United States foreign trade

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
United States foreign trade
Alternate title:
United States foreign trade. FT900, Summary of United States export and import merchandise trade
Portion of title:
Summary of U.S. export and import merchandise trade
Abbreviated Title:
U.S. foreign trade, FT900, Summ. U.S. export import merch. trade
Physical Description:
13 v. : ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of the Census
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census :
For sale by the Subscriber Services Section (Publications), Bureau of the Census
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Creation Date:
August 1978
Publication Date:
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Imports -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Exports -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Commerce -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
statistics   ( marcgt )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Issued also to depository libraries in microfiche.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Dec. 1976-
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Ceased in 1988.
General Note:
"FT 900."
General Note:
Description based on: Jan. 1979; title from caption.
General Note:
Beginning with July 1980 for sale by the Supt. of Docs., U.S.G.P.O.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Mar. 1988.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001320869
notis - AGH1745
oclc - 07222812
lccn - 81646118
issn - 0730-3270
sobekcm - AA00005268_00001
Classification:
ddc - 382/.0973/00212
System ID:
AA00005268:00021

Related Items

Preceded by:
Summary of U.S. export and import merchandise trade
Succeeded by:
U.S. merchandise trade. Seasonally adjusted imports and exports

Full Text

3, 160 :00- Ti -


UNITED STATES FOREIGN TRADE



Summary of U.S. Export and

uv. oF Import Merchandise Trade








U.S. DEPOgTOoRY AUGUST 1978
FT 900-7818S For wire transmission 9:30 A.M., Wednesday, September 27, 1978



Seasonally Adjusted and Unadjusted Data

(Including unadjusted data on imports of petroleum and petroleum products)


F AS. EXPORTS AND F.A.S. IMPORTS


a.son.nliv AdliusPd
the Bureau s f U he fenru.. Deprn.r.tf oa Iurr.e hre -
nounced %,,day ithr during PugusL jIla, eaport: un a I .-
tare alongande hiapi U.S. po o ul eoportaticu. l.a -
baris, exaclidlitn. D[lepara ernt i i llno 11,n l n l .i[a,
A-&Inar,0 Fro1grram ,.n,-Aaj cihapr.7nti. amo1n...
912,t h .3 saI llor. and that ,uen ral imports on I..
tore ign poart of ieporl i.r i' lt 9. .7 av.r.[c3. a .

asted or. he aboae 0por00 ant arpora igurep o ,I ,.r3
,erchia.ndise trade balance u1 s in 8fi7elt tb Sl.b.',j.
illtior., a, CoiqpaIed to 1the 0i71. I cl SI i otI .1. t 1
recorded In 1.1,. 1

Durr.g the f r1 .8-.iornthi 1 1 I 8 ianuart-ui; pr
or. a eiasonallt aliusted baaL: iere at an ir.anual rit i
I1 J.,9]7? m llion, a le ibtHlt 12 ptr;enl r.pler ir,.,, Ih.
.:latnddar year 1 "11 rE. al of t5 t1tI 5'i Illt or. Import
lor tlse Jarnu.ary-AuupEt 19'S perilu- nri E 33 antal r7t
at l16 ..0 .l m iion in Irc1rp e 1 ,1 about |J per. ..t 1 1 i r
tnl 1lderiar 93.r t1 hlual r 9iL '.rd 1,7,i7i .

For the i-,nir period. M1.-r....-* 1 0, *:rE a.r7-
Sll,o.J5.a m ll. 0 ,er 1( a.n t,, *r..u[ n p-rcen i ri'r.,r E r..
07e t10.b20.0 ir, llian ter. reporti~Ed for 0t.e pre. -.1-
.-.nor,[l period Jinuary-Apr.i 7 141. Import .
jalue basio seorn CLd t1-tl ..1 pr i 1 n pdr nn.or.[. Acr rc i c
current .-mloort. per Iod. a lkah Itbo0au J p. rcn.-L 1.ihF r
hratr. rte $13.7-1..1 t m lti averAg. rep:.rt l .r Ert. vr1 -
iaLng .-lrTnch pea-td. I 1



Expori, eIrctleding Mfliarn fsiaar.te PIp tr r. r tr'.i-nil
s1.ipments, Ir.Creasel IroT, Slt .037..., lt 70or. r7 Jtr, r
l lst l).2 iall tl r. In Aug Lst. Mlr, H ib rar, l:i:a.n.;
fro ran ,m.rrant- d hIlpierE in;ludeJ. rhp rt tnr r r:. i
truam l1,0 -s.. mil Lt on lr, Julo 70 II /l nil.:n ir.
4ugU E. General i.m.ports d.c reatac l70.1 St..A l ,7 1
in July to Sl ,'02.-.0 m-ll I a Au.ut.

Nmot Footnoces I 1, an .i are 'it.7 ,t th L I t,:7 : I
pap : .


FAS EXPORTS AND C I F IMPORTS


eusonally Adiulld
iTr .. Bre I [Ir, ': r .L .. N ,r ,-.. r ar .- r : I .r. .r I .-.nu. .1
-.d., that 7 r7.I A3.1 I A I 1 p r t I 'It
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P1 ..u1l.l 7.-l lJ7 11p amra .t- I t .S '. L'iu Iinr I
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.,, th i :t :r -r a l ,..p. r ,', a 1 1 'r i .r.,"r J
r i. Itt I.' .'. p:ra f t ...rr, Ilu.: ra ti =,r.. .r r.


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Pet r..7 L L,.. ,I ..

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Cr, =i 3.-. .,l t Ju:. 1 = 7r. l r., l r ..
tIl j .u" y ll n a lr. 71 a C .,[ 1 : r.t -. r L rh.1r rt,
:.77 1..r ,.. ,- l .', [7 l : t .I.? l. ,, I l 7 l ,,r, l. .rr
1. 59 l ..r .r i-AuI t al l r 1 ar r r. 0r.ra I ra1'
GO l '1 d. r 3llon. r. I. I .I I ,, a ..r I :r .- .


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r i 1 1 s-- 7 .-.r.r 1i 7 7 1 i 07.

1 Jl.llia -. ,'.71 t lo].f

Unadioulnd


ia .oI6 Io.I., I. r. .11i 1....1 i 7nt. l., ., 73

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19IB lrsitiC a s s I IRe Ii aulm. r.nt, d.m on I60 ,i r. 1. A hl IBi B 97 HE.r.C l. 1. lH ir., i rii 0ol Isgu. J rF.ut.r Ma,.r I ia.n A.D, 1 .rII ril ., ar. *d, ,,a h a -Ma 1ld .. .0
* r7 dlofa PaouQh 19P6 Insirs m r or, *lral Pa0m mor.alt dair lr7.,gh 19lF ai. ueo r0o lai Jr, Iar. Mancr. 131 .,1,1 1~
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Il0 II t0e er.o Octane Dicenlail I 191,' ecau on olronrrr. l.T,.1 a. aI dmam oa .i tl. I a[ fi 6.r.O l a l y n ii .1-71 o l ,r g ir...., |1/ lp 31d .r..i .. n .., frtn l .i. n rl .,s-l
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Mont cl-rn -nI.nl 4EAer..ge M:n.r.I I rate it Lhange


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F...a. LparN oalae -.: *f -I N -- 4 : 11
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03I, 'insDlgnl.ofl OP rangr.e.l I. ESP.al,nnlo n, o* g .n7 ar ..7.aOrr es.0 5 ra.e .ar 3.


0 O U.S. Department

S\ of Commerce

\ i BUREAU OF
%r/ THE CENSUS


Inquiries concerning these figures should be addressed to the Chief, Foreign Trade Division, Bureau of
the Census, Washington. D.C. 20233. Tel: Area Code 301, 763-5140; 763-7754; and 763-7755.
For sale by the Subscriber Services Section (Publications), Bureau of the Census, Washigton, D.C.
20233, or any U.S. Department of Commerce district office. Postage stamps not acceptable; currency
submitted at sender's risk. Remittances from foreign countries must be by international money order
or by a draft on a U.S. bank. Price 30 cents per copy. Annual subscription (FT 900, 975, 985, and 988
combined) $14.90.








EXPLANATION OF STATISTICS


IMPORT STATISTICS

Coverage

The U.S. import statistics reflect both government and
nongovernment imports of merchandise from foreign countries
into the U.S. Customs territory, which includes the 50 States,
the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. The U.S. import
statistics exclude imports into the Virgin Islands, Guam,
American Samoa, and other U.S. possessions; and shipments
between the United States and Puerto Rico, between the United
States and U.S. possessions, and between any of these outlying
areas. (Data on U.S. trade with Puerto Rico and the Virgin
Islands of the United States are published separately in Report
FT 800. Additional data on such trade and on imports into the
Virgin Islands from foreign countries are presented in reference
tabulations.) Data on imports of petroleum and selected
petroleum products, including shipments into the Virgin Islands
from foreign countries, are included in this report effective with
the January 1976 statistics (previously shown in former Report
FT 900-Supplement).
The U.S. import statistics also exclude American goods re-
turned to the United States by its Armed Forcesintransit ship-
ments through the United States when documented as such
with Customs; temporary shipments; transactions not con-
sidered to be of statistical significance, such as shipments of
personal and household effects; low-valued nondutiable im-
ports by mail; and issued monetary coins of all component
metals.

Inclusion of Gold in the Statistics

Effective with the statistics for JanuarN 1978, imports of
nonmonetary gold (in such forms as ore. scrap and base bullion,
nonmonetary refined bullion, etc.) which were previously
excluded, are now included in the statistics. Imports of silver in
these forms have been included since January 1969. Additional
information regarding the inclusion of gold in the 1978 statistics
appears in the November and December 1977 issues of Report
FT 990.

General Imports/Imports For Consumption

The statistics on U.S. imports are presented in terms of both
"General Imports" and "Imports for Consumption." General
imports are a combination of entries for immediate con-
sumption and entries into Customs bonded warehouses, and
thus generally reflect total arrivals of merchandise. Imports for
consumption are a combination of entries for immediate
consumption and withdrawals from warehouses for con-
sumption, and thus generally reflect the total of the com-
modities entered into U.S. consumption channels
Source Of Import Information

The official U.S. import statistics are compiled by the Bureau
of the Census from copies of the import entry and warehouse
withdrawal forms which importers are required by law to file
with Customs officials. The information as to country of origin.
net quantity, value, and commodity classification is verified by
Customs officials on entries filed for transactions valued over
$250. which are ordinarily subject to examination for Customs


appraisement purposes. The statistical copy of the entry is
corrected if it does not accurately reflect the information
called for by the statistical requirements.

Import Valuation

F.a.s. Import Value. -The f.a.s. (free alongside ship) value
represents the transaction value of imports at the foreign port of
exportation. It is based on the purchase price, i.e., the actual
transaction value and generally includes all charges incurred in
placing the merchandise alongside the carrier at the port of
exportation in the country of exportation.

C.i.f. Import Value.-The c.i.f. (cost. insurance, and freight)
value represents the value of imports at the first port of entry in
the United States. It is based on the purchase price and includes
all freight, insurance, and other charges (excluding U.S. import
duties) incurred in bringing the merchandise from the country
of exportation and generally placing it alongside the carrier at
the first port of entry in the United States. If the merchandise
was acquired in a transaction between related parties, the
purchase price used in deriving the c.i.f. value is based on an
arm's-length equivalent transaction price. i.e., a price which
would exist between unrelated buyers and sellers.

Import Commodity Information

Import data are initially reported in terms of the commodity
classifications in the Tariff Schedules of the United States An-
notated (TSUSA), which is an official publication of the U.S.
International Trade Commission, embracing the legal text of..
the Tariff Schedules of the United States together with statis-
tical annotations. The TSUSA data are rearranged and presented
in this report in terms of totals for the I-digit commodity
sections in Schedule A. Statistical Classification of Commodities
Imported Into the United States, which is based upon the
Standard International Trade Classification (SITC), Revision 2,
effective with the statistics for January 1978. Prior to January
1978, Schedule A was based upon the former SITC, Revised.

Date of Importation and Import Monthly Carryover

It is the objective of the compiling procedures to include.
shipments, insofar as practicable, in the statistics for the actual,
month of importation (or the month of withdrawal in the case
of warehouse withdrawals for consumption). Effective with the
January 1978 statistics, the date of importation as reported on
the import entries is being used to determine the statistical
month in which the shipments are included. However, since
under the Customs "immediate-delivery" procedures importers
may file the import entry up to 10 workdays after the date of
release of the merchandise, some documents for merchandise
imported during the last few days of a given month may not
be received in time for inclusion in the statistics for that month.
As a result, there is a carryover, estimated at about 15 percent,
from the actual month of importation to a subsequent month.
In addition, processing problems (e.g., late filing of documents,
rejection of a shipment by the computer because the data fail
to meet certain edit criteria established to protect the accuracy
of the statistics, etc.) contribute to an additional carryover of
about 5 percent (in terms of value) of shipments from the re-








ported month of importation (or withdrawal from warehouse)
to a subsequent month, usually the succeeding month. These
limitations should be borne in mind when making month-to-
month comparisons.
For 1977 and previous years, the date of Customs official
acceptance of the import documents was used to determine the
statistical month in which the shipments were included. How-
ever, in certain annual publications for 1977 and in 1978 re-
ports which also present 1977 data (e.g., FT 900. FT 990, etc.),
the 1977 data are recompiled on a date of importation basis.

Cumulations of data over at least 4-month periods are desir-
able to identify underlying trends. Month-to-month changes in
imports, exports, and similar series often reflect primarily
irregular movements, e.g., exogenous events such as strikes,
differences in monthly carryover, etc.

Estimated Data for Imports Valued Under $251

The overall import and Schedule A Section 9 totals include
sample estimates for shipments valued under $251. Therefore,
they are subject to sampling error, estimated at less than
one-tenth of one percent for the unadjusted overall total and
about one percent for the unadjusted Schedule A Section 9
total. This means that we can have about 67 percent confidence
that the published unadjusted overall totals and the unadjusted
Schedule A Section 9 totals differ by less than one-tenth of a
percent and one percent, respectively, from the totals that
would have resulted from a complete tabulation. The statistics
on imports of petroleum and petroleum products included in
this report reflect fully compiled data and, therefore, are not
subject to sampling error.

EXPORT STATISTICS
Coverage
The export statistics reflect, in general, both government and
nongovernment exports of domestic and foreign merchandise
from the U.S. Customs territory (includes the 50 States, the
District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico) to foreign countries.
whether the exportation involves a commercial transaction or
not. The statistics, therefore, include Department of Defense
Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid shipments, shipments for
economic assistance under the Foreign Assistance Act and
shipments of agricultural commodities under P.L. 480 (The
Agricultural Trade Development and Assistance Act of 1954, as
amended) and related laws. The following are excluded from the
statistics: Shipments to U.S. Armed Forces and diplomatic
missions abroad for their own use; shipments between the
United States and Puerto Rico, between the United States and
its possessions (including the Virgin Islands). and between these
outlying areas; exports from U.S. possessions; intransit ship-
ments through the United States; transactions not considered to
be of statistical importance, such as personal and household
effects; temporary exports; low-valued or non-commercial
exports by mail; and issued monetary coins of all component
metals.

Inclusion of Gold in the Statistics.

As indicated above for imports, effective with the statistics
for January 1978, exports of nonmonetary gold (in such forms
as ore, scrap and base bullion, nonmonetary refined bullion.
etc.) which were previously excluded, are included in the


statistics. Exports of silver in these forms have been included
since January 1969. Additional information regarding the
inclusion of gold in the 1978 statistics appears in the November
and December 1977 issues of Report FT 990.

Definition of Exports of Domestic and Foreign Merchandise

Exports of domestic merchandise include commodities which
are grown, produced, or manufactured in the UnitedStates, and
commodities of foreign origin which have been changed in the
United States from the form in which they were imported, or
which have been enhanced in value by further manufacture in
the United States. Exports of foreign merchandise consist of
commodities of foreign origin which have entered the United
States as imports and which, at the time of exportation, are in
substantially the same condition as when imported.

Source of Export Information

The official U.S. export statistics are compiled by the Bureau
of the Census primarily from copies of Shipper's Export
Declarations which are required to be filed with Customs
officials, except for Department of Defense Military Assistance
Program Grant-Aid shipments which are reported directly to the
Bureau of the Census by the Department of Defense and
shipments by qualified exporters who have been authorized to
submit data in the form of magnetic tape, punched cards, or
monthly Shipper's Summary Export Declarations directly to
the Bureau of the Census.

Export Valuation
F.a.s. Export Value. --The value reported in the export statistics
generally is equivalent to a f.a.s. (free alongside ship) value at
the U.S. port of export, based on the transaction price,
including inland freight, insurance and other charges incurred in
placing the merchandise alongside the carrier at the U.S. port of
exportation.

Export Commodity Information
Beginning January 1978, export commodity information
is collected in terms of the commodity classifications in the
1978 edition of Schedule B, Statistical Classification of Do-
mestic and Foreign Commodities Exported from the United
States, which is based on the framework of the classification
system in the Tariff Schedules of the United States (TSUS).
In this report, the Schedule B data are rearranged and presented
in terms of totals for the 1-digit commodity sectionsin Schedule
E, which is based upon the Standard International Trade Classi-
fication (SITC), Revision 2, effective with the statistics for
January 1978. Prior to January 1978, the export classifications
in Schedule B were based upon the organizational framework
of the former SITC, Revised.

Export Monthly Carryover
It is the objective of the compiling procedures to include
shipments. insofar as practicable, in the statistics for the actual
month of exportation. For purposes of the statistics, the month
of exportation is generally based on the date when the shipment
leaves the United States. (For vessel or air shipments it is the
date when the carrier departs or is cleared from the port of
export.) However, as indicated above for imports, because of









processing problems (e.g., late receipt of a document for an
end-of-month shipment, rejection of a shipment by the com-
puter because the data fail to meet certain edit criteria
established to protect the accuracy of the statistics, etc.), there
is an overall average carryover of about 2 to 3 percent (in terms
of value) of the shipments from the actual month of exporta-
tion to a subsequent month, usually the succeeding month
These limitations should be borne in mind when making
month-to-month comparisons.
Cumulations of data over at least 4-month periods are
desirable to identify underlying trends. Month-to-month
changes in imports, exports, and similar series often reflect
primarily irregular movements, differences in monthly
carryover, etc.

Estimated Data for Export Shipments

The overall export and Schedule B section and division totals
include sample estimates for shipments valued $251-$1,999 to
Canada and for shipments valued $251-$999 to countries other
than Canada. Data for shipments valued $250 and under to all
countries are also estimated, based on established percentages of
individual country totals, and included in the Schedule B
Section 9 totals regardless of the commodity exported. It is
estimated that the unadjusted overall total is subject to a
sampling error of less than one-tenth of one percent, and the
unadjusted Schedule B section or division totals are subject to
sampling errors of about one percent. In addition, the Schedule
B Section 9 total is subject to possible error in the estimated
data for shipments valued $250 and under, and the overall total,
and the individual totals for sections other than Section 9, to a
more limited extent. Such $250 and under shipments represent
about 1 percent of the total value of exports, and about 60
percent of the Schedule B Section 9 total.

SOURCES OF ERROR IN THE STATISTICS

Monthly import and export figures are subject to the
possibility of errors which may arise from sources other than
sampling errors, discussed above. Among these are errors in the
reporting and/or processing of information as to commodity
classification, value and other statistical factors, month of
inclusion (see paragraphs on import and export carryover,
above), and the undercounting of exports to Canada due to the
non-receipt of Shipper's Export Declarations. For 1976, the
undercounting amounted to about one and one-half billion
dollars. In the case of imports the information as to value and
commodity classification (as well as country of origin and net
quantity) is verified by Customs officials on entries filed for
transactions valued over $250 which are ordinarily subject to
examination for Customs appraisement purposes, thus con-
siderably reducing the possibility of error. In addition, the
procedures used to compile both the import and export sta-
tistics include clerical and computer processing checks designed


to protect the accuracy of the statistics to the fullest practicable
extent.

MERCHANDISE TRADE BALANCES

Two trade balances are presented in this report:
I ) The balance between exports based on f.a.s. values and.
imports based on f.a.s. values.
2) The balance between exports based on f.a.s. values and
imports based on c.i.f. values with adjustments for imports from
affiliated sellers abroad to reflect arms-length equivalent prices.
Both balances are useful for certain purposes. The first
balance corresponds to a measurement of the international
payments or credit flows resulting from merchandise trade
between the U.S. and foreign countries. The second balance is
based on concepts similar to those used by most foreign
countries, and therefore provides a reference for comparison
with the trade balances published by those countries.


REVISIONS TO THE STATISTICS

Under the revision policy adopted effective with the 1977
statistics, revisions to the monthly statistics for the current year
will be issued only once a year, i.e., with the reports for June
of the following year. Thus, revisions to 1977 statistics will be
issued only in June 1978. Under the policy previously in effect,
revisions were issued twice a year-the current year's June re-
ports contained revisions for the prior year while the December
reports usually contained revisions for the first three quarters
of the uulrent year.
In addition to the revisions which are made on d once a year
basis, instances ma\ occur where a significant error in the
statistics for d month of the current 5ear is discovered after the
statistics for that month are compiled If the error is of
sufficient importance to require correction prior to the time
that the regular revisions dre carried, the correction is made and
so noted in this report


SOURCES OF FURTHER INFORMATION

Additional foreign trade statisucs and information regarding
coverage, valuation, sampling, and qualifications which should
be considered by users of the statistics are contained primarily
in the following publications: Report FT 9Q0, Highlights of U.S.
Export and Import Trade; FT 135, U.S. General Imports,
Schedule A Commodity by Country; FT 410, U.S. Exports,
Schedule E Commodity by Country; and the Guide to Foreign
Trade Statistics Information regarding additional sources of
statistics, the methodology used in seasonally adjusting the data,
and other matters relating to foreign trade statistics may be
obtained from the Foreign Trade Division. Bureau of the
Census. Washington, D.C. 20233.






5


Table 1. U.S. Exports (f.a.s. Value Basis), General Imports (f.a.s. and c.i.f. Value Basis), and Merchandise
Trade Balance, Adjusted for Seasonal and Working-Day Variation, by Month: January 1977

to August 1978

(In millions of dollars. See Explanation of Statistics for information on coverage. atea o1 importation. definitioni of sport and import values and
trade balances, and sources of error In the data)

F.a.s. Exports and I.a... Imports F.a.s. Exports and c.i.f. Imports 1 2 3

Period
Traae-. Trade
Exports Imports bTale Exports Imports balance


1977

Januory-August........................... 60..,3..9 t o6. -l6,023.7 80,342.9 102,841.3 -22,498.4

January ................................... ,666.. 10,-- .. -"'7.4 9,666.5 11,169.8 -1,503.3
February ................................. ,5739 .5 l'. ,'15.2 9,897.5 13,462.2 -3,564.7
March .................................... 10,16-. i .-.2 -.', 60.0 10,164.2 13,238.9 -3,074.7
April .................................... 9, 0.0 L, '.' -1,a'7.7 9,940.0 12,577.3 -2,637.3
May ..................................... 10,52 9.6 1 1 i .' -0-0.9 10,528.6 11,925.0 -1,396.4
June ........................ ............. 10,090.6 1., 3.j... -J,2-3.7 10,090.6 14,232.5 -4,141.9

July..................................... 10,37 .3 :,-82.9 ,iO0.6 10,372.3 13,338.6 -2,966.3
August............................. ..... 9,68.2 .llO .- -:, 18.2 9,683.2 12,897.0 -3,213.8
September ................................ 11,0 8. 12,9-1.6 -1,903.0 11,038.6 13,813.1 -2,774.5
October .................................. 1 .9,357.- l.,,8t.9 -",;.'9.5 9,357.4 13,431.5 -4,074.1
November ................................. q." *. t ,-b. -. s 8.7 9,477.9 13,202.5 -3,724.6
December................................... 10,999..' li,.. .. ',-75.4 10,999.0 14,369.6 -3,370.6

1978

January-Augpust ........................... .:. I ..... -. 5.9 90,624.9 118,823.5 -28,198.6

January ................................ 10,01..3 i. ',80.4 2.366.6 10,014.3 13,157.0 -3,142.7
February ................................. 22... 1.,- 0.2 --.5L7.8 9,922.4 15,381.3 -5,458.9
March .................................... 1 9 .1 l,69 -2,'87.2 10,912.1 14,569.6 -3,657.5
April .................................... 1 ,6}-.9 14,..96.1 -2,61.2 11,634.9 15,435.8 -3.800.9
May ...................................... 11,751.7 13, 92 l.1 ,.238.4 11,753.7 14,894.2 -1,1-0.5
June .................. ................... 12,12. 5. I 3, '?. -1,597.0 12,125.7 14,607.4 -2,481.7

Ju y 11..................................... 1 792.5 ., '9.3 -2.986.8 11,792.5 15,748.2 -3,955.7
Augus....................................... :.- -....... 1..20.9 12,469.3 15,030.0 -2,560.7
September ............................... .
Oct ober..................................
November..................................
December.................................

'Ercport d.ta represent domestic ann foreign Fercnar.dlie escluaitn Department el Deier.-e (DOD) Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid shipments.
Import data repre.=ent general imports ol sr.erchandi-e.
'Beginning uith the jsnusry 19786 iiue of this report, expcorr ana airport toral anro rrade balances include data on shipments of nonmonetary gold
In the form of ores, concentrates, -a-zte, acrip, ana relirea bullion. See "Epl.anrtion of statistics" for additional information.
'Adjusted for seasonal ana sorkrng-dav variation uiing a .uat.7.ent factor: az QecriDec in footnote 1 at bottom of this page.








Table 2. U.S. Exports (f.a.s. Value Basis) of Merchandise Showing Department of Defense (DOD)

Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid Shipments, by Month: January 1977 to August 1978


fin million; of ollara. See Explana[ion ol Statistics for tinlrmaton or, coverage, definition of f.a.5. export value, and sources of error IDn
the data. Unaajusted totals represent sum aof unrounned figures and hence may vary slightly from sum of rounded amounts)


Exports excluding DOD Exports incuaig Grant-Ad
Grant-Aid DOD Grant-Aid' DOD Grant-Aid


Period Domestic est Dostic

and ana Ornmetlic, and Domestic. WeTotal stern Other
oreignly foreign, unaju ated foren. unadjulted Furope countries

adjusted' un3.lus ted anadjusted


1977

Jarnuary-Decerib# r................ ...

January-u-st : t...

January ..............................
Februs r .............................
March ................................
April ................................
May ..................................
June .................................

July .................................
Aucu t ...............................
Sep'emo- r ............................
October..............................
No% ct rbe r.............................
December r.............................

1N76

Jaxrua ry--ugu ..t .

January..............................
February. .............................
March................................
AprLi ................................
May ..................................
June .................................

July .................................
Auzu -= I...............................
SeptEmber ............................
October r ..............................
Noveanm r .............................
December .............................


'Deginntir,c itr JInurs 19"8 st ttal t :i-,
nf ,r .,a t icr.


R0,3-.2 9

'I, tfr, 5
9,8 ? I
10i, I.-..2
9,90.0 U
10, 528.o
10,090. 6

10,372.3
9,683.2
11,038.t,
9,357'.
9, .77 9
10,999.0





10,01.. 3
9,922.-
10,9i2. I
I,hb3u..9
11,'53.7
12,125 7

11,'12.5


121,150 -

80,1-1.7

9,120 3
9,g.69. 9
11,050. 5
10,S;3 s
10,969.7
10,279.3

9,739 6
8, 98.. I
10,367. 5
9,55. .8
9,690.2
11,396. 1





9,36. "
9,5l. .t,
12,07..2
12,06.. 2
12,.78 9


10,93- 0
I I r. .


118,943..

:8,709 9

8,961 9
9,33' 0
10,85-. 2
10,330.5
10,777..
10,06.. 7

9,576. I
8,606.2
10,153 9
9,361 8
9,520.-
11,197. 1






9,321-. 1
9,33' .8
11,830.5
Li,85 5. I
12,234 3
12,261 7

10,769.-
. I .. I.-


121,212 3

80,191.2

9,137.0
9,'.74.9
11,056.3
10,533 9
10,97- .6
10,282 -

9, '42.8
8,987.1
10,371. 1
9,557 -
9,692.6
11,399.9






9, 36.9
9,318 5
12,079..
12,069.7
12,.9... 6
12, 7.3

10,9.-.7 ;


rotals- itacllu.e data on -hipmenrt of nontonetajr) glol


119,005 5

78,759.3

8,978 "
9,3-2.0
10,8t,2.0
10, 36. 1
10,782.5
10,007 7

9,581.3
8,809.1
10,157.5
9,36..-
9,522.8
11,201.5





9,216.6
4,3-.1 7
11,835.8
11,859.6
12,250 0
12,271 .

10,780 0 I
[ I.., 1


See Explanation of Statistics" for additional


lheprCsents onal portot Ehipmsnr. Irom the unitedd -[aLe a.ri ditter; iron UOID IlLiTralr Assistance Progra CraJt-ia nti s aient figures urider this
pror..r am I'llo.* 1; Trani-r. 01oi the mac'.rkai proc-e ..re'atEliae the United -tates ana transfer: irm DOD overseas stocks Iron. export shipments
(b Fport salue is .-r,.re.- [D.:- ailue, in ,l-=t ,r. tn.ces, is f 0.0., point of origin (c) Cata lor shipments reported b5 the DOD for a
gite-n maontri re incluo.ae in Bureau o *'r,-us report. in Th. second month subsequent to the montrs reported by the DOD.
'A3, juared fo'r _e s_-i.', '.ra- ...rvih ng-da ti riL t lon. -e I'otn ote 1 on tr e bottom of page 5
"Armuual r.tij is riot sria-n i.:.r eea-sonall. ai.jutea a.ta l'nadjusted aara should be used for annual totals










Table 3. U.S. Imports of Merchandise, by Month: January 1977 to August 1978

(fin millions of dollars. See Lxplanation of Statistics for information on coverage, date of Inportation, dellfinition of f.a.s. and C.l.l. Import
values, and sources of error in the data. Unadjusted totals represent sum of unrounaed figure. end hence- may vary lightly from Ium 'if rounded
amount s)


F.a.s. valu i r.m.1 valdlU


Period General Imports Import General impor Ipr
,or for
Seasonally corumpti on, Se. onally crIn option,
adjusted' aer d juE ted ad lustea ad a j u td


1977

January-December......................... l ,. u l .. 5- ,l .'i.. i L .' T.'i I'' '' 6

Jenuarv-Aur.-st ... .96 6. 7.,i1. 'ib Ai" l1'. '-I1 J [''3 1bi r. I 5

Januai ry..................................... 1" -- I 1 0 't.3' I 1 1 i 1 11 3C t 4
February................................. 1 .. -6 II 11 ,.' '. L' -' I .-' I. 1. 4
March..................................... 12 -s'- 13 i- .' 1. r' 9 1' ? 1- l- I I 9' L 3
April .................................... 11 "' 11 93 -.6 11 B : I '. .- '2 0 o 7
May ...................................... 11 LP' LI 25 Li I 1 [. 1L 11 n, 9
June..................................... i1-..0-n l- .- -U" j: L- *9 I 9

July......... .. .......................... .. 12 -.: l 12 L- 5 9 1tJ :l I .] 2 c li 1i') 9
August........ ............... .. ....... I l L 1 0-.. 12 '- '.' I I' l 0
September................................ .1 9-1 a 12 .:.2 1 326 < I 1 1 :i ; l i If, 6
October.................................. 12 '6t' 9 12 -9' i 1I .1-n 3 I, I l i L B
November................................. 12 .06 0 '' ) 1 [ 'C0 13 .1 -' I 'l 1 1'' 4
December................................. 13 -2- I:' 3'_' (,' i. l' 1 .' I- 1-. '-li 2

1978

Januarv-Augus- .. j[I r.." .. 11 .11 ll.'.J1-.r l _. '' LiI *. 5

January.................................. 12 0 9 L '1 I- ''.'- I i' 19 L'' )I 1- I Ii )%" 7
February ................................. 1. --0 2 16 -b 3 L il' I- V' J31 3 1- 1,3. 1 180 2
March.................................... 1.3 .9 l.- i" i'- 'ri n l- 1, I I Li .' 4
ipril .................................... l. o l I- -ho 'J 1. -l' .' 15 -- 1' '- 0
May ...................................... 1 .'. I I- I) 1I- '"a i lI- 'a I- 1-- 8


June ..................................... "' i ''.' -''1 ,'' -. i 1 48 3

September................................
October..................................
November r.................................
December .................................

Beginning with January i1978 'tatictic., coral s include oata cr r.ip.r o' r.uniarn-rr', colai. 'eE tn E Cpl nation :.- it -ti -:- l Sr aja i t ora'
information. Sep aiLo rabli I, lfootnote 2.
1Adjute.d for seasonal and -.oring-lay Larlation. -..'- Io.inaot. I -.O tne curt.--e o1 pjag 3.
'Annual total ma rn.t -hoen Trr .ea-onallv adju-to da3ta. Ijnaai-.itro tat-a -niuli De uncd flO rarruam i-Etlai.










Table 4. U.S. Exports (f.a.s. Value Basis) of Domestic Merchandise, Including Department of Defense

(DOD) Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid Shipments-Schedule E Sections, Seasonally

Adjusted and Unadjusted, by Month: January 1977 to August 1978

Itn million= ol dollir-. See E planartion nf Sttltstic: for Inflrmattnon n .overage. deflinttor. of f.a.i. export value, and sources of error
In the dot,. i.Ifldlusted total' repre=.-nt ;um of unrounnod [icurp= and hence -nav vary slightly from ;um of rounded amounts)

Schedule E -'ewlon-i
Period -
0 I 1 J 678 '


Seasonally adjusted'

1977

January-August................ 9,655.1 1 *3 0 h '_ 83.. s6']. 7 I1'. 2 .'3.0 i2. '6 6 .3.9.6 2.812.9

January....................... 1,085.3 I' .- t.'- 235.4 71.5 .'" 3 89't .. h 5.1 379.6
February...................... 1,179.1 1-" [.' .9 3:7.2 93.3 9..;.,> 1. )3.989.6 66L.8 315.3
March......................... 1,256.0 1,2.e I u88.6 321.9 LL .. 6 4 1 929.' ...129 8 i6.I.2 320.1
April......................... 1,210.3 12 I I 18' ] 3.. 1 11.3 859 I sL .) 4.1)5b.3 6]8.2 2.2.3
May........................... l J1. 1 -1.'.2 1 2.2.2 391 8 Ii6. 8;18 I 92t. "-.238.o 6b7..8 367.5
June.......................... l 2)8.. 1l 7 6 1, 1I.5 l37 L 111.9 0L1 I 9L8 5 ,.091. 692.0 301.1
July .......................... 1,231.6 l88.- i 1 I18.. 122.-' 932.o .86'. &.106.7 o 97.6 508.1
August........................ 1,172.3 160 8 8"'.. L '.1' 3 12 .7 Bo-.9 663.6 'lOn .5 67 .9 318.9
September ..................... 1,271.7 l1).4 ..'2"-.1 31.2 1o0.2 1 I'J2. L 1 10.',.16 ..h32 2 7e8.0 265.5
October....................... 963.4 ..' I L 23., s38.6 30. + '8... '1.0 0'3 5 660.8 529.2
November...................... 1,020.4 l L.. l. 0 339. I 1'3.1 '8) 9 32.1. -.''5'' 'u. 2 317.4
December.......... ............ 1,250.6 ::1 h I h 83 '" ] 1i1.9 9 .9 1* F .'9 -.'21. '69. ..00.7

1978

January-August ................ 12,371.2 1i-. 1,1. s. I 1 ...* .1 i.,. a... i .' ,, ,. --..a :,- .2

January....................... 1,153.5 1? l 230i I 100.. 6'3..l 887.n ..2.2. 3 t36.3 4b..
February...................... 1,342.7 Ltl 1 I dlli.i.1 '1 2 2 i8B 919 ,' 5"b.' 123.3 '35.2 266.9
March................ ......... 1,384.0 ''i0 0 I t,8. 183.6 liil. '*62.' 909.6 --2 5 7s9.9 ]38b.
April......................... 1,535.8 W15 .2 B.,86. 2?'.1" I.- 1 9 a8.1 9 '82i t. 836.2 '2.8
May.......................... 1,732.7 I1..' I 334 3 331.1 1 11..' 60.1 1. 138. 1 ..169. 8a0. 1 300.8
June.......................... 1,796.4 l't, I .,1, I 3'16 f. 133.' 1,009 9 I ..38 6 s'..1 80rJ .7 358.1
July.......................... 1,649.5 lL..- 1. .18 .8 3I ,,r I L. 0 L ..90 .3 8l0 '5 352.3
August........................ 1,776.6 : I i n i I [ ,, ., 3 ,.
September ....................
October.......................
November......................
December......................

li-t- iu-- i -.1


1977

January-December.............. 14,115.7 I 9-n 8 13 ,)' J 18L I 306.' A. I .l l0.3 i I.,' iJ j 2.'.6 8.2]33.9 ..]11.6
January-August................ 9,389.6 I li 2 0 W"'9.8 2. 3' .- 8'.- '-:. 3 7 3l17.. 2...2-2.8 .38.. i 2.822.0

January....................... 1,078.8 tlb 3 l )5 .1 217 "5 I l' 139.5 3. ;61.5 5 .9n 3 3i6.9
February...................... 1,116.6 133). I 21i. ...0 |.) 4 0'). 8 1 ? 3.818.0 210.8 260.9
March ......................... 1,289.9 i '.. 1 2- 3 2L9 .5 132 2 -..]. I ... .. 753 2 I'3.1 299.6
April......................... 1,223.6 11;." I ] 2.L 9'.9 _,12.9 ".i' l ) -.' 0 3-..8.. t,2.2 270.2
May........................... 1,230.6 Ii 6 I J .- -i".. 1I ) 2 322.9 );2.; b 6 -..- 368.2
June.......................... 1,148.0 I.-' I 3'.48'. 120.. L c '.r 9 .9'. -: L. J _' .. 33 .1
July.......................... 1,165.1 1: '. 3 1 j'... 12I 9.- .7 861..2 3.798 683.6 ,15.,
August........................ 1,137.1 l .r 2' 33]. P0. 8'8.' 931.O 3.622 61l.3 315.5
September..................... 1,247.6 i 2 1.A 9.2. I,,L. .8 1,, ., ..9 1. .. 3)3 .. ,.. 2,0.9
October....................... 987.5 3 I r,, 3 ",' 0 1L 1' 2 '-2.. I)' 9 6.0. 93.
November...................... 1,142.9 t.2.. I i i2.. It L 1 '. .J 5 .. ... 2.4 312.3
December...................... 1,348.2 e2 r. i I" 1~.1 u.'' I L 1 L -'.?. 7i.6 '3a.8

1978

January-August................ 12,020.7 I ... 7, Ii.. -' .j .'r ..?

January....................... 1,132.7 lv ,i l.,.. .e. IRA 0 0'4 .. 1 oN-. 6...6 -3 .6
February....... .............. 1,271.5 i' I I r i. ,-, 1- ,i, 7 6a .. 3.4-1.. 3,69.'n 237.5
March......................... 1,465.7 .13.t 1.33 .. 165 L1-1 I i I I .I ...I 78.5 390...
April .............. .......... 1,472.8 1.. 1 L 96 t )-H L. .. I 88,. .,.6. 2 895. 6 511.1
May........................... 1,684.2 ll. I j .r j.) 19 1r L. i L", l. Lr i 2. 2 9,0 .8 312.8
June ................ .......... 1.737.1 1-1 I 7 ).9 ..2. i .1 L l.'n) ,. ,.')n' .2 85' 2 195.0
July.................. ......... 1,540.6 r .. 21 i 'J. I U' .;2 9 ,.8 7?'" .9 351.6
August .......... ............. 1,716.2 ,- .4 I thiJ
September.....................
October.......................
November ......................
December.....................

'Schedule F section descriptions are as foli -
0. Food and live animals I -,1,..1 .I-r. p. i i.
1. Beverages and tobacco ,,i[ i, t.,r- ,,., ,|,-'i,,= rl,fi, ri n,,. II ,,
2. Crude materials, inedible, except *... i- lllry o ,,,r,.-p.,.i ,.,,.i,., r...
3. Mineral fuels, lubricants, and relat. i ...r.- riI ^ *'7 -. i ',1ll' "'. ",.,. i ,l.rl f C ,r I, r,.. r I
4. Oils and fats--animal and vegetable 9. I '....,, I. "i ,,,, 1 ',. Ir i ,' i = .-he re
'Beginning with January 1978 statistics, to! L. I ...l. i,, .,1,r, .9.. -,*r..r,.n, ,- r..'.,.,, ,, ,, .1, ,e i, n' tr r ..i ,. i t .i l ti fur ,.,lti i.-nal
information.
3Adjusted for seasonal and working-day vari i .r n h' .e- r.. r .. h. ,,,, L .,r ri nor -r, ...r, I .r I.I.. .a ly a..ju.Ired
data. Unadjusted data should be used for annu.t .- Tr. -,-ri r r La r. rhI r -,,i, arn. r.. l ,r '. 1,- i ,., r.i r, f in rIbi- I 11, 2 e r,
adjusted independently.










Table 5. U.S. General Imports (f.a.s. Value Basis) of Merchandise, Schedule A Sections, Seasonally

Adjusted and Unadjusted, by Month: January 1977 to August 1978

(In milln Ins nr dni lar. See E rplansallon of StalI Il for Ir Frirat tiln on cteraLe nate .if Importatiin, definitlonny f.e.n. Import value and
source" or error In the data. Lradlusned totals represent sum of upronunded fleures and hen'e nmav vary slightly frnm s-UT. of rounded amounts)


Schedule A section,.I
Pertid
0 1 2' 3 6 7 8 92


Se.so.nally adjusteat


197.

JanP.ar.-Ai.e..-i i '' 0 1 7182 5 .4 'i 6 '66 1101 u l I', I i 800 ..'-. 8 283 1 : n5 8

January................ .. ... I .s9.2 1 1 5 1 i :.' .7 1 -]8 I : 9. 5 128 02 21 4
February ... .. ........ ..... .. 13 9 -0I 1 5 i 3 .. 7 I i J 0-1 1 52 8 56 4
March. ... ........ .. l 103 U 1 ii 6 .' 1i4 6 1l ..08 ls 1 i i I ,." : :
April ........ ... .. ....... i 283 'I 128 ? 6 I *i .I'" 'i '4 6 1 8 5 0)? )
May...... .................... I.;u 5 II. J [ -i' -I -t- 4 1 '6 ? '6 3, I 13J6 3 2 : 5
June ... .. ........... I L,6 4 I.. o. k'-h I '3 )B I n i. 1 I l 2u' 39 ]?j q
July.......... ............ Q4LI .. I ) .' '" i 3 5 -I a '.. i l A' .. '6? 6 1 .6 0 8.0. 6
Augus .... ... ................ 89.. 5 I I$) 4 4 521 i :1 3 |.24) 5 ) -.'2 9I ri i ..
September. ................... 92u .7 19.' 6 3 1 1 .2 -.1 9 V1o 3 1 ) 6Ji 23 | d 30.
'n''ber....................... ..7. I 1.. l i ) '1. 9- :- 1 .-9 8 a :1 9 i 1)1 1 Ar, 0 7?I 5
November ...................... bto. 4 '7 6 7.-9 3 1 9) 1 T. 1 O" cA i t UtJ8 I 05. 6 361 5
December ..................... 2 i ] 8 5) : IlI 3 -.1.1 5 i 9: 5 .i- 3;* I il 9



I n lFr i.-Augu' t l .r ..r r ,.a:. .y :- i .l It A 2 ;

January... ........... ...... ... l 7 ii-. ot- o 3 il S A .' i 2 -* 3 i I 12 t 1U ;.5 0
February.. ..... .... .. ... I 1A8 c 131. A > r 319 *I 50 6 I : 1-. 8 1 4i 0 I 2n9q t 98- ,
Maren ........... .. .......... I 20... 167 ? '*I B 122 1 .. i.-4 266 ; S 68 .B' 380 2
April .......... .. .. ...... I 1 6 23] '2? L 3'. 1 5 0 j61 I 2 I i )11 C I 6 6 6 3.1 1
May......... ......... 3 1 .0 t 1 7 832 4 5 0? 50 2 "a. .' 1 '8 .9 i 5>1 i 318 i
lajne............... ......... ..4 9 19' 's" .? ] i-' :. I' ,j 4 ,, '. ic. i n'l iI. 3
July .............. ........... I 1 1,-, 3 1Bh 7.. 3 3 35) 11 ,- 1 ,., :. e ; _1,, I n ,l 0 !i 1
Aulu t ........................ .. 3 ... -' .. ,1... i -" l 5 .-. il 1, .. '. .
September ..................
Oc or ............. .. .......
November ...................
Deember.....................





q19"

January-De.cen'.er.. ........... ..: ) 666. ; '.'i .9 I ,, Ir. U .1.i 6 i A '14 i i '

January. -A,uir : A TI I 5' 11 ] 1 r i ,6 i 3

January ........ .. ..... I 12'' i 1 4 3 i -2B 8 : 1 j3 )-5A 8 20.
Fsrcn.. .. .. .. ..... I rn, j. '. 8 .n 0 .19 9 I r.1 : 4 6 I 03n ? 1,
April.... .. .................. I.. .I. I-,1 r 3 5 S 3 b -o 3 I8 l I ? b9 I. .I Iu
May ............ 1 1. 6 '9 i 1 5 .4 3 .1
MAy. . . .- I .B ? -b ") ] ,1i, -* q'h" b
June.. ... ... .... 3 136 6 i- 2 i I 1.:', I '' --n .' 3 3014 : -.3 i 1 '2 (' '.:4
Jul) .. ....... .. .... ..... 3 111 2 '1. 3 3 13 18 3 4 5 I : I l 3 8 it,
A u-t... .. .... b .8 1 2 1 I a ] 15 3 -.2 I 6 t A 1, '"l 3 I I I 2 2-. 2
Septe.t.er..... .. .. .. ... n'S 3.2 4 -.. .. i '.j .. t i i is 'i4, i 1 ju u
October...... ..... .. .... bL. 9 1i a ) 1 'i i .4) I I v83 ) l i 3 1 '.1 1 ? ,J
N c.nbe r ........ ) r. t" 2 : '.,2 u i l I 'r ] 10 tI It8 9 1. 1 .
Dec.ler..r ............ ... I A'- f li i' -c 1 .-0 i i 6.1 I 1 j' -
1078

I rh.l rV-,-All- =t .. C,' r I .:t.1 l .'.1 .l I .- .. ..'',. I I .r .,.. -. I .l... .3,

January..... ................. I l r. 9 I % I 2 2 -" 3 ..I L : 4 3 34 2. l 1 325
February ......... ............ I Ill 2 I 6 -'' L A ) 2, 3

April .......... .............. I. .. 1, 1 :j[ I i -2 "il 1 : ) 1 .


July.. ... ......... 1... r ia" I .- .5- lb 3 .- I j I J 2 321 0

Sepleher....................
NIc tehi. r ..................
Nv-eroIe r...................
Deceiber...................

'Echedu le 4 sef.I ii.n de'crlptions are as follows:
0. Finr and I've animals 5. Chemicals and related products, n.s.p.f.
I. lieherae- and t ,bacco 6. Manufactured goods classified chiefly by material
2. Crune material,. inedible, except fuels 7. Machinery and transport equipment
J. Mineral lu'l| lubricants, and related material 8. Miscellaneous manufactured articles, n.s.pf.
". nil; aru Itl--animal and vegetable 9. Commodities and transactions not classified elsewhere
'Beginning ,ith January 147B statistics, totals include data on shipments of nonmonetary gold. See the Explanation of Statistics for additional
Infonritlon. See also table 1. footnote 2.
'Anlitierd (.r eaq-narl and working-day variation. Effective with May 1978 issue, revised factors used to adjust 1977 and 1978 data. See footnote
I .n t..i tn lI paee S' Annual totals are not shown for seasonally adjusted data. Unad.lusted data should be used for annual totals. The section
I-t-.I= in Ih1i; i -riF .ant similar overall monthly totals In tables 1 and 3 were adjusted independently.







10

Table 6. U.S. General Imports (c.i.f. Value Basis) of Merchandise, Schedule A Sections, Seasonally

Adjusted and Unadjusted, by Month: January 1977 to August 1978

fin nillllons of dollars. See Explanat or. of Stat itLcs tor Inform.a. t3r o0.1 coverage, date of Lnportat Ion. defitnition of c i.f Lmport value, and
sourcess of error in the oata. Lnadjusted totalE represent sum, of unrounded Iigures ana hence may vary allghtly from sum of rounded amounts

Schedule A sectiorns
Pe r ltoo
0 I 2 .- 5 6 7 B s


Seasonally sadjustea'

1977

January-August................ ,121.3 1 .220.0 4.2t7.. 31.s.l.I. .02.. 3..92.0 1..862.. 2-...W2. 1 4 532. 1 2,069.7

January .......... ............. 1 .058.2 1218.i 62; 1 3.53 .- 60.1 365.' 1.5'2.0 2,?7 .l 1. 105 1 219.7
February ...................... '-2. 1 1.9 ..8 .. .1 .". -..0 ? 1,6 )-2.2 1,259.- l. 261.9
March ........... ............. 1,169 162.0 J.I ..6 5.E. 3). .26.9 1,20u.6 :;.3 l. L2; 6 230.6
April ............ ............. ,j .6 .. -'.'.I- 3, -b.. 3 .. -36.6 l,906. ; 2, .- t.162.7 236.6
May .................. ......... .j. 98.6 1.. c .1 3.:ii.5 .A O3 ].6n 6 7 2, 9. i .21B 2 266.9
June .......................... ,1l8.,3 -7.3 B0J.3 -.6.18. 5 -.2 bO.O 1, l 6 3.:18 .B 1.293 3976.8
July.... ................ ...... 0.' u. 19. :. -.. 120. -3.6 ... ] .9 0.t, _.,tt 1 .6 .230 3 228.6
August........................ ".a. ..'4 .i?. ,. .- '. "j 3 I .L II r.,. ,20 1 i 2-h 6
September..................... *.I-- 22.1 "''.0 -.03.- .. -I91.8 .06;.9 2.--.l. 3 .1J .. 1 309.3
October....................... 131'.-- 1 .0 1I .. 13-.0 j1.i 3J 1.8 1.415 .5 ,5 5 1.361 7 2376.7
November...................... -2-.6 I,:,3.' ,:.,. ..:i0.1 -2.i 321.- l. l]5 3,2; 0 a .1.33 8 36..6
December ...... ............ .-... I6.?. 16.)3 1. : 9 ; 2 *-5.2 ',2s. 3,;?j ,14.6 317.0

1978

January-August..................-... r.- '.' 2n,A3i. .l. -.'.l... l1, .-.. 3 7 I7 lul6.'0 2.c76.3

January....................... I. 201 9 1i ? '2 :,38a.3 31.j -3-..1 2.16-.3 3. 25 8 1.121.8 350.3
February. ...................... i. .. 201:. L 0.3. "~3 .9 5 -.8 2, "il i ,9 i 1.620.7 289.6
March......................... ,.2 1.- 1l2.- i., 2 .i,00: .9 :9 PI 0 2.)- I J,V23 1,633.0 385 6
April......................... .23 i '.33.B *.2 L -. 588.9 8. .9 ? .0,0.- 1.b82'.0 355.1
May........................... .211.1 I i.' 53.0 3,h1- 8 53.- 616 5 2.- l 0 -,01 L I,66 3 bt 323.5
June.......................... i. .'lu 9 :] '.9.. 0;.0 -.1 j4.7 2.253 .' -.0.8 2 1, 4 .S 320 0
July.......................... 0 .' 0:.- 81 .3 .5- 9.r J5l.8 20..2 2.t63 -'. 1 ,. .1-0.0 32-.8
August........................ t ..1 -.1 :'l .i --.L 51 .'. ?. 1 .' i ) .t ?". [l 29..
September...................
October.......................
November...................
December ....................

I.I1 a : d f qa

1977

January-December.............. il..-2- A l. L 16r f -7.2 2. ,B..Il ,2 ".5. 22, 4 .2 38.83).3 1..828.0 3.387.8

January-August................ 9 1, l2.5 9-.1.o 32. .".7 -r .. 3.50i.' 1-. '38.1 2-.859.3 9..2.2.2 2.018.3
January....................... I '39 2 131.2 58 .8 3. 7?2. 60 6 3'1.0 1, ..-0.6 2.665 1..1Lb.7 207.8
February...................... lt' 2 133.0 6.2. l ..099 8 -3.3 -"9. L. 616.. 2. 5.8 lIi.6.u. 76 233.1
March.................... ... I 1..- I,7 5 28 2 5.08..- 0.3 -61.j 1. 6,.3 3 213. 1. 106.' 223.9
April.............. ... .... 31 133.2 "02. j. .'2'. 7 38.8 -.8 ,.3 1, 32.3 3 042 5 10 3.6 230..
May .......................... t... .1;. 15?7. 7 .3 2.4r.3.8 .. .-.3 1 1 ? 6 3 1.7.9 I 136., 2 1.8
June......................... 1.35. l4.. 908.- -, c82.8 7-.. -.5.2 2. 10-. 1 3.6.7.5 1, 3.7.0 397.9
July................. .......... -''.1 I .I "'4.1 -., 157 I ..2 .2 1 923.3 3. 19 .0 1.35S .6 23..8
August................. ..... 92.. l'.r 81-..L 3.8 J ii ..-.a 2 10 J.5 2 92..3 1 320.2 2.8.6
September..................... *. -1.0 Ii4., 908.6 3.4 7., ...2 ..9.8 2,uul.0 3.191.9 1.351.9 313.0
October....................... ;o'-.7t 1-8.. 0.6 3 85 7.0 3l.b 371. 1 ,0Lt0.- 3 511.6 .-- .8 2385.8
November...................... 6..6 ilI.8 '1I.5 3.9I1 .6 .1.6 326.3 1.8i5.7 3. 399.5 l.Z01 8 -18.2
December...................... 38i.r' I ;. 8-2.) 3 335.3 ..I 5-1.5 2.292.0 3.868.0 I .03.- 332.5

1978
January-August.............. .. ... i.r 1, '. r.- .'. : '. 3'8.9 -. i'. ." ; .. ,o'u-.. 2.o 9.2

January....................... I.i 2 i I bi2 9 3.612 3 31.5 ... 2. 131.6 3 595.- 1,31 7 333.5
February...................... 1. 1 "i .) '7 -. 3 I 2 O,500.B 2 3I' 3 ?73. 1. 38. 258.0
March......................... .*3-0.3 L,0.- 8. "i i 3.t,26 9 .3 t.3r..i 2,507.1 ..307.9 L.615.6 37-.4
April......................... 2-6 7 218.8 '61.' 22.' .5 n.1.9 2.5b3.2 -,338.3 I..5 .8 3.0.5
May ........................... 2 2. 0-' : 2 9,'' .2 3 .2 ". -.... olj.4 2 520.' 262 1.506.1 320.9
June.......................... I 126 i 32.9 82' .i .6 1. l .9. : '0.2 2. -5'. -.38..2 1. U.B 3 0.2
July..................... ..... 1.213. 7 1 3 8 ..n 5. :.6l. 52.3 i'8.0 2. 59.. i -.3-3.8 l.91 332.6
August ........................ I r.. !, .1 2 ., .' ... ,'8-. j2 .0G
September....................
October .......................
November .................
December......................

iSchedule A section descript, .: nr- .'* il i--
0. Food and live animals 3 C-r.eic l. .nr,1 rl.-r,, -1 I r'uc t r.s.p.l
1. Beverages and tobacco t, M r.t .:r re' a g_ .li la,i;ied cr.nill r.. i .attrial
2. Crude materials, inedltle s.eat fiels Macr. ir.r. ...a ro r.0ari',rt I.Oul men.t
3. Mineral fuels, lubriciht' .r.a rel iea material 6 Misce la'.er.u ..nar.ijacturena jrtlietl.e p r .
4. Oils and fats--animal .r' .r taoiD 9. .:,.-.mOlttedI I .-i tiransacti on .*,:r la. if~ l 1 .f l a,-here
'Beginning with January 1978 taitl:l=c. total- Influnce aata on ohtpmern ts of norunanetary gola. See the Eiplanai.ton of Statistics for additional
information.
'Adjusted for seasonal and a r-' .-,-.3, arok. i L, 'itcI 1. -. n iat !. 8 1 ue r. li.d lactr- usea '. tju i;J.' anra 19"- aats. See footnote
1 on bottom of page 5. Annual Trial: are not r.o-rn or -e..or. Ill aajU ?e.ta ?a'a Lins.] idEleo sata .nould De u-ea fe r annual orall. the adjusted
section totals in this table ari .la c.--r. ll .'..,thi% t.,.l-- I r. tatl.: I ann 3 -uere sr].usteu tir-aepend.ntl .








GENERAL IMPORTS OF PETROLEUM AND SELECTED PETROLEUM PRODUCTS INTO
THE U.S. CUSTOMS AREA AND U.S. VIRGIN ISLANDS, UNADJUSTED

Monthly and cumulativeto-date data on general imports of petroleum and selected petroleum products into the U.S. Customs area
and into the U.S. Virgin Islands for the period January 1977 through the current month are presented in the tables that follow. Tables
1-A and 1B present imports into the U.S. Customs area and tables 2-A and 2-B present imports into the U.S. Virgin Islands. It should
be noted that imports into the Virgin Islands are excluded from the regularly compiled foreign trade statistics and, therefore, are ex-
cluded from the data presented in tables 1-A and 1 B as well as the other tables shown in the front of this report.-See "Explanation of
Statistics".

Effective with January 1978 statistics, certain changes were made in the commodity classifications (Schedule A and TSUSA) covering
petroleum products These changes are reflected in the listing of classifications shown below. Data presented in tables 1-B and 2-B which
follow have been revised to reflect all changes in classifications, effective January 1978.


Schedule A and TSUSA Commodity Numbers Used in Compiling the Petroleum
Information Presented in This Report


Energy products


Nonenergy products


Schedule A No.

Crude petroleum and deriv-
atives to be refined
333.0020
333.0040
334.4040

Crude petroleum
333.0020
333.0040

Gasoline
334.1500


TSUSA No.



475.0510
475.1010
475.6510


475.0510
475.1010


475.2520, 475.2560


Schedule A No.

Lubricating oils
334.5410 pt.

Lubricating greases
334.5410 pt.

Paraffin and other mineral
waxes
335.1225 pt.
335.1245


TSUSA No.


475.4500



475.5500, 475.6000




494.2200
494.2400


Jet fuel
334.1205

Kerosene
334.2000


Distillate fuel oil
334.3021

334.3041

Residual fuel oil
334.4050
334.4060

Propane and butane gas
341.0025

Liquid derivatives of
petroleum, n.e.s.
334.5430 pt.


{475.2530
475.2550

475.3000


475.0525
475.0545
475.1015
475.1025

475.0535
475.1035


Asphalt
335.4500

Naphthas
334.5420


All other petroleum products
(pitch of tar coke, non-
liquid hydrocarbon mix-
tures, and calcined petro-
leum and coal coke not for
fuel)
335.3000 pt.
334.5430 pt.
598.5020 pt.


475.1525, 475.1535,
475.1545


475.6530


521.1100



475.3500


401.6200
475.7000
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