11,-086
February ................................. 1;,nl:'. L b .5 .' i,-0o 3 -.. 12, 30-.-
March.................................... ,--" I .3 1 3,06i 5.'4 3,l- I Ol-. I 9?7 .3
April .................................... 1 1 9' ILI r I, ." 12, I 12,E 8.'
May...................................... l ,lo9. II, 11,0' .- l 12 .1a.2 11,d30.9
June..................................... .,3-..3 l-, -i .- i ,3-. l .?j 3 1,'i2 1-,9'86.9

July..................................... 12,- .. 12, 0.i 12 1 i,-'. 3,3.8. 1 13,1 0.9
August.................................... 1 l 12,2,10.0. 1-2,89" .0 12,8 .- L2,629.0
September................................ 12,-i. I. 12,- 2.. l2, j;no. 13 ,81 1 1 i] "1.0 13,ln2.6
October.................................. 12,5Ab.9 12,-. i. 12,ir .3 1 3,- 31i I, 3t 13,'.10.8
November................................. 12, Oo. uo 12, -,' 0.1 12,2 3.- l ),2. I ,i ) 1 ,0' .-
December................................. I .13,.? .' l '2.I Is l., r l-. i c.. -., .

19i8

Jainuary-November ............ .. ......... .. r. .7 r t .r. ir ir '. i.r C ti.

January.................................. 12, 0.' 1 I '. L :,60 l i ), 1 is .. 15 39'.
February................................. l-..-0. L3, .. 31 .. 15, 1.3 -, 2. -, i60i .
March.................................... 13, fi ) i -, 9. i-, 5t.'. i. 1 ,- i. 1 ,-92.,.
April .................................... b .--46. bl ,-"f.O i.,-lo.- l ,-i .8 5,-2:.O l ,3-i.O
May...................................... 3.' 1 -, I'1.. 2 1 1 n -. t, 1-,9"A .a
June..................................... 3. ': -. l-. -. 1-,-3 -,o0 .- I ,- u0.2 l ,l .

July..................................... i 3 i-, 03. 1-,88). 1 Ii. .2 i ,6(c .4 11 5 3
August................................... ]. ,?, .. ,.- ,, 1- ,'u 3.r l: '. "- : js 1. )60 5
September................................ i u L- I_ -2-. .L o I-3 1i .C' I ..-O'' '
October.................................. j. li 0 1*6 16 '0' 2 15 :i l u -..2
November ................................. I n.. -.. r i l
December.................................

IBelrinning with Januar) 1978 sTatil'ice, total inecluae data *r. 6thip-'ernts o0 norimonetary gold. See the Eplanatlon .if Statistic, for additional
Information. See also table I, lootr-ote 2.
'Adjusted for seaconal and oraunL-, s veiriation. See footnote 1 or, the botto.- of page 5.
'Annual total is not shown for -essonalLy adjusted data. TInadjutie, aata should o. uEed for annual tortaIs.








8


Table 4. U.S. Exports (f.a.s. Value Basis) of Domestic Merchandise, Including Department of Defense

(DOD) Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid Shipments--Schedule E Sections, Seasonally

Adjusted and Unadjusted, by Month: January 1977 to November 1978

(In millions ,.[ aol larr. See Explanatfton of Statistics for information on coverage, definition of r.a.s. port value, and sources of error
in. thF dat a. Unodu-ftLd totals present sum of unrounded figures ana hence may vary Ilightly rom uSaum of rounded amounts)


Period


January-November .............

January.....................
February........*...........
March..........................
April..........................
May............................
June..........................
July..........................
August.......................
September.....................
October ,.....................
November.....................
December......................

1978


January-November.............

January......................
February......................
March.........................
April.........................
May...........................
June..........................
July..........................
Augustember .....................
September.....................
October......................
November ......................
December.....................





1977


January-December..............

January- November..............

January.......................
February......................
March.........................
April..........................
May...........................
June..........................
July..........................
August........................
September.....................
October.......................
November......................
December......................


1978

January- November...............

January......................
February......................
March.........................
April.........................
May...........................
June..........................
July.........................
August........................
September.....................
October.......................
November......................
December.....................


Schedule E sections'


Ci I .7


5 6 ? 8


Seasonally adjusted'


1, 21h.


I,23.''


122-1.6











* .
I n-. I




*,335.8
L. 32'.




I .


I I31 l

1 .9





1 '. I

Lt.b.
i r4 -
59. "









l I, .

I .



L .

L I.


11 .4-1 h


l,lJ.9
1 ,08 .'

i .2'2.2



S,lj]. I
0 1. 2
i.0"-. i
1,02". -









-,0'1.2
i 010.6





t.,


3' I.

-0..
343.7
3 3.1
16.

393. -
336.










i3. l
.3 '. 4









, l.2





131. .

.-u *"


'1.5
0J.3
115.'.
111.3

111.9
122.2
L? 2
110.2
10-.,

lOJ.8






0,3.-
S.7
131.3
l l .I

1173.'

I s' .

I .


1.87; *.



Bob. 9
856+ i
8-6. i
912. I
932.6

1002.7
"8.5
989.9


v ;v. 5





'417.0
402. ;
9'8. 1
460. 1

, L ".'* V
, .70
1 .1 2 .
1.23.2


V,801 6

90 .
941 1
929. 7
qli. 3
NO, V

18.,
8"* .'4
otfi.
1,02.b6
".1.0
632.0
982.0




II,: l..-

,'.6


I '3 i6. I


.00..9
,L 0 '
L I -


.,093.0
3,989.6
-,129.8
-,056.3
-,238.o
-,09'. 1
-, L06.
-,06i 5
-,t 32.2
-,096.5
-,050..








-,2.2. )
.,123.3
-, 1 i

-,'92.6


-,903.3
5.122.3

5.33.7.
I. 1 t


7.-79.1

6-5.1
661.8
665.2


692.0
6)-.9

b6.0
660.9
710. ;





b. ...


736. 5
735.2
'69.9
s6t. 2
1336.2
i50. 1

609. 3

8Y6.
950.
1 .,7


J,925.0

379.6
315.3
320.

36).5
301.1
508.1
3786.9
265.5
529.2
317.,
-00.7








266.9
387.7
-72.8
300.8
358.4
352.3
33l.6
7-0.0
371.1
t, '.


UnL' adju t 'e


al, 1 .1 "
',-',.





1,22 .-
1 J r,
1 1-.0

1,9'.1
t.22'.-

. ^-.
1,1.7 .7


1.1-..4:.







lL -1^. "
.- .
I -'- ,

.- '2.

I.
I-,..."

1. .U.6 '

b- i "


1 .u'tb.



L-r.
L )'. "

I .

S1.^ .

1.5.7


l-i. .
1 62.










l 1. ,)
t-. J




-.l.JI


11 11..
i '. 4 :. i

7 ,7-,.
I 1 l, j
1,._: .J



7 .L*
"2 .
722.'
,7 7 ..
L !'J .-'
l I J l. J
i,i+. .t






t 9 1_

L Oc ).'-

I.33 ,.r



., -

1. -


7 dna..

1 [.6
'it. .,

i .6
'.32.-
396. 1

33 -
.4.7.9





,.r. ..-




1o.9
In!.,

.6-.
S.

i-v.1
j-B.I.
3-6. ,
-2:1.
., ,


I, J06. "



L V
41 9
i32 2
11'2 A
12,. 2
120. I
S. .0.2
102.0


1 I. 0
110.0






Lr..'l
l.



:'. 1


L2,
1 :*, .,


. ;: .

i -
1(7







91" .



L n
l,03'.-










9 7.3






.,76...f


n1,8 7

4,d", 6



8-1.2


9':.
9-..0


8. l '
I '.7-..
.7-2.1
815..
9 '7.1






829.l
a-. -
1 .06:.
986.
10,..
1,07 .-"

319 *i
7 .L. '*
1.13:..
1.1t2. 8
......


45.-'8 9

'.. 701 .
3.86.0
-.a"..-


l.. 1 .0
3.1J8.i

. 52.9

-.C....
...706.7






3,:32.0
.,9-1.9
S--.-
'.0"8. ?
.1 32. .'
3,0'5.2

43.4 6
.. 4:, 0
J, l-O.l


B.233.9



590. 3
"20.'5
i33 3
6K2.2
698.1


51 3

670. 7
042. 9
i-l.a




*I .6.. .

66-. a
669..n
875.

9i8. 6
e5-.2

'L 9


*. 313.6

3,878.9

376.9
280.9
299.6
2 '0.2
366.2
335.1
515.7
315.5
230.9
.93.7
312.3
-3'..8






'.33.6
s3;. 5
390.-
511.1
312.8
395.0
351.9
33'0 6
"03.0
32 .1
v.'1.3


'Schedule E section descripti-. I.: ar a i i iio-
0. Food and live animals ClherLcal .and related product ,, N...P.F.
1. Beverages and t.-iacr, b Mianductur-c goods clas'ilean chiefly by material
2. Crude material', irt ijiI. .scept fluo : 2. Machlner) and transport equlDment
3. Mineral fuels, lubricant;, and related matFrili 8. MLscellaneous manufactured articles. N.4.P.F.
4. Oils and fats--animal .ra F-aeta.Il,'- q Colmmoditice and transactions not classified elevere
2Beginning with January 1978 itatitlc',. total- Irscijde data on -hipnment- of normonetary gold. See the Eicplanatlon of Statistics for additional
information.
'Adjusted for seasonal and worklng-sa) vaeratiun. ine (ooinEte I onr the nDotom of pag 5. Annual totals are not shown for seasonally aajusted
data. Unadjusted data should be usea for ,arnnual totals. The -erc[ion totals in thi tanle and similar overall monthly totals In tables I ana 2
were adjusted independently.










Table 5. U.S. General Imports (f.a.s. Value Basis) of Merchandise, Schedule A Sections, Seasonally

Adjusted and Unadjusted, by Month: January 1977 to November 1978

(I m utillions of dollars. See Eaplanatton of Statl3tilc for InforaT ion or. coverage, date of importation, defiant ionof f.a.s. Import value, and
sources of error Lna toe data. Unadjusted totals represent sBu. of unrunaea figuress and hence *may .arp sl ighril from sai. of rounded amounti;I


Schdule A sec tons
Period
b I 2' 3 5 1 6 9'


Seasonally adjusted'


19;7

January-tNov.,r.-r .I. .L. t ... 1 -l.-.t. -'" -. .'L L ,-. ,< ~ 12,-3j C l

January.................. .... 9 9.9 2 l 1i .. 0 :i 3 :' 6.- 3 i. 1 -.3.0 ., .-.. 1 .u .'' ilo.
February ... .......... ... ,l o .- 13 l .. 3 .3 -2 .1 l- 3 .. 2 1,15z.- 56.-4
March ... .................. 03.0 i, 0.)3 o ). -.3. 2.s 3 .1 -.0 .6 L, ll.1 2 9.,) 1 ,- .- 1;26.9
April ......... ...... ......... 1, -6 .0 10.2 0" .1 t. ) .3 L t. 1 ,0 j 232.9
May................. .. .... .. ,L '0. 5 1-0.3 .t. 3,1:':'.- -l.- l... 1, 'r ?. .'9 8 f l 1i 3i ;" 2.
June.................... .. .*0 c.'. 13.. 3. -, i. L .2 -3-. 6 L, -1.1 L 1. l,-0 ., 3 31.
July. .... ... .2 l 3 -I.. I L : .- :' 1 "2--. ,
Augue -t.... .............. ... Ar 3 iO. r. >, 45 3 2 .1 Ii3 -N.. o. .- 0 >,02 I 1 3.1 oj-...2
Sep eerber .. ....... .. .. L .. I .3 3 1 r 3 1,2 1.: 0 .
c one r .. .... ....... .. .-.9 ... 3, t A. 6 3I .. i 1,2 -. 2'1 .
November .......... ...... -. ,9 i. 3..- i'''. ,.0 ol
Deco ber. . .. 1 i .3 -0 -c .. .. 1, 311.



Jar uary-N .v..ber... .. I r -. 3 1 Q! .i '2 4

January...... ... .. .. 1, c-.o .9.. 2 I ..013.1 3 il 1,3 6. .5.
February.. .. ... .. ... .... .. I .. l "1. r .. l.."- "-." "'.'' 1,1 .
March............. ........ .. 1,-u-. Le 3 l.r. j,1 .I1 -*. i".. ,2"o o \2 I .1 380. 2
.prtl ... ............ ....... I r,1 .. ." "2 ,). 3 i ..l -J. ,01.1 2 ,1 l '4, I ,l46 .r 3-':..i.
May.. ......... .. ......... l J .( 1 1 ; l2.. 3, ." ., ..1 i i lt. 31 :.
June..... .................... ':.l, 1,; .. +' 3 3',. .,", '. 7' -" I : ':'* 1t. ,.J ... 1i, i .\ 3l:.3
De .. r.r ....... .... .. .. .. .... 1 ,1- 3.. n 311 3
ul.usary-N vE.. b r. ..... .. .. t'..- t r,',. -. -. '' 13 31' '



Jrnuar ......... ... .. .''. .. .. L .'- .- -. 2 -









Februr ........... la. .,f, ''. L_. .' -'2 I, 3 r' L. 2',

Junepr. . .... .. .. .. ,1 .0 '. :i. :' 3: i L. I .. ,I I I .: L.
J ;u e r. .... ... ..... .. ... i [t. -." Jo, L. 33 0 -''. L, -. 1 it. :l I.



A .ut . . '.. 2 .hI' .-2 ,4 1 ,, r.--. 2.? ,. .
J Mu y . . ., l ^ 'ic. I O i 1 i.L O r.. 3 A t 1 !1; .



epterber ..... .. J I .
JaE, nuar. -ecE. ber... .... ... .- I101 r :,.- -. i .' ,6 4 .j 3, 'I,0.0 -
January-'Novsm. Er.... ... .. 11 .1 ., 3 I U L 2-.C











J near .. ...... ... I. .i .2 .. 3,, 3' 1 ", .- j,-' 1. L, .
F eabry r .. . .. .' J 3l i ', -'r.0.. i 1 l.c.
ar t ....... .. 10 I .3 "..-i .I ; -.. l L .,1 3. 3 .13 -
.A p r I .. .. .. .. ,- 3' ', -. '. ,, -. I i ".l1 i ,. ',
un ... .... .... Ir.b. ;.- 3 ,' i. \ 1.t .- 1 .. 1 3 i P! r 0 L














3 'I I L k' I I t 3
pil .. . .. '- i 5. 3, ; '. L 5 I A
Augt . .. .... 3 1i. .. t '.6 J I ,3 3. t. L -t' 12
npt mber.. . ... 6. I. 3, .. .' 1..- 6 2 1 3 -
l ... .. .. .. ....... .. i- .l 1 .8 3 .- r.i 1, 9.3 3i 1. 1 ,i-. 8 6 J 3' 3,3
No;ep eber ... . . 1 63. .4 -1-. 6
Dc e re r.. . l .3 t11.L 3 J. vi.c -u.;i ,3.1 1 0". .1 -

















Dee a r ... ...
r I -r .L E.j.. I.t,-, 13,e ,'r p -r. r' .1 .i 3 .. .2. -

F.b uaN .. .. ... ... .. .- .z.i j rt 2. 11 o r.. 1is i
Car h. .. .... .t .. '' .... 7 6. .-31 d n. rI. 0 3. '1 0 r1 1. i, i tq.2







Apr Mln.r. i *ul. hIuDr, r, 1, re .. r l .. .iL i .l r .ri l re .rt I : I .1F
-ay ii.- i 3--.. lii. ,i i,-~?3t ...] i i a Tra, i.:Li n. i. :r : 5hil 1,0 eiJ, Iir6
l.e i.. ir.. .ilr. .j nu. .to t it.>- : *.9 i -_r ic .r' -.r ir gui'. 1.e r., l0.i.n. [ .i[4 -[1 Ic r L I. ii' ir.l
0. F r iek'.n n-da irI E i -1 l- i-. n rt u c t iut n icLnot 13
on .O riLoci pace r. Annl a la. are n.Lt .r..I r ril J [ii r t'.aojua' a, a Erri l iO t b I J i t!ial. n Ls
3 .. Mineral tkrae' ail-r ur nr i, i *... r l, .'.at-.aly tu1ta In ini.- I an 3 cr iart a1-.A E r lei, P.f.


tie c t -D t a 0 i; r. Itr .'e ,ab i. i .i- EE. n. r c....E.ra i r-on Ih I V c t : a r i 1 n k- L at rz o 3 -cre zi i .=te=d int wnrra rent ij.








10

Table 6. U.S. General Imports (c.i.f. Value Basis) of Merchandise. Schedule A Sections, Seasonally

Adjusted and Unadjusted, by Month: January 1977 to November 1978

1in millions of dollars. See Explanatkaon of Statistics for Informatton on coverage. dale of importation, definttor. of c.*.' import value, and
source of error Jn the data. Unadjusted totals represent sum of unrounded figures and hence may vary slightly from sum of rounded amounts)


Schedule A sect ionne

Per iod
0 I 2' 3 n S 6 T 8 9n


Se..sonally adjusted'


1977

January-November .............

January......... ............
February........... .........
March ......... ......
April........................
Hay..........................
June....... ...................
July.........................
Aupust
.,. ptember .
October.......................
November..... .................
December ........... ..........

1978

January-November..............

January.......................
February......................
March ..........................
April .........................
May. .........................
June ..........................
July ........ .................
August.......................
September......................
October .......................
November......................
December ....................




I,"




Jor.ijar ,-N5. 'o.arr..............



Mir. r,




ZAu r I
h.,.


)c t 'her
i .




',nnr.- 5 e ..............

-13r.r.r

M.r n .







r... .m t.
T r I





*1 l -4 '.n r



c,,ii'iulIe 7 ?L-- .1.4 Hit. ripti


12,.'71.1

1 58.2
I .2-2.
1,169.6
1 o 6
1,938.8
.1 1'i. )
i .o'l). 4
966.9
gal. t.
9 39.-

1,382..6






1,209.9

S.281.-
1,239. 3
1,219. 1
1,010.9
1.22.. 7
.01-.3
,0 ;.5
1,)?.42.


1,6-1.0

126.9
1.".8
b162.0

1I0. 3
I.?.,
129.6
2.,') ;'.
212. I
1; .0
103.9
162.9






1..
200.2
182.-
23,. 8

21-. 3
205.'.
218.'
199.6
2 06.
21 .1-


8,329.0

625.1
,12.8
7;3. 1
702. 1
737.6
803.9
138.5
0.3..
779.0
615.4
1108.
818.3






729.,

816.2
7 '0.2
8'5.6
;29.4.
817. 3
896.1

'.0-. 1
'I .7.'


-.029. 5

3,539..

-,635.0
3, 0. 8
3,311. 5
4,638.5
',120.'
3, 30. 3
-,03-. 1
4,13-.0
.,210. 3
3,279.7






3, 386.3
3,731.9
, 300.2
3,576. 1
3,812.6
3, 707.0
3.5-.9.6
3,767.9
.,0t9.9
3,9.6.2
...., ?. I


520.1

60.1
4.7.0
3q.3
39.4

-3.8
75.2
-3.6
5i. .
'.4.&
31.3
42.1
-'1 2



)11.




-6.6
3 3.4
.9.9
51.8
_.b
32.6

:. ..3


.,679.0

364.2
]5l. ,
-51.'
*,28.9
038.8
637.7
460.0
454. 7
455.0
-91.8
371.8
323.4.
575.2






'3..1
552.8
599.0
586.9
616.5
559. 5
620. 2
551.6
610.t
5,6.6
=0.-


20,710.3

1,572.0
1, 862.2
, -20.6
1,906. 7
1,896. 1
1,981.8
1,950.6
1,996.5
2,067.9
1,959.5
1,815.8
2,26,-.6






2,16-.3
2 ,711 .9

2, no0. 9
2,,81.0
2 237.9
2, 63b. -
2.373.7
2,-3-.5
2,-21.6


35,079.8

2, 74.1
3,.59..
2 ,93. j
l,987.9
2,969.5
3,383.6
3,263.8
3,206.5
1,='.,3.3
3,543.5
3,290.9
3,773.1






3, 25.8
.,159. 1
3,923..'
.,244.9
,'31 7.6
,0-.8.2
.,,-.1. S
.4156.0
1,.32.9
-.529.7
-.II '. -


13,351.7

1,105.1
1,236.2
1,123. n
1,162. 7
1,218.2
1,293.9
1,230. 3
1,162. 1
1,324.1
1,361.7
1,133.8
1,46...9






1,021.8
1,620. '
1,633.6
1,682.0
1,66-. 3
1, 69b4. 5
1,240.0
1, .659.1
1, Bbl.8
1,830.70
i. 'm.2


3,020.3

219.7
261.9
230.6
236.6
266.9
376.8
228.6
248.6
309.3
276.7
364.6
317.0



I,669. I

350.3
289.6
385.6
355.1
323.5
320.0
324.8
329.4
308.8
374.1
30A.?2


U'nadji-tea


13. --'-.

12,035.o
1 ,, Q. 2


8. .. 6
1,216.-
9 -'.. -
I. 163,. 1

i ,l' 7 8








932.-
9-1.0


1. 369.0





I Z.I 3. I
1 .,13. 1
I, "-0. -

1,:32. *,

i,:13 ;
I 1 j,-..I

L 2-,:. .


1,811.5

1 ,l i2. 5


133.,'

131.2

L ,9.4
123.0

199.*-
1-6.9
111.8
'1- .0





151.
1 76.0
190.-
21l.B

232. -
195. 3

IaS .-
7.i',."


9,lho10.

6,316.5
688.8

72B.2
702.
75.3
90".
7'9. 1
83-. 1
806.. 6
9t. 6
711.5
6-2.0



W. I.

692.'-
121..
823.,
'61. -
90s,.2

60.9.
6'-?.t

ho .e


- ,;2.6 2

-3,7 5'.3
3, '62.-
- 3,99.8
5,,94.6
j, 727. 7
2,963.8
-,582.8
4, 157.8
3,868,.
3,937.5
j,637.0
3,915.6
), 331.5





3,623. 3
3 '13.2
3,626.9,
3. '22.'
3,4, 2.. ;
3,681. 1
3,581.5
3.q,7.1
3 .,37 .3
3,717.-


4,24.3.1

-.667.9
3'1.0

"61.
-85.3
35.1
475.2
424.2

459.8
371. 1
328.3
577.,5






500.6
63t.1
n. 1.9
bli.9
580.2
178.0

565...
57A. b
.. 1; .i


2?,997.2

20,705.?
1,5'0. o
1.606.-
1,765. 3
1,61 2. 3
1,917.6
2,16 .. I
1,923. 3
2,008.5
2,0-1.0
2,010.4
1,895. 7
2,292.0





2,131.8
2,367.5
, 507. 1
2,563.2
2,520. 1
2,-57.2
2,59..5
2,]38.0
2. 383.-
2,501.5.


38,830. 3

31, t,2.2
2,-65.9
2,9,5. a
3,21 3.4
3,02.5
3, 1.7.9
3,6 .7.5
3,192.0
2,924. 3
3,191.0
3,511.6
3,399.5
3,868.0



--..6a'.o

3,595.4
3,793. 1
.,3 07.9
.,338. i
,262.'
.,364.2
4,3'3.8
3,79-.4
-.0'13.8
-.516.1


h.,828.0

13,"-2-.7
1,016. I
1,060. "
1,106. 7
1,083.6
1,136.6
1, 317.0
1, 354.6
1,320.2
1,351.9
1, ..B
1,201.8
1, -03..,



I 7 L. I

i,316.1
1, 388.9
1,615.6
1,5.5.8
1,166. 1
I,'70.B
1,915. I
1.884.8
1,880.-
1,95-.5


3,387.8

3,055.3
207.8
233.1
223.9
230.4
261.8
397.9
234.8
248.6
313.0
285.8
418.2
332.5



3.0. 5.2

333.5
258.0
374.4
340.5
320.9
340.2
332.6
329.0
309.7
388.7
127.b


r,- are a, [ 1 7 .


0 f n ind iILe .cr,.r, 45
1. IC'Uer;i,' .nn F.bacc
4. '.s ,l 7*eri 0ls. .r 4 Inr .l, .r,, ?r|t o, I.
3. %i--r14 fu- Is, lutbricarts, aria rFla a matrr i3 I
-. *.4 a .r.i i .s-n-1nniIl ana welrtaniu
r, in,-tric *.h n.nuir 1978 It.i- tic-s. r tal% inc4JJi
'll.a ri 1t i C..


5. Ch-emacals and rilateo Drroaduts, 7.S.P.F.
c.. Ma.r.ui ictire.1 '..- as claai,,,ed cnie' lt o, ,iatertal
7. Macntr ,r.and tra-,ap.ort equipivent
8. MiI.:-ellne,-us manufacturedd articles, h.S.P.F.
9. C, DIaj1itLeS any transactions not classiiien elsewhere
r,. a r. -h iptert ..( nornantarvy gold. See the explanation u Satat i-t s for addlt loal


'AI lU1 i .r 1 ,-. ., r I andl -.rkine-.ay varatia.r.. Lifectl,-. -rth MJy 19'68 isie rerised factors used tL ayaust 1977 and 1978 data. See footnote I
or, b.t a, r ,-. r.nual 3als ire n. I h.,n f r iez' :nall1 adjut-.e adTa. L.ajuvtea oana anould bUe usea for annual totals. The adjusted
sfcti:n I ta- in th. uabie and asimlar .s-erall m- rtonly ut-al; in tables I and 3 .ere adjusted independently.








GENERAL IMPORTS OF PETROLEUM AND SELECTED PETROLEUM PRODUCTS INTO
THE U.S. CUSTOMS AREA AND U.S. VIRGIN ISLANDS, UNADJUSTED

Monthly and cumulative-to-date data on general imports of petroleum and selected petroleum products into the U.S. Customs area
and into the US Virgin Islands for the period January 1977 through the current month are presented in the tables that follow. Tables
I A and 1 B present imports into the U.S Customs area and tables 2-A and 2-B present imports into the U.S. Virgin Islands. (It should
be noted that imports into the Virgin Islands are excluded from the regularly compiled foreign trade statistics and, therefore, are ex-
cluded from the data presented in tables 1-A and 1-B as well as the other tables shown in the front of this report.-See "Explanation of
Statistics".

Effective with January 1978 statistics. certain changes were made in the commodity classifications (Schedule A and TSUSA) covering
petroleum products These changes are reflected in the listing of classifications shown below. Data presented in tables 1-B and 2-B which
follow have been revised to reflect all changes in classifications, effective January 1978.


Schedule A and TSUSA Commodity Numbers Used in Compiling the Petroleum
Information Presented in This Report


Energy products

Schedule A No.


Nonenergy products

Schedule A No.


rSUSA No.


Crude petroleum and deriv-
atives to be refined
333.0020
333.0040
334.301 pt.

Crude petroleum
333.0020
333.0040

Gasoline
334.1500


-'5.0510
.75.1010
475.6510


'75.0510
475.1010


.'5.2520, 475.2560


Lubricating oils
334.5410 pt.

Lubricating greases
334.5410 pt.

Paraffin and other mineral
waxes
335.1225 pt.
335.1245


475.4500



475.5500, 475.6000




494.2200
494.2400


Jet fuel
334.1205

Kerosene
334.2000


Distillate fuel oil
334.3021

334.3041 pt.

Residual fuel oil
334.4050
334.4060

Propane and butane gas
341.0025

Liquid derivatives of
petroleum, n.e.s.
334.5430 pt.


('55.2530
.'5..2550


-?5.3000


475.0525
.75.0545
475.1015
'"5.1025

-'5.0535
-75.1035


Asphalt
335.4500

Naphthas
334.5420


All other petroleum products
(pitch of tar coke, non-
liquid hydrocarbon mix-
tures, and calcined petro-
leum and coal coke not for
fuel)
335.3000 pt.
334.5430 pt.
598.5020 pt.


475.1525, 475.1535,
-75.1545


475.6530


TSUSA No.


521.1100



475.3500


401.6200
475.7000
517.5120
517.5140











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