United States foreign trade

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Material Information

Title:
United States foreign trade
Alternate title:
United States foreign trade. FT900, Summary of United States export and import merchandise trade
Portion of title:
Summary of U.S. export and import merchandise trade
Abbreviated Title:
U.S. foreign trade, FT900, Summ. U.S. export import merch. trade
Physical Description:
13 v. : ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of the Census
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census :
For sale by the Subscriber Services Section (Publications), Bureau of the Census
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Creation Date:
May 1978
Publication Date:
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Imports -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Exports -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Commerce -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
statistics   ( marcgt )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Issued also to depository libraries in microfiche.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Dec. 1976-
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Ceased in 1988.
General Note:
"FT 900."
General Note:
Description based on: Jan. 1979; title from caption.
General Note:
Beginning with July 1980 for sale by the Supt. of Docs., U.S.G.P.O.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Mar. 1988.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001320869
notis - AGH1745
oclc - 07222812
lccn - 81646118
issn - 0730-3270
sobekcm - AA00005268_00001
Classification:
ddc - 382/.0973/00212
System ID:
AA00005268:00018

Related Items

Preceded by:
Summary of U.S. export and import merchandise trade
Succeeded by:
U.S. merchandise trade. Seasonally adjusted imports and exports


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

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i-I.


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UNITED STATES FOREIGN TRADE


'Log,


(Including unadjusted data on imports of petroleum and petroleum products)


F.A.S. EXPORTS AND F.A.S. IMPORTS

Seasonally Adjusted

The Bureau of the Census, Department of Commerce an-
nounced today that during May 1978. exports on a f.a.s.
(free alongside ship) U.S. port of exportation value
basis, excluding Department of Defense IDOD) Military
Assistance Program Grant-Aid shipments, amounted to
$11,753.7 million and that general imports on a f.a.s.
foreign port of exportation value basis, amounted to
$13,992.1 million.t 2 s

Based on the above export and import figures, the May
merchandise trade balance was in deficit by $2,238.,
million, as compared to the deficit of $2,861.2 million
recorded in April.' 2 3

During the first 5-months of 1978 (January-flay), exports
on a seasonally adjusted basis were at an annual rate of
$130,170 million, a level about 7 percent higher than the
calendar year 1977 total of $121,181 million. Imports
for the January-May 1978 period were at an annual rate
of $165,621 million, an increase of about 12 percent over
the calendar year 1977 total of $141,671 million.

For the 4-month period, February-May 1978, exports
averaged $11,055.8 million per month, about 11 percent
higher than the $9,967.8 million average reported for the
preceding 4-month period October 1977-January 1978. Imports
on a f.a.s. value basis, averaged $14.156.9 million per
month for the current 4-month period, a le'.el also about
11 percent higher than the $12,709.1 million average re-
ported for the preceding 4-month period.' 2
Unadjusted
Exports excluding Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid
shipments increased from $12,064.2 million in April to
$12,478.9 million in May. With Military Assistance
Program Grant-Aid shipments included, exports increased
from $12,069.7 million in April to $12,49-.6 million in
May. General imports decreased from $14,u86.0 million
in April to $14,199.2 million in May.


Note: Footnotes 1, 2, and 3 are shown at the bottom of
page 5.


F.A.S. EXPORTS AND C.I.F. IMPORTS

Seasonally Adjusted

The Bureau of the Census, Department of Commerce announced
today that during May 1978, exports on a f.a.s. (free
alongside ship) U.S. port of exportation value basis, ex-
cluding Department of Defense (DOD'i Military Assistance
Program Grant-Aid shipments, amounted to $11,753.7 million
and that general imports on a c.i.f. (cost, insurance, and
freight.i U.S. port of entry value basis, amounted to
$14,89..2 million.' 2 3

Based on the above export and import figures, the May
merchandise trade balance was in deficit by $3,1+0.5
million, as compared to the deficit of S3,800.Q million
recorded in April.' 2 3

During the first 5-months of 197P lJanuar,.-Mai, exports
on a seasonally adjusted basis were at an annual rate of
$130,-'0 million, a level about 7 percent higher than the
calendar year 1Q'' cocal of $121,181 million. Imports
tor the January-May 191' period were at an annual rate
of $l'o,251 million, an increase of about 12 percent over
the calendar ,ear 1977 total .:.f $157,59 million.

For the A-month period, February-Ma:, 19"1, exports
averaged $11,055.8 million per month, about 11 percent
higher than the $9,967.8 million average reported for the
preceding --month period, October 19?i-Januarv 1978.
Imports on a c.i.f. value bails, averaged $15.0-0.2 million
per month for the current c-month period, a level also
about 11 percent higher than the $13,536.9 million average
reported for the preceding 4-month period.' 1 3

Unadjusted
Exports excluding Military A-.istance Program Grant-Aid
shipments increased lightly from $12,064.2 million in
April to $12,478.9 million in May. With Military Assisc-
ance Program Grant-Aid shipments included, exports increased
from $12,069.7 million in April to $12,.94.6 million in
May. General imports decreased from $15,425.0 million in
April to $15,ilc.6 million in May.


U.S. Department of Commerce
BUREAU OF THE CENSUS


Inquiries concerning these figures should be addressed to the Chief. Foreign Trade Division, Bureau of
the Census, Washington, D.C. 20233. Tel: Area Code 301. 763-5140; 763-7754; and 763-7755.
For sale by the Subscriber Services Section (Publications), Bureau of the Census, Washington. D.C.
20233, or any U.S. Department of Commerce district office. Postage stamps not acceptable; currency
submitted at sender's risk. Remittances from foreign countries must be by international money order
or by a draft on a U.S. bank. Price 30 cents per copy. Annual subscription (FT 900,975,985, and 986
combined) $14.90.


Fr 900-78-5


Summary of U.S. Export and

rI;mport Merchandise Trade




.-MAY 1978
.* iFor Release June 27, 1978 9:30 A.M.


jWted and Unadjusted Data








EXPLANATION 0


IMPORT STATISTICS

Coverage

The U.S. import statistics reflect both government and
nongovernment imports of merchandise from foreign countries
into the U.S. Customs territory, which includes the 50 States,
the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. The U.S. import
statistics exclude imports into the Virgin Islands, Guam,
American Samoa, and other U.S. possessions; and shipments
between the United States and Puerto Rico, between the United
States and U.S. possessions, and between any of these outlying
areas. (Data on U.S. trade with Puerto Rico and the Virgin
Islands of the United States are published separately in Report
FT 800. Additional data on such trade and on imports into the
Virgin Islands from foreign countries are presented in reference
tabulations.) Data on imports of petroleum and selected
petroleum products, including shipments into the Virgin Islands
from foreign countries, are included in this report effective with
the January 1976 statistics (previously shown in former Report
FT 900-Supplement).
The U.S. import statistics also exclude American goods re-
turned to the United States by its Armed Forces;intransit ship-
ments through the United States when documented as such
with Customs; temporary shipments; transactions not con-
sidered to be of statistical significance, such as shipments of
personal and household effects; low-valued nondutiable im-
ports by mail; and issued monetary coins of all component
metals.

Inclusion of Gold in the Statistics

Effective with the statistics for January 1978. imports of
nonmonetary gold (in such forms as ore, scrap and base bullion,
nonmonetary refined bullion, etc.) which were previously
excluded, are now included in the statistics. Imports of silver in
these forms have been included since January 1969. Additional
information regarding the inclusion of gold in the 1978 statistics
appears in the November and December 1977 issues of Report
FT 990.

General Imports/Imports For Consumption

The statistics on U.S. imports are presented in terms of both
"General Imports" and "Imports for Consumption." General
imports are a combination of entries for immediate con-
sumption and entries into Customs bonded warehouses, and
thus generally reflect total arrivals of merchandise. Imports for
consumption are a combination of entries for immediate
consumption and withdrawals from warehouses for con-
sumption, and thus generally reflect the total of the com-
modities entered into U.S. consumption channels.
Source Of Import Information

The official U.S. import statistics are compiled by the Bureau
of the Census from copies of the import entry and warehouse
withdrawal forms which importers are required by law to file
with Customs officials. The information as to country of origin,
net quantity, value, and commodity classification is verified by
Customs officials on entries filed for transactions valued over
$250, which are ordinarily subject to examination for Customs


IF STATISTICS

appraisement purposes,, The statistical copy of the entry is
corrected if it does not accurately reflect the information
called for by the statistical' requirements.

Import Valuation

F.a.s. Import Value. -The f.a.s. (free alongside ship) value
represents the transaction value of imports at the foreign port of
exportation. It is based on the purchase price, i.e., the actual
transaction value and generally includes all charges incurred i*
placing the merchandise alongside the carrier at the port of.
exportation in the country of exportation.

C.i.f. Import Value.-The c.i.f. (cost, insurance, and freight):
value represents the value of imports at the first port of entry in
the United States. It is based on the purchase price and includes
all freight, insurance, and other charges (excluding U.S. import,
duties) incurred in bringing the merchandise from the country
of exportation and generally placing it alongside the carrier at
the first port of entry in the United States. If the merchandise
was acquired in a transaction between related parties, the:
purchase price used in deriving the c.i.f. value is based on adn
arm's-length equivalent transaction price, i.e., a price which
would exist between unrelated buyers and sellers.

Import Commodity Information

Import data are initially reported in terms of the commodity
classifications in the Tariff Schedules of the United States
notated (TSUSA), which is an official publication of the US.
International Trade Commission, embracing the legal text
the Tariff Schedules of the United States together with static
tical annotations. The TSUSA data are rearranged and present
in this report in terms of totals for the I-digit commodity
sections in Schedule A, Statistical Classification of Commoditl
Imported Into the United States, which is based upon thi
Standard International Trade Classification (SITC), Revision 2
effective with the statistics for January 1978. Prior to Jan
1978, Schedule A was based upon the former SITC, Revi

Date of Importation and Import Monthly Carryover

It is the objective of the compiling procedures to incl
shipments, insofar as practicable, in the statistics for the actuti
month of importation (or the month of withdrawal in the
of warehouse withdrawals for consumption). Effective with
January 1978 statistics, the date of importation as reported
the import entries is being used to determine the statistic i
month in which the shipments are included. However, sia
under the Customs "immediate-delivery" procedures imported
may file the import entry up to 10 workdays after the date of
release of the merchandise, some documents for merchandise I
imported during the last few days of a given month may not i
be received in time for inclusion in the statistics for that monta I
As a result, there is a carryover, estimated at about 15 percent |
from the actual month of importation to a subsequent monteil|
In addition, processing problems (e.g., late filing of documents'
rejection of a shipment by the computer because the data fail
to meet certain edit criteria established to protect the accuracyO
of the statistics, etc.) contribute to an additional carryover o:
about 5 percent (in terms of value) of shipments from the it-








ported month of importation (or withdrawal from warehouse)
to a subsequent month, usually the succeeding month These
limitations should be borne in mind when making month-to-
month comparisons.
For 1977 and previous years, the date of Customs official
acceptance of the import documents was used to determine the
statistical month in which the shipments were included. How-
ever, in certain annual publications for 1977 and in 1978 re-
ports which also present 1977 data (e.g., FT 900, FT 990, etc.),
the 1977 data are recompiled on a date of importation basis.

Cumulations of data over at least 4-month periods are desir-
able to identify underlying trends. Month-to-month changes in
imports, exports, and similar series often reflect primarily
irregular movements, e.g., exogenous events such as strikes,
differences in monthly carryover, etc.

Estimated Data for Imports Valued Under $251

The overall import and Schedule A Section 9 totals include
sample estimates for shipments valued under $251 Therefore,
they are subject to sampling error, estimated at less than
one-tenth of one percent for the unadjusted overall total and
about one percent for the unadjusted Schedule A Section 9
total. This means that we can have about 67 percent confidence
that the published unadjusted overall totals and the unadjusted
Schedule A Section 9 totals differ by less than one-tenth of a
percent and one percent, respectivel), from the totals that
would have resulted from a complete tabulation. The statistics
on imports of petroleum and petroleum products included in
this report reflect fully compiled data and, therefore, are not
subject to sampling error.

EXPORT STATISTICS
Coverage
The export statistics reflect, in general, both government and
nongovernment exports of domestic and foreign merchandise
from the U.S. Customs territory (includes the 50 Stales, the
District of Columbia. and Puerto Rico) to foreign countries.
whether the exportation involves a commercial transaction or
not. The statistics, therefore, include Department of Defense
Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid shipments, shipments for
economic assistance under the Foreign Assistance Act and
shipments of agricultural commodities under P.L. 480 (The
Agricultural Trade Development and Assistance Act of 1954, as
amended) and related laws. The following are excluded from the
statistics: Shipments to U.S. Armed Forces and diplomatic
missions abroad for their own use, shipments between the
United States and Puerto Rico, between the United States and
its possessions (including the Virgin Islands), and between these
outlying areas; exports from U.S. possessions: intransit ship-
ments through the United States, transactions not considered to
be of statistical importance, such as personal and household
effects; temporary exports: low-valued or non-commercial
exports by mail; and issued monetary coins of all component
metals.

Inclusion of Gold in the Statistics.

As indicated above for imports, effective with the statistics
for January 1978, exports of nonmoneiarv gold (in such forms
as ore, scrap and base bulbon. nonmonetary refined bullion.
etc.) which were previously excluded, are included in the


statistics. Exports of silver in these forms have been included
since January 1Q69. Addnional information regarding the
inclusion of gold in the 1978 statistics appears in the November
and December 1977 issues of Report FT 990.

Definition of Exports of Domestic and Foreign Merchandise

Exports of domestic merchandise include commodities which
are grown, produced, or manufactured in the UnitedStates. and
commodities of foreign origin which have been changed in the
United States from the form in which they were imported, or
which have been enhanced in value by further manufacture in
the United States. Exports of foreign merchandise consist of
commodities of foreign origin which have entered the United
States as imports and which, at the time of exportation, are in
substantially the same condition as when imported.

Source of Export Information

The official U.S. export statistics are compiled by the Bureau
of the Census primarily from copies of Shipper's Export
Declarations which are required to be filed with Customs
officials, except for Department of Defense Military Assistance
Program Grant-Aid shipments which are reported directly to the
Bureau of the Census by the Department of Defense and
shipments by qualified exporters who have been authorized to
submit data in the form of magnetic tape, punched cards, or
monthly Shipper's Summary Export Declarations directly to
the Bureau of the Census.

Export Valuation
F.a.s. Export Value. -The value reported in the export statistics
generally is equivalent to a f.a.s. (free alongside ship) value at
the U.S. port of export, based on the transaction price,
including inland freight, insurance and other charges incurred in
placing the merchandise alongside the carrier at the U.S. port of
exportation.

Export Commodity Information
Beginning January 1978, export commodity information
is collected in terms of the commodity classifications in the
1978 edition of Schedule B, Statistical Classification of Do-
mestic and Foreign Commodities Exported from the United
States, which is based on the framework of the classification
system in the Tariff Schedules of the United States (TSUS).
In this report, the Schedule B data are rearranged and presented
in terms of totals for the I -digit commodity sections in Schedule
E, which is based upon the Standard International Trade Classi-
fication (SITC), Revision 2, effective with the statistics for
January 1978. Prior to January 1978. the export classifications
in Schedule B were based upon the organizational framework
of the former SITC. Revised.

Export Monthly Carryover

It is the objective of the compiling procedures to include
shipments, insofar as practicable, in the statistics for the actual
month of exportation. For purposes of the statistics, the month
of exportation is generally based on the date when the shipment
leaves the United States. (For vessel or air shipments it is the
date when the carrier departs or is cleared from the port of
export.) However, as indicated above for imports, because of








processing problems (e.g., late receipt of a document for an
end-of-month shipment, rejection of a shipment by the com-
puter because the data fail to meet certain edit criteria
established to protect the accuracy of the statistics, etc.), there
is an overall average carryover of about 2 to 3 percent (in terms
of value) of the shipments from the actual month of exporta-
tion to a subsequent month, usually the succeeding month.
These limitations should be borne in mind when making
month-to-month comparisons.
Cumulations of data over at least 4-month periods are
desirable to identify underlying trends. Month-to-month
changes in imports, exports, and similar series often reflect
primarily irregular movements, differences in monthly
carryover, etc.

Estimated Data for Export Shipments

The overall export and Schedule B section and division totals
include sample estimates for shipments valued $251-S1,999 to
Canada and for shipments valued $251-$999 to countries other
than Canada. Data for shipments valued $250 and under to all
countries are also estimated, based on established percentages of
individual country totals, and included in the Schedule B
Section 9 totals regardless of the commodity exported. It is
estimated that the unadjusted overall total is subject to a
sampling error of less than one-tenth of one percent, and the
unadjusted Schedule B section or division totals are subject to
sampling errors of about one percent. In addition, the Schedule
B Section 9 total is subject to possible error in the estimated
data for shipments valued $250 and under: and the overall total,
and the individual totals for sections other than Section 9, to a
more limited extent. Such $250 and under shipments represent
about 1 percent of the total value of exports, and about 60
percent of the Schedule B Section 9 total.

SOURCES OF ERROR IN THE STATISTICS

Monthly import and export figures are subject to the
possibility of errors which may arise from sources other than
sampling errors, discussed above. Among these are errors in the
reporting and/or processing of information as to commodity
classification, value and other statistical factors, month of
inclusion (see paragraphs on import and export carryover,
above), and the undercounting of exports to Canada due to the
non-receipt of Shipper's Export Declarations. For 1976, the
undercounting amounted to about one and one-half billion
dollars. In the case of imports the information as to value and
commodity classification (as well as country of origin and net
quantity) is verified by Customs officials on entries filed for
transactions valued over $250 which are ordinarily subject to
examination for Customs appraisement purposes, thus con-
siderably reducing the possibility of error. In addition, the
procedures used to compile both the import and export sta-
tistics include clerical and computer processing checks designed


to protect the accuracy of the statistics to the fullest practicable
extent.

MERCHANDISE TRADE BALANCES

Two trade balances are presented in this report:
1) The balance between exports based on f.a.s. values and
imports based on f.a.s. values.
2) The balance between exports based on f.a.s. values and
imports based on ci.f. values with adjustments for imports from
affiliated sellers abroad to reflect arms-length equivalent prices.
Both balances are useful for certain purposes. The first
balance corresponds to a measurement of the international
payments or credit flows resulting from merchandise trade
between the U.S. and foreign countries. The second balance is .
based on concepts similar to those used by most foreign
countries, and therefore provides a reference for comparison.
with the trade balances published by those countries.


REVISIONS TO THE STATISTICS

Under the revision policy adopted effective with the 1977
statistics, revisions to the monthly statistics for the current year
will be issued only once a year, i.e., with the reports for June
of the following year. Thus, revisions to 1977 statistics will be
issued only in June 1978. Under the policy previously in effect,;
revisions were issued twice a year-the current year's June re-
ports contained revisions for the prior year while the December'
reports usually contained revisions for the first three quarters.
of the current year.
In addition to the revisions which are made on a once a year
basis, instances may occur where a significant error in the .
statistics for a month of the current year is discovered after the..
statistics for that month are compiled. If the error is of'i
sufficient importance to require correction prior to the time|
that the regular revisions are carried, the correction is made and..
so noted in this report. I


SOURCES OF FURTHER INFORMATION

Additional foreign trade statistics and information regarding
coverage, valuation, sampling, and qualifications which should.:
be considered by users of the statistics are contained primarily
in the following publications: Report FT 990, Highlights of U.S.-
Export and Import Trade; FT 135, U.S. General Imports,:
Schedule A Commodity by Country; FT 410, U.S. Exports,'
Schedule E Commodity by Country; and the Guide to Foreigna
Trade Statistics. Information regarding additional sources ofI
statistics, the methodology used in seasonally adjusting the data,
and other matters relating to foreign trade statistics may be
obtained from the Foreign Trade Division, Bureau of the
Census, Washington, D.C. 20233.




i







5

Table 1. U.S. Exports (f.a.s. Value Basis), General Imports (f.a.s. and c.i.f. Value Basis), and Merchandise
Trade Balance, Adjusted for Seasonal and Working-Day Variation, by Month: January 1977

to May 1978

(In millions of dollars. See Explanation of Statistic- for information on coverage, date of Imporittior,, definirtons of export and import values and
trade balances, and sources of error ID the data)

F.a.a. Exports ana f.a.c. Imports F.a.s. Export, ana c.i.f. Import

Period
ETxporr, Iport-rade trade
ExporTs import- ce Eport. Import bat ade
IaI ance Hbalance

1977

Japuary-May .. 01.0 3...- -8 2.6 5 5. 1 201 o 3B- ao. -1; i'5 3

January.................................. .b.t lb ILU -~. 0 -7" 9 b6 1, 11 i 6 -1., J 5
February................................. 9.90.i5 [2 hill. --2 ,1 a 9 896.5 13 .oL -3.56 .2
March.................................... 1l. lb-.1 12.-.. 0 -2.?$9.9 10. 16 .. 1 2. -3 0 8 -
April.................................... 9.953 2 11 '91 .' -1 8 ..5 9.9:,3 12 62w.
may................................. 0...... o..iL 9 [1. 69 5 -o-. b t, ,. I L -i -O1..
June.................................. .. If'.. 091 6 L.3,. 1 -]i : 10 ''9l.6 I- -"] '* -- [.i, 3

July................... .................. 1') 38-.6 12 -.d 0 -, 98.- li'l 6-...6 1 3 -2 95,. I
August................................... 9 t,'. 0 12 IlII.. -2 -..; 9 o~' '3 1I .6 0 -3 21 3 0
September................. ................ I i 036. 12 9i9.J -1.90' 6 Ii ,)r 1i 610 3 -2. '3 8
October.... .................... ........... 9.3 -.o 11.583 3 -3,206.5 9 '. 8 13 -2" -- 0.2 9
November................................. 9.u. 0 12 398 1 -2 93 9 'T 0 13 lIi 6 -3 -16 b
December................................. 11 00' 0 1,.-.'- 2 -2 -b. 2 :i L1 0 0 1. 369 -3 :62 -

1978

January-May... .. .. ..23 .- ..v, Ou. .r. l- .,'" i.? -.2 '.- ,.-i ." -C=,p0..5

January.................................. 10 )01.. 3 12.3861 9 -2 36,6 k lO 01-. 3 1 -'.1 .' -I. 1-2 7
February................................. 9 9 1 1.. ..'.8 -- l 6 9 922 l1 3 1 3 -3 .:8 9
March.................................... l. )..l. 12.1 1t 6a .3 -2 )' 1 10 5i? i 1- Sc -3 26 7. 5
April.................................... 11.03..9 1. -.96 1 .8ol. ll .r .. 9 i ..;- B -63 uO 9
May...................................... ., IJ3. -I, h3 i .sn.- II, '3. ,' I-. 16'..: -3. L.'.
June..............................,.....

July.....................................
August...................................
September...............................
October..................................
Noveaber...............................
December.................................


'Export data represent uomest c ana foreign
Impllport data represent general upo-rts olf iercria
'Adjusted for seasonal no 'orkinx-nav eria


mercrea.dIlse txcludinri Depar ver. 3! feIen.e i [DODI Mil irary As;sistnce Fr.'gram Grar.1-Aia srnirpentF
na L E .
I l r. us ing l aj.ist..e t -'A't.r, f s a5 e-c ribed in f 3-trn3e I ti but torn .- 1 his paU -.


'Expor and ;mport statistical series are adjusted for seasonal and working day variation but not tfor change in price level Factors used to adjust 1977 and 1978 data represent the combination of
BMDaInal adjustment factors derived from monthly data through 1977 and Ihe appropriate working day factors These factor. were implemented for the adjustment of eorton data with the release of the
January 1978 statistics, and for the adjustment of import data with the April 1978 staistici. In issuess of this report for January through March 1978 Ihe 1977 import data adjusted by factors derived from
monthly data through 1976 Interim factors. derived trom monthly data through 1977 were used to adjusl Janu3ar March 1978 import data
'Cumulations of data over at least 4-month periods are desirable to identity underlying rrends. Month to10 month changes in eispors imports. and similar series ofter reflect primarily irregular move.
ments. differences in monthly carryover, eir Recent month to monih percent changes in the overall seasonally adjusted export and import series aie presented in the following able wilh average percent
month-to-month rise and decline over longer periods shown for comparison The average rise and average decline figures do nor reflect data on nonmrronetary gold The average also exclude percentage
changes for 11) the period October December 1977 because of abnormalities in the data due to effects of dock strikes and 121 periods hen negligible changes (zero perrentl in thp level of esportsiimporls
occurred. Percentage changes for I.a.s and c.i.1 import values are not available for periods priol t January 1974

Montn-to-month Average monthly rates of change


Series Average Average 4 months 12 months
Apr.-May Mar.-Apr. Feb.-Mar. Jan.-Fen. rise decline Jan. 1978- May 1Q77-
1978 1978 1978 1978 1972-1977 1972-1977 May 1978 May 1978
(Percent' (Percent) (Percent) [Percent) Percent) (Percent) (Percent) (Percent)


F.a.s. export value.. ,1.0 .6.6 .10.0 -0.9 *3.6 -3.- ..2 .1.3
F.a.s. import value.. -3.5 3.9 -4.9 + 5.5 (NA) (NA) .*.5 .2.2
C.i.f. import value.. -3.5 .4.0 -5.0 +L5.8 (NA) (NA) .3.5 .2.2

3See the "Explanalton of Statistics" for definaions of the eporl and import values and trade balanLes








Table 2. U.S. Exports (f.a.s. Value Basis) of Merchandise Showing Department of Defense (DOD)

Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid Shipments, by Month: January 1977 to May 1978


f r. million. oi dollars. See Explanation of Statistics for information on coverage, definition of F.a.s. export value, and sources of error in
the data. Unadjusted totals represent sum of unrounded figures and hence may vary slightly from sum of rounded amounts)

Exports excluding DOD Exports Including DOD Grant-Aid1
Grant-Aid' DOD Grant-Aid DO Grant-Aid


Period Domestic Domestic Domestic
and and Domestic, and Domestic. Western Other
foreign, foreign, unadjustea foreign, unadjusted Total Europe countries

adjusteonal unadjusted unadjusted


1977

January-December ..................... i i 121 18U 5 118 980 0 121 2-2.. 119.0.1.9 61 9 3.1 58.7

)anuary-May .... .. .... .... 5..0,201.0 .i.1. i.8 50.267.1 51.184..0 50.307.4 i40 2 1.1 39.1

January.............................. 9.665 1 9.119 2 8 96C 9 9.1jo.0 8.977 6 16 8 0 1 16.6
February............................. 9.89b 5 9..69.6 9 336.U0 9,..7 .9 9.3-1.0 5.0 0.3 4.7
March ................................ 10 16. 1 11 050.. 10 855 2 11 058.2 10.863 I 7.8 0 3 7.5
4pril ............................... 9.9 ,3 2 lu,5. 2 10.3.- 5 10.548 0 10.350.1 5 6 0.1 5.5
May.................................. 10 521 9 10 962 8 10.70,3.5 10.967.9 10.775 6 5.1 0.3 4.8
June................................. 10 091 10.280.3 10.0b65.5 10.283.- 10.068.6 3. 1 0 1 3.0

July................................. 10.38. 6 9 151.1 9.590.3 9.;5... 9.593 5 3 2 0.1 3.1
August............................... 9,67. 0 8.9175.5 8.802 2 8,928.5 8.605.1 2.9 0 4 2.6
September............................ 11 036 O i0 365 5 10,151.9 10.169.2 10.155.5 3 6 0 2 3.4
October......................... ..... 9,3 9 5,2 r 9.3.9 9,575.2 9.382 3 2 6 0.2 2.4
November.............................. 9.. 75.') 9,681 ; 9.51 9.689.6 9 519 8 2.5 0.3 2.2
December............................. 11 007 0 11...0'..0 11 206.0 11..08.2 11.209 8 3 8 0.8 2.9

1978

Juruary-May. ... ... ........... 55. '. .'.9. 3 5 .- 0.8 i5,529.1 S.,03.6 32.8 3.9 28.9

January.............................. 10 01" 3 9.36'. 9,21-..1 9,366.9 9.216.6 2 5 0.5 2.1
February, ............................. 9.9'2 .. 9,51- b 9 332 8 9,518.5 9.3-1 7 3.9 1.3 2.7
March................................ L0.912.1 12.07. 2 L 830 5 12 0D 9... 11 835.8 5.2; 0.5 4.8
April................................ li.t 3. 9 1L .06-..2 11.85-.1 1?.069.? 11.859.6 5 4 0.7 4.8
May.................................. L I 2. "6.9 2 ?. -. 2l .' .., ]2,2 0.0 15. 1.0 14.7
June.................................

July .................................
Augu.st ...............................
September............................
October..............................
November r.............................
December .............................

IBeginning with January 1978 statistics, totals include data on shipments of nonnmcnetary gold.
'Repre.ents only export shipirent; from the United States uina aiffers irom DOD Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid shipment figures under this
program aF follow_ la) Transfers of the material procured outside the United States and transfers from DOD overseas stocks from export shipments.
Ib) Export value is i.a.s., *hereas DOD value. in most instances, is f.o.b., point of origin. Ic) Data for shipments reported by the DOD for a
given month are Irnciuded ir, Bureau of Censu' report- in the second month subsequent to the month reported by the DOD.
'Adjuated for seasonal and working-any ssrtation. See footnote I on the bottom of page 5.
Annual total Is not shown for seasonally adjusted data. Unadjusted data should be used for annual totals.









Table 3. U.S. Imports of Merchandise, by Month: January 1977 to May 1978

(In millions of dollars. See Explanation of Statistics for information on coverage, date ot tmporration, defiantionr of i.e.-. and c.z.f. Import
values, and sources of error in the data. Unadjusted totals represent -urn of unrounded figures ana hence may vary lightly from sum of rounaea
amounts)


F.a.s. viluel C.i.f. valuet


Period General import Imports Ceneral imports rmport-
for lor
Seasonally conzuIption, Seasonally consumption,
adjus ted: na te d ]juste3 adiu ted e lnadju tea


19"

January-DecembEr......................... I z i- ,t."'.'.. l-o..3'9. 'i li'i 7 [io "h ,

January-May......................... ..... 50 -. .5 5 l 3 50 168.1 i.. 6- ',1.' 6 il? -

January................................... .) --5.0 10 .- 5 Li,60 .0 L1 1'l.6 1L.3-. ii -09 5
February................................. l-..oll.l l 11.592 3 11. z.? 1 .L, 60 12. 3. 1 303 1
MIarch.................................... l... .-.1l. 13 12.1 13 t 13.2-" i .u,)? 33 930 i
April................................... 11 1 11 852 2 12., .- i.7'... 1. 638
Nay........................................ 1 1. 9 5l, 11.9 ; l l .0 L1 -5 u '12 019 2 11 31i
June..................................... 13. '-. 1-.0.-6 1- 03- l-.S32 3 3- 992 3 98 '-

July.................................. ..... 12 .63.(' 12.-.0 b 12.3 2 i9 3.336 1 .2-'.' ij I "J 9
August ................................... 12.l'l 1 0-. -.5 1' L.0 ,89' 8 12,636.. 12 8669 C
September................................ i..939.3 12.-;0 2 12 r6 o U 10 3 16.12 8 3 13 1 9 9
October................................... ..12.58.i) 12 -9-.0 l12.'-. 1 3.1 2 13.332 13 363
November................................. 12.3986 1 12 261.' 1.2 2'. 9 1 .i93 t '.0-8.5 13 lOt. 5
December................................. 13.-'- 2 13 3%i 8 L3.15' 9 l-.. 69.- 1 3'60.' 1- 0.O I

1978

January-May............................. ,", 8. f'.23)6.. t6, r,..2 ; j,-j .i ; .078.3 j .

January.................................. 12.360.9 12,'1" 12.60-.l 13.15'.0 13.51- 9. 13 397
February................................. i1-.- 2 13 286 13i 316 i3.381 3 l-.152.3 1 160.2
March.................................... 13.699 3 i..im' .2 i.. 69.5 L-.5o .6 15..7L. 15 -92 -
April.................................... 1-.-96.1 1 ..-Bo ') 1- .10.. 1 .-33.6 15,-25.0 15. 3-t. 0
RMay...................................... 13,92., i-,l"".2 L .Ojt I-, '-. 2 L I -.c L-.9--.3
June.....................................

July.....................................
August...................................
September................................
October..................................
November.................................
December.................................

IBeginning ulth January 1978 statistics, totals include data on anipment- ot nonmonetary gold. See the Lplanstion of 3ratastic for additional
Information.
'Adjusted for seasonal and ,orking-day variation. See footnote 1 on the bottom of page 5.
'Annual total Is not shown for seasonally ad uEtea data. rUnadjusted data should be usean for annual total.






8

Table 4. U.S. Exports (f.a.s. Value Basis) of Domestic Merchandise, Including Department of Defense

(DOD) Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid Shipments-Schedule E Sections, Seasonally

Adjusted and Unadjusted, by Month: January 1977 to May 1978

tin million; of dollars. See Explanation of Statistics for lalormation on coverage, definition of f.a.s. export value, and sources of error
In the data. Unadjusted totals represent sum of unrounded figures and hence may vary slightly from sum of rounded amounts)

Schedule E sectionsal

Period
0 1 2' 3 4 5 6 7 8 9'


Seasonally adjusted'



January-May... .......... 6 05...0 'j6.2 5.'4. 1.662.9 508.. -...5 9 ..o21.9 20.97 8 3.285.1 1.624.8

January....................... 1 .u06 I .9 1.0'l.: .65.0 '1 .5 6'-. t 907.5 4. 093.8 6.53.1 379.6
February ................ ...... I 1 '9.1 50.- 1 1l.9 327 2 2 93.5 9.. ?.? 9.2.1 967 6 661.8 315.3
March......................... [.5bt.0 I? b 1.090 9 321.9 115.. 886 9 929 7 ..129.8 665.2 320.1
April ............... ........ .221 122.1 1.6' 1 375 0 Il1.3 859.1 918.3 .,'355 9 638 2 262.3
May................... ..... 1.312. L.. 2*.2 ? 393.8 I16.7 87;.1 92..3 -,230 5 6] 4 8 367.5
June..................... ... ... 1.208. 1 '. 1 1ob.6 373.1 111 9 912 1 918 5 -.Of6 9 692.0 301.1
July.......................... I ']1 6 1886.4 1 i1 3 -18.8 122 3 9.3.? 890.5 4.106.9 699.3 508.1
AuguE ....................... I 1.0 168.8 859 i 09 3 127 7 8a5 1 863.9 4.06-.6 67~4.9 378.9
Seplean er..................... I 771.9 193 9 1.027 i 393.2 110 2 1.101 0 1.025.2 -.632.0 758.0 265.5
October....................... U. f..- 9.7 1 023.6 338.- 10..0 '-8.5 I'.1.3 112.7 661.. 529.2
Nh vemner...................... 1 020 11..5 1 036 4 336. 1 123 1 786.9 632.0 0C 8.1 710.7 317.4
December........................ I ?0 6 221 1 1 081.: 30' 9 101 a 989.9 982.2 '29 6 769.5 400.7



January-May... ............. '.1-I. 8.r .'. 1i-..1.: 6. .' ./,:." .'5'.8 22,210.; 3,92'.? 1,892.9

January....................... 1.1 3.. 12 .9 I 071 2 230.. 100 6'3.0 88' a ..o.2 2 3 736 3 464.7
February ...................... 1.3.2.7 ab 3 1 (' in 6 1 2 2 96.? 419.0 896 8 4.123 3 735.2 266.9
Mar:n ......................... 1.386- 0 )2 0 I lo 1 183 6 131 962 da9 1 -..u2 i 769 9 387.7
April ......................... I 535 6 i57 2 I :bo 9 o' .9 1..4 1 976 1 965 5 .,76,2. 836.2 472.8
May........................... I. t. 3ir..." I.i".. 331.1 Ill .' 1' '. I .u 6. 1 .t,,4.6 850.l 300.8
June ..........................
July..........................
August........................
September.....................
October.......................
November.....................
December.....................

i Jr. us tea




January-December............... I- L i. b I 6-b. 13.u80.'. 63 ') i.308.7 10.822.6 10 856.0 50.256.7 8 236.2 4.313.7

January-May.... .. .. 1, 66 6b 6.1.3 I t.oo j ;1'.2 6... -9 0 .b.3 0 21 2-6 6 3 32). 8 1.595.8

January................ .... m '.. i 160 3 1 1 .. l. I ? 7 b6 ;5 I 81 .0 839 3 '62 2 590.3 376.9
February...................... I lt o 1i 1 -'10 266 0 91 9 910.3 892 ? 3.61" 3 620.6 280.9
March......................... I 6. 11. l to0 u 79 1. 132 9.3 1.003 1 '53 733.0 299.6
April......................... 2 .- 11:2 t 1.132 ? 39: 9 102.8 902.1 967.9 3.7.9 682.2 270.2
May ........................... -3- l' e a -25 .2.- 325 2 922.9 970.5 566.9 698.4 368.2
June........................... I [- .0 1.- > .0G -.8 398.1 120 1 91' 6 9.".0 260.6 72-1.5 335 1
July.......................... .1. I 150 Lp 33-.3 -A6.3 1.6 3 950 656.7 3 ;98.9 685.3 515 7
August ....................... IL- 15 6 11 5 33i 10'2 86 6: .5 831 9 3 621 6 651 3 375 5
September ..................... 2 3ul 6 622 2 .01 8 LI, ; 1 063 b l 013 9 -.303 I 7- .. 250.9
October....................... 6. 61'. 1.0-3 366 8 98 I 3' '-2 8 -.17.. 671 3 493.7
November...................... 1- 130 6 362 I 1t2 7 3t 0 615 ..072 692 9 312.3
December...................... 1. .. 28'2. I 1 I a 315 3 l[L 03 1.03' 9'? 3 776.9 7?1.8 434.8



January-May... .' '. ..' ....6 .'.-l. ... -. ..... -.0':. 23.lt &.6 3,99i.1 1.865.5

January....................... i): 1id .0-. 8 188 9 9., a 8t0..2 629.9 3.852 0 665.6 433.6
February....................... .31 3 t6.'J .ur,).- t-t..' 2 a63 2 6.6 3 9-1 9 689.6 237.5
March.......................... I -.. 213 b 1 3j3 ) b16; 1-1.3 1 ",i.1 1.06 .; 5. 1-... 878.5 390.4
April......................... l -? ) 1t-- 3 Jb6.b a 6 5 1.5, 9'1.3 988.' 5.098 2 854 6 511.1
May........................... .. .... '1- .'. .-tt : ir r .r i I'. I I ...+'i I .'. ... I i;.9 W 8.8 i )12.8
June.........................
July..........................
August .......................
September ....................
October.......................
November......................
December.....................

'Schedule E section descriptions are as follows:
0. Food and live animals 5. Chemicals and related products, N.. P.F.
1. Beverages and tobacco 6. Minulacrure., goods classified chief) ny material
2. Crude materials, inedible, except fuels 7. Machinery and transport equipment
3. MinerIl fuels, lubricants, and related material 8. Miscellaneous manufactured articles. N.i.P F
4. Oils and fats--animal and vegetable 9. Commodities and transactions not classified elsewhere
2Beginning with January 1978 statistics, totals include data on shipments of nonmonetary gold. See the Explanation of Stattstics for auaditonal
information.
'Adjusted for seasonal and working-day variation. See footnote 1 on the bottom of page 5. Annual totals are not shown for seasonal ly adjusted
data. Unadjusted data should be used for annual totals. The section totals in this table and similar overall monthly totals in tables 1 and 2
were adjusted independently.






9

Table 5. U.S. General Imports (f.a.s. Value Basis) of Merchandise, Schedule A Sections, Seasonally

Adjusted and Unadjusted, by Month: January 1977 to May 1978

(In millions of dollars. See Explanation of Statistics for ainorritatto r on coverage. date of importation, dEflmIT IODOnf f. a.. Import value, and
sources of error un the data. Unadjustea totals represent sum of unroundea figures and hence may tary -:ightly from sumr of rounded amounts)


Schedule A section;
Period
0 1 2' 3 4 5 6 ? 6 9'


Seasonally adjusted'


1977

January-May................... 5.665.l t67,.9 3._95.' 1 18.I lO. 2l0., 1 Oi5. 86 32' 1 13 962 9 5 -' .0 I 195 I

January....................... 989.2 li1 .. i .3.3 3.j1; ; 26.- .j-' I 1.-58.0 2..9-.5 1.0)8 0 O 1i .9
February...................... 1.166.- 139.' '"i 5 3.86.. -W 3 .22.1 1 71-.. .1 0-1. 1.152 6 256.9
March......................... 103.0 150. 3 680 6 -. 3 '2.. I'. -08 6 1,611 L 2.'39.) 1 10.7 226.9
April.......................... L."16.0 1.'8.- o5. 1 3,3.1 5 0 -l' 3 1 2 L.6 2.'89.6 1,083.5 232.9
May........................... .120. I'. i0. 6'.t 3. 0.L -1 .1-.9 1 's2 1 2 ;98 6 I 13 16 62.5
June.......................... L.0.6.9 1. 5L t2.6 J6 1 2 -3-6.8 1 6- 1 I 3,L'1.7 I 2'0 5 371 9
July................ .......... 990.2 11' 2 b77 3 e' .. -l 3 "..l 1 609. 1.062.6 1 Itr (0 222. 6
August........................ 898. 3 169.0 9.9 ".321 l t l j 2. i I i.'., 3 027.6 i.063.6 24. 2
September..................... 9_'',.7 19g 6 'I'.] 3 212.0 i .66 7 1 9i a t.231.8 1.231 i5 3',..7
October......................... 8' .l 24.9 8 695.9 9. 9.6 1 .8 11 9 3.231.5 1.26..0 2 1 .5
November ...................... 86-.. 9"'.r '-4 3 961.6 39.- jr: .ob i. 666 3.,088 12 l. 55.6 361 5
December...................... ..'93.3 i.6. "59..' 000. 3 5.b 8 ".'91 5 3 55..2 l.362.6 "ll 9

1978
January-May........... ....... ,,8: l 688'. .' Li.,61:.. 2 2 L .', .2 1 '9.9 ;,- 1.e L ,6'7.')

January....................... 1.1.L1.? 13. 7 8b. 6 3 196.. j." -_09 1 1 '113 L 3.51. 8 1.326 2 3-* .7
February...................... 1.176.6 L86 .6 '91 6 3.j 19.) 50.6 ,21.; 2 'i- 8 3 918 0 1.509.6 284.5
March......................... 1.-02 1 .'7. 761 A6 i. 2 1 -L.2 559.- 2 266 1 3 t 9.2 1.527.9 380.2
April ......................... 1,154 6 i5.3 ': 3 3 3' -3. 4t. L Sl1.1 3.997 6 1.5f.6 6 3.9.1
May........................... '. 1 2 .- 1. :'. 3, ', 2,322. 3. 69. 3 1 ,, 1 .5 3i .
June..........................
July..........................
August ........................
September.....................
October.......................
November ......................
December......................


Lr. d ..d Ie,


19'7

January-December........... .. .. 12.'. 8 L.ef.) 6 6 2 3 .> ,30 970 :.1.:| .,, .-rj 13.609 3. "i .

January-May.. .......... ...... 5.653. 1 ob. 9 16:." L .8 .- 1- .')53. b 070.3 LI.. 0 6 .0136. I L37 5
January ....................... 9- 1 129.'. -.9.5 I I: .- 6 .9 35 I ..2 .6 : ..93.3 9 5.6 20..2
February...................... 1.09' 6 1:".- 998.- '65r.5 0 6 387.. L .9-.9 2,?76 6 989.1 -28.0
March ......................... i .. .1 '.1 1i5.- o ,.m .8m 38 -. 39 3 1.653.0 2.990. 1i.031 2 220 3
April ......................... 1.. 31-. 3 121.' I5 i, .' 36. -61. 5 1. 12 l 2.68 2 .009.8 226.6
May........................... 1. 1-, 1.-.9 696.6 2,';32.8 -2.1 -1i I 781.5 2,9-6.9 L.U0 O ; 257 5
June.......................... i. i56.68 l. 5 39.1 ,305.6 '0.t, ..9.2 2.010.3 3,-19.1 1.257.0 392.1
July........... .......... .. 980.3 1 .2 21-..2 3.9 1. 3 -L.8 399.. l.'8-..1 995.2 1.261.8 230.7
August........................ 886-.8 B2.3 .3 3.61. l.- 52.c ,.21 8 L 8 3.5 2.11.3 1,231.2 24..2
September ..................... 873.' L8'.9 "-. 3 'u. 5 .l' 36..- 1.888. -1 995.9 [25' .. 306.-
October......... ..... ....... 812.9 13- '37.. 3,b3-.9 -`9.6 3 .).1 1 &8 9.3 3 301.5 l.3- I 260.5
November ...................... 'o01.6 1':'5 '0 7l 2 3.' 2.9 j9.0 311.6 1 763 3 3 190.1 1,118.9 *1.- t6
Decemoer...................... 1,29- 6 159.8 781.2 3 153.0 -1.1 4.).0 :.117 B 3.6.3. 1 1.305.- 327 2
1978

January-May .......... .. .. ,, ,,. 7 i-..I f,, .. I T Ir. .r. 3 1 l -.. .L->. 1 1,,'i2. I .uO2.0

January....................... ,L12. 9 136.1 650 3.-22 2 29 3 -18 9 L 962.9 3 3,2.' I :28.1 328.2
february ...................... I. 111.- i b. .5 2 3. iu2 .6. .'- 2. 2 2.19;.- ..573 3. 1.293..' 25) ,
March......................... L "5" -.. 1'1 6 .S 3 31 -l. o00-.2 2.33-.1 050 1. l 511. 1 369 2
April ......................... L.,lot 5 201 '12.- 3. i l i .2*. olt., '..383.' -. Om5 1 -39 7 33..8
May...................... ,1 -3.- !.. -.2 -I.- 3 23 .l ',. 583.' ;'4 '. -,'3''.- a 0-r .O0 3 Lt.,u
June.........................
July..........................
August ........................
September .....................
October.......................
November ......................
Dec embe r......................

'Schedule A section oexcription' are as follow.':
0. Food and lite antTala i. Crar..:i31 and rmla're prc.aucts. N.5 P.F.
1. Beserages and tobacco. Msnulacturea g '.r claifl Ied cnef'ly by raterlal
2. Crude martertll'. inedible except fuel- '. M3chinery ard trarsoort equipment
3. Mineral fuels. lubricant;. and related ..atertal 8. M -i_'celi.raeou- .,anufactureo article', N.9 P.F.
4. Oils arna ats--anioml .an ve1retacle. C.-,.3odtle: tnd tran'ac'tlorn not cl sss f led li.'.her-
mBegina-ng a l Janu.r 1|9'6 ;ti .: tota.ll 16il.: i.. dr ,ta on .I. pI ,t C" r.. r,,-.r.t.r, gal .. E. E ti- EL pI .fnlat n if it. t t' ,c tor .ddtor.t.1
lin format i n.
Adpitet a for .eaiai 1 .ini rltnr, -d .ar.it o.m Eftictit -..' l, ln [ ,,. r a_ 1.crc r, ..r r_ ,d.u:t 14'?7 and lIm0 Jai. ;E
footnote I on boLtt.r. oi pa@E 5. Anr.'nl total ar. cc in-, ...r ,. a I'i .lwitji.-d t. 'i,-,am 'sW I ta h',.ui t. ,.'.a tor rar,,.ail r.[il' rhe
SECtlon ECtt l, In this tat ..-A i.,rllr ..ri|L sonthll t ilt in a' l I i'.-I.al 3 wFr,. i.j.t.. .stldc-.td ncc .






10

Table 6. U.S. General Imports (c.i.f. Value Basis) of Merchandise, Schedule A Sections, Seasonally

Adjusted and Unadjusted, by Month: January 1977 to May 1978

(In millions of dollars. See Explanation of Statistlcs for information on coverage, date of Importation, definition of c.i.f. Import value, and
sources of error In the data. Unadjusted totals represent sum of unrounded figures and hence may vary slightly from sum of rounded amounts)

Schedule A sectionst
Period
0 I 2 3 1 5 6 7 8 9'


Seasonally adjusted'


1977

January-May.. .............

January... ... ... ... ..
February.......... ....
March .. .... ... .. ... .....
April ........ .... .... .....
May .. ... .. ............
June ..........................
Ju ly .... .. .. ..
Iugu" it. ... .. .... ...
September.....................
October .......................
November...... .. .... .
December .... ........ .. ....

1978

January-May...................

January.......................
February......................
March.........................
April.........................
May...........................
June..........................
July..........................
August........................
September.....................
October.......................
November......................
December......................




1977

January-December ..............

January-May ...................
January.......................
February......................
March .........................
April ..........................
May.............. .............
June ......... ...... .........
July..........................
August ........................
September......................
October.......................
November.......................
December......................

1978
January-May....................

January.......................
February......................
March.........................
April.........................
May...........................
June.................. ......
July..........................
August........................
September....................
October.......................
November......................
December.....................


6,030.7

1.058.2
1,242.5
1.169.6
1,366.6
1,193.8
1.118. 3
1,060.4
966.9
991.6
939.6
92...8
1,387.6



6,204.3

1,209.9
1,254.6
1.281.4
1,239. 3
1,2 l[ .


735.6

128.9
151.8
162.0
140.4
L52.5
147.3
129.6
207.5
212.1
135.0
103.9
162.9



962:.

1.7.4
200.2
182.4
233 8
199.O


3, 540.;

625.1
752.8
72 3 1
702.1
737.6
803.9
738.5
843.u
779.0
815.'
806.7
818.3



..0)7. 1

7?9.-.
845.7
816.2
770.2
875.b


19,161.4

3,539...
4.128.7
4.635.0
3,546.8
3.311.5
4,638.5
4 L120.7
3.730.3
4,034. 3
4. 13 .0
-.210.3
3,279.7



1',601.3

3.386.3
3.731 9
3. 300.2
3.576.1
3.812.6


?, 12 .3

365.2
451.7
.28.9
438.8
437.7
'60.0
454.7
..55.0
4.91.8
371.8
323.4
575.2



2.781.3

-3-.1
552.8
589.0
586.9
I i


8.938.2

1.572.0
1.842.2
1,720.6
1.906.7
1.896.7
1.981.8
1,950.6
1.996.5
2,067.9
1,959.5
1.815.8
2,264.8



12,-92.2

2.164.3
2.711 9
2..3,.1
23.700.9
-,-1.0O


14,948.2

2.77. 1
3.259..
2.937.3
2.987.9
2,989.5
3.383.6
3.263.8
3.206.5
3.-43.3
3.543.5
3.290.9
3.773.7



20.0''0.8

3.725.8
..159.1
3.923.-
,2.4.9
.,01 .b6


5,845.8

. 105. 1
1,236.2
1,.123.6
1.162.7
1.218.2
1.293.9
1,.230.3
1.162.1
1.324.1
1.361.7
1,133.8
1,464.9



8.022.5

1,421.9
1.620.7
1.633.6
1.682.0
1,66b. 3


LUna lusted


13.42-.8

6.017.8
I 039.2
1 .169. 2
1.216.-
. 396. ,
1,196 2
;.235 7
1.049.8
952.-
941.0
87-..6
96..6
I 389.0





1. 19. 2
1.163.1
1 30. 3
I 2-6.7
1,2 )2.5 1


1,817.5

722.4
131.2
133.0
167.5
133 2
157.5
159..
123.0
177 6
199."
148.9
111.8
175.0





151.1
176.0
190 ..
218.8
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3.-20.2
588.8
642.1
728.2
702.8
758. 3
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779.1
834. 1
808.6
796.6
771.5
8-2.0


3, .'.05 .

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72 1.
823.5
761. 7
wOh. 2


47.292.8

19.B36 3
3.762 4
4.099.8
5.08-..6
3,727.2
2,963.8
.582 .8
..157.8
3.868.3
3,937.5
3,657.0
3.915.6
3,335. 5





3.623.3
3.713 2
3,626 9
3.722.7
3 ..27.-


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2.162.6b
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475.2
u24 2
446.8
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4.14, 5
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22.997.2

8,662.2
1.5-0.6
1.606.-
1.765.3
1.832.3
1.917.6
2.164. L
1.923.3
2.008.5
2,0~1.0
2,.010.4
1.895.7
2.292.0


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2.131 6
2 367 5
2.50'.1
2,563.2
2, .20.'


38 830.3

15,095.5
2,665.9
2,975.8
3.213.-
3.092.5
3, 14'.9
3 64' 5
3,192.0
2.924 .3
3.191.9
3.511.6
3.399.5
3.868.0





3.595..
3.'93 L
..307 9
-.338 3
4.2h',. 7


I. 828.U

5,.04. 3
1,016.7
1,060.7
1.106 7
1,083.6
1,136.6
1.347.0
1,354.6
1.320.2
1,351.9
1.444.8
1.201.8
1..03.4


7,.433.0

1.316 7
1.388.9
1,615.6
1.545.8
S.566.1


'Senedule A section descriptions are as follows
0. Food and live animals 3 Chemicals ana related products. N.S.P.F.
1. Beverages and tobacco 6 Manufactured goods classified cnlefly by material
2. Crude materials, inedlile. except fuels 1. Macninery and transport equipment
3. Mineral fuels, lubricants. ann related material 8 Miscellaneous manufacturea articles N.S.P.F.
4. O11a and fats--animal and vegetable 9 Commoditles and transacti tons not classified Elsewhere
2Beginning with January 1978 stt.tit,cs. totals Include data on shipments of nc.nnonretary gold. See the Explaration of SLtatstIcs for additional
information.
"Adjusted for seasonal .nd worling-day, ar,aticn. Eliect-e u.th Mua 1978 ,siue, revised actor: used to adjust 1977 and lq78 data. See
footnote 1 on bottom of page 5. Annual total! are not shown for seasonally adjusted data. Unadjusted data should be uued for annual totals. The
section totals in this table ana miailir overall monthly totals ir. t.le; I ar.d were adjusted indeper.dertlv.


L.215.7

219.7
261.9
230.6
236.6
266.9
376.8
226.6
248.6
309.3
276.7
364.6
317.0



1,703.9

350.1
289.5
385.6
355.1
323.5


3,387.8

1.157.0
207.8
233.1
223.9
230.4
261.8
397.9
234.8
248.6
313.0
285.8
418.2
332.5


1,627.4

333.3
258.0
374.4
340.5
320.9







GENERAL IMPORTS OF PETROLEUM AND SELECTED PETROLEUM PRODUCTS INTO
THE U.S. CUSTOMS AREA AND U.S. VIRGIN ISLANDS, UNADJUSTED

Monthly and cumulative-to-date data on general imports of petroleum and selected petroleum products into the U.S. Customs area
and into the U.S. Virgin Islands for the period January 1977 through the current month are presented in the tables that follow. Tables
1-A and 1-B present imports into the U.S. Customs area and tables 2 A and 2-B present imports into the U.S. Virgin Islands. (It should
be noted that imports into the Virgin Islands are excluded from the regularly compiled foreign trade statistics and, therefore, are ex-
cluded from the data presented in tables 1-A and 1-B as well as the other tables shown in the front of this report.-See "Explanation of
Statistics".

Effective with January 1978 statistics, certain changes were made in the commodity classifications (Schedule A and TSUSA) covering
S petroleum products These changes are reflected in the listing of classifications shown below. Data presented in tables 1-B and 2-B which
follow have been revised to reflect all changes in classifications, effective January 1978.

Schedule A and TSUSA Commodity Numbers Used in Compiling the Petroleum
Information Presented in This Report


Energy products

Schedule A No.


Nonenergy products

Schedule A No.


TSUSA No.


ide petroleum and deriv-
;Lves to be refined
333.0020
333.0040
334.4040


Iflde petroleum
333.0020
333.0040

heoline
334.1500


at fuel
334.1205

i lsene
334.2000

letillate fuel oil
334.3021

334.3041

duall fuel oil
334.4050
S 334.4060

repane and butane gas
1 341.0025

i.klid derivatives of
petroleum, n.e.s.
334.5430 pt.


475.0510
475.1010
475.6510


475.0510
475.1010


475.2520, 475.2560


475.2530
475.2550

475.3000


475.0525
475.0545
475.1015
475.1025

475.0535
475.1035


Lubricating oils
334.5410 pt.

Lubricating greases
334.5410 pt.


Paraffin and other mineral
waxes
335.1225 pt.
335.1245


Asphalt
335.4500

Naphthas
334.5420


All other petroleum products
(pitch of tar coke, non-
liquid hydrocarbon mix-
tures, and calcined petro-
leum and coal coke not for
fuel)
335.3000 pt.
334.5430 pt.
598.5020 pt.


475.4500


475.5500, 475.6000


494.2200
494.2400



521.1100



475.3500


401.6200
475.7000
517.5120
517.5140


475.1525, 475.1535,
475.1545


47 .6530


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U.S. Department
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BUREAU OF THE CENSUS
Washington, D.C. 20233
Official Business


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

3 1262 0586 50267
First Class Mail I .
COM-202




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