United States foreign trade

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Material Information

Title:
United States foreign trade
Alternate title:
United States foreign trade. FT900, Summary of United States export and import merchandise trade
Portion of title:
Summary of U.S. export and import merchandise trade
Abbreviated Title:
U.S. foreign trade, FT900, Summ. U.S. export import merch. trade
Physical Description:
13 v. : ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of the Census
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census :
For sale by the Subscriber Services Section (Publications), Bureau of the Census
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Creation Date:
June 1978
Publication Date:
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Imports -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Exports -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Commerce -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
statistics   ( marcgt )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Issued also to depository libraries in microfiche.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Dec. 1976-
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Ceased in 1988.
General Note:
"FT 900."
General Note:
Description based on: Jan. 1979; title from caption.
General Note:
Beginning with July 1980 for sale by the Supt. of Docs., U.S.G.P.O.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Mar. 1988.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001320869
notis - AGH1745
oclc - 07222812
lccn - 81646118
issn - 0730-3270
sobekcm - AA00005268_00001
Classification:
ddc - 382/.0973/00212
System ID:
AA00005268:00019

Related Items

Preceded by:
Summary of U.S. export and import merchandise trade
Succeeded by:
U.S. merchandise trade. Seasonally adjusted imports and exports

Full Text

- 15-o UNITED STATES FOREIGN TRADE


S(' summaryy of U.S. Export and

.V import Merchandise Trade


1:A .* it. JUNE 1978


MISSION 9:30 A.M. WEDNESDAY, JULY 26,


1978


-S asonally Adjusted and Unadjusted Data

(Including unadjusted data on imports of petroleum and petroleum products)


F.A.S. EXPORTS AND F.A.S. IMPORTS

Seasonally Adjusted

The Bureau of the Census, Department of Commerce an-
nounced today that during June 1978, exports on a f.a.s.
(free alongside ship) U.S. port of exportation value
basis, excluding Department of Defense (DOD) Military
Assistance Program Grant-Aid shipments, amounted to
$12,125.7 million and that general imports or a f.a.s.
foreign port of exhortation value basis, amounted to
$13,722.7 million.' 2 3

Based on the above export and import figures, the June
merchandise trade balance was in deficit by $1,597.0
million, as compared to the deficit of $2,238.6 million
recorded in May.z s 3

During the first 6-months of 1978 (January-June), exports
on a seasonally adjusted basis were at an annual rate of
$132,726 million, a level about 10 percent higher than the
calendar year 1977 total of $121,150 million. Imports for
the January-June 1978 period were at an annual rate of
$165,463 million, an increase of about 12 percent over the
calendar year 1977 total of $147,685 million.4

For the 4-month period, March-June 1978, exports averaged
$11,606.6 million per month, about 15 percent higher than
the $1.0,103.4 million average reported for the preceding
4-month period November 1977-February 1978. Imports on a
f.a.s. value basis, averaged $13,977.6 million per month
for the current 4-month period, a level about 6 percent
higher than the $13,175.5 million average reported for the
preceding 4-month period.' 2 3

Unadjunsted
Exports excluding Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid
shipments were valued at $12,477.3 million in June, a
level about the same as the comparable total for May of
$12,478.9 million. With Military Assistance Program
Grant-Aid shipments included, exports decreased slightly
from $12,494.6 million in May to $12,487.3 million in June.
General imports increased from $14,199.2 million in May to
$14,514.5 million in June.

Note: Footnotes 1, 2, 3, and 4 are shown at the bottom
of page 5.


F.A.S. EXPORTS AND C.I.F. IMPORTS

Seasonally Adjusted

The Bureau of the Census, Department of Commerce ar.nounced
today that during June 1978, exports on a f.a.s. (free
alongside ship) U.S. port of exportation value basis, ex-
cluding Department of Defense (DOE) Military Assistance
Program Grant-Aid shipments, amounted to $12,125.7 million
and that general imports on a c.i.f. (cost, insurar.ce, and
freight) U.S. port of entr:, value basis, amounted to
Sl4,tO7.- million. 3

Based on the above export and import figures, the June
merchandise trade balance was in deficit by $2,481.7
million, as compared to the deti.:it of $3,140.5 million
recorded ir May.

During the first 6-months of 1978 ,Januarv-June'. txporis
on a seasonally adjusted basis were at an annual rate uf
$132,726 million, a level about 10 per.ernt hi-her than ttr
calendar year 1977 total of $121,150 million. Imports for
the January-June [978 period were at an annual rate of
$176,091 million, an increase of about 12 percent over the
calendar year 1977 total of $157.560 million."

For the 4-montl, period, March-June 1978, exports a,.eraged
$11,606.6 million per month, about 15 percent higher than
the $10,103.- million average reported for the preceding
'-month period, Houember [197-February 1978. Imports c.n.a
c.i.f. value basis, averaged $1.87b.8 million per month
for the current -month period, a level about t percent
higher than the $14,027.6 million average reported for the
precedirg 4-month period.'

Unadjuned
Exports excluding Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid
shipments were valued at $12,-77.3 million in June, a
le.'el atout the same as the comparable total for May .of
$12,478.9 million. Wit. Military Assistance Program
Grant-Aid shipments included, exports decreased slightly
from $12,49-.6 million in May to $12,48?.3 million in June.
General imports increased from $15,114.6 million in May tc.
$15,450.2 million in June.


U.S. Department of Commerce
BUREAU OF THE CENSUS


Inquiries concerning these figures should be addressed to the Chief. Foreign Trade Division, Bureau of
the Census, Wahington, D.C. 20233. Tel: Area Code 301.763-51-10.763-7754; and 763-7755.
For sle by the Subecriber Services Section (Publications), BurSeu of the Census, Washington, D.C.
20233, or any U.S. Deertnent of Commrce district office. Postage stamps not acceptable; currency
submitted at ender's risk. R 'mnttanme from foreign countries must be by international money order
or by a draft on a U.S. bank. Price 30 centsper copy. Annual subscription IFT 900. 975, 985, and 986
combined) $14.90.









EXPLANATION OF STATISTICS


IMPORT STATISTICS

Coverage

The U.S import statistics reflect both government and
nongovernment imports of merchandise from foreign count nes
into the U.S. Customs territory, which includes the 50 States.
the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. The U.S. import
statistics exclude imports into the Virgin Islands, Guam,
American Samoa, and other U.S. possessions: and shipments
between the United States and Puerto Rico, between the United
States and U.S. possessions, and between any of these outlying
areas. (Data on U.S. trade with Puerto Rico and the Virgin
Islands of the United States are published separately in Report
FT 800. Additional data on such trade and on imports into the
Virgin Islands from foreign countries are presented in reference
tabulations.) Data on imports of petroleum and selected
petroleum products, including shipments inio the Virgin Islands
from foreign countries, are included in this report effective with
the January 1976 statistics (previously shown in former Report
FT 900-Supplement).
The U.S. import statistics also exclude American goods re-
turned to the United States by its Armed Forces;, intransit ship-
ments through the United States when documented as such
with Customs; temporary shipments; transactions not con-
sidered to be of statistical significance, such as shipments of
personal and household effects; low-valued nondutiable im-
ports by mail; and issued monetary coins of all component
metals.

Inclusion of Gold in the Statistics

Effective with the statistics for January 1978. imports of
nonmonetary gold (in such forms as ore. scrap and base bullion,
nonmonetary refined bullion, etc.) which were previously
excluded, are now included in the statistics Imports of silver in
these forms have been included since January 1969. Additional
information regarding the inclusion of gold in the 1978 statistics
appears in the November and December 1977 issues of Report
FT 990.

General Imports/Imports For Consumption

The statistics on U.S. imports are presented in terms of both
"General Imports" and "Imports for Consumption." General
imports are a combination of entries for immediate con-
sumption and entries into Customs bonded warehouses, and
thus generally reflect total arrivals of merchandise. Imports for
consumption are a combination of entries for immediate
consumption and withdrawals from warehouses for con-
sumption. and thus generally reflect the total of the com-
modities entered into U.S. consumption channels.
Source Of Import Information

The official U.S. import statistics are compiled by the Bureau
of the Census from copies of the import entry and warehouse
withdrawal forms which importers are required by law to file
with Customs officials. The information as to country of origin,
net quantity, value, and commodity classification is verified by
Customs officials on entries filed for transactions valued over
$250. which are ordinarily subject to examination for Customs


appraisement purposes. The statistical copy of the entry is
corrected if it does not accurately reflect the information
called for by the statistical requirements.

Import Valuation

F.a.s. Import Value.-The f.a.s. (free alongside ship) value
represents the transaction value of imports at the foreign port of
exportation. It is based on the purchase price, i.e., the actual
transaction value and generally includes all charges incurred in
placing the merchandise alongside the carrier at the port of
exportation in the country of exportation.

C.i.f. Import Value.-The c.i.f. (cost, insurance, and freight)
value represents the value of imports at the first port of entry in
the United States. It is based on the purchase price and includes
all freight, insurance, and other charges (excluding U.S. import
duties) incurred in bringing the merchandise from the country
of exportation and generally placing it alongside the carrier at
the first port of entry in the United States. If the merchandise
was acquired in a transaction between related parties, the
purchase price used in deriving the c.i.f. value is based on an
arm's-length equivalent transaction price, i.e., a price which
would exist between unrelated buyers and sellers.

Import Commodity Information

Import data are initially reported in terms of the commodity
classifications in the Tariff Schedules of the United States An-
notated (TSUSA), which is an official publication of the U.S.
International Trade Commission, embracing the legal text of
the Tariff Schedules of the United States together with statis-
tical annotations. The TSUSA data are rearranged and presented
in this report in terms of totals for the I-digit commodity
sections in Schedule A. Statistical Classification of Commodities
Imported Into the United States, which is based upon the
Standard International Trade Classification (SITC), Revision 2,
effective with the statistics for January 1978. Prior to January
1978, Schedule A was based upon the former SITC, Revised.

Date of Importation and Import Monthly Carryover

It is the objective of the compiling procedures to include
shipments, insofar as practicable, in the statistics for the actual
month of importation (or the month of withdrawal in the case
of warehouse withdrawals for consumption). Effective with the
January 1978 statistics, the date of importation as reported on
the import entries is being used to determine the statistical
month in which the shipments are included. However, since
under the Customs "immediate-dehvery" procedures importers
may file the import entry up to 10 workdays after the date of
release of the merchandise, some documents for merchandise
imported during the last few days of a given month may not
be received in time for inclusion in the statistics for that month.
As a result, there is a carryover, estimated at about 15 percent,
from the actual month of importation to a subsequent month.
In addition, processing problems (e.g., late filing of documents,
rejection of a shipment by the computer because the data fail
to meet certain edit criteria established to protect the accuracy
of the statistics, etc.) contribute to an additional carryover of
about 5 percent (in terms of value) of shipments from the re-








ported month of importation (or withdrawal from warehouse)
to a subsequent month, usually the succeeding month. These
limitations should be borne in mind when making month-to-
month comparisons.
For 1977 and previous years, the date of Customs official
acceptance of the import documents was used to determine the
.statistical month in which the shipments were included. How-
ever, in certain annual publications for 1977 and in 1978 re-
ports which also present 1977 data (e.g., FT 900. FT 990, etc.).
the 1977 data are recompiled on a date of importation basis.

Cumulations of data over at least 4-month periods are desir-
able to identify underlying trends. Month-to-month changes in
imports, exports, and similar series often reflect primarily
irregular movements, e.g., exogenous events such as strikes,
differences in monthly carryover, etc.

Estimated Data for Imports Valued Under $251

The overall import and Schedule A Section 9 totals include
sample estimates for shipments valued under $251. Therefore,
they are subject to sampling error, estimated at less than
one-tenth of one percent for the unadjusted overall total and
about one percent for the unadjusted Schedule A Section 9
total. This means that we can have about 67 percent confidence
that the published unadjusted overall totals and the unadjusted
Schedule A Section 9 totals differ by less than one-tenth of a
percent and one percent, respectively, from the totals that
would have resulted from a complete tabulation. The statistics
on imports of petroleum and petroleum products included in
this report reflect fully compiled data and, therefore, are not
subject to sampling error.

EXPORT STATISTICS
Coverage
The export statistics reflect, in general, both government and
nongovernment exports of domestic and foreign merchandise
from the U.S Customs territory (includes the 50 States, the
District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico) to foreign countries.
whether the exportation involves a commercial transacuon or
not. The statistics, therefore, include Department of Defense
Military Assistance Program Giant-Aid shipments, shipments for
economic assistance under the Foreign Assistance Act and
shipments of agricultural commodities under P.L. 480 (The
Agricultural Trade Development and Assistance Act of 1954, as
amended) and related laws. The following are excluded from the
statistics: Shipments to U.S. Armed Forces and diplomatic
missions abroad for their own use; shipments between the
United States and Puerto Rico, between the United States and
its possessions (including the Virgin Islands), and between these
outlying areas, exports from U.S. possessions; intransit ship-
ments through the United States; transactions not considered to
be of statistical importance, such as personal and household
effects; temporary exports; low-valued or non-commercial
exports by mail, and issued monetary coins of all component
metals.

Inclusion of Gold in the Statistics.

As indicated above for imports, effective with the statistics
for January 1978, exports of nonmonetary gold (in such forms
as ore, scrap and base bullion, nonmonetary refined bullion,
etc.) which were previously excluded, are included in the


statistics. Exports of silver in these forms have been included
since January 1969. Additional information regarding the
inclusion of gold in the 1978 statistics appears in the November
and December 1977 issues of Report FT 990.

Definition of Exports of Domestic and Foreign Merchandise

Exports of domestic merchandise include commodities which
are grown. produced, or manufactured in the UnitedStates, and
commodities of foreign origin which have been changed in the
United States from the form in which they were imported, or
which have been enhanced in value by further manufacture in
the United States. Exports of foreign merchandise consist of
commodities of foreign origin which have entered the United
States as imports and which, at the time of exportation, are in
substantially the same condition as when imported.

Source of Export Information

The official U.S. export statistics are compiled by the Bureau
of the Census primarily from copies of Shipper's Export
Declarations which are required to be filed with Customs
officials, except for Department of Defense Military Assistance
Program Grant-Aid shipments which are reported directly to the
Bureau of the Census by the Department of Defense and
shipments by qualified exporters who have been authorized to
submit data in the form of magnetic tape, punched cards, or
monthly Shipper's Summary Export Declarations directly to
the Bureau of the Census.

Export Valuation
F.a.s. Export Value. -The value reported in the export statistics
generally is equivalent to a f.a.s. (free alongside ship) value at
the U.S. port of export, based on the transaction price,
including inland freight, insurance and other charges incurred in
placing the merchandise alongside the carrier at the U.S. port of
exportation.

Export Commodity Information
Beginning January 1978, export commodity information
is collected in terms of the commodity classifications in the
1978 edition of Schedule B. Statistical Classification of Do-
mestic and Foreign Commodities Exported from the United
States, which is based on the framework of the classification
system in the Tariff Schedules of the United States (TSUS).
In this report, the Schedule B data are rearranged and presented
in terms of totals for the 1-digit commodity sections in Schedule
E, which is based upon the Standard International Trade Classi-
fication (SITC), Revision 2, effective with the statistics for
January 1978. Prior to January 1978, the export classifications
in Schedule B were based upon the organizational framework
of the former SITC, Revised.

Export Monthly Carryover
It is the objective of the compiling procedures to include
shipments, insofar as practicable, in the statistics for the actual
month of exportation. For purposes of the statistics, the month
of exportation is generally based on the date when the shipment
leaves the United States. (For vessel or air shipments it is the
date when the carrier departs or is cleared from the port of
export.) However, as indicated above for imports, because of








processing problems (e.g., late receipt of a document for an
end-of-month shipment, rejection of a shipment by the com-
puter because the data fail to meet certain edit criteria
established to protect the accuracy of the statistics, etc.), there
is an overall average carryover of about 2 to 3 percent (in terms
of value) of the shipments from the actual month of exporta-
tion to a subsequent month, usually the succeeding month.
These limitations should be borne in mind when making
month-to-month comparisons
Cumulations of data over at least 4-month periods are
desirable to identify underlying trends. Month-to-month
changes in imports, exports, and similar series often reflect
primarily irregular movements, differences in monthly
carryover, etc.

Estimated Data for Export Shipments

The overall export and Schedule B section and division totals
include sample estimates for shipments valued $251-S1.999 to
Canada and for shipments valued $251-$999 to countries other
than Canada Data for shipments valued $250 and under to all
countries are also estimated, based on established percentages of
individual country totals, and included in the Schedule B
Section 9 totals regardless of the commodity exported. It is
estimated that the unadjusted overall total is subject to a
sampling error of less than one-tenth of one percent, and the
unadjusted Schedule B section or division totals are subject to
sampling errors of about one percent. In addition, the Schedule
B Section 9 total is subject to possible error in the estimated
data for shipments valued $250 and under" and the overall total,
and the individual totals for sections other than Section 9, to a
more limited extent. Such $250 and under shipments represent
about 1 percent of the total value of exports, and about 60
percent of the Schedule B Section 9 total.

SOURCES OF ERROR IN THE STATISTICS

Monthly import and export figures are subject to the
possibility of errors which may arise from sources other than
sampling errors, discussed above. Among these are errors in the
reporting and/or processing of information as to commodity
classification, value and other statistical factors, month of
inclusion (see paragraphs on import and export carryover,
above), and the undercounting of exports to Canada due to the
non-receipt of Shipper's Export Declarations. For 1976, the
undercounting amounted to about one and one-half billion
dollars. In the case of imports the information as to value and
commodity classification (as well as country of origin and net
quantity) is verified by Customs officials on entries filed for
transactions valued over $250 which are ordinarily subject to
examination for Customs appraisement purposes, thus con-
siderably reducing the possibilitN of error. In addition, the
procedures used to compile both the import and export sta-
tistics include clerical and computer processing checks designed


to protect the accuracy of the statistics to the fullest practicable
extent.

MERCHANDISE TRADE BALANCES

Two trade balances are presented in this report;
1) The balance between exports based on f.a.s. values and-
imports based on f.a.s. values.
2) The balance between exports based on f.a.s. values and
imports based on c.i.f. values with adjustments for imports from
affiliated sellers abroad to reflect arms-length equivalent prices.
Both balances are useful for certain purposes. The first
balance corresponds to a measurement of the international
payments or credit flows resulting from merchandise trade
between the U.S. and foreign countries. The second balance is
based on concepts similar to those used by most foreign
countries, and therefore provides a reference for comparison
with the trade balances published by those countries.


REVISIONS TO THE STATISTICS

Under the revision policy adopted effective with the 1977
statistics, revisions to the monthly statistics for the current year
will be issued only once a year. i.e., with the reports for June
of the following year. Thus, revisions to 1977 statistics will be
issued only in June 1978. Under the policy previously in effect,
revisions were issued twice a year-the current year's June re-
ports contained revisions for the prior year while the December
reports usually contained revisions for the first three quarters
of the cuirent year.
In addition to the revisions which are made on a once d year
basis, instances ma. occur where a significant error in the
statistics for a month of the current year is discovered after the
statistics for that month are compiled If the error is of
sufficient importance to require correction prior to the time
that the regular revisions are carried, the correction is made and
so noted in this report.


SOURCES OF FURTHER INFORMATION

Additional foreign trade statistics and information regarding
coverage, valuation, sampling, and qualifications which should
be considered by users of the statistics are contained primarily
in the following publications: Report FT 990, Highlights of U.S.
Export and Import Trade; FT 135, U.S. General Imports,
Schedule A Commodity by Country; FT 410, US. Exports,
Schedule E Commodity by Country; and the Guide to Foreign
Trade Statistics. Information regarding additional sources of
statistics, the methodology used in seasonally adjusting the data,
and other matters relating to foreign trade statistics may be
obtained from the Foreign Trade Division, Bureau of the
Census. Washington. D.C. 20233









Table 1. U.S. Exports (f.a.s. Value Basis), General Imports (f.a.s. and c.i.f. Value Basis), and Merchandise
Trade Balance, Adjusted for Seasonal and Working-Day Variation, by Month: January 1977

to June 1978

(In millions of dollars. See Explanation of Statistics for Information on coverage. date 0o Importation, definitions of export and Import values and
trade balances, and sources of error In the data)

F.a.s. Exports and f.a.s. Imports 1 F.a.s. Exports and c.i.I. Imports

Period
Exports Imports bine Eirports Imports branee
ba I ce balance

1977'r

JarB uary-June............................. 60.287.- ;. :82.3 11,.9,. 9 60 28'.- 76, bw0 .7 -16.318.3

January.................................. 9,6 5 10.."43.9 7?. 9, b666.5 1 L. I -1.503.3
February................................. 9.897.5 1'. 612.7 -2. 715.2 b.8617. 13 -.62.2 -3.56-.?
March..................................... 10. 16 2 12,-. ...2 -2.260.0 l0. f-.2 3. ?38. -3.07..'
April................................ ...... 9.9. 0.-] 11 < 97 -L.85-. 9 ,,9 ,0.0 1 '. 577.3 -2 63' 3
May...................................... 10. 28.6 11 69. -6-0.4 10u. 52 .6 11.925.0 -1 396..
June..................................... 10,090.6 3i,33-.3 -3.2]3.7 IJ.Oq0 6 b- 232. --, 1-1.9

July ....................................... 10. 372.3 12, .82. r -2,110.6 10, '2.3 13. ,338.6 -2. 966.3
August.................................. 9,683.2 12,101.- -2. 18.2 9,683.2 1.897.0 -3.213.8
September................................ 1 1.038.6 12.94-1.6 -i 903.0 11,038.6 13,813.1 -2,77..5
October.................................. 357.. 12. ,8 -3,229. 9.357.4 13,-31. -4,074..1
November................................. 9,.. 7.9 12.-u0 .b -2.928.7 9.,k'.9 13,202.5 -3.72'..6
December................................. li)..9. 9.0 i 3,'74.-. -2,- .- i0. 999.0 L-, 3o9.6 -3. 370.6

1978

January-June............................. on ,jt,3.1 I2. 1 -l 3r. ..2 to.ib6 8 ,-8 3 1 ,682.2

January.................................. 10.01-. 3 12,380.Q -2. 3 6.B 10,01-..3 13,157.0 -3,1-2.7
February................................. 9.Qr22.. L-.-', 0.2 -- 517.8 9,9;'.- 15i 38i.3 -5..58.9
March.................................... .10,912.1 13,69 3 -2. 78 .2 10.912.1 14,569.6 -3.657.5
April.................................... 11,634.9 1-,-.9b.l 2, I.2 1 l1. 3- .9 15,435.8 -3,800.9
May........................................ 1l, 7?53.7 13.992. 1 -2.238.4 li. ;53.' 14.89-.2 -3 1l0.5
June..................................... I. I .. ,. 13. 27 .' -I ,-' .O 12,1 7 l-,tO .- -2,-81 .

Jul .....................................
August...................................
September................................
October...................................
November..................................
December.................................

rTotals for 1977 revised. See "Revisions to Steri stic;"paragraph unaer the tEplars.silr., of Statistics ;ectmln on pagi -.
'Export data represent aonmestic ana foreign mercrarcilae excluding DeLarrment of Def.ense ih[OD) Military Assistance Program Grant-Ala snipi.ents.
Import data represent general imports of merchandise.
'Beginning with the January i978 issue of this report. export ina import totalsE nd traoe balances inciune osai on shipments oat nonmonetary gold
In the form of ores, concentrates, waste, scrap, and refined bullion. See Explanatilon ., Statistics" for additional Informatior..
'Adjusted for seasonal and worklng-day ariation using adjustment factors as described In footrnore I at bottom of this page.





'Export and import statistical senes ar adjusted for seasonal and working-day variation but not for changes in price level Factors used to adjust 1971 and 1978 data represent the combination of
seasonal adjustment factors derived from monthly data through 1977 and the appropriate workingday factors These factors were implemented for the adjustment of export data with the release of the
January 1978 statistics, and for the adjustment of import data with the April 191B statistics In issues of this report for January through March 1978. the 1977 import data adjusted by factors derned
from monthly data through 1976. Interim factors. denved from monthly data through 1977 were used to adjust January March 1978 import data
'Cumulations of data over at least 4.month periods are desirable to identify underlying trends Month-to month changes in exports, imports and similar series often reflect primarily irregular move-
ments, differences in monthly carryover, etc Recent month tom4onth percent changes in the overall seasonally adjusted export and import series are presented in the following table with average percent
month to-month rise and decline over longer periods shown for comparison The average rise and average decline figures do not reflect data on nonmonetarV gold. The averages also exclude percentage
changes for (1) the period October December 1977 because of abnormalities in the data due to effects of oock strikes and 121 periods when negligible changes Jhero percent in the level of exports/imports
occurred. Percentage changes for f.a.s. and c.i.f import values are not available for periods prior 10to January 1974

Month-to-month Average monthly rates of change


Series Average Average 4 months 12 months
May-June Apr.-May Mar.-Apr. Feb.-Mar. rise decline Feb. 1978- June 1977-
1978 1978 1978 1978 1972-1977 1972-197' .J.ine 1978 June 1978
(Percent) (Percent) (Percent) (PercentI (Percent) (Percent) (Percent) (Percent)


F.a.s. export value.. ,3.2 +1.0 -6.6 *10.0 .3.6 -3-. .5.2 .1.9
F.a.s. import value.. -1.9 -3.5 *3.9 -4.9 (NA) (NA) -1.2 .0.5
C.i.f. import value.. -1.9 -3.5 -4.0 -5.0 (NA) (NA) -1.2 *0.5

3 See the "Explanation of Statistics" for definitions of Ihe export and import values and trade balances.

Totals for 1977 revised. See "Revisions co the Scat st cs" paragraph under the Explanation of StatiStic4 section

on page 5.









Table 2. U.S. Exports (f.a.s. Value Basis) of Merchandise Showing Department of Defense (DOD)

Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid Shipments, by Month: January 1977 to June 1978


(in millions of dollars. See Explanation of Statistics for Information on coverage, definition of f.a.s. export value, and sources of error in
the aata. Unadjusted totals represent sum of unrounded figures and hence may vary slightly from sum of rounded amounts)

Exports excluding DOD Exports Including DD Grant-Ad-
Grant-Aid' DOD Grant-Aid'


Period Domestic Domestic Domestic
and and Domestic. and Doaestle. Western Other
foreign, foreign, unadjusted foreign, unadjusted Total Europe countries
adjasteda unadjusted unadjusted



1977r

January-December..................... (l) 121,150.4 118,9'3.7 121,212.3 119.005.5 61 9 3.1 58.7

January-June......................... 60,267.- 61,* 18.0 60,325.6 61,461.3 60,368.9 -3.3 1.2 42.1

January.............................. 9,666.5 9,120.3 8,961.9 9,137.0 8. 9.8.6 16.8 0.1 16.6
February.................. .......... 9,897.5 9,469.9 9.337.0 9.7..- 9 9, 3 2.0 5.0 D.3 4.7.
March.............................. 10,lo-..2 1,050.5 10,85-.2 11,058.3 10,862.0 7.8 0.3 7.5
April................................. 9,940.0 10.528.. 10,330.5 10.533.9 10,336.1 5.6 0.1 5.5
May.................................. 10.528.b 10,969.7 10,777.. 10,974.8 10,782.5 5.1 0.3 4.8
June................................. 10.rj90.6 10,279.3 10 06.. 7 10,282.. 10,067. 3.1 0.1 3.0

July........................ ..... ........... 10,372.3 9, ;39.6 9,578.1 9. '.2.8 9.581.3 3.2 0.1 3.1
August............................... 9.683.2 8.98-.1 8,806.2 8.987.1 8.809.1 2 9 0.4 2.6
September............................. 11,038.6 10, 3 7.5 10.153.9 10.371.1 10.15'.5 3.b 0.2 3.4
October.............................. 9, 3 7.. 9.55-.8 9. 361.8 9.557.- 9 364.- 2.6 0.2 2.4
November............................. 9.-77.9 9.690.2 9.520.. 9.692.b 9.522.8 2.5 0.3 2.2
December............................. 10,999.0 11.396.1 11.197.7 11,399.9 11,201.5 3.8 0.8 2.9

1978

January-June......................... 6, '.1 o:,. 3. n ,:;2.5 L6.016.5 66,775... .2.9 10.5 32.4

January.............................. 10,)01 .3 9.36-..- 9,214.1 )3. 66.9 9.216.6 2.5 0.5 2.1
February............................. 9,922.- 9,5ii4.6 9,337.8 9. 18.5 9. 3 1.7 3.9 1.3 2.7
March................................ 10,912.1 12. ,7. 2 11 810.5 12,079.4 11,835.8 5.2 0.5 4.8
April................................. L...1,1.-.9 12.06-.2 11 85..1 12.069.' 118.8 9.6 5.4 0.7 4.8
May.................................. 11, 53. I J,-;'8.9 12. j- 3 12,-9-.6 12.250.01 15.7 1.0 14.7
June.......................... .... .. 12.12..: 2,. 77.3 12.2ol .7 12 ,-87.3 1'.271 1L0.1 b.5 3.5

July.................................
August...............................
September............................
October..............................
November.............................
December.............................

rTotals for 1977 revised. See "Revisions to Statistics" paragraph under the Explanation of Statistics sector. on page 4.
'Beginning with January 1978 statistics, totals include data on shipments of nonmonetary gold. See "Explanation of Statistics for additional
information.
2Represents only export shipments from the United States and differs from DOD Military Assistance Program Crant-Aid shipment figures under this
program as follows: (a) Transfers of the material procured outside the United States and transfers from DOD overseas stocKs from export shipments.
(b) Export value is f.a.s., whereas DOD value, in most instances, is f.o.b., point of origin. (c) Data for shipments reported by the DOD for a
given month are included in Bureau of Census reports in the second month subsequent to the month reported by the DOD.
3Adjusted for seasonal and working-day variation. See footnote 1 on the bottom of page 5.
"Annual total is not shown for seasonally adjusted data. Unadjusted data should be used for annual totals.











Table 3. U.S. Imports of Merchandise, by Month: January 1977 to June 1978

(ID millions of dollars. See Explanation of Statistics for Information on coverage, date of Importation, definitions of f.a.s. and c.l.f. import
values, and sources of error In the data. Unadjusted totals represent sum of unrounded figures and hence may vary slightly from sum of rounded
amounts)


F.a.s. value, C.I.f. value'


eriod General Imports Imports General Imports Imports
for for
Seasonally unajuste consumption. Seasonally Unadjustea consumption,
adjusted' unadjusted adjusted' unadjusted


1977 r

January-December......................... .'1 l-.'.68 .iJ l-b,9-5.' 1 1.'.i,.0. lib, 79? j.

January-June............................. 71,78 3 '2. 618.0 7;', 2' 3.2 76,.05.7 77. 96. 77.08'.;

January................................... 10.l -3.9 10,6-3.- 10.66h .9 LI,169.8 11,383.1 l l.408..
February.................................. 12. 12. 7 11.593.0 11 '25.0 13.-6 .2 12.37'-.5 12,30,..-
March.................................... .12,,..*.._2 13.1.2.3 j.0668.9 13. 238.9 l. 00-. 13.926.3
April.................................... 11,797.' 11 j-.6 11 8l2.3 L2.577.3 I 2.723. 12.638.'
May ...................................... 11,169.5 11,257. 1 7l .. 11,925.0 12.01I9.2 11,830.9
June....................................... 13.33-.3 ,0-6.- 1.,03..7 1.,23.' 5 1-.992'.5 1l,978.Q

July..................................... ..12..:82.9 12.-30.5 2., -2.9 13. 38.6 1 3,282.6 13 190.9
August...................................... 12,1 1l 12,0--.' 12 .-.7 i2.897.0 12 83b.- 12.82.0
September................................ 12.9-.1.6 12.. 2.-) 12. 328.9 L3.813.1 1 1.. I).0 13.1b2.6
October.................................. 12.58b.9 121.'97.5 2 .568.3 13,-31.5 1 3.33b.1 13.410.8
otvember................................. 2. 0s,.6 12. 2 0.1 12.283.4 13.202.5 13.05;. 13..0?2..
December................................. 1 3,-?-.? 3l, 2. 13. 156.1 L 369.bo 1.. 200.4 1-.040.2

1978

January-June............................. 52,73j1. 83.2ii 1 83. i. 7 88 ,.'. .3 B 2. .'86. 58.0

January................................... 12. 380. 12. 17.7 12. ,60 l 13.1 7.0) 13.51-.9 13. 397.7
February................................. l.,-.0.2 13. 28? .. 13.31.,. 13 381.3 -.L152.3 1. .180.2
March.................................... .613, 09'.3 l'..5 ?.3 1-. T9.5 I.. ,iS .o 15 -'7 .5 15 -92..
April.................................... i. .,-9s I l...- .0 I-.-lu.- 15.-35.8 1 2'5. i 15. 3.5.0
May...................................... 13, 992.1 0I. 1'9.2 i- 0 5.9 .8 -., il-2.o 1-. 97..8
June ..................................... 1. .' l-. l-.. 1 ,-j, ., '. l .,3Ld .-

July.....................................
August ...................................
September................................
October..................................
November.................................
December.................................

rTotals for 1977 revised. See "Revisions to tatisticc' paracrphn under the Esplaniation c.f Statistics section on page 4.
'Beginning with January 1978 statistics, totals include dsta on hiztmentis ii normonn tar rold. See the 'E"planatlon of Statistics for adaitionsj
Information.
2Adjusted for seasonal and norking-day variation. See ijoirtne I inr the bottom if page 5.
'Annual total is nor shown for seasc.n3ily adjustea data. iUnaajustea dates snouia be used lor annual totals.







8

Table 4. U.S. Exports (f.a.s. Value Basis) of Domestic Merchandise, Including Department of Defense

(DOD) Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid Shipments-Schedule E Sections, Seasonally

Adjusted and Unadjusted, by Month: January 1977 to June 1978

SIn million- of dollars. See Explanation of Statistics for Inlormatlon m coverage, definition of f.a.s. export value, and sources of error
In the data. Unadjusted totals represent sum of unrounded figures and hence may v.ry slightly frI Sum of rounded amomats)

Schedule E sections'


0 1 2' 3 5 6 7 8 9'


Seasonally adjusted'



.r.u'an- Jjn- ... 7.." ,... 903.f8 1.872.1 2 05b.0 boc0.3 5.356.0 5.540.'. 24.59..7 3 977.1 1.925.9

January ....................... 5.3 155.9 1.071.2 265.0 71.5 874.6 907.5 4,093.8 6.5.1 379.6
February ..................... 1.179.1 l .- 1.153.9 327.2 93.5 9'1.2 9.2.1 3,987.8 661.8 315.3
arrh .. .. ................... 1.25b.0 162.b 1,090.9 321.9 115.'. 886.9 929.7 ,.129.8 665.2 320.1
Apr i ......................... 1.-21.5 1 2.1 1,187.3 315.0 111.3 859.1 918.3 4,055.9 638.? 242.3
ay ........................... 1.312.1 1'.7.2 1.2.2.2 393.8 116b.7 878.1 924.3 -,230.5 674.B 367.5
June.......................... 1.208.-. ls .6 1.126.6 37i .l 111.9 912.1 918.5 4.096.9 692.0 301.1
July........................... .231.b 168.-. 1,112.3 418.8 122.3 9q 3.2 890.5 4,106.9 699.3 508.1
4urW'u ........................ ..177.0 168.8 85Q.3 309.3 127.7 SB 5.6 863.9 '..06..6 6741.9 378.9
Sept-arer..................... 1.271.9 q19 .9 1.027.1 39i.2 110.2 1,101.0 1.025.2 4..632.0 758.0 265.5
Octo er....................... b).2 5 .7 1.023.8 338.' 10'..0 778.5 7241.3 .:112.7 661.4 529.2
Nyvs.b r...................... ,'320.. 11. 1.038.' 338.1 123.1 788.9 832.0 4.048.1 710.7 317.6
-.c. be r...................... 1,250.b 221.6 1.083.2 30'.9 101.8 989.9 982.2 4.729.6 769.5 400.7

1978

Januar- June.r ...... ...... ,-.. I ... 7.2o.'. .61.6 il4. l3.;02.6 .196.3 27,16-.c, .736.. 2,251.3

Janu: ry ....................... .1,153.5 1';.9 1.071.2 230.- 100., 8;3.0 887.8 .2'.2.3 736.3 664.7
February...................... .. .j J 16. I. l u. 8 1 2.2 9 914.0 90. 8 4., 123.3 735.2 266.9
March......................... 1 ,38-.u 220.0 1.168.1 183. 131 3 962.2 969.68 '.4'.25 769.9 387.7
Apr I .......................... I *. ,. l 1 7.2. 1.286.9 267.9 1-' .l 9i8.1 965.5 *.782.6 830.2 472.8
m v ....... ................... '32.; 16..' 1.3'9 3 331 1 111.0 960.1 1.038.1 4,699.8 850. i 300.8
June ........................... I v l. o 11t00. Lt..F, 33.; I 0O 'i.9 1.038.a '.R9...1 8u6.7 35] .4
July ..........................
Au 'u t ........................
Se tetmb. r.....................
October.......................
Noveembo r .. ...................
Sc =w. r .....................

UraajU- ted


192I

Janua rs-l c.p ,o r............ 1. ..1 5.s 1.8.6.8 13 .080.2 -.15 3.0 1.308.7 10.822'.8 10.858.0 50.256.7 &.236.2 .,313.7

January Ju.ne .. .. ..... ". 8-'11. ;' 0 7.9 2 Cil1i I ob _..J i,5 .l'.o .620.0 21.509 4.049.3 1.930.9

January ....................... 1. u'6.6 I1r6.3 1.055.1 17.b6 15.1 816.0 834.. 3.762.2 590.3 376.9
February ................... 1,116." 13.' 1.710.' 2t8.0 *1.9 a10.3 892.2 3.816.3 620.8 280.9
1ar81.. .................... l,289. 15'.2 1.260.0 2 1.C, 132.2 9-3.i 1,003.1 4.353.4 233.0 299.6
April......................... 1..2-.- 112.0 1.332.2 397.9 102.8 902.1 967.9 4.,347.9 682.2 270.2
May ........................... 1.jI2 .- 128.B 1.325.' -'32.4 125.2 927.9 970.5 4,568.9 698.4 3.8.2
June .......................... 1.1.8.1 : 1-2.5 1.07'-.. 398.1 120.1 912.6 9-7.0 L,260.8 726.5 335.1
July.......................... 1,165.1 156.6 "3'-.3 398.3 126.3 95o.t 856.7 3,1 98.9 685.3 515.7
August ........................ 1,1.1.2 155.6 l112. 313.7 102.8 879.5 831.9 3 621.6 651.3 375.5
September..................... 1 2.'..2 ;01.6 822.7 -01.8 105.7 L.061.6 1,013.9 4,303.1 744.4. 250.9
Octot-r ....................... 98'.: 1.3 1.0-3.3 366.8 8-6.1 757.2 71 2.8 -. 17. ..' 671.3 493.7
Nove.t.r ...................... W.lt'.9 1.2..- .13.3.6 362.1 112.5 136.0 6815.- ,072.4. 642.9 312.3
DeceIher ...................... 1 .:8.2 :82.6 1.1'.6 315.3 116.0 1.0327.. 11.3 a.776.9 7.1l.8 ].34.8

1978

January- l'u ..... a.7,.." ". 1.2'.: ;11 w. -' ..2.. t''.- *.8 '.,81..2 2,280.5

Januar ....................... 1.12. :' .0 1 '.-.,8 188.9 96.0 830.? 829.9 3,852.0 665.6 -33.6
Febrar ...................... I .271. 168.3 I 731 ,. I-I. Q 2 88 3 2? 8 8 2 1,941.9 b89.b 237.5
Marcl .................... .... I ,' .; .213 33;.5 165.2 1-1 5 I 031.1 1.067.2 'i-,.. 878.5 390.4
April......................... I -' 8 t-..3 1.386 26-..> 1-5.- 0l1.3 988.? 5.098 2 85-.. 511.1
May ........................... nr8-.. L.J.I [.-,b 5 o]3.t. 11 .3 I 1I1 .7? 1.100.. 5.13?.2 908.6 312.8
June.......................... 1. .1 I.1.1 1. '. 3.. .' i).1 I .013.'. .092.5 .0i5.2 857.2 395.0
July. ........................
August ........................
September .....................
Octob r .......................
Novemne r......................
tDecemb r......................

1Scned'l-c E -ectIos aeacrptLons are a. follow.
0. Food ano live animals 5. Chemicals
1. BFverage: and tobacco 6. ManufoacCured goods claaskiled chiefly by material
2. Crude materials, inedible, except fuels 7. Machinery ana transport equipment
3. Mineral fuels, lubricants, and related material S. Miscellaneous manufactured articles, n.e.c.
4. Animal and vegetable oils and fats 9. Coammodaites and transactions not classified according to kind
'Beginning with January 1978 statistics, totals include data on shipments of nonmonetary gold. See the Explanation of Statistics for additional
information.
'Adjusted for seasonal and working-day variation. See footnote 1 on the bottom of pagE 5. Annual totals are not shown for seasonally adjusted
data. Unadjusted data should be used for annual totals. The section totals In this table and similar overall monthly totals In tables I and 2
were adjusted independently.










Table 5. U.S. General Imports (f.a.s. Value Basis) of Merchandise, Schedule A Sections. Seasonally

Adjusted and Unadjusted, by Month: January 1977 to June 1978

(ID millions of dollars. See Explanation of Statistics for Intlrmattor onr coverage. date of Importation. definitionof f.a.a. Imporl value, and
sources or error in the data. Unadjusted totals represent sum of unrounded figures and hence nay vary sligntly from sum of rounded amnoalts)


Schedule A sect onsI
Period
0 1 2' I3 5 6 7 8 9'


Seasonally adjusted'


19'77

January-June.... ....... t '12.0 611.- -6',3'. 12.J 0 '.u 2 ..>0. 10. 1 6.. I I' .3-.b c. 6 .I i 7. .0

January....................... .. 918.. 58l.t 1 .311 .' 56.1 3 122.1 l.u-5 .0 2 l u. 1 .0.'. 2'15.9
February...................... I 16b., 139. 701.5 i 3.B63." .A 3 .3 I 'I-.3 3.0-1.2 I 1 2 6 2 0o.9
March .................... .... I IO3.u 15 .1i 680.t i52.6 31.1 -08.6 1 11.1I '19.0 I 0'.?.- 22..9
April ......................... I 2'b6.0 12 .2 n5.:. 3,3 L.5 5 l'.' i -. '.3 1,781., 2.'69.6 1 3.5 82 2 9
May............................ 1.12 .> .3 n7.. 7 3.12.,.- -1 [ -1. I ,2 I 2. 9B o 1 36.17 3 202.5
June.......................... .. ,0-I.' 13-i.. -. bd. I 71.. -.3- b 1 l 6-1.1i ..1 L. I 92 ?l.
July............. ............ 990.2 11; 2 u.3;'..- i.a -- .3 -2 .l i 8609.- 3i1162.n 'I -..t'0 ; -. S
August ................... .... 898.3 i89.6b '2?q. ..'1 il .) -29.5 1 652.- 3.027. 1.0 3.8 --.2
September. ............. ..... O I 19-. 6 'l .. l12..'. 1 9 hi'.' .913.o 3.231.o l .'3] 3u-.
October....... ............... 's .1 i2-.. ''.ld.8 J.9,I 2i.. j.9.8 1 821.9 3.3l 1 :6-..0 2.71 5
November ...................... .t-... 9..b ?7.9 J3,981. 119.- 3J7.0 1.bB8.7 3,088.2 1 ,0c 3ol.i
Decembier................ ..... ..29I. l b. 4 3 190 I1 -0.3 I -6 8 2.L092.. 1, 1-.. 1 361.' 311.9

1918
January-June................... .1.1. ..:. ..-. '.liu.c E.-I 0t9.. tI 2.o :. ..6.l -. ... '.0

January......... ............. 1. 11 1i-.. oso.. J. l b.) 2.o 9. 1 i. 2. 1 J15.6 1. 2.0 33.5 0
February ...................... 1... 1 5.o ln-.s i. 3 il[ 4 '.. 21 2. 1- 8 i8.0 1 0'9.6 28-..
March................ ........ .1.2.3 lc'. '1.o 3 122.1 -2 2 5 .- .2cc I 684.2 1. 37 9 380 2
April ............. .......... 1.15-. : 15. j C0.3 3 i 7 I ..I3. 561 I 2 11 I ji s I .t, 6 3-9.1
May........... ............. 1.l l 1i 1611.2 81 i..-. 5o-.4 2. 3 2.1 J, "8 1.551 5 318.5



October..........................

November....... ......... ..
Dec embe r ........ .............

Una justea


197'

January-December.............. 12..,'57.8 1,6bb.- 8.-86.2 ..;37.2 530.2 9'0*.- 21.367.0 36 -Ob.6 13 809.. ,3).5.'

Jasuary-June .... ............. n.A809 h. ., t. 2 .'t I.3 28-._ '..l 1 .0. 800.6 I ; 19. o ,2 3.' .330 I1
January....................... 911.- 120.5 .'-. 3.521.- 5i .G l52.2 1 ..28.8 2.-93.3 .-5.8 20'..2
February............ ......... 1,097.o 122.'. 5 6.- 3.856.5 .O.6 387.I- I..9'.9 .'?776.6 989.1 22B.B
March................. ....... ,1 -7.1 155.'. 685.- -,'7-.8 i6.0 .39.9 1.653.0 2.99q .5 1,031.- 220.3
April .............. .......... .ji l-..3 lIl. 6,2.a8 ).5 11.'4 h. -61.5 1.71 2.1 2 8d'.2 1,009.8 2no.8
May........................... 1,122.7 i-..9 bo b6.o 2,2 ; 2.8 .2.1 t-12.. 1.761.5 2.4 o. 1.060.2 257.5
June.......................... 1.1s .8 1-i.5 839.1 ., t05.6 'O.c --9.2 2.010..5 j.-14.1 1.257.0 3<:. 7
July.......................... 460.j 111.2 l -1 ." 3,411. -1.8 399.- 1. 8'..l 2.9'- .2 1.2bi.8 230.7
August........................ .n6 .8 It.2.3 'l.3 3.o51. i:.B -21.8 1.6 ).5 2.' t.l J 1.231.2 ;--.2
September..................... 8'S 182.q '--. 3,'20.5 -.1. -36.' 1,888.7 2.995.9 I 57.-. 308..
October....................... 812.Q 137.8 717.- 3.t,3-..4 21.6 3j-.. 1,864.3 3.,301.5 ] 3.1.1 280.5
November...................... 401.6 105.0 '1I .2 3. ),2.4 39.0 311.6 1.1't3.0 3.190.1 1 118.9 1-..6
December....................... I 24-.6 159.8 7816.2 3.113.0 -.1.1 5.4.0 2.11'.c 3,t3.1 1, 305... 327.2
1978

tanuary- June ......... ..... ..... 5 I J''. -..3 9.

January..................... .. 1,1 26. 138.1 650.- 3.-22.2 "i.1 -16.9 1.982.- 3.392.' I 2." 9 326
February.............. ... .. I Ill 102.- 6'5.2 3.502.3 1...'. -'2.' I ).'. 3I '3 2 1.293.' 253.5
Marchb....... .... ...... ...... 1,2, 1 .'. 1 3.-11.2 -t u 6f,- 2 2 33-.I -".'7. I 511.1 J39 2
April .............. .. ... 1.101 20i. I 3.513 :.7 61l.t, 363.0 -.(.O.. ..39 33h.8
May......... ............. .. 1. 189 2 8.1.- 3 23-..1 1 S 583.Q 2 359 3 02L 0.. 1.-IL 0 31b.0
J u n e . . . L : I .. 11. ) "- 2 .) i ; q l i 3 3 .
July ................ .. .. .
Augut ................ ... ....
Septie ber ............. .. .....
Oc tober.......................
November ...... ....
December.... ..... ...... .

'Schedule A sectIon de-criptl -r. art as follo-'
0. Food and tIe anim..ile '. t e lical
1. Beverages and tobacco 6. Marnuiacturcd geod classic Leoa .:CleIly b) materil
2. Crude materials. Lnedible. eXcept fuels 1. Machlnery and transport equipment
3. Mineral fuel', lubricants. and related '.aternlls 8. SMLscellaneoum sa.r.uractured articles n.e.s.
4. Antina and vegetable oils and Tlai 9. Con.ln.i11lies ana transaction rnot class.ifleo el.e-here
'Beginninag with January 19'8 statistics,. total; include data on shipment of nonmonetary gold. See the Explan -lon of Statistics for additional
Iniormalion.
'Adjusted for seasonal and iw.rklin -di. variailon. Effeclite citn as% 19'8 issue. rei en factors used to adjues 197.' and j4?7 dat... See f-'otn.t.le
I on bottom of page 3. Annual totals are nit hotn lo r s.. ionill adijuteua ,La rJnai..iveu naa n. would be ued f.r anr.u.al totals rnc ecln
totals in this table &na similar overall mn-.nlp totals in tabie- I nu J rr adiu l e inuaeer.nentil.







10

Table 6. U.S. General Imports (c.i.f. Value Basis) of Merchandise, Schedule A Sections, Seasonally

Adjusted and Unadjusted, by Month: January 1977 to June 1978

(In millions of dollars. See Explanation of Statistics for itnforwatlon on coverage, date of Importation definition of c L .. import value, and
sources or error In the data. Unadjusted totals represent sau of unrounded figures ana hence may wary slightly from sua of rounded amounts)

Schedule A sections


1 1' 3 4 6 7 8 9'


Seasonally adjusted'

1977

January-June.................. .1.I.9.0 662.9 .,3.4.b 23.799.9 30...6 2.582.3 10.920.0 18,331.8 7,139.7 1,592.5

January....................... .l158. .2 128.9 t2 1 3,539.1. 60.1 3b5.2 1,572.0 2,77-. 1,105.1 219.7
February...................... 1,2-2.5 L51.8 712.B 4,128.7 17.0 -51.7 1,6L2.2 3.259.. 1,236.2 261.9
March............................. .... l9.6 1s2.0 723.1 ..,635.0 39.3 -28.9 1.720.b 2,937.3 1.123.6 230.6
April......................... 1,36 .6 -.0.. 702.1 3.5-6.8 39.-. 38.B 1.906.7 2,987.9 I 162.7 236.6
May........................... 1,19,.8 152.5 237?. 3,311.5 '.3.B .37.7 .1896.7 2.989.5 1,218.2 266.9
June.......................... 1,118.3 1.7.3 803.9 .,o38.5 75.2 -60.0 1,981.8 3. 38..6 1.293.9 376.8
July........................... 1,060.4 129.6 )36.5 4,120.7 -3.6 -.54.2 1.950.6 3,263.8 1,230.3 228.6
August......................... 966.9 C0.'.5 8-3.-. 3,730.3 54.1 .55.0 1.996.5 3,206.5 1,162.1 268.6
September..................... 991.6 212.1 i79.0 4,03-..3 -.. 491.8 2.067.9 3,443.3 1.324.1 309.3
October....................... 939.4 135.0 815.. ..,13..0 31.3 371.6 1.959.5 3.5-3.3 1.361.7 276.7
November ...................... 92-.6 103.9 608.7 4,210.3 -2.1 323.4 1.815.8 3,290.9 1 ,133.8 364.6
December.....................17 1, 387.B 162.9 818.3 3,279.7 --.2 5;5.2 2.264.8 3,773.7 1.46..9 317.0

1978

January-June .................. 1,215.2 1.I'.1 ..*.5 21,1I-.3 .6'.. 3,30.8 16. 130.1 2-.119.0 .I6. 2,024.1

January....................... ,209.9 Is.-'. '29.- 3,386.3 31.0 43..1 2,In0 .3 725.8 1,421.8 350.3
February...................... L,5s' .6 200.2 M45.: 3.731.9 5... 552.8 2,711.9 4,1I9.1 1.620.7 289.6
March......................... 1, 81.' 182.1 816.2 3.300.2 .7.9 589.0 2.-34.1 3.9`3.' 1.633.6 385.6
April......................... .1, 39.3) 33.8 77U.2 3,576.1 -6.8 588.9 2. 00.9 -...9 1.682.0 355.1
May........................... .i '9. 191.0 mij.e 3,812.8 53.. 616.5 2,-.1.0 '.017.6 1.66..3 323.5
June.......................... ,.0100 21-.3) 3.70 .0 .,9.' Sq9.5 2,217.9 ,0..8.2 1 .04-.5 320.0
July..........................
August........................
September.....................
October......................
November..... ..........
December......................

.rr.a lusted

1977

January-December.............. 13,424.8 1,817.5 9,160.5 -1,299.8 564.1 5.2-~5.5 22,991.2 38,m30.3 14.6828.0 J,38..6

January-June.................. 7,253.5 881.9 4,328.6 -.,221.] 302.,) 2,637.7 10.826.3 18.743.0 6 151.3 1,554.9
January....................... 1,039.2 131.2 588.8 W,'62.- 60.6 371.0 1.560.6 23.B5.4 1.016.7 207.8
February...................... 1,169.2 133.0 642.1 L,094.6 43.3 404." 1,606.4 2,75.8 1.060.7 733.1
March......................... 1,216.4 167.5 728.2 i,06-.b 40.3 461.5 1,765.3 3.213.. 1.106.7 223.9
April......................... 1,396.7 133.2 702.8 3,727.7 38.6 '85.3 1.832.3 3.092.5 1.083.6 230.4
May............................ 1,196.2 157.5 758.3 2,463.8 44.5 415.1 1.917.6 3.1 '.9 1,136.6 261.8
June ......................... 1,235.7 159.4 908.4 .,562 8 ?I.5 ..75.2 2.16s.1 3.617.5 1.347.0 393.9
July.......................... 1,049.8 123.0 779.1 4.15'.8 '..1 -24.2 1.923.3 3,192.0 1,354.6 234.8
August ........................ 952.4 177.6 834.1 3.866.3 55.5 4.6.8 2.008.5 2,924.3 1.320.2 248.6
September..................... 941.0 199.4 808.6 3,937.z -.2 459.8 2,0.1.0 3.1,1.9 1.351.9 313.0
October....................... 874.6 148.9 796.6 3.651.0 31.B 371.1 2,010.. 3 511.6 1,444.8 285.8
November ...................... 964.6 111.8 771.5 3.915.6 -1.6 328.3 1.895.7 3.349.5 1.201.8 418.2
December...................... 1,389.0 175.0 842.0 3.335.5 -5.1 577.5 2,292.0 3.868.0 1..03.4 337.5

1978
January-June.................. 7,322.8 1,176.4 4,733.7 1. ...9 260.9 -.'. .. 1-,5i:.- 2",nBl.5 9.203.7 1.967.1

January....................... 1,194.2 151.1 692.9 ).63.3 11.5 -- .5 2.131.8 3.595.,. 1.310.6 333.5
February...................... 1,183.1 176.0 721.4 3..:1 .2 50.1 500..8 2,367.5 3.793.1 1.388.9 258.0
March......................... 1,340.3 190.4 823.5 b.6. 4-9.3 o3b.1 2,507.1 307.9 I 615.6 376.4
April......................... 1,246.7 218.8 761.7 3,7'2.7 -5.5 b41.9 2.163.2 4.338.3 1.45 1.8 340.5
May........................... 1,232.5 2(..2 906.2 3'.'.2 S-.? o15.9 2,520.7 4.262.7 1.5B.1 320.9
June.......................... 1,126.1 2,..4 827.9 :.bsl. .-.7 580.: 2.-.2 .-,36.2 1,770.8 340.2
July ..........................
August ........................
September....................
October....................
November.....................
December.....................

iSchedule A section descriptions are as follows:
0. Food and live animals. ie.wi.dls
1. Beverages and tobacco t. Mar...factured goods csla-iileo cliiell bh material
2. Crude materials, Inedible, except fuels Ma-rnieri and tranipurt equipment
3. Mineral fuels, lubricants, and related material 8 Mznellaneous ina.utactured articles. n e
4. Animal and vegetable oils and fats 9. C,.- Iod r ies ano transac I .ns not classflen elsewnere
'Beginning with January 1978 statistics, totals include data on shlpmr, .ts of nor.monetary gold. See the E explanation of Statllatics for additional
informant ion.
'Adjusted for seasonal and working-day variation. Effective with Mal 19'6 IsuE reuirea factor used to adjust 1o7i and 1978 data. See footnote
I on bottom of page 5. Annual totals are not shown for seasonally sapjlr-oa oita. Ulnad]itlea data mnould be usea for annual totals. The section
totals in this table and similar overall monthly totals in tables 1 and 3 -ere anoausten noependentl1.








GENERAL IMPORTS OF PETROLEUM AND SELECTED PETROLEUM PRODUCTS INTO
THE U.S. CUSTOMS AREA AND U.S. VIRGIN ISLANDS, UNADJUSTED

Monthly and cumulative-to-date data on general imports of petroleum and selected petroleum products into the U.S. Customs area
and into the U.S. Virgin Islands for the period January 1977 through the current month are presented in the tables that follow. Tables
1-A and I B present imports into the U.S. Customs area and tables 2-A and 2-B present imports into the U.S. Virgin Islands. (It should
be noted that imports into the Virgin Islands are excluded from the regularly compiled foreign trade statistics and, therefore, are ex-
cluded from the data presented in tables 1-A and 1-B as well as the other tables shown in the front of this report.-See "Explanation of
Statistics".

Effective with January 1978 statistics, certain changes were made in the commodity classifications (Schedule A and TSUSAI covering
petroleum products. These changes are reflected in the listing of classifications shown below. Data presented in tables 1-B and 2-B which
follow have been revised to reflect all changes in classifications, effective January 1978.


Schedule A and TSUSA Commodity Numbers Used in Compiling the Petroleum
Information Presented in This Report


Energy products

Schedule A No.


Nonenergy products

Schedule A No.


TSUSA No.


Crude petroleum and deriv-
atives to be refined
333.0020
333.0040
334.4040


Crude petroleum
333.0020
333.0040

Gasoline
334.1500

Jet fuel
334.1205

Kerosene
334.2000


Distillate fuel oil
334.3021

334.3041

Residual fuel oil
334.4050
334.4060

Propane and butane gas
341.0025

Liquid derivatives of
petroleum, n.e.s.
334.5430 pt.


475.0510
475.1010
475.6510


475.0510
475.1010


475.2520, 475.2560


(475.2530
475.2550

475.3000


S475.0525
475.0545
475.1015
475.1025

475.0535
475.1035


Lubricating oils
334.5410 pt.

Lubricating greases
334.5410 pt.


Paraffin and other mineral
waxes
335.1225 pt.
335.1245

Asphalt
335.4500

Naphthas
334.5420

All other petroleum products
(pitch of tar coke, non-
liquid hydrocarbon mix-
tures, and calcined petro-
leum and coal coke not for
fuel)
335.3000 pt.
334.5430 pt.
598.5020 pt.


475.4500


475.5500, 475.6000


494.2200
494.2400


521.1100



475.3500


401.6200
475.7000
517.5120
517.5140


475.1525, 475.1535,
475.1545


475.6530


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U.S. Department
of Commerce
BUREAU OF THE CENSUS
Washington. D.C. 20233
Official Business


U 3 1262 0I61 Sab

First Class Mail I| 3
COM-202