United States foreign trade

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
United States foreign trade
Alternate title:
United States foreign trade. FT900, Summary of United States export and import merchandise trade
Portion of title:
Summary of U.S. export and import merchandise trade
Abbreviated Title:
U.S. foreign trade, FT900, Summ. U.S. export import merch. trade
Physical Description:
13 v. : ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of the Census
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census :
For sale by the Subscriber Services Section (Publications), Bureau of the Census
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Creation Date:
September 1978
Publication Date:
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Imports -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Exports -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Commerce -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
statistics   ( marcgt )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Issued also to depository libraries in microfiche.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Dec. 1976-
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Ceased in 1988.
General Note:
"FT 900."
General Note:
Description based on: Jan. 1979; title from caption.
General Note:
Beginning with July 1980 for sale by the Supt. of Docs., U.S.G.P.O.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Mar. 1988.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001320869
notis - AGH1745
oclc - 07222812
lccn - 81646118
issn - 0730-3270
sobekcm - AA00005268_00001
Classification:
ddc - 382/.0973/00212
System ID:
AA00005268:00022

Related Items

Preceded by:
Summary of U.S. export and import merchandise trade
Succeeded by:
U.S. merchandise trade. Seasonally adjusted imports and exports

Full Text
C3.^ 10:9 6-79- -1


Summary of U.S. Export and


Import Merchandise Trade





SEPTEMBER 1978
For wire transmission 3:30 P.M., Thursday, October 26, 1978


Seasonally Adjusted and Unadjusted Data

(Including unadjusted data on imports of petroleum and nhtrole r


F.A.S. EXPORTS AND F.A.S. IMPORTS


Seasonally Adjusted
The Bureau of the Census, Department of Commerce an-
nounced today that during September 1978, export, un a
f.a.s. (free alongside ship) U.S. port of exportationr
value basis, excluding Department of Defense (DOCI1 Miii-
tary Assistance Program Grant-Aid shipments, amournted to
$13,428.9 million and that general imports on a f.a.i.
foreign port of exortEation value basL'i, amounted to
$15,120.0 million. .

Based on the above export and import figure:, the Septem-
ber merchandise trade balance Was in deficit by $1, iL1.1
million, as compared to the deficit of $1,620.' million
recorded in August.

During the first 9-months of 1978 (January-September'l, e -
ports on a seasonally adjusted basis were at an annual rate
of $138,738 million, a level about 15 percent higher than
the calendar year 1977? total of $121,150 million. Import5
for the January-September 1978 period were at an annual rate
of $168,961 million, an increase of about I- percent o'er
the calendar year L977 rotal of $1-7,685 million n.

For the 4-month period, June-September 1928, export:
averaged $12,454.1 million per month, about 13 percent
higher than the $11,055.8 million average reported for the
preceding 4-month period February-Hay 1978. imports on a
f.a.s. value basis, averaged $14.428.1 million per month
for the current 4-month period, a level abouL 2 percent
higher than the $14,156.9 million average reported for ehe
preceding 4-month period. 2 3


Unadjusted
Exports, excluding Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid
shipments, increased from $11,613.9 million in August to
$12,713.1 million in September. With Militar,, qssictancr
Program Grant-Aid shipments included, exports increased
from $11,621.8 million in August to $12,71-.- million in
September. General imports increased from $1,02-..0 mil-
lion in August to $1,416.9 million in September.

Note: Footnotes 1, 2, and 3 are shown at the bottom .tf
page 4.


F.A.S.


ThE ur-au 2 th Cen r C e n C crce arinnuuned
troda, tr.ha d'ar.irig Sepo-, a f .a. a tree
long c idc hip i U.. par value t basis, ex-
cluding l'epartent ,t SeFen se Military isi t ri-cL
Prrurar, i.rant-mid i hLapiT.ri. E amc' our.ited to. 3,- 2d.9 mi lion
and chat r, e ra I impo, rc *- .f c. I t i r,. n- ra nc e, and
[reir-i t LiU. port ut nr. r, valueu e basic ', amounted c c
I ., t-a 7 iTi L ,:, '

Baced r, the above expc.r[ anrd iimpor figure-, the September
mcr.. h andi -e crade balance a: in d,le ti t b ib 2.71 mi.l-
lion, a u.r.ipar d r,-. rthe J, t r, it of 2. 0 .7 ., l iLon recorded
i r .uau, .

'',ar ii the I ',_ r' -mc iTi ri oli It r'. t i ua r eptemTber ,. ex-
ports :r 3 a seasona I adjusted I-*a i 4 re ar ar, annual rate
, $'1, Jl.' 3 I r, L i on, a le'. l I about I percer.n h ,ehtr rhan
the a lend r .ear lIO 7 tot-l ctf $12 .1 5'J mil i, n. imports
for the Jian ar\ -Sepcembn c r TI e perted were 3at ar anrnali rate
of fi ''1 ,956 m il c.n, an ',c re a e of about Ia percent .over
the alend r ,e r I 7 tutal of 1_ .5iC' mill'_ on.

For cthe ,-monr.th pe r iod. Juni e-S' pt mbe r 1 'A4 exp c.rt
averaged $12, -.1 miill ion per month, about 1 3 percent
hig-her than the $1 .U'J .8 mi ll ionr, a.'eragie reported tor the
p rec Ld Ln r-i -month per od, F'br',a r,, -la',' I 078. import : on a
c.i.f .a u- ba- s, averaeEd $1 ,382.3 mill on per iToncth
tor the current a-month period, a letel aboJut 2 percent
higher than the $i 5,07,.'.2 mill ion average reported for the
prectdinre -muonth period. 3


Unadjusted
Expirtc in-cx lauding Ililitjir,' Ai' L SitaFlIc Program CGrant-Aid
Shp L en- inc r reased t r.om ll l,013.9 mill ion in Augusrt to
S12, 13.1 mi l ion 1n Septemiber. 1 ti th l li t ar A si tan.:e
Program 7, ranrt-Aid h i pmien s nc .luded, exp.orc increased
from $ll.r1.2L.8 mi ii ior irn August co $12, '"4.- million in,
Sepceie r 'enerral i sports i r, r a, E d fr.'i $1- .9 n5 .b I -
I lon in AuuLu c t c Si,33.0 mi ion L n Sept empber.


9*0I o U.S. Department
of Commerce
BUREAU OF
S:: THE CENSUS


Inquiries concerning these figures should be addressed to the Chief, Foreign Trade Division, Bureau of
the Census. Washington, D.C. 20233. Tel: Area Code 301, 763-5140; 763-7754: and 763-7755.
For sale by the Subscriber Services Section (Publications), Bureau of the Census, Washington, D.C.
20233, or any U.S. Department of Commerce district office. Postage stamps not acceptable; currency
submitted at sender's risk. Remittances from foreign countries must be by international money order
or by a draft on a U.S. bank. Price 30 centsper copy. Annual subscription (FT 900,975,985, and 986
combined) $14.90.


FT 900-78-9


i,-


.....


UNITED STATES FOREIGN TRADE
UNITED STATES FOREIGN TRADE








EXPLANATION OF STATISTICS


IMPORT STATISTICS

Coverage

The U.S. import statistics reflect both government and
nongovernment imports of merchandise from foreign countries
into the U.S. Customs territory which includes the 50 States,
the District of Columbia. and Puerto Rico. The U.S. import
statistics exclude imports into the Virgin Islands. Guam.
American Samoa. and other U.S. possessions, and shipments
between the United States and Puerto Rico. between the United
States and U.S. possessions, and between any of these outlying
areas. (Data on U.S. trade with Puerto Rico and the Virgin
Islands of the United Slates are published separately in Report
FT 800 Additional data on such trade and on imports into the
Virgin Islands from foreign countries are presented in reference
tabulations.) Data on imports of petroleum and selected
petroleum products, including shipments into the Virgin Islands
from foreign countries, are included in this report effective with
the January 1976 statistics (previously shown in former Report
FT 900-Supplement).
The US. import statistics also exclude American goods re-
turned to the United States by its Armed Forces; intransit ship-
ments through the United States when documented as such
with Customs; temporary shipments. transactions not con-
sidered to be of statistical significance, such as shipments of
personal and household effects; low-valued nonduliable tin-
ports by mail, and issued monetary coins of all component
metals.

Inclusion of Gold in the Statistics

Effective with the statistics for Januar. 1078. imports of
nonmonetary gold lin such forms as ore. scrap and base bullion.
nonmonetary refined bullion, etc ) whichh %.ere preiousli
excluded, are now included in the slalistics. Imports of silver in
these forms ha.e been included since January lQI Additional
information regarding the inclusion of gold in the 1978 statistics
appears in the November and December 1977 issues of Report
FT Q90.

General Imports/Imports For Consumption

Tlie statistics on U.S. imports are presented in ternims of both
"General Imports" and "Imports for Consumption." General
imports are a combination of entries for immediate con-
sumption and entries into Customs bonded warehouses, and
thus general. reflect total arrivals of merchandise. Imports for
consumption are a combination of entries for immediate
consumption and withdrawals from warehouses for con-
sumption. and thus generally reflect the total of the com-
modities entered into U.S. consumption channels.
Source Of Import Information

The official U.S. import staustics are compiled by the Bureau
of the Census from copies of the import entry and warehouse
withdrawal forms which importers are required by law to file
with Customs officials. The information as to country of origin.
net quantity, value, and commodity classification is verified by
Customs officials on entries filed for transactions valued over
$250. which are ordinarily subject to examination for Customs


appraisement purposes. The statistical copy of the entry is
corrected if it does not accurately reflect the information
called for by the statistical requirements.

Import Valuation

F.a.s. Import Value.-The f.a.s. (free alongside ship) value
represents the transaction value of imports at the foreign port of
exportation. It is based on the purchase price, i.e., the actual
transaction value and generally includes all charges incurred in
placing the merchandise alongside the carrier at the port of
exportation in the country of exportation.

C.i.f. Import Value.-The c.i.f. (cost, insurance, and freight)
value represents the value of imports at the first port of entry in
the United States. It is based on the purchase price and includes
all freight, insurance, and other charges (excluding U.S. import
duties) incurred in bringing the merchandise from the country
of exportation and generally placing it alongside the carrier at
the first port of entry in the United States. If the merchandise
was acquired in a transaction between related parties, the
purchase price used in deriving the c.i.f. value is based on an
arm's-length equivalent transaction price, i.e., a price which
would exist between unrelated buyers and sellers.

Import Commodity Information

Import data are initially reported in terms of the commodity
classifications in the Tariff Schedules of the United States An-
notated (TSUSA), which is an official publication of the U.S.
International Trade Commission, embracing the legal text of
the Tariff Schedules of the United States together with statis-
tical annotations. The TSUSA data are rearranged and presented
in this report in terms of totals for the 1-digit commodity
sections in Schedule A, Statistical Classification of Commodities
Imported Into the United States, which is based upon the
Standard International Trade Classification (SITC). Revision 2,
effective with the statistics for January 1978. Prior to January
1978, Schedule A was based upon the former SITC, Revised.

Date of Importation and Import Monthly Carryover

It is the objective of the compiling procedures to include
shipments, insofar as practicable, in the statistics for the actual
month of importation (or the month of withdrawal in the case
of warehouse withdrawals for consumption). Effective with the
January 1978 statistics, the date of importation as reported on
the import entries is being used to determine the statistical
month in which the shipments are included. However, since
under the Customs "immediate-delivery" procedures importers
ma% file the import entry up to 10 workdays after the date of
release of the merchandise, some documents for merchandise
imported during the last few days of a given month may not
be received in time for inclusion in the statistics for that month.
As a result, there is a carryover, estimated at about 15 percent,
from the actual month of importation to a subsequent month.
In addition, processing problems (e.g., late filing of documents,
rejection of a shipment by the computer because the data fail
to meet certain edit criteria established to protect the accuracy
of the statistics, etc.) contribute to an additional carryover of
about 5 percent (in terms of value) of shipments from the re-







ported month of importation (or withdrawal from warehouse)
to a subsequent month, usually the succeeding month. These
limitations should be borne in mind when making month-to-
month comparisons.
For 1977 and previous years, the date of Customs official
acceptance of the import documents was used to determine the
statistical month in which the shipments were included. How-
ever, in certain annual publications for 1977 and in 1978 re-
ports which also present 1977 data (e.g., FT 900. FT 990, etc.),
the 1977 data are recompiled on a date of importation basis.

Cumulations of data over at least 4-month periods are desir-
able to identify underlying trends. Month-to-month changes in
imports, exports, and similar series often reflect primarily
irregular movements, e.g., exogenous events such as strikes,
differences in monthly carryover, etc.

Estimated Data for Imports Valued Under $251

The overall import and Schedule A Section 9 totals include
sample estimates for shipments valued under $251. Therefore.
they are subject to sampling error, estimated at less than
one-tenth of one percent for the unadjusted overall total and
about one percent for the unadjusted Schedule A Section 9
total. This means that we can have about 67 percent confidence
that the published unadjusted overall totals and the unadjusted
Schedule A Section 9 totals differ by less than one-tenth of a
percent and one percent, respectively, from the totals that
would have resulted from a complete tabulation. The statistics
on imports of petroleum and petroleum products included in
this report reflect fully compiled data and, therefore, are not
subject to sampling error.

EXPORT STATISTICS
Coverage
The export statistics reflect, in general, both government and
nongovernment exports of domestic and foreign merchandise
from the U.S. Customs territory (includes the 50 States, the
District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico) to foreign countries,
whether the exportation involves a commercial transaction or
not. The statistics, therefore, include Department of Defense
Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid shipments, shipments for
economic assistance under the Foreign Assistance Act and
shipments of agricultural commodities under P.L. 480 (The
Agricultural Trade Development and Assistance Act of 1954, as
amended) and related laws. The following are excluded from the
statistics: Shipments to U.S. Armed Forces and diplomatic
missions abroad for their own use; shipments between the
United States and Puerto Rico, between the United States and
its possessions (including the Virgin Islands). and between these
outlying areas: exports from U.S. possessions; intransit ship-
ments through the United States; transactions not considered to
be of statistical importance, such as personal and household
effects; temporary exports; low-valued or non-commercial
exports by mail; and issued monetary coins of all component
metals.

Inclusion of Gold in the Statistics.

As indicated above for imports, effective with the statistics
for January 1978, exports of nonmonetary gold (in such forms
as ore, scrap and base bullion, nonmonetary refined bullion,
etc.) which were previously excluded, are included in the


statistics. Exports of silver in these forms have been included
since Januar% 1969. Additional information regarding the
inclusion of gold in the 1978 statistics appears in the November
and December 1977 issues of Report FT 990.

Definition of Exports of Domestic and Foreign Merchandise

Exports of domestic merchandise include commodities which
are grown, produced, or manufactured in the UnitedStates. and
commodities of foreign origin which have been changed in the
United States from the form in which the, were imported, or
which have been enhanced in value by further manufacture in
the United States. Exports of foreign merchandise consist of
commodities of foreign origin which have entered the United
States as imports and which, at the time of exportation, are in
substantially the same condition as when imported.

Source of Export Information

The official U.S. export statistics are compiled by the Bureau
of the Census primarily from copies of Shipper's Export
Declarations which are required to be filed with Customs
officials, except for Department of Defense Military Assistance
Program Grant-Aid shipments which are reported directly to the
Bureau of the Census by the Department of Defense and
shipments by qualified exporters who have been authorized to
submit data in the form of magnetic tape. punched cards, or
monthly Shipper's Summary Export Declarations directly to
the Bureau of the Census.

Export Valuation
F.a.s. Export Value. -The value reported in the export statistics
generally is equivalent to a f.a.s. (free alongside ship) value at
the U.S. port of export, based on the transaction price,
including inland freight, insurance and other charges incurred in
placing the merchandise alongside the carrier at the U.S. port of
exportation.

Export Commodity Information
Beginning January 1978, export commodity information
is collected in terms of the commodity classifications in the
1978 edition of Schedule B, Statistical Classification of Do-
mestic and Foreign Commodities Exported from the United
States, which is based on the framework of the classification
system in the Tariff Schedules of the United States (TSUS).
In this report, the Schedule B data are rearranged and presented
in terms of totals for the 1-digit commodity sect ions in Schedule
E, which is based upon the Standard International Trade Classi-
fication (SITC), Revision 2, effective with the statistics for
January 1978. Prior to January 1978, the export classifications
in Schedule B were based upon the organizational framework
of the former SITC, Revised.

Export Monthly Carryover

It is the objective of the compiling procedures to include
shipments, insofar as practicable, in the statistics for the actual
month of exportation. For purposes of the statistics, the month
of exportation is generally based on the date when the shipment
leaves the United States. (For vessel or air shipments it is the
date when the carrier departs or is cleared from the port of
export.) However, as indicated above for imports, because of








processing problems (e.g., late receipt of a document for an
end-of-month shipment, rejection of a shipment by the com-
puter because the data fail to meet certain edit criteria
established to protect the accuracy of the statistics, etc.). there
is an overall average carry over of about 2 to 3 percent (in terms
of value) of the shipments from the actual month of export.
tion to a subsequent month. usually the succeeding month.
These limitations should be borne in mind when making
month-to-month comparisons.
Cumulations of data over at least 4-month periods are
desirable to ideniif) underlying trends. Month-to-month
changes in imports, exports, and similar series often reflect
primarily irregular movements, differences in monthly
carryover, etc.

Estimated Data for Export Shipments

The overall export and Schedule B section and division totals
include sample estimates for shipments valued $251-$1.999 to
Canada and for shipments valued $251-$999 to countries other
than Canada. Data for shipments valued $250 and under to all
countries are also estimated, based on established percentages of
individual country totals, and included in the Schedule B
Section 9 totals regardless of the commodity exported. It is
estimated that the unadjusted overall total is subject to a
sampling error of less than one-tenth of one percent, and the
unadjusted Schedule B section or division totals are subject to
sampling errors of about one percent. In addition, the Schedule
B Section 9 total is subject to possible error in the estimated
data for shipments valued $250 and under; and the overall total.
and the individual totals for sections other than Section 9. to -a
more limited extent. Such $250 and under shipments represent
about 1 percent of the total value of exports, and about bO
percent of the Schedule B Section 9 total.

SOURCES OF ERROR IN THE STATISTICS

Monthl) import and export figures are subject to the
possibility of errors which may arise from sources other than
sampling errors, discussed above. Among these are errors in the
reporting and/or processing of information as to commodity
classification, value and other statistical factors, month of
inclusion (see paragraphs on import and export carry oer.
above), and the undercounting of exports to Canada due to the
non-receipt of Shipper's Export Declarations. For 1976, the
undercounting amounted to about one and one-half billion
dollars. In the case of imports the information as to value and
commodity classification (as well as country of origin and net
quantity) is verified by Customs officials on entries filed for
transactions valued over $250 which are ordinarily subject to
examination for Customs appraisement purposes, thus con-
siderably reducing the possibility of error. In addition, the
procedures used to compile both the import and export sta-
tistics include clerical and computer processing checks designed


to protect the accuracy of the statistics to the fullest practicable
extent.

MERCHANDISE TRADE BALANCES

Two trade balances are presented in this report
1) The balance between exports based on f.a.s. values and
imports based on f.a.s. values.
2) The balance between exports based on f.a.s. values and
imports based on c.i.f. values with adjustments for imports from
affiliated sellers abroad to reflect arms-length equivalent prices.
Both balances are useful for certain purposes. The first
balance corresponds to a measurement of the international
payments or credit flows resulting from merchandise Irade
between the U.S. and foreign countries. The second balance is
based on concepts similar to those used by most foreign
countries, and therefore provides a reference for comparison
with the trade balances published by those countries.


REVISIONS TO THE STATISTICS

Under the revision policy adopted effective with the 1977
statistics, revisions to the monthly statistics for the current year
will be issued only once a year. i.e with the reports for June
of the following year Thus. revisions to 1977 statistics will be
issued only in June 1978. Under the policy previously in effect,
revisions were issued twice a year -the current year's June re-
ports contained revisions for the prior year while the December
reports usually contained revisions for the first three quarters
of the currentt year
In addition to the revisions hiich Jre made on a once a year
basis. instances nima occur heree a signiticani error in the
statistics for a month of the current year is discovered after the
statistics for tiha month are Lompiled. If the error is of
sufficient importance to require correction prior to the time
that the regular revisions are carried. tihe correction is made and
so noted in this report


SOURCES OF FURTHER INFORMATION

Additional foreign trade statistics and information regarding
coverage, valuation, sampling, and qualifications which should
be considered by users of the statistics are contained primarily
in the following publications- Report FT 990, Highlights of U.S.
Export and Import Trade. FT 135, U.S. General Imports,
Schedule A Commodity by Country; FT 410. U.S. Exports,
Schedule E Commodity by Country, and the Guide to Foreign
Trade Statistics. Information regarding additional sources of
statistics. the methodology used in seasonally adjusting the data,
and other matters relating to Ioreign trade statistics may be
obtained from the Foreign Trade Division, Bureau of the
Census. Washington, D.C 20233.













Table 1. U.S. Exports (f.a.s. Value Basis), General Imports (f.a.s. and c.i.f. Value Basis), and Merchandise

Trade Balance, Adjusted for Seasonal and Working-Day Variation, by Month: January 1977

to September 1978

(In millonias o dollars. See Explanation of Statistic- for information on coverage, dite of importation, definition, of ecaport and Import values and
trade balances, ana sources of error in the data)

F.a.s. Exports and i.a.E. Imports 1 f.a.s. Export- and c.i.t. Imports

Period
Exirports Iaports d E port i part I
b all ccn a a nI ri


1977

Ja nuary-September........................

January..................................
February................................
March....................................
April....................................
May......................................
June.....................................

July.....................................
August..................................
September................................
October..................................
November .................................
Decemte r .................................

1978

January-Septen er r........................

January..................................
February.................................
March....................................
April t....................................
May......................................
June .....................................

July .....................................
August .................................
September................................
October..................................
November r.................................
December.................................


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IEsport data reDresent domestic and 'oreicti a.erchandtie excluding Depirt.eent o, Eerene k C,, iitilllirsr. tsiznr.c- Proc.ram Crane
Import data repre-ent general tiports of .imercnarel-e.
'Beesnaing -irh the Januar, 197a8 issue of rhtE report, esponr and n.-.port total.- I n troac balInc inLluae Jst. :n ahpsienrt oI
in the fnorm of ores, concentrates, waste, acrap, ato reiinea oullion. Sev "Nxplanitioni of .tviticri- for adaoitiinl ,roi-5ration.
rAdjusted for seasonal arnd norktg-oaa vararion u ing anajusntErent iacror a na-crio-a in io tnote I at bottn. of thi.z page.


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-4la nrpi n[n: .

naon.onte[ary cld


'Export and import !talesTical series are adjusted for seasonal and working day variation but riot for Lhanges in price level Factor; used to adjust 1977 and 1978 data represent the Lmomrinaiun of
seasonal adjustment factors derived from monthly data Through 1977 anrid e appropriate working dav factor. These actors were implementrd for Ihe aullu.imE-n t eeat ort dala 1ir. In relePase oI mhe
January 1978 statistics and loit he adjustment ot impoairt data with rh Aril 1978 isat. It in issues of Ir.. report or January Irnough Marrh 1978 the 1977 iT.por Idata were adjusted b, factor; derived
from monthlV data through 1976. Interim factors derived from monthly oala through 1977 were used tu adlu5t Januar, March 1978 importn dia
'Cumulations of data over at leasi month periods are deiiorble to identlif, underlying trends Monr.lh to mronir, changes in ewpoiri impurt ar.d similar ysr.e. ailen rEflect primarily, irregular mouv
ments, differences in monthly carryover eir Recent month to month ppricenl changes in the overall seasonaliv sijusred E xporl nd import ser,%. are preetriled I.N the iollownir table with average Dpercel
month to'monrth ise and decline over longer periods shown for comparison The average rise and average decline figures do north illeci data on nonmor npiarv gold The averages also ecludre percerniage
changes for ( ll the period October December 1977 because ol abnormalities in ihe data due to eHfels of dock sirikesand ( periods where. negligible chines (ier percenril in the level of expanrri'imoorts
occurred Percentage changes for I a s. and i 1I import values are not available for periods prior to January 1974


Month-to-month Average monthly rates of change


Average Average 4 ..-.nths 12 month'
Series Aug.-Sept. .July-Aug. June-July May-.June rise AecIne May 1 3 Sept. 197 7
,978 1978 1978 19-8 rise aecline May 1973- Sept. 1977-
1978 1978 1978 1978 1972-1977 19 2-1977 Sept. 1978 Sept. 1978
(Percent) (Percent Percertl IPercenit i
IPercente Peent Per nt i (Percent) t Percent ,



F.a.s. export value.. *.. +5.7 -2.7 +3.2 *3.6 -3.4 .3. .2.,
F.a.s. import value.. .7.3 -4.7 +7.7 -1.9 (NA (NA) -2.I .I .N
C.i.f. import value.. 7." -4.6 +7.8 -1.9 (N'r rN'i .2.-'. .1.


'See the "Explanallon of Statistics' for definitions of the export and import values and Irade balances












Table 2. U.S. Exports (f.a.s. Value Basis) of Merchandise Showing Department of Defense (DOD)
Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid Shipments, by Month: January 1977 to September 1978


(In millions of dollars. See Explanation of Statistica for information on cr-erage, derintLion of f.a.s. export value, and sources of error in
the data. Unadjusted totals represent sum of unfounded figures and hence may vary slightly from sum of rounded amounts)

Exports e-cluding DOD Exports Including DOD Grant-Ald1
Grant-Aid' DOD Grant-AidG


Period Domestic Domestic Domestic
and and Domestic. and Domestic, otal western Other
foreign, foreign, unadjusted fore Ign, unadjusted Furope countries

adjusonlly unadjus ed unadjusted


1977

January-December ..................... ) 121,150.- 118,943.7 121,212.3 119,005 5 61.9 3.1 58.7

January-'ept emoer ... ........ .. 91,)81.5 90,509.3 88,863.7 90,562.3 88,916.8 53.1 1.9 51.2

January.............................. 9,666.5 9,120 3 6,961.9 9,137.0 8,978.b 16.8 0.1 16.6
Februiry............................. 9,897.5 9,469.9 9,337.0 9,.7-.9 9,342 0 5.0 0.3 4.7
march....... ......................... 10,1u..2 11,050.5 10,85- 2 11,058.3 10,862.0 7.8 0.1 7.5
April..................... ........... 9,9.0.0 10,528.4 10,330 5 10,533.9 10,336.1 5.6 0.1 5.5
May.................................. 10,528 b 10.969 7 10,777 4 10,974.8 10,782.5 5.1 0.3 6.8
Jr.e.................................. 10,090 6 10.279 3 10,06..7 10,262.4 10,067 7 3 1 0.1 3.0

July.................... ............. 10,372.3 9.739.6 9,578.1 9,7-2.8 9,581.3 3.2 0.1 3.1
Augu t ............................... 9,6b3 2 8,984.1 6,a0o 2 8,987.1 8,809.1 2.9 0.- 2.6
September............................ 11,038.6 10,367.5 10,153.9 10,371.1 10,157.5 3 6 0 2 3.4
October.............................. 9,357 '. 9,55-.8 9,361 8 9,557.- 9,36-.. 2 6 0.2 2.4
November............................. 9,&77 9 9,690.2 9,520.- 9,692.t 9,522.8 2.5 0.3 2.2
Decemner............................. 10,999.0 11,396 1 11,19;.1 11,399 9 11,201.4 3 8 0 8 2.9

1978

January-Zeptehmber.. .. .... .... l...I.... s I.'j. j .r. Lt .. it .3 10u1 ..fO. 2-..- 38.3

January.............................. 10,01- 3 9,36- 9,21. I 9,3t6.9 9,216.n 2.5 0.5 2.1
February............................. ,9.9 2. 9,51-.6 9,337.8 9,518 5 9,341.7 3.9 1.3 2.7
Maren................................ 10,912 I 12,07- 2 11,830.5 12,079.4 11,835.8 5.2 0 5 4.8
April................................ ll,b3-.9 12,06- 2 11,85-.1 12,069 7 11,859.b 5.4 0 7 4.8
May ................................... 11,753 7 12,478 9 12,234.3 12,49..6 12,250 0 L5 7 1.0 1A.7
Juce................................. 12,125 ; I.,-77.3 12,261 1 12,4 87.3 12,271.7 10.1 e.5 3.5

July ................................. 11, )2' 5 10,93- 0 10,709 4 10,9--.? 10,780 0 10.6 7.. 3.2
August ............................... .,-. ] i .r. ).9 I .-2 .- I I .r. l .b 11 ,-29.1 t; 1 1 .4
Septe ab- r............................ t i ,- l ? ;",- .- 12, 1-.- I ?. )u I IZI 1.3
October ................... ........
November ................ .........
December..........................

NIeglnning -ith Januars 19T scaristics, to'tal- i rcluao data ar hjlp, ent of rnornmonetary gold. See Erpiamation of lttlEljcs" for additional
information.
2Represents only export shipments from the United States and differs from DOD Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid shipment I iguxres under tais
program as follows: (a) Transfers of the material procured outside the United States and transfers from DOD overseas stocks from export shipments.
(b) Export value is f.a.s., whereas DOD value, in most instances, is f.o.b., point of origin. (c) Data for shipments reported by the DOD for a
given month are included in Bureau of Census reports in the second month subsequent to the month reported by the DOD.
3Adjusted for seasonal and working-day variation. See footnote 1 on the bottom of page 5.
4Annual total is not shown for seasonally adjusted data. Unadjusted data should be used for annual totals.












Table 3. U.S. Imports of Merchandise, by Month: January 1977 to September 1978

(in millions of dollars. See Explanation of Statkstics for information on coverage, date of importation, definitions of F.a.5. and c.i.i. i.np.,rc
values, and source; of error in the aata. Unidjdi-ted total a represent su- o3 ur.rounded figure : sd rance mny uv- -lightly Irm ur. of round-a
amount s)


F.a.'. value' ...1. value1


GenPeriod eral import. General imports
Period imports smport =
for for
Seazonal)ly cuanur.pion, Sea Ion lly lind conumption
adjuusteat unadjuted ad justld d nadjust ioa


1977

January-Deceml e r ... ....... ..... ... .... t" J I 4-. 1, '. P a t'..') 3 ,T

January-September. ;l,, 31:. l (i,..-..- 114.35.' Ilt, r,5. II.'0o. lrt, 2 40'.1

January ............. ............. ...... 1r ..3 10 -) vlC 06 9 11 I99 6 11. 383 i II h -
February..... ...................... .... 1 .nl II 59) I I:I '. 0 ] 1 2 2. l '.. 1' 1.-. .'-
March .................................... 12.-. 2 13] I ? 1 "I 68 i ) 1 .8 3 9 1. uu- i 1 "
April . . .. .. .. .. 11 '* II 13-. 11 8 3 2 12 12 '2" .2 1 6ia
May. . ........... .. .. .. 1 9 5 1 1 1 O'. i 9. 0 It r1 2 II 60
June..................................... C. i J ''-a.- 1. u:,- ': I IJ 1- ).')2 1. 9"

July..................... .. ....... .2 -.2 9 '2 -30 1. J-- 9 13 h rj li ,. ( E' 1" 9'
August ................................... .. t i. v [I* 6) -') j 8? i 12 f, ui
SEptember................................ 12.9-1 t L2 -i 12 4I 1 1 il I 13 i 0 Ij I'.:
October.................................. I" 1 9 1?.-1' 1 e 1 -I 1 '36 I 1 3 I 'j 6
November.................................. 12 i-'. is 2 '. 1I 12 I i -11] I 1'3 I -
December.. . . .. .'.-'1 -



January-September .. I '.. ..o 2r.''r. j.r. v .1 I '. 194. 1 l.- .

January............................. ... ..i 130 2 "' I 'i- I 1 1 l i ii- ii I) I "
February................................. i -. -- li 'ot H) b .O i 3'l i I- 1) 3 1,. inu
March.................................... .1 .'. 9 ) 1- ;-' :.. 5 1 6 a6 I -)' 5. 1, -
April .................................... 1. -*c I I- -ot 3 1- "u Is -ji .2L i 0 Is '-j u
Maly...................................... .-13 1 1. ,1" 2 1- I c'9. : I I- c -- i
June..................................... ...I. 22 1- I-. 1- -3' I- '"'' I -t" 2 ii sod -

July.................................... .. 3 I. fl = ) '.u I 1.. -, I 1 I. 0.0 3

September................................ I .. i. -. -. i- .l i
Octu ber..................................
November.................................
December r.................................


Beginning -ith Januar) 1978 -;tit'tlc'-,
Information.


torai. trLiciude d. a -.ir shipments o ncora.cne.tar c d.


Sic E pl, nia t it an -.1 5tast c f r a.atitonal


'Adjusted for seasonal ana worlinrg-day varlirlon. Se, i'3.-trce I on ihI notima of page 5.
'Annual total is not .horn for w.eaconally adjureoa aata. I'naaju. En nata honuia ao uied for annual total..









8

Table 4. U.S. Exports (f.a.s. Value Basis) of Domestic Merchandise, Including Department of Defense

(DOD) Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid Shipments-Schedule E Sections, Seasonally

Adjusted and Unadjusted, by Month: January 1977 to September 1978

fin millions of dollars. See Explanation of Statistics for information on coverage, definition of f.a.s,. export value, and sources of error
In toe data. Unadjusted totals represent sum of unrounded figures and hence may vary slightly from sue of rounded amounts)

Schedule E sections'

Period
0 1 2' 3 5 6 7 8 9'


Seasonally adjusted'

1977

January-September............. 10,926.8 1,-.5.'9 9,879.5 3,177.1 980.. 8,259.8 8,318.6 32,-08.8 6,107.6 3,078.4

January....................... 1,085.3 L55.9 1.071.2 265.0 '1.5 876.3 907.5 4.093.0 b45.1 379.6
February...................... 1,179.1 I50.- 1,153.9 327.2 93.5 9..7.5 9-1.1 3,989.o 661.8 315.3
March ......................... 1,256.0 102.e 1,068.6 32L.9 1L_ .4 886.9 929.7 .. 129.8 665.2 320.1
April......................... 1,210.3 122 1 1.187.3 37...7 111.3 859.1 418.3 4,056.3 b38.2 242.3
May........................... 1,312.1 ti-.. 1.2- .2 393.8 lln. 7 878.1 926.4 .238.C 67..8 367.5
June.......................... 1,208.4 16' 6 l.i23.5 323.1 111.9 912.1 918.5 ..097. 1 092.0 301.1
July.......................... 1,231.6 188.- 1.115.b -.18.9 122.2 932.b 887.9 ..,106.7 b91.6 508.1
Aug.st ........................ 1,172.3 108.8 870.1 309.3 I?;.' 86-.9 8b3.o 4,065.5 674.9 378.9
September..................... 1,271.7 013.9 1.027.1 393.2 ilO.2 1. 102.3 1.025.6 4,632 2 758.0 265.5
October....................... 963.4 5'.7 I 1 23.3 3386. ln-.0 778.5 7.L.0 4.096.5 o60.8 529.2
November...................... 1,020.4 11..5 1 031.0 338.1 1.3.1 '88.4 832.0 .,050.-. 710.7 317.4
December...................... 1,250.6 221.o 1.083.2 307.9 101.8 989.9 982.0 .721.5 7169.5 400.7

1978

January-September............. 14,052.3 l .o l.cp II.l-,. L.'J 1.1- 1.' It.." ,',L-.l -2.715.8 ?,3-.6.3 3.t78.2

January....................... 1,153.5 127.9 1.0 1.2 230., 100.'. 873.0 887.b ..2.2.3 736.3 464.7
February...................... 1,342.7 188.) 1.010.8 i72.2 38.7 919.0 899.8 123.3 735.2 266.9
March......................... 1,384.0 220 0 1.166.1 183.6 i31.3 962.' 969.8 ....2.5 769.9 387.7
April......................... 1,535.8 137.2 1.286.9 261.9 i1..1 978.1 0 5.5 ...82.6 836.2 472.8
May ........................... 1,732.7 1.-.7 133 3 331.1 111.0 9t0.1 1.038.1 .6b99.8 850.1 300.8
June.......................... 1,796.4 166.7 1...00. 1 39,.o 133.7 1,.0t'.9 1.038.5 ..89..l1 808. 358.4
July........................... 1,649.5 19s.9 1, 185.8 331.9 113.5 1.080.. L.U05.9 4.963.3 809.5 352.3
August........................ 1,776.6 )1.n 1 Ji .. .- 18.2 1 '.... I .5 .1 2 i 01.4 3j3 .-
September..................... 1,681.1 1 '.I 1'l.. 1-..- 1 7l .o I,.21.. 1.1 .-.0 5,5.b 848. 74, 0.0
October.......................
November......................
December......................

[.si&O j Se-3


1977

January-December........ L... li I...o 1 3. 086 3 1 183.n 1 309.' 109.l1.3 10.85'.0 50,247.6 8,233.9 ..313.6

January-September.... .. ..... 10,637.2 135-.5 13:.5 3,19.2 982.1 8, 01.6 8.321.9 37,2.6.3 6,128.5 3,072.9

January.................. ..... 1.'0 ., 161.3 .l.O.. I 217 o 5 1 81 6 639., 3.761. 3590.3 376.9
February...................... 116.6 133. 1 210.-. .60.0 il.9 9 0.5 891.2 3.818.0 620.8 280.9
March......................... 1 .289.9 157.2 1 52.3 291.5 132.2 9.3.' 1.002.4 -.755.2 733.0 299.6
April......................... 1.223.6 iL 1:.0 1 332.2 397.6 10 ..8 900. 1 961 .0 -.3-8., 082.2 270.2
May........................... 1.2i-.6 1'8.8 1 35.- -.3 .- 125.2 922.9 172. .51 .7 698... 368.2
June.......................... I. 1 .1-6.0 1-2.. 1.8 398.1 i:". I '.6 '-9.0 261. ) 7-4.5 335.1
July....................... .. 1.i .1 15 .6 W7t 1 .- b L12. Q.5.7 oi .i 3. 798.7 683.6 515.7
August........................ 137.1 155.6 ;20 4 333.7 102.8 8 8.7 63oil.6 3.622.4 051.3 375.5
September..................... .i.2.'.b 01.8 822.7 .1.8 105.1 i L.06-.9 9 .O-.3 303.4 7- .4 250.9
October..................... s'.) ';.3 l.'3.0. 98.1 r .3 '.2 .2. -. 157.9 670.7 493.1
November................... ... 1.) 1-32.4 1.131. 36.1 12.5 736.0 8i.- -.0;..7 692.9 312.3
December.............. ...... 1 3-6 2 .:.'- 1.L1' .6 3 3i 3 Llb.0 1.03".. 977.1 '68.7 1.81 36.8

1978

January-September....... ..... i '.- 1.l .- ,:?:.. '-, .,"-. ) -..- '..7l.i. i,665.8

January............... .... L.13..13 13 Q' i.--. 1. 8.' 9r, 0 i30.2 329.. 1.8 2.0 665.6t .33.6
February.............. .. ..... L.271.5' 18 '0 L.l'3.- I-L.' 9? 2 83.2 -.8. 3.9.1.9 B84.6 237.5
March................. ...... 1..l 65.7 13.- 1L. 3'.5 lb5.2 L.L.i 1.031.1 1,06 5, 1..... 878.5 390.4
April.................. .... L. '2.- 1--.3 1 38 6 -'8-.) L5.- ''1.3 988.7 5,098.2 85-..6 511.L
May................... ...... L.t .. 1 3.6 1. -.o. 3 '3.- il19.3 1.018.; 1. 1OO.1 5.132.2 908.8 312.8
June.................. ... .. L ']'.1 l.L.i 353.9 -2-.1,' 132.1 j.Ot 3.- 1.U92.5 5.U75.2 857.2 395.0
July.................. .. .. L. .0.6 1oL '92 5 3 1 130.' 1,''.2 939.5 .-86.8 '77 .9 351.6
August ....................... 'l :ri J I. ) ... -'.1 lt ..-. .. 9 69 6:5.4 330.0,
September..................... l..-. I 'c I.III.' '.. I It ?. I.t32.'5 i,i:.l '.-1.3 u03.0
October..................... .
November..............
December .....................

tSchedule E section ceccriltl l -E ir.: ai oil-
0. Food and live- an'l.L .. Cher~..ls an3 r.llateu product. n. p.f.
1. Beverages anrd nacco 6. M:,nulf -ttured .ooa classiftied chietly b[ maternil
2. Crude materzlls. ire, 1l ,l c .cDr fis. 7. Michine.ry ara transport .usipmnent
3. Mineral fuel=. lunrnlcrit. arnn relateo -.ateral 8. l-aicellaneou: mtnuf-ctured articles. n.s.p.f.
4. Oils and fals--animal aorn3 .eer.n.-e C"cmcdtrife- an- crrnsacts ns ni't csIaisfle elsewhere
'Beginning with Jjnuars L 4' *tarliticn. t'-jal- include dttu un ihlpmene i e [ nf.nmonetar, cold. pe. the Exoisaratlon of Stal.itirs for additional
information.
3Adjusted for seasonal .an -,rting-na a.r,ti-op i.. i strn:te 1 or, th. ,ti jom rf pc,.re Anr,.ual -tal, ar rnot shonn for seas.'nally adjusted
data. Unadjusted data -hjula be u-el l or ann.uaL totally. rh- se.ttion to.a15 in tinb cable ar.d sin.ilar uterali monthlyy oral. .s tables I and 2 were
adjusted independently.











Table 5. U.S. General Imports (f.a.s. Value Basis) of Merchandise, Schedule A Sections, Seasonally

Adjusted and Unadjusted, by Month: January 1977 to September 1978

tin ntilian. 01 dollars. See LEplanf'tlor, ot 'atr IErIc or iLnnrr .a[in on coverage. date "1 Imp.rat ion, rnein r lonro f..a. import aiu6e. ann
aource- 0t error Ln Lne anta. Inadju-tea tIal' reDrelerc[ n- .of urrouanue-3 Iigure- and ,hene m3y ubar Lieh[t) fra- su-. of rour.aea ar.tunti)


Scned,,le A sect a .: '
Perloa
0 1 2' 3 6 8 9I


Sea- nlI s i-- tea


1977

January-v-enteber.... .. ,51. 1,312.6 s,?12.3 3.1:'8.: ..1.9 77-.3 5,"-3. .,-nSo ." i'l, ti. .0.,

January .. ............ .. I 61 l0tI 5 3 312 6 1 i.0 : I u2 u 1i 9
February ............. ... I lor, ": I 3 : 8 6 -- 6. I 1 i I I r.
March.......... .......... 1. 3 13" 3 -.3; t 3 i 'C e I 611 1 3 I ')-- -2a 9
April .... .... .n1 2 r 1 3. .'" I I "i n 4a 81 '3 '
May.......... .. .. ........ I 2'J 3 !1. n o 3 i nt -i 1 9 a 1 13 26 3
June........ .. .. .......... '-.6 ''. '- f 1 1 2 I -'- L n- 1 I Ij ." 1
July........... ............ .90' I '. 2 .. j i t, -. 3 8 1 60q- -. It I 1-. r
August ......... .. .......... ..9 3 l 9 -i I 1 1 L3 6., K! I e, 2.- "
Septer.ber ... ........... ''- c 3 l? `I -66 1 l c .1 .231 1 l31
Octooer......... ........... .. 1 12.- 8 o n .) 8 1' i 3 1 I 4 1
Nose iner...................... a.-. 6Z01 4o 0l I bn 3 O AF. L 0"' L
Decemnier........ ....... ..... 1' 3 3 lA 0 j 0' 3 5. s I 9

1978

Janu ry -.ept.,ouer.. 9, L ,j '" '. ,1 '. .r. ". -. .: -3 .' r t L. .L

January............... .......... l L 1c, : Jl 3 1 0 I 3:. 13 '
Febr ary...................... 1. 1 "': 1!:t 1 31 3 18 6 u l 1 6 A3- ,
Marcn......................... i.. 2 2 3 l: 3 1 I- .,- l' 2 I l69 I 3I0 .
April......................... la1 .c 3 3 I i il 3 1 l I :- .
May....................... II 1 1 Il .. .. .. : 3.In:.. L I U 3 3 i1 4
June................. .. ...... .. '3 l ^ 6" 8. \' "... a 3 616 1n' j -" 31' 3


OJulye .......................... 130 4 '.' 6 ". l 1 319 3

Du omber ........................ .. .. .....
Dec s.\ber.............. ....... .. .... ..... .





191

January-December.............. 1 ,..0 -r ..- .' 4 -' :1 je' 0 ) -Or 6 1 : ;W3.-

Januuarv- ,leo ei-ber... 09,5.8 lhi .d e, ;., :3. *'' A. -:0.9 ., 'l' 1 Il?.: 'r. I'.LO-- .U ,. 3!3.
JanuarV ................ ... 9" i2.'2 3 :.-9 ) i l A I 28 $ .A : '1.
reoruar. ................... I 09.' r 2 ,o i -'. 9 2 "'' 1 4f 6
March ................. ... -. I 1. e. 36 .34 4 ) '. L', 3
Apr l ......................... 3 I .3 -I1 t 6 > jl 3- .1 1 2 66 14 '""' 6 8
Ma ..................... 1- 1... rn t 92 -L 1 61 o" "
Jr ..... ..... l-A 0 9 L 4 "," -.9 3 i 'i .p -I 2 m' 11 O'I
J ly .. ... .... ... ...... .. i L 5 l,1 I-- I I 1 .01 : lJ "'
Augd t... .. ... ....... Il'. lo 3 t l r 1 0 1 : 1 -. .j1 2 .
Septenier. ... .. .. .. 3 -
Ocrober.. ... .... 1. 3- : 6 .3- 1 1 3 3 ):1 1 3-1 A .): 3
No-enber. .. jul '1: "3 I ll ,6 1 '0 1''6 1 1 ml 3 -l- 6
Decenuer ............. ... I -. I 1: 3 i r. l U" "



lalnusary-Septresu er ,:" ,- .- l ., 1. .)

Jan-iary .... .. .... r .3 13 I 6I 11 6
February ..................... i 6. 3 : 3
March......................... 1 :, 5 '1 I i,2
April . ... .... 3.3 13 1m -
Apr . ... .. 1 1 8 1 3 i '
Mane . ........ 1 1 f1 f ':'I
June ...... -.*i -* u'le 1 J31 2
ly. u :''' lLJ : e: 1 '1
Augua ........................ .- 3.. .
Se ip err- ve r . . ... j...
Sctooer .......................
N eoner. ....................
Decem er .... ................

'Scheaule A Eect 'cn de'cr p[lt-n air- Ia il:-'
0 f ,3od a na I 've arn 1\ ;. :r -, r1 'a.-.a re t e or J: r -; rI : p r
1. Beter agc. and tODacco t. M ut c[4clure,3 3-,.,u ':la 11-4a c"I l.' i b ab, a r'3al
2. Cruae T.ater l.is., iriedole. except [uel- MKich ,-,r r ana cranic a-rt .tuip- e,1
3. Mineral Tue luoricIr.r *na rela-e n,-',r'.i 6. O cellune.u .....clura rr 1 ? r
l- 1~ ara r ItE-- Ini.-u arena Eg.I a nDL '). I -C T i E S a tran aIct .-r,- ot 15 -' i it e -'-I'-'r
'Beginnang -itn January 19;6 ;ita:racs. total- IncIaoe ,data or hipterntr; rorauuon etar-y o ,:.. iee tre EXP I&r 3at ion of StatlIttic- lor idanitiodraL
Inr.orat Ion.
'Ad iuarea r sn i aral a rn -Kire.r-aa, a irit I-. Eireci -ra I. I' t 1 6.-. r-.a --a :-r -cd :. ran.. arn 1 .ar ;ee rt:.ce
l n baton ta pn-i 'ge s-.. l ti -al re r.Ior 3 ir..r :- i e,-,i-.ai ai -lj d t L'liv ru'.I- art Ar r-ul1 be -1e 1-r w err.,-., T.:.I; r -1 -.:r '.r
to-tlo s- tr-i, role unI ...era -rana r.r a'. I I5 i .i c-CLe I ann i -j.r: 3 r jju.rea ir-..,c4enet'i










10

Table 6. U.S. General Imports (c.i.f. Value Basis) of Merchandise, Schedule A Sections, Seasonally

Adjusted and Unadjusted, by Month: January 1977 to September 1978

Ir. millions of dollarE. See Explanation of Statletics for tr.formnatlon on coverage. date of Importaltion. definition or c.t.r. Import value, and
sources of error in the nata Unadjusted totals represent sum of unr.ounded figures and hence may vary slightly froa sun of rounded amounsal

Schedule A sect ions'
Per r.ad
0 I 2' 3 4 5 6 7 8 1


Seasonally adjustedt

1977

January-Septeaber............. 10,912.9 1,-32.1 6,705.5 35,685.2 --6.9 3.983.S 16,935.0 28,245.4 10,856.2 2.379.0

January....................... 0 .038.2 128.9 625.1 3.53).. 60.1 365.2 1.572.0 2,77-.i 1.105. 1 219.7
Fr bnar, ... .. .2.2.5 151 752.6 -,126. ..7.0 -. 1.7 1.8,2.2 3,259.- 1,236.2 261.9
Marchn l .b 2 0 ;'2 I -. ;ji.0 39.3 .28.1 1.720.6 2,937 3 1,123.6 230.6
April .. ... .. 1, n3k i.u.. 02 i 3. 5 b.8 39.. .38.8 1.906.2 2,981.9 1,162.7 236.6
S. .. ,938. 152.5 ; '.6 3,311.5 -3.8 -J7. 1,896. 2,989.5 1.216.2 266.9
JAme 1.118.3 1-'.3 603.9 -..,b: .5 75.2 600 1.981.e 3,383.b 1,293.9 376.8
"nJuly. 1 .00.. 19 6 8., .,120. ..3.6 .? 1,950.b 3,263.6 1,230.3 228.6
August 96 bb. 2O' 5 i.- ;30.3 3. I ..55.0 1.996.5 3,206 5 1,162.1 248.6
Septee.s r [91.6 212.1 7 ;9.0 ., 03 .3 -.... 91.8 2,067.9 3....3.3 1,324.1 309.3
October I. "'. I5.u 811.. 13. ..G 31.3 3;1.8 1.9i9.5 3.5-.3. 1.361.7 276.7
hoP em (r 103.Q 8n18.7 ; -..210.3 -2.1 323.. ],81 .6 3,290.9 1,133.8 364.6
Deier.t.er ........... I 38'.6 162.6 81 .3 j.2 9. ; ..2 575.2 2.26 .8 3, ::3. : 14.64.9 317.0

1978

January-September............. .r .-.O 1.0..6 ,j3 ., ",901.- -I'.- i,12i.2 2 1.',7i.03 3; .[1i.. 1 ,977.8 2.981.1

January....................... l. ",'-. 1'7..- 9.- .386..3 31.0 434.. I ,16-.3 3,725.8 I,-21.8 350.3
Febr ry 1.23-.6 200.2 -.5. ; 3.231.9 5-.4. 557.6 2, ;11 ., 19. 1,620.1 289.6
Marcn ... i,26l., 17.- 816.2 3.'"00 2 ";.9 58e .0 2.-3-. 1 3.923 1.633.6 385.6
April .. i ; .* 233!.8 ??0 2 3, ;.1 -6.8 588 Q .000.9 2.: .. 3 1,b662.0 355.1
Ma ...... .1 I 199.0 6s5.6 .,812.8 53.. 616 5 2.-_81.0 -.017.6 ],66..3 323.5
Ju ... .':l.0.' 1- 3 729 3, 70 0 2L.9 5 ,59.5 2.231.9 .,04.8.2 1,69'..5 320.0
,v .. I 22-..7 2. 61 ;.3 J.5-4.b 51.8 B0O.2 ..636.7 .. 1.5 1.4,.0.0 326.8
August.......... ... .... ...... ,l -. Id. t6. i 3 .t. 55l .b 2, -, I '.. L .o5 329.4
September..................... I 1 .'u'4. i .r. Sc".o .u.,9.9 2 .t. 10O.t 2.-l-. -.-32.4 1 661.8 308.8
October........... ..........
November.....................
December......................

'naa ]uE te

1977

January-December............. 1 -2..8 1.817 5 i 160.5 .',292.8 6-..l 5.2-5.j 22,997 2 18.630.3 1.,828.0 3,387.8

January-September ............. 10,196.7 1,311.9 b .750.' 36,18-.7 -5.-8 3,968.5 16,.99.1 28,051.1 10,778.1 2,351.3
January........................ 1.'Ji9.2 ill.2 86.8 3. '62..- bo0. 3 1'.0 1,3-O.n 2.605.9 1.016. 7 207.8
February...................... 1 169.2 133.0 6-2.1 ...099.8 .3.3 1 i=9. L,606.. 2.975.8 1.060.' 233.1
March ......................... Lb.- 16b7., i2. 2 1. Us...o 10.3 461.5 1.765.3 3,.213.4 L.10b.7 223.9
April....................... ...... 396. 133.2 '02.8 3. :'.' 38.8 .85.3 1,832.3 3.092 5 1,083.6 230.4
May........................... i,19 .2 157.5l 738 3 2.9e3.8 --.5 -35.1 1,917.6 3. 1 7.9 1.136.6 261.8
June.......................... -I 235.7 LI9.. 908. 7.,.82.5 ?-..5 5.2 2. LI..L .b6-7.5 1.3.7.0 397.9
July.......................... 1.. .9.8 123 '" "9. I ..15 I --.1 424..2 L.923.3 3. 192.0 1,35..6 234.8
August........................ i?2.- 17'.. 83..1 3,868.3 -3.i ..6.8 .,008.5 2,92.-.3 1,320.2 248.6
September..................... 9..1 u l9... 8'J.oe 3.93. 7., -.2 459.8 2,.'1.0 3.191.9 1.,51.9 313.0
October........................ 87. .r. 148.9 79o." 3 857.0 31.6 1'1.1 2.010.. 3.511.6 i,....8 285.8
November...................... 9b. 11L1.8 171.5 3.913.6 4l.t, 328.3 1.89I .7 3.399.5 1.201.8 418.2
December...................... 1 3"9 1:1 'I5.:i 8-2.0 3 335.5 -5.1 :27.q 2.292.0 3,868.0 1..03.4 332.5

1978
January-September............. I. ...a ii l .. -la.< w., L-.. i. ]l.i l3t.. )j.r. -,M8-.6 2.938.9

January....................... 11 -L.lI .2 1l 1.1 I 92.9 3 t,23.3 31.i --- 5 2. 31.8 3.595.. 1,316.7 333.5
February ...................... 1.18 .1 176.0 -'21.. 3 713.2 30.1 i00.8 2. 3 .'. 3. 793.1 1 388.9 258.0
March.......................... 1, 3-.0.3 1 .-- 623.. 3.626.' .9.3 t36.1 2.5u7.i ..30i.9 1,613.6 3714.4
April......................... i .2-.6 218.8 'tl.' 3 .22.7 -3 5 6.1.9 2.0 .1.2 -.338.3 I. .5.8 340.5
May........................... 1 32.5 202.2 90n.2 3 .27.' s5...7 61 .9 2., 20.7 4.262 7 1,566.1 320.9
June........................... .. 12t..l 232. 82'.9 3 681.1 -9.' )80.2 2.-i7.2 .38,.2 1.770.8 340.2
July.................... ..... L.213.7 195.3 8,0U.o 3 ".81.5 52.3 578.0 2.59..5 ..3- 3.8 1.9L5.7 332.6
August......................... ...... 1 I r,... -l.1 2.3a.l.b .'9-.. 1, 6 4.8 329.0
September..................... I l .u iS .1r 54- 9 3.'li .2 j 'r.'-.- ', l].- -. '].O 1.880.- 309.7
October.......................
November.....................
December.....................

S.:r, 'dululc *.**: l .[ -, de;r ,' -.r.= arC as I li .-.
0. Food and live animals '. Che-icals ana relateor pro ncu.' n .p i
1. Beverages and tobacco n u,..u..'fl.urd coods cl-isliea cniefly tl .'.aleral
2. Crude materials, ineciole e-cept 1.11 MaNliner. and itr nsp.irt uipilent
3. Mineral fuels, lubric.-.t ar.a relavea m.natLral 8 Miscelar.ceou. manulfatirea articles n.=.p f.
4. Oils and fats--animal ir-as .ea.: ca 9. Co.'.moas le a.na transactions n-,t clas.aflit elsewhere
"Beginning with January 19768 tatlsilc,. total' include data on shipment: of nonamnetary gold. See the Expiaratlon of Statistics for additional
Information.
3Adjusted for seasonal ana -.,rking-Jay varrl, ,:.- EffectllIt- tsh May 1978 1 iue re ised factors ued to adjust 1977 and 1978 data. See footnote
1 on bottom of page 5. Annual tI.tasd are n.t n r....r, m.r -easo.naIly ajulTe, aLEn. U-iaoalu-:t data snsull b.e used tor ar.r ual cotaln. The adjusteea
section totals in this table ar.i l-.rl.iar 'erall =.Ianhil, tE.-B iS, [anolec 1 ann 3 iere anld1tCEa Indeeendently.










GENERAL IMPORTS OF PETROLEUM AND SELECTED PETROLEUM PRODUCTS INTO
THE U.S. CUSTOMS AREA AND U.S. VIRGIN ISLANDS, UNADJUSTED

Monthly and cumulative-l date data on general imports of petroleum and selected petroleum products into the U.S. Customs area
and into the U.S. Virgin Islands for the period January 1977 throughh the current month are presented in the tables that follow. Tables
1-A and 1 B present imports into the U S Customs area and tables 2 A and 2-B present imports into the U.S. Virgin Islands. (It should
be noted that imports into the Virgin Islands are excluded from the regularly compiled foreign trade statistics and, therefore, are ex-
cluded from the data presented in tables I A and 1-B as well as the other tables shown in the front of this report.-See "Explanation of
Statistics".

Effective with January 1978 statistics, certain changes were made in the commodity classifications (Schedule A and TSUSA) covering
petroleum products These changes are reflected in the listing of classifications shown below. Data presented in tables 1-B and 2-B which
follow have been revised to reflect all changes in classifications, effective January 1978.


Schedule A and TSUSA Commodity Numbers Used in Compiling the Petroleum
Information Presented in This Report


Energy products


Nonenergy products


Schedule A No.

Crude petroleum and deriv-
atives to be refined
333.0020
333.0040
334.30-I pt.


Crude petroleum
333.0020
333.0040

Gasoline
334.1500

Jet fuel
334.1205

Kerosene
334.2000


Distillate fuel oil
334.3021

334.3041 pt.

Residual fuel oil
334.4050
334.4060

Propane and butane gas
341.0025

Liquid derivatives of
petroleum, n.e.s.
334.5430 pt.


TSUSA No.



475.0510
4735.1010
475.6510


-75.0510
-'5.1010


475.2520. 475.2560


{475.2530
S75.2550

475.3000


4'5.0525
475.05-5
475.1015
475.1025

475.0535
u75.1035


Schedule A No.

Lubricating oils
334.5410 pt.

Lubricating greases
334.5410 pt.

Paraffin and other mineral
waxes
335.1225 pt.
335.1245


Asphalt
335.4500

Naphthas
334.5420


All other petroleum products
(pitch of tar coke, non-
liquid hydrocarbon mix-
tures, and calcined petro-
leum and coal coke not for
fuel)
335.3000 pt.
334.5430 pt.
598.5020 pt.


TSUSA No.


475.4500



475.5500, 475.6000


494.2200
494.2400



521.1100



475.3500


401.6200
475.7000
517.5120
517.5140


475.1525. 475.1535,
475.1515


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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


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