United States foreign trade

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Material Information

Title:
United States foreign trade
Alternate title:
United States foreign trade. FT900, Summary of United States export and import merchandise trade
Portion of title:
Summary of U.S. export and import merchandise trade
Abbreviated Title:
U.S. foreign trade, FT900, Summ. U.S. export import merch. trade
Physical Description:
13 v. : ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of the Census
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census :
For sale by the Subscriber Services Section (Publications), Bureau of the Census
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Creation Date:
April 1978
Publication Date:
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Imports -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Exports -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Commerce -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
statistics   ( marcgt )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Issued also to depository libraries in microfiche.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Dec. 1976-
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Ceased in 1988.
General Note:
"FT 900."
General Note:
Description based on: Jan. 1979; title from caption.
General Note:
Beginning with July 1980 for sale by the Supt. of Docs., U.S.G.P.O.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Mar. 1988.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001320869
notis - AGH1745
oclc - 07222812
lccn - 81646118
issn - 0730-3270
sobekcm - AA00005268_00001
Classification:
ddc - 382/.0973/00212
System ID:
AA00005268:00017

Related Items

Preceded by:
Summary of U.S. export and import merchandise trade
Succeeded by:
U.S. merchandise trade. Seasonally adjusted imports and exports


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text


:j. 79


UNITED STATES FOREIGN TRADE


UNIV. OF FL LI. Summary of U.S. Export and

UViENT DT Import Nandise Trade

IziIN


iU.S. DEPOTORY
.. -JUN Isi M APRIL 1978
...78-4. FOR W .RANSMISSIO : 0 A.M. MAY 26, 1978


Seasonally Adjusted and U ata

(Including unadjusted data on imports of petroleum and Wroleum products)

Note: New seasonal adjustment factors have been applied to 1977 and 1978 import data.
See special announcement on page 2.


F.A.S. EXPORTS AND F.A.S. IMPORTS


Seasonally Adjusted
Bureau of the Census, DepartmenL of Commerce an-
ced today that during April 1978, exports on a
||i:s. (free alongside ship) U.S. port of exportation
atlue basis, excluding Department of defense e (DOD) Mili-
trfy Assistance Program Grant-Aid shipments, amounted to
|:,634.9 million and that general imports on a f.a.s.
ieietgn port of exportation value basis, amounted to
gi- 496.1 million.

iSed on the above export and import figures, the April
"aOrchandise trade balance was in deficit by $2,661.2
ri lon, as compared to the deficit cf $2,787.2 million
ftcorded in March.' 2 3

*.r.ing the first 4-months of 1978 (January-April), exports
a seasonally adjusted basis were at an annual rate of
7451 million, a level about 5 percent higher than the
*jlandar year 1977 total of $121,181 million. Imports
r the January-April 1978 period were at an annual rate
I $165,050 million, an increase of about 12 percent over
tim' calendar year 1977 total cf $147,670 million.

A Ahe 4-month period, January-April 19;8, exports
aged $10,620.9 million per month, about 4 percent
a tLan che (10,223.3 million average reported for the
. ~.eding 4-month period September-December 1977. Imports
f.a.s. value basis, averaged $13,754.1 million per
f*O for the current 4-month period, a level about 7
,eoasst higher than the $12,848.7 million average re-
;pa~ted for the preceding w-month period.i 2 3

Unadjusted
rt's excluding Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid
kpaents decreased slightly from $12,074.2 million in
S. ito $12,064.2 million in April. With Military Assist.-
feik.rlogram Grant Aid shipments included, exports decreased
u 12,079.4 million in March to $12,069.7 million in
General imports decreased from $14,5.7.3 million
3 tL:ch to $14,486.0 million in April.

ate BJootnotes 1, 2, and 3 are shown at the bottom of
page 6.


F.A.S. EXPORTS AND C.I.F. IMPORTS

Seasonally Adjusted
The Bureju of the Census, Depattment of Commerce announced
today that during April 1978. exports on a f.a.s. free
alongside ship) U.S. port -t exportation value basis, ex-
cluding Department of DeferEE (DCi'I lilitars AsE stance
Prog Tim Grrint-Aid shipments, amounted to il ,b3-.9 million
and that general imports on a c. i.f. ic.t, insurance, and
freight U.S. port of entry value bacir ar..cunted to
$15,435.8 million.' 2 3

Based on the above export and import figures, the AFril
merchandise trade balance was in deficit by $3,800.9
Million as compared tc the deficit cf $3.657.5 million
recorded in March.' 2 3

During the first --months cf 1978 iJanuary-April), exports
on a seasonal, adjusted basis were at an annual rate of
$127, 451 million, a leel about 5 percnet higher than the
calendar )Ear 1977 total of $12i,181 million. Imports
for the January-April 1978 period wErE at an annual rate
of $175.631 million, ar. increase of about 11 percent over
the calendar year 1977 total o $l157.5-. million.

for the --month period, Januar,-i,pril lI78 exports
averaged 110,620.9 ruiillion per month, about percent
higher than the $10,223.3 million average reported for the
preceding --month period, Septembcr-Decer.,ber 1977. imports
on a c.t.f. value basis, averaged 1&4,635.9 million per
month for the current 4-month period, a level about 7
percent higher than the $13,700.3 million average re-
ported for the preceding u-month period.' 2 3

Unadjusted
Expcrtc excluding Military Assistance Programr Grant-Aid
shipments decreased slightly from $12,07-.2 million in
March to $12,064.2 million in i.pril. with Militarv Assist-
ance Program Grant-Aid shipments included, exports decreased
from $12,079.. million in March to $12,0b9.7 million in
April. General imports decreased ftom $i5,.7L.5 million
in March tc. $15,125.'' million in April.


1USA Department of Commerce
BUREAU OF THE CENSUS


Inquiries concerning these figures should be addressed to the Chief, Foreign Trade Division, Bureau of
the Census, Washington, D.C. 20233. Tel: Area Code 301, 763-5140; 763-7754; and 763-7755.
For sale by the Subscriber Services Section (Publications), Bureau of the Census, Washington, D.C.
20233, or any U.S. Department of Commerce district office. Postage stamps not acceptable; currency
submitted at sender's risk. Remittances from foreign countries must be by international money order
or by a draft on a U.S. bank. Price 30 cents per copy. Annual subscription (FT 900.975,985, and 986
combined) $14.90.


41 i .. 0







SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT

Seasonal Adjustment Factors


Listed below are the seasonal (and trading-day) adjustment factors
for total exports and total imports for 1977 and 1978. These factors
have not previously been published.

The factors for exports are based on data covering the period from
January 1966 through December 1977 which were introduced in
January 1978.

The factors for imports are also based on data from 1966-1977
but differ from interim factors which were used to adjust January,
February, and March of 1978. The replacement of the interim
factors is the result of recently completed efforts to develop sea.
sonal adjustment factors which more accurately reflect the compila.
tion of import data on a "date of importation basis" introduced


with the January 1978 statistics (see the "Explanation of Statistics"
section of this report for more details). The seasonal factors for 1977
were also revised based on the above.

The factors for seasonally adjusting the Schedule A sections
(Tables 5 and 6) have also been revised.
All appropriate data, including the Merchandise Trade Balance, in
this report have been revised retroactive to January 1977 to reflect
these changes.

Further information regarding the methodology used in develop-
ing the adjustment factors and on the factors themselves may be
obtained by contacting the Foreign Trade Division, Bureau of the
Census, Washington. D.C. 20233.


Export and Import Trading-Day and Seasonal Adjustment Factors: 1977 and 1978


(Percent. Combined factors equal trading-day adjustment
seasonal adjustment factors)


factors multiplied by


Total exports Total imports

Year and month Trading- Seasonal Year and month Trading- Seasonal
day adjustment Combined day adjustment Combined
adjustment factors factors adjustment factors factors
factors factors

1977 1977

January ........ 100.8 93.6 94.35 January ....... 100.9 101.0 GI1.91
February ....... 92.0 104.0 95.68 February ...... 92.1 99.8 91.92
March .......... 101.7 106.9 108.72 March ......... 102.5 103.2 105.78
April .......... 100.3 105.6 105.92 April ......... 98.6 102.6 101.16
May............ 99.7 104.5 104.19 May........... 101.6 99.2 100.79
June ........... 99.0 102.9 101.87 June .......... 99.1 106.3 105.34
July ........... 102.4 91.7 93.90 July .......... 101.1 98.5 99.58
August ......... 101.4 91.5 92.78 August ........ 102.5 97.1 99.53
September ...... 99.7 94.2 93.92 September..... 99.5 96.7 96.22
October ........ 100.8 101.3 102.11 October ....... 100.9 98.4 99.29
November ....... 98.5 103.8 102.24 November ...... 98.9 100.0 98.90
December ....... 103.4 100.2 103.61 December ...... 102.1 97.2 99.24

1978 1978

January ........ 99.9 93.6 93.51 January ....... 101.6 101.1 102.72
February ....... 92.2 104.0 95.89 February ...... 92.1 99.9 92.01
March .......... 103.7 106.7 110.65 March ......... 102.9 103.2 106.19
April .......... 98.1 105.7 103.69 April ......... 97.3 102.7 99.93
May............ 101.6 104.5 106.17 May........... 102.5 99.0 101.48
June ........... 99.9 103.0 102.90 June .......... 99.5 106.3 105.77
July........... 101.0 91.8 92.72 July .......... 100.9 98.6 99.49
August ......... 101.9 91.4 93.14 August ........ 102.5 97.1 99.53
September ...... 100.5 94.2 94.67 September..... 98.6 96.7 95.35
October ........ 99.9 101.2 101.10 October ....... 101.6 98.3 99.87
November........ 99.2 103.8 102.97 November ...... 99.1 99.9 99.00
December ....... 102.6 100.3 102.91 December ...... 101.2 97.3 98.47








EXPLANATION OF STATISTICS


IMPORT STATISTICS

Coverage

The U.S. import statistics reflect both government and
nongovernment imports of merchandise from foreign countries
into the U.S. Customs territory, which includes the 50 Slates,
the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. The U.S. import
statistics exclude imports into the Virgin Islands. Guam,
American Samoa, and other U.S. possessions: and shipments
between the United States and Puerto Rico, between the United
States and U.S. possessions, and between an) of these outlying
areas. (Data on U.S. trade with Puerto Rico and the Virgin
Islands of the United Stales are published separately in Report
FT 800. Additional data on such trade and on imports into the
Virgin Islands from foreign countries are presented in reference
tabulations.) Data on imports of petroleum and selected
petroleum products, including shipments into the Virgin Islands
from foreign countries, are included in Ihis report effective with
the January 1976 statistics (previously shown in former Report
FT 900-Supplementl).
The U.S. import statistics also exclude American goods re-
turned to the United States by its Armed Forces. intransit ship-
ments through the United States when documented as such
with Customs; temporary shipments: transactions not con-
sidered to be of statistical significance, such as shipments of
personal and household effects; low-valued nondutnable im-
ports by mail; and issued monetary coins of all component
metals.

Inclusion of Gold in the Statistics

Effective with the statistics for January 1 7S8. imports of
nonmonetary gold (in such forms as ore. scrap and base bullion.
nonmonetary refined bullion, etc.) which %Lere previouslN
excluded. are now included in the statistics. Imports of silver in
these forms have been included since January \16Q Additional
information regarding the inclusion of gold in the 1 ,78 statistics
appears in the November and December 1977 issues of Report
FT 990.

General Imports/Imports For Consumption

The statistics on U.S. imports are presented in terms of both
"General Imports" and "'Imports for Consumption." General
imports are a combination of entries for immediate con
sumption and entries into Customs bonded warehouses, and
thus generally reflect total arrivals of merchandise. Imports for
consumption are a combination of entries for immediate
consumption and withdrawals from warehouses for con-
sumption. and thus generally reflect the total of the com.
modities entered into U.S. consumption channels.

Source Of Import Information

The official U.S. import staustics are compiled b) the Bureau
of the Census from copies of the import entry and warehouse
withdrawal forms which importers are required b) law to file
with Customs officials. The information as to country of origin,
net quantity, value, and commodity classification is verified by
Customs officials on entries filed for transactions valued over
$250. which are ordinarily subject to examination for Customs


appraisement purposes The statistical copy of the entry is
corrected if it does not accurately reflect the information
called for bh the statistical requirements.

Import Valuation

F.a.s. Import Value.-The f.a.s. (free alongside ship) value
represents the transaction value of imports at the foreign port of
exportation. It is based on the purchase price, i.e., the actual
transaction value and generally includes all charges incurred in
placing the merchandise alongside the carrier at the port of
exportation in the country of exportation.

C.i.f. Import Value.-The c.i.f. (cost, insurance, and freight)
value represents the value of imports at the first port of entry in
the United States. It is based on the purchase price and includes
all freight, insurance, and other charges (excluding U.S. import
duties) incurred in bringing the merchandise from the country
of exportation and generally placing it alongside the carrier at
the first port of entry in the United States. If the merchandise
was acquired in a transaction between related parties, the
purchase price used in deriving the c.i.f. value is based on an
arm's-length equivalent transaction price, i.e., a price which
would exist between unrelated buyers and sellers.

Import Commodity Information

Import data are initially reported in terms of the commodity
classifications in the Tariff Schedules of the United States An-
notated (TSUSA), which is an official publication of the U.S.
International Trade Commission, embracing the legal text of
the Tariff Schedules of the United States together with statis-
tical annotations. The TSUSA data are rearranged and presented
in this report in terms of totals for the 1-digit commodity
sections in Schedule A, Statistical Classification of Commodities
Imported Into the United States, which is based upon the
Standard International Trade Classification (SITC), Revision 2,
effective with the statistics for January 1978. Prior to January
1978, Schedule A was based upon the former SITC, Revised.

Date of Importation and Import Monthly Carryover

It is the objective of the compiling procedures to include
shipments, insofar as practicable, in the statistics for the actual
month of importation (or the month of withdrawal in the case
of warehouse withdrawals for consumption). Effective with the
January 1978 statistics, the date of importation as reported on
the import entries is being used to determine the statistical
month in which the shipments are included. However, since
under the Customs "immediate-delivery" procedures importers
may file the import entry up to 10 workdays after the date of
release of the merchandise, some documents for merchandise
imported during the last few days of a given month may not
be received in time for inclusion in the statistics for that month.
As a result, there is a carryover, estimated at about 15 percent,
from the actual month of importation to a subsequent month.
In addition, processing problems (e.g., late filing of documents,
rejection of a shipment by the computer because the data fail
to meet certain edit criteria established to protect the accuracy
of the statistics, etc.) contribute to an additional carryover of
about 5 percent (in terms of value) of shipments from the re-


Effective January 1978








ported month of importation (or withdrawal from warehouse)
to a subsequent month, usually the succeeding month. These
limitations should be borne in mind when making month-to-
month comparisons.
For 1977 and previous years, the date of Customs official
acceptance of the import documents was used to determine the
statistical month in which the shipments were included. How-
ever, in certain annual pubhcations for 1977 and in 1978 re-
ports which also present 1977 data (e.g., FT 900, FT 990, etc.),
the 1977 data are recompiled on a date of importation basis.

Cumulations of data over at least 4-month periods are desir-
able to identify underlying trends. Month-to-month changes in
imports. exports, and similar series often reflect primarily
irregular movements. e.g., exogenous events such as strikes,
differences in monthly carryover, etc.

Estimated Data for Imports Valued Under $251

The overall import and Schedule A Section 9 totals include
sample estimates for shipments valued under $251 Therefore,
they are subject to sampling error, estimated at less than
one-tenth of one percent for the unadjusted overall total and
about one percent for the unadjusted Schedule A Section 9
total. This means that we can have about 67 percent confidence
that the published unadjusted overall totals and the unadjusted
Schedule A Section 9 totals differ b less than one-tenth of a
percent and one percent, respectively, from the totals that
would have resulted from a complete tabulation. The statistics
on imports of petroleum and petroleum products included in
this report reflect fully compiled data and, therefore, are not
subject to sampling error

EXPORT STATISTICS
Coverage
The export statistics reflect, in general, both government and
nongovernment exports of domestic and foreign merchandise
from the U.S. Customs territory (includes the 50 States, the
District of Columbia. and Puerto Rico) to foreign countries.
whether the exportation involves a commercial transaction or
not. The statistics, therefore, include Department of Defense
Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid shipments, shipments for
economic assistance under the Foreign Assistance Act and
shipments of agricultural commodities under P.L. 480 (The
Agricultural Trade Development and Assistance Act of 1954, as
amended) and related laws. The following are excluded from the
statistics Shipments to U.S. Armed Forces and diplomatic
missions abroad lor their own use; shipments between the
United States and Puerto Rico, between the United States and
its possessions (including the Virgin Islands), and between these
outlying areas. exports from U.S possessions: intransit ship-
ments through the United Stales, transactions not considered to
be of statistical importance, such as personal and household
effects, temporary exports; low-valued or non-commercial
exports by mail; and issued monetary coins of all component
metals.

Inclusion of Gold in the Statistics.

As indicated above for imports, effective with the statistics
for January 1978, exports of nonmonetary gold (in such forms
as ore, scrap and base bullion, nonmonetary refined bullion,
etc.) which were previously excluded, are included in the


statistics. Exports of silver in these forms have been included
since January 1969. Additional information regarding the
inclusion of gold in the 1978 statistics appears in the November
and December 1977 issues of Report FT 990.

Definition of Exports of Domestic and Foreign Merchandise

Exports of domestic merchandise include commodities which
are grown, produced, or manufactured in the UnitedStates, and
commodities of foreign origin which have been changed in the
United States from the form in which they were imported, or
which have been enhanced in value by further manufacture in
the United States. Exports of foreign merchandise consist of
commodities of foreign origin which have entered the United
States as imports and which, at the time of exportation, are in
substantially the same condition as when imported.

Source of Export Information

The official U.S. export statistics are compiled by the Bureau
of the Census primarily from copies of Shipper's Export
Declarations which are required to be filed with Customs
officials, except for Department of Defense Military Assistance
Program Grant-Aid shipments which are reported directly to the
Bureau of the Census by the Department of Defense and
shipments by qualified exporters who have been authorized to
submit data in the form of magnetic tape. punched cards, or
monthly Shipper's Summary Export Declarations directly to
the Bureau of the Census.

Export Valuation
F.a.s. Export Value. The value reported in the export statistics
generally is equivalent to a f.a.s. (free alongside ship) value at
the U.S. port of export, based on the transaction price,
including inland freight, insurance and other charges incurred in
placing the merchandise alongside the carrier at the U.S. port of
exportation.

Export Commodity Information
Beginning January 1978, export commodity information
is collected in terms of the commodity classifications in the
1978 edition of Schedule B, Statistical Classification of Do-
mestic and Foreign Commodities Exported from the United
States, which is based on the framework of the classification
system in the Tanff Schedules of the United States (TSUS).
In this report, the Schedule B data are rearranged and presented
in terms of totals for the I-digit commodity sectionsin Schedule
E. which is based upon the Standard International Trade Classi-
fication (SITC). Revision 2, effective with the statistics for
January 1978. Prior to January 1978, the export classifications
in Schedule B were based upon the organizational framework
of the former SITC, Revised.

Export Monthly Carryover

It is the objective of the compiling procedures to include
shipments, insofar as practicable, in the statistics for the actual
month of exportation. For purposes of the statistics, the month
of exportation is generally based on the date when the shipment
leaves the United States. (For vessel or air shipments it is the
date when the carrier departs or is cleared from the port of
export.) However, as indicated above for imports, because of


Effective January 1978







processing problems (e.g., late receipt of a document for an
end-of-month shipment, rejection of a shipment by the com-
puter because the data fail to meet certain edit criteria
established to protect the accuracy of the statistics, etc.), there
is an overall average carryover of about 2 to 3 percent (in terms
of value) of the shipments from the actual month of exporta-
tion to a subsequent month, usually the succeeding month.
These limitations should be borne in mind when making
'month-to-month comparisons.
Cumulations of data over at least 4-month periods are
desirable to identify underlying trends. Month-to-month
changes in imports, exports, and similar series often rellect
primarily irregular movements, differences in monthly
carryover, etc.

Estimated Data for Export Shipments

The overall export and Schedule B section and division totals
include sample estimates for shipments valued $251-S1,999 to
Canada and for shipments valued $251-$999 to countries other
than Canada. Data for shipments valued $250 and under to all
countries are also estimated, based on established percentages of
individual country totals, and included in the Schedule B
Section 9 totals regardless of the commodity exported. It is
estimated that the unadjusted overall total is subject to a
sampling error of less than one-tenth of one percent, and the
unadjusted Schedule B section or division totals are subject to
sampling errors of about one percent. In addition, the Schedule
B Section 9 total is subject to possible error in the estimated
data for shipments valued $250 and under: and the overall total,
and the individual totals for sections other than Section 9. to a
more limited extent. Such $250 and under shipments represent
about 1 percent of the total value of exports, and about O0
percent of the Schedule B Section 9 total

SOURCES OF ERROR IN THE STATISTICS

Monthly import and export figures are subject to the
possibility of errors which may arise from sources other than
sampling errors, discussed above. Among these are errors in the
reporting and/or processing of information as to commodity
classification, value and other statistical factors, month of
.inclusion (see paragraphs on import and export carr.oer,
above), and the undercounting of exports to Canada due to the
non-receipt of Shipper's Export Declarations. For 1976. the
undercounting amounted to about one and one-half billion
dollars. In the case of imports the information as to value and
commodity classification (as well as country of origin and net
quantity) is verified by Customs officials on entries filed for
transactions valued over $250 which are ordinarily subject to
examination for Customs appraisement purposes, thus con-
siderably reducing the possibility of error. In addition, the
procedures used to compile both the import and export sta-
tistics include clerical and computer processing checks designed


to protect the accuracy of the statistics to the fullest practicable
extent.

MERCHANDISE TRADE BALANCES

Two trade balances are presented in this report:
1) The balance between exports based on f.a.s. values and
imports based on f.a.s. values.
2) The balance between exports based on f.a.s. values and
imports based on c.i.f. values with adjustments for imports from
affiliated sellers abroad to reflect arms-length equivalent prices.
Both balances are useful for certain purposes. The first
balance corresponds to a measurement of the international
payments or credit flows resulting from merchandise trade
between the U.S. and foreign countries. The second balance is
based on concepts similar to those used by most foreign
countries, and therefore provides a reference for comparison
with the trade balances published by those countries


REVISIONS TO THE STATISTICS

Under the revision policy adopted effective with the 1977
statistics, revisions to the monthly statistics for the current year
will be issued only once a year, i.e., with the reports for June
of the following year. Thus, revisions to 1977 statistics will be
issued only in June 1978. Under the policy previously in effect,
revisions were issued twice a year-the current year's June re-
ports contained revisions for the prior year while the December
reports usually contained revisions for the first three quarters
of the -utrent year.
In addition to the revisions which are made on a once a year
basis, instances may occur where a 'iiltnl'iLJnti error in the
statistics for a month of the current year is discovered ulter the
statistics for that month are compiled. If the error is of
sufficient importance to require correction prior to the time
that the regular revisions are carried, the correction is made and
so noted in this report.


SOURCES OF FURTHER INFORMATION

Additional foreign trade statistics and information regarding
coverage, valuation, sampling, and qualifications which should
be considered by users of the statistics are contained primarily
in the following publications Report FT 990, Highlights of U.S.
Export and Import Trade; FT 135, U.S. General Imports.
Schedule A Commodity by Country; FT 410, U S Exports,
Schedule E Commodity by Country and the Guide to Foreign
Trade Statistics. Information regarding additional sources of
statistics, the methodology used in seasonally adjusting the data,
and other matters relating to foreign trade statistics may be
obtained from the Foreign Trade Division, Bureau of the
Census, Washington. D.C. 20233


Effective January 1978










Table 1. U.S. Exports (f.a.s. Value Basis), General Imports (f.a.s. and c.i.f. Value Basis), and Merchandise
Trade Balance, Adjusted for Seasonal and Working-Day Variation, by Month: January 1977

to April 1978

fin millions of dollars. See Explanation of Statistics for Information on coverage, aate of Importatton, definitions of export and Import values and
trade balances, and sources of error in the data)

F.a.s. Exports and F.a.s. Imports i F.a.s. Exports and c.l.f. Imports !

Period
Exports Imports b. ance Exports Imports dBlnce


1q77

".ruary-Apr,1 ............................ r 39,b79.l1 '- .27U.0 r-.,q1 .9 F 39,679.1 'ro0.451.) r-.0.172.2

".an .arS ............. ... .. .. ...... .. 9 ,665.3 .C,-- ,. -79.. 9.665.3 11.173.8 -1 ,505.5
cbruaro ................................... 9.89 .5 12 .ra -2. 71..d 9.896.5 ] ..BO. 7 -3, b5.2
March............ ................... ..... lU,lb ..1 2 ..2. .J -2", :5). 10 b1 .. l i .2.2.5 -3.078.,
April .................................... 9,953.2 I1 7. i -i ,..... 9,953. 1 2.57 i -2.b625.
lai ..................................... 10,521I.' .II ,.. -6-7.6 10,521.9 11.9'2,.0 -1.403.1
Jun- .................................... 10.091 .t, 1 3,)3-..3 .J .2 10.091.b I .'). 3 -i. 4.0.9

Jul ................. ............. .... 10.38i..b I ,-83.0i -2.0 BS.- 10.3BA .B 13.338.7 -2.954.1
Augu' t................................ 9. b7 .Ci. 12. 101 .- -2 .-.'.. 9,674.0 12.d:,S .0 -3.223.0
September r ........................... ... 11 .036b. ."i -1 .1, 2.8 11 036. 1 3.810.3 -2.173.8
Oc toner .. ................................ 9,7.B '. :.83. -3.208.5 9,37-.8 1.-22. -4,05.
Noseem.er ................................. 9.. .i.0 ] ,3c. l -2. 2i. 1 9 ,75.0 13.l9q .6 -3.718.6
ecenmber ................................. 11,007.0 I 3,- -. .' -2..~. '.2 11,007.0 lI, b3 q.. -3. 62.4 J

1978

Jrnuarv-Aprtll ............................. .i83. 5,ul ,. -12.532.8 ,i. -83. -.5 4 3. -16.060.0

January................................... 10).01 3 12. 380. -2,366b.6 10,01..3 1 i. I 1 .1 2.1
Fenruarv ................................. 9,9 2.- 1..--0.. ,. .8 9.922.4 5, 381.3 -5,.58.9
Marc .......... ...................... ..... ,, l. 91 .1 -2. 787.2 10,912.1 I 569.b -3.65 .5
April l.................................... 1 .. '- .' ].. l,. 9 I -2. 8 1.2 1 1 *.3 ..' 15.-35.8 -3.800.9
May ......................................
June .....................................

July ..................................
A.ugu=t .. ....... ...........
1ptemntr .. ............ .
0r toner ................................
Ncaueber................................
'ec. nbe r .................................

rR e lsed. Retle t core: ed i ri ,ti i. l l, l l a ..I ar,1- r- May ;na Jur.e it r exp r[t ;, d .'un ai.L iagu: t Ic.r ic ports.
'Eport data repre-ent domestic ar. lor .in r.crchainol e e.cluialr. DOeparrment of Deirerse IDOD) Milltar%' Assistance Program Grant-Aid shipments.
Import data represent general imports of merchandise.
'Beginning with the January 1978 issue of this report, export and imp-rt totals and trade balances Include data on shipments of nonmonetary gold
in the form of ores, concentrates, waste, scrap, and refine bullion. During 1977, U.S. exports oe nonmonetary gola totaled $1,079.1 million.
Monthly values were reported in millions as follows: January !u13.3: February 165.3 Marcn E5.9. AprLl 1i.9; May J101.5. June 2B.I. July t245.9;
August $96.5; September !7.5. October $263.1; November jL.b. and December 118.3. Imports totaled b4B.B million. By moi.h, values In millioos
were as follows: Ja-rary IiJ).-; FebrJar, r.).3. March I2b.O, April `23.7 May '28.8. June 89... July 12b.5; August 127.3; September $88.2;
October $43.1; Notember i187.X and )ecsr.bir !59.3.
'Adjusted for seasonal and working-day variation using adjusrment factor, s nescribea in footnote I at bottom of this page.




'Exports and imports are adjusted for masonal and trading day variation but not lor changes in price level Factors used to adjutl 1977 and 1978 export data shown in this report represent maIll
adjustment factors derived from monthly data through 1977 and introduced in January 1978 combined with appropriate trading day adjustment laclorF Beginning with this report the 1977 end 1N
import data are being adjusted by revised seasonal factors derived from monthly data through 1977. In issues ol this report for January through March 1978, the 1977 seasonally adjusted impofl datlMIl
adjusted by factors derived from monthly data through 1976; while interim factors derived Irom monthly data through 1977 were used to adjust 1978 import data for January, February, and Maud.Si
the special announcement on "seasonal Adjustment Faclor appearing in thisreport for furnner informallon.
'Cumulations of data over at least 4-month periods are desirable to identify underlying trend Monlh 10 month changes in exports, imports, and similar series often reflect primarily irregular meil
ments, differences in monthly carryover, etc. Recent month-to-month percent changes in the overall seasonally adjusted export and import series are presented in the following table with average pailMl
month-to-month rise and decline over longer periods shown for comparison. The average rise and average decline figures do not reflect data on nonmonetary gold. The averages also exclude permnt
changes for (1) the period October-December 1977 because of abnormanliles in the data due To effects of dock strikes and (2) periods when negligible changes Ihero percent) in the level of exports/imnpelli
occurred. Percentage changes lor I a.s. and [ 1 import values are not available for periods prior To January 1974

Montn-to-montn Average monthly rates of change


Average Average 4 months 12 month,
Series Mar.-Apr. Feb.-Mar. Jan.-Feb. Dec. 1977- rise decline Dec. 1977- Apr. 1977
1978 1978 1978 Jan. 1978 1972-1977 1972-1977 Apr. 1978 Apr. 1973
iPercent) (Percent) IPercent) (Percent I (Percent) (Percent) (Percent) (Percent)



F.a.s. export value.. -+..o +10.0 -0.9 -9.0 +3.6 -3.4 ,1.7 .1.7
F.a.s. import value.. -5.8 -.1 .[1t.ti -6.1 (NA) (NA) *2.3 .2.1
C.i.f. import value.. .*." -,.I .16.9 -8.4 (NA) (NA) +2.3 .2.1


'Sep ini' E pranation of Statistics tor defin.i. r; of ine export and impao values and trade balances










Table 2. U.S. Exports (f.a.s. Value Basis) of Merchandise Showing Department of Defense (DOD)

Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid Shipments, by Month: January 1977 to April 1978


(In millions of dollars. See Explanation of Statistic: for information on cyaerage, definition of f.a. export aLuc, ar a s-ource rof error In
the d.ata. Unadjusted totals represent sum of unrounded figures aDo hence may vary -lightiy ira" m iu of rounded amounts)


Export excluding DOD Exports including DOD Grant-Ad
Gra.r-MaI DOD Grant-Alat-Aid


Period Doisestic Dmentic Domestic
and and Dome Ic. ana Domestic. es tern Other
sreigsn foreign, unadju ted foreign. unaaJuated total Europe countries
a njusted y unaduted unaaju tea



1977

January-December............ ......... r i') l2l l, l..5 r ll ..4u.0 r 1. ,;.2.- r 19,0-1.9 61.4 3.. .

January- Apre i ....................... 39.6 b1. -.0, 80.9 39 -46., -0,24. l 39, ,k. ,..9 3-.3

January ............................. 9.66 .3 l ,119.2 8.60.9 9,i 3E 1 6,i9 .6 16.8 0.1 16.6
February ............................. 9,89B6.9 9,- 3.0 ') 1. j 9,.-.3.4 .13i,3. .. 3. 0).J .7
March ................................ lO. Is-.l 11 .050.- l0.6V. .2 ll ,1 o. 10.8t). i '.8 0.3 '.5
April................................ Q, 3.2 10.l -. .- 10 3.. 10-. O.0 10. l 0.l1 4. 0.1 .5
May ................................. 10, 5 1.9 10,9t2.o I0, ). 1,. '.g9 l':', -.8
June ................................ '1,091. t, 0,80. 0 .0o 3 ],) 3l.- Iloba t 3. 1 0.1 3.0

July................................. 10, 6.6 1. 1.1 -.51'0.3 ~.'. .. 9.533, .5 '. 0.!1 1.1
August ............................... Q b5'-.') ,9-').) 6,802.2 -.''8., 8.nns. l ..9 0.- 2.6
September............................ 11 .0ib.5 10 3i5.: 10,1 1 ) 1). ) O. 1 .. j., 0. )3.4
October.............................. 9,s .- 9. i.6 9 .3 7 9 .' 4.32.3 2.,6 0.2 ?.,*
November.......................... .... .-9 .' 0 f.i85'.2 9 il?.- -.1.f8 .r n3 3 .8 02.0 0.2
December.............................. 1 ,00.0'. I I ,..-. I l.,0 .0 il .0c,. l.0 I I .B 3. 0.8 2.9

1978

Jamnuary-Aor i ............ ...... .. -: .- ->..l .- -., 23 .: 3-. -. .'. I .. ?. '- 3

January............................... 10,01-. J p-... -' .1 i. 66. ) :.1 .i 2.4 0.5 2.1
February ............................. 9 ..: .... -.i f, 33 9i L' h, 3-l. 3. 3
March................................ 10,91-.1 l -. II, "'1. i; 9, 1l l 3 .0 i.2 '.i -.5
April ................................ yn .' i ... .. II. -. ] .i .c '. .- ". '.i
May.................................
June.................................

July.................................
Augus t..............................
September............................
October.............................
No eambe r.............................
December.............................

IRev ised. R IIcLL rC .iL t 1 [. '! E r r ...r Ma .- J .-ur.r 1
'Begiwning cirh January 198 -tatietics., total: include aata on =hipmerts ol niuni.net .r coin. lea table 1. ifootote 2.
:Represenrs only export 'hiDoent: from the UInitea 'rte na oaitfer Irom DO Mtlllarv Ar I-t-tanrc Program- Crant-sid -hipm-.nt figures under this,
program aa follaoa- *il Tran!'er: of the mnst-rial procurea onutl--' the Lr'irtea -tltes an. trat.ie.r 'ro- DOO o-rseas- rock ir-i export shipaent.
(b) Export value is I.a.a ., -.hereas DOD -alue. in oc- t i rst-ances, im I.o.b.. pc.nt i1 ortain. i'; Data !or s iFt rtI reported by the COD for
given month are incluaea ir. Bureau or Cencut report: in trc e. -c.nd month sub-eqer.nt to th= month reporl.d by Ine DOD.
'Adjusted for seasonal ana %oriing-aoy variation. See ioon.te ]I or, the otricri oi pige r.
'Annual total is not shown lor -easonally anut.a asts. Unidy lteO oata -hould be u:eu lor annual roEaLs.










Table 3. U.S. Imports of Merchandise, by Month: January 1977 to April 1978

(In millions of dollars. See Explanation of Statistics for Information on coverage, date of Importation, definitions of f.a.s. and c.i.f. Import
values, and ourcc-s of error In the data. Unadjusted totals represent sum of unrounded figures and hence may vary slightly Irom sum of rounded
amounts)

F.a.s. value' C.I.F. value'


Period General imports Imports General imports Impors
for for
Seasonally Unadjusted consumption, Seasonally adjusted consumption,
adjusted* Unadjasted unadjusted adjusted Unadiusld unadjusted


197T

January-December ......................... I I .' ,0. r146,909.1 r' rl57,5.8.7 r'16,758.3

January-April............................ 47,2?a.. .2, 313.6 L.7,111.7 i.:,.I .3 50,4.88.5 50,281.1

January.............................. ...... I. .... 10,644.5 10,667.0 L I u.6 11,384.2 11,4109.5
February................................. 1 l.r. 11 .3 11,592.3 11,523.7 I l.- u.' 12,373.1 12,303.1
March................................... I,-..0 13,142.1 13,068.7 I3.2d-.5 14,007.9 13,930.1
April.................................... 11,7 7.: 11,93-.6 11,652.2 12, 17.j 12,i23.2 12,638.7
way ...................................... 11,1]i.5 11,25).? 11,076.. 11, 25.. 12,019.2 11,831.0
June .................................... 13,33-.3 1 ,0'.6.-4 1.,033..' l.1 4'.. 1.,992.5 1 978.9

July...................................... 12,- ., 12,'.30.6 12,3.2.9 13.J3a.7 13,282.7 13,190.9
August .................................. 12, -'l.. 12.0-- 12,0140.7 12.8 "., 12,836.- 12,829.0
September................................ 12., t'. 12,450.2 12,326.6 1 3,610.3 13,288.3 13,159.9
October .................................. 12,;di.. 12,.9..0 12,543.1 13,.1I.7 13,332.. 13,383.5
November .................................. 12,3s.1 12,261.7 12,274.9 13 3.6 13,0.8.5 13,063.5
December................................. .. 13, -..' 13,371.8 13,157.9 1 ,30'-.s. 1.,260.2 11.,040.1L

1978

January-April............................ .. 5,Ol.', ,,01.- t .....,501,. 3 .5i-'.1 i ,.3.8 58..Jl5.3

January .................................. 12,360.. 12,117.7 12,00 1 .l,1'.O 13,51-.9 13,397.7
February................................. 14,- ,. ;: 13,2 BBo.. 13,316.- 5, sIl. 14,152.3 14,180.2
March .................................... 13, n ..* 1.-,547.3 1.-,*659.1 i .I. 15, ? l 1.5 15,492.4
April ...................................... 14,-'"..I l-.-iDo.O 1-- '-'.- 1.,.- ).. >.-;' .0 15,345.0
May......................................
June.....................................

July .....................................
August..................................
September................................
October..................................
November................................
December................................

rRevised. Reflects revised totals for June arnd August 1977.
lBeginning with January 1978 statistics, totals include data on shipments of nonmonetary gold. See the Explanation of Statistics for addlttioal
information. See also table 1, footnote 2.
2Adjusted for seasonal and working-day variation. See footnote 1 on the bottom of page 6.
3Annual total is not shown for seasonally adjusted data. Unadjusted data should be used for annual totals.










Table 4. U.S. Exports (f.a.s. Value Basis) of Domestic Merchandise, Including Department of Defense

(DOD) Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid Shipments-Schedule E Sections Seasonally

Adjusted and Unadjusted, by Month: January 1977 to April 1978
(In million of dollars. See Explanation of Statistlcs for information on coverage, definition of f.a.s. export value, and sources of error
in the data. Unauju'ted totals rmpre.sent uen or unroundeo figures and hence may vary .lightly from sum of rounded amount.)

Schedule E sections'

Period
0 1 2: 5 b 1 8 9'


Serorally aJjustco'

1977

January- pr I ................. .., 1 .9 91.i.. .,50 i 1 ,.8 .1 1.. "J T.7 J3, T2. It., r: .3 2,610.3 1 2, 7.3

January ...................... 1,085. 155.'3 .. 1. 2 265.0 "1.5 8'-.6 90'.5 -.04q .8 6-5.1 3''9.6
February...................... ",1 9.1 150.- 1, 1 3.9' 32'. 13.5 9-7.2 9 -2. ] 3.8'.8 661.. 315.3
March......................... 1,256.0 162'.b .090.4 321.4 115.. 886.9 9 ').' -.129.68 hi.2? 320.1
April......................... 1,221. 122.1 1. 18b'. 315.0 111.3 8 59.1 918.3 4.055.Q ..38.2 242.3
May .......................... ,. 12. 1 7.2 1. .2 393.8 116.,' 76.1 92.. 3 -.210.1 67-.8 7 367.5
June ......................... ,20 .- lb'.a 1.1'6.6 3:3.1 111.9 912.1 918.i -.09t,.. 692.0 1 301.1
July.......................... 1 .231. 1i.B.- l.ll2.j 18.B l:I.' 4.-3.2 890. ,.106.9 649.3 508.1
August........................ .i'7.0 lt8.F 854.3 i09. 1 :7. 6ti. 8a3.9 .O -..r, '-..9 3'6.9
September..................... '1.9 1 j." I 02'.1 393.2 110.2 1 l01.0 1.02 .2 -.61'.0 -58.0 165.5
October....................... -..i ). I ,02j.i Ji3J.- 10-.0 ") .. 7-1.3 -,11'.' 661... 529.2
November...................... .020.- 11.. 1 .06~.- 338.1 123.1 '688. 832.0 g,0-8.1 -10.' 317.4
December ...................... 1.250.6 2.i.a 1.083.2 i01.9 101.8 48.i 82.2 .7429.6 69.5 -00.7

1978


January- .*r L I ... ............ : e .i 1 ..,ra -

January....................... 1, 153.5 I .9 1 .0 1. 3 .- 10:0. 7i.'7. 667.E -.. -2.. '36. .64.7
February...................... I :.l '' 186.3 I .01)0.6 1 73.1 41-..1 y.." ,1 3.3 '3, .2 2r .9
March......................... ., 20.0 J 1. I .1 [1 .e 131. c '. 9tc9. -,--.1 269.9 38s .7
April ......................... i .I I w...i ., -.7 .. 8 r. 2 -'2.8
May...........................
June..........................
July..........................
Auxust........................
Septemner.....................
October......................
November......................
December r ............. ........

I.,.O ia lU cI.


1977


January-December .............. al-, 5.8 1 8 6.6 13.080.2 ...It .'.l i 30 .7 li),82:.6 10.858.0 s0.2 6. 7 8,236.2 ,,313.7

January-Anr. .,................ .. 0.1 ,a9.1 ..,8 ,17- I '2.l i. 16.679.8 2,r'6.3 1.227.6

January ...................... 1.0-8.8 'r.. I 1,0,35. I : l'.o 'i.1 e'1 ..' nI3 .'. '. .' u. 3-r .9
February...................... 1 1 6. I ." .210.- 1 o I ./ -10. 692. 2 i,81 .) I .20.8 280.9
March......................... ii.'8 .4 '.: 1.2o0.'1 291.' 1 '.' ).' 1 .003.1 -.,'3.- '3).0 -2 9.6
April......................... 1... ..3 11 0 I',. 9 .9 3l'2.6 02.1 9",'.9 t.3.7.9 n82.2 270.2
May .......................... 1. 3-.' ;'8.8 1. .2 -32.- 1:15.2 Y 2.o 9'0.5 -.568.9 r.n.- 3o8.2
June ......................... 1. .18.0 1-l .5 I .0 -.8 338.1 12 .1 017.6 9-'.0l -.260.8 724.5 1 l35.1
July.......................... 165.1 156.6 4 3 3 3 8.3 1 2 .3 ...- 8 6. 3, 8.9 85.3 515.
Aurust ........................ l. l. 1n.. '11 .0 f."' 102.8 8'. 631.9 3.6'1 51. 3 <'5.5
September ..................... 1.-'. 7 01.8 22.'7 ltl. 105. ; 1.063 E. 1,013.9 4.',03.1 -... 50.9
October..................... .. ..8 ... .. '.. 1 ,- I J.3.8 .1i "-2'. ..1 -.- 1.3 4- 3.7
November...................... 1- 1,1 0.0 3,'' I 11 2. "36.. 610..- -.0'2.- 992.9 312.3
December ...................... -8.2 .. ft I 1, '9. ilD 3 .. 116. 1,0 '.- 09" .3 4.." 6.9 '-1.8 .3-.8

19'8

January. pr, ................. i. -. 'l '* I J. I' 3. .i r. .7

January....................... I A, I... ..0 L .0- I.S 18.9 46.11 J0.' 6."9.9 i. 6 2.'0 o6..n n.33.6
February...................... .2 1. i 1 3.- I 3, '.0 l. A bp9., i2-.5
March.................. .. .. 1.-6 3 i s i, i'." Lr... 1-.1., Ol .. I rr.'. I- 2 8;7 .5 390.4
Aprtl ......................... I.--., I. ,.i .-- -. .9" "
May...........................
June..........................
July..........................
Augu st ........................
September .....................
October .......................
November......................
December.....................

rRevisea.
'Schedule E -eciun 3aeLtr1p[r.-rs a'r. as foll-)s:
0. Food ar.d llte animal 5 Che ical ind re0t.d pr.:-,ucts ?J ,.P.F.
1. Beverages ard tobac.: n Mtr.ufa.:tU.r.jd g .:.]- criz ,-s ri d cnieiis as ,atertal
2. Crude .mareriala, ineuiblE, except idels '. Marna-rr, ani transport .equipurent
3. Mineral iuela, lubricints, and related .mairkaL 8. Mdcallareuus mat.uiactur-a articles. N.;.P.F.
'.. Oils ann lasi--anie.al ana ae itbl, t Cr..w,,tin1tier ana transact'frt.p, not classifci el'enhere
'Beginning with January 1Q'8 -statt.cs, totals nc.Jide dat3 .ir shipm.erts ut t.or..netary cola. See the Eplanation at Sta[tstcs I.-r aoujtional
Information. See alas table 1. 2.otnote 2.
'Adjusteo for ea-nsral annd -rking-da szrlartior.. See ioitnote L or, The botar.>t, pafe '. Annual totals are nut sho'.n iTr seasona3ll aomju'td
data. Unadjusted .ar .'ra-ts ld r, us-eJ Jor ionnjal tt lI,. The actor, totals t n th6 table an .lim.i ,-. rall runihl c tals in table. I and 2 -ere
adjueteo Lndepe-rdent i.










Table 5. U.S. General Imports (f.a.s. Value Basis) of Merchandise, Schedule A Sections, Seasonally

Adjusted and Unadjusted, by Month: January 1977 to April 1978

tn mIlllons of dollars. See Explanation or Statistics for Informatlion on coverage, date of Importation, deflottLonof f.ea.. Import value, and
sources of error in the dals. Unadjusted totals represent sum of unrounded figures and hence may vary slightly from sum of rounded amounts)

Schedule A seet ons'
Period
0 1 2' 3 4 5 6 7 B 9'


Seasonally adjusted'


1977

January-April.................. .-,511.2 535.9 2,629.7 15,217.1 174.9 1,600.2 6,609.8 11,155.1 4,316.6 933.1

January........................ 985.2 118.3 581.5 3.3'37.8 56.4 348.2 1,507.2 2,583.7 1,022.5 219.8
February....................... 1,175.2 137.8 707.3 3,927.2 ,.4.3 .26.7 1,702.6 3.07'..9 1,162.3 255.4
March.......................... 1,071.1 153.9 686.1 '.,368.5 37.1 408.8 1,654.7 2,706.9 I,0m 9.5 22A.6
April .......................... 1,279.7 125.9 65..8 3.583.6 37.1 .16.5 1,745.3 2,789.6 1,082.3 233.3
May y............................ 1,139.8 139.3 676.3 2.826.7 ..1.5 412.4 1,774.4 2,809.2 1,131.5 256.3
June .......................... 1.058.4 13 ..7 736.1 -.,384.7 71.3 437.0 1,854.7 3,2..7.0 1,225.1 384.2
July.......................... 989.2 120.0 6114.6 3.B,2.1 41.3 430.4 1,789.5 3,018.3 ,149.2 228.2
Augus ........... ............. 879.5 186.8 750.3 3,5l 1.6 51... '.28.7 1,821.6 3,017.8 1,121.3 246.7
September....................... 933.4 193.3 728.6 3.893.7 -.2.0 70.3 1,886.8 3,217.9 1,238.8 300.9
October........................ 880.7 125.- 757.9 3.900.1 29.'. 347.7 1,809.6 3,255.9 1,199.6 269.5
November....................... 896.2 100.6 7b9.0 3.985.9 39.5 310.0 1,735.2 3.155.. 1,069.7 391.9
December....................... 1,261.8 1-6.6 753.3 3,091.0 -0.3 5..4.6 2,061.9 3,519.9 1,349.9 306.1

1978

January-April.................. -..63.8 t .1 .6 2.969.B 3,5-l.a l2 ..2 .3.u3u.S' ..33.3 ] ..I1 3.5 5,,38.4 1,359.4

January......................... 1,Lb.0 134.5 683.9 3,222.4 28.9 410.7 2,085.1 3,497.6 1,320.5 351.L
February....................... 1.187.' 182.5 797.. ),562.9 50.7 521.2 2,497.6 3,970.2 1,522.0 282.9
March.......................... 1,166.5 171.b 76.6.2 ,133.5 '.a.7 558.9 2,329.'. 3,6.6.0 1,531.0 375.6
April.......................... I ,1-6.4 21 .J 722. 3.,,22.2 -3.9 55I .h 2,,t .l 3,948 ? ,56,'.9 369.5
May............................
June..........................
July...........................
August.........................
September......................
October........................
November.......................
December.......................


Unadjusted


1977

January-December............... 12.557.b 1,669.' 8,.86.2 -..,117.2 530.7 .,970.- 21,367.0 In.406.7 13,809.4 3,335.7

January-April.................. .. ,i30... 50.0 .-.86.l 15,E64.b 112.2 l,6 '.5 6,2B8.B 11,153.6 3,976.4 879.9

January........................ 971.. 1Z0.5 509.5 3,521.4 56.9 352.7 I,.28.B 2,.93.3 9-5.8 204.2
February....................... 1,097.t, 122.4 598.- 3,686.5 .0.8 387.4 1,'9..9 2,776.b 989.1 228.6
March.......................... 1,142.1 155- 685..- .,77.. 38.0 439.9 1,653.0 2,996.5 1,031.7 220.3
April.......................... 1,31-.3 1231.7 652.8 3,511.9 36.5 .61.5 1.712.1 2,887.2 1,009.8 226.8
way............................ 1,122.7 l.-.9 696.6 2,792.8 '2.1 .12... 1,781.5 2,946.9 1,060.2 257.5
June .......................... 1,156.8 145.5 B39.1 305.8 70.6 '.49.2 2,010.5 3,419.1 1,257.0 T392.7
July........................... 980.3 111.2 71..7 3.911.3 -1.8 399.4 1,78&..1 2,995.2 1,261.8 230.7
August ........................ 884.8 162.3 771.3 3.651.- 52.6 .21.8 1,863.5 2,761.3 1,231.2 r244.2
September...................... 8;.3.7 182.9 7-... 3, 70.5 .-.7 .36,4. ,888.7 2,995.9 1,257.-. 08.8
October........................ 812.9 137.8 737.4 3,634.9 29.6 3u.9.1 1,869.3 3,301.5 1,341.1 280.5
November....................... 901.6 105.0 -15.2 3,702.9 39.0 311.6 1,763.0 3,190.1 1,118.9 414.6
December....................... 1.29..t 159.8 781.2 3,153.0 -1.1 5'9.0 2,117.6 3,643.1 1,305.& 327.2

1978

January-April.................. ..r. '.s r'r.. 7 .oC, .- j.8k '. It-.r [.C..-- a.6 .,- l-.102.0 5,-72.2. 1.285.9

January........................ 1.1,6.b 138.1 ti0.- 3..22.2 29.3 418.9 1.982.9 3,392.7 1,228.1 3128.2
February....................... 1,111-.' It..-. 675. 3,502.3 .6.6 472.7 2,195.4 3,573.2 1.293.7 253.5
March.......................... ..,57.5 I1 ..7 768.5 3,. 31.2 .6.0 60-..2 2,33-.1 I .,050.7 1.511.1 369.2
April .......................... i.iti.s *. 1 3.- ),13.) -2.7 b6l.6 2,3 8]. ,085.5 I .39.7 334.8
May............................
June.......................,...
July...........................
August........................
September.....................
October........................
November......................
December.......................
rRevised.
'Schedule A section description are as iollo-,"
0. Food and live animals 5. Chemical- and related products, N.S.P.F.
1. Beverages and tobacco 6. Manulactured goods classilled chieflyv y material
2. Crude materials, inedibit, except fuels 7. Macriners and transport equplSenL
3. Mineral fuels, lubricants, and relate, material 6. Miscellaneous manufactured articles, NS.P.F.
4. Oils and fats--animal and vegetable 9. Comoedltles and transactions not classified elsewhere
'Beginning with January 1978 statistics, totals include oat, on shipments of nonmonTetary gold. See the Explanation of Statistics for additional
information. See alEo table 1, footnote 2.
'Adjsuted for seasonal and .orking-day .arLation. Spe fonenoe I on bottom of page b. Annual totals are not shown for seasonally adjusted data.
Unadjusted data should be used for annual totals. Tne sectLon totals in this table and similar overall monthLy totals In tables I and 3 were
adjusted independently.








11

Table 6. U.S. General Imports (c.i.f. Value Basis) of Merchandise, Schedule A Sections, Seasonally

Adjusted and Unadjusted, by Month: January 1977 to April 1978

(In millions of dollars. Zee Explanation of Staltst LCs for Infoam tlon ,r,. cserage. date of' imprtat ion. definit on f c i.f toort valie ar.nd
sources of error in the data. Unadjusted totals represent s ,m rof unrounred iluares 3na hence may vary slightly from suam of romundeO amounts

Schedule A sections


0 1 2' 1 6 7 8 9


Season aliV ad Lusted'

1977

January-April................. .. ,801.6 582.1 I ,1315.9 16,1 1b, 0 a186.0 1.68-.: ',08 6 1,9*8.8 '.632. 9.9.3

January..... ... ......... ,0 .. 1 05. 128.1 n 3.1 3,56b 3 00. 36bb.2 1,625.1 2, 762.4 1,099.1 223.'
February............ ..... 1,2iL.8 1.9.8 '59.0 ..- 9 .'.1 51.2 1,829.6 3,295.,5 l,;2 b.- 2b0.-
March. ... .. ... ,13 .6 1 5.8 72628. -.652 0 39.- -26.9 1 ,' .' 2,9.02. 1, 12I5. 221 .2
April ................ .... 1,360.0 1 37. ; '' .- 31 603.A 34.- -38.0 i b .8 2, 8 '.9 1, 61. 23' .0
May............ ... .. ... ,.I.. 1]51.. I In.' 2 2,9, 9. -I3. I.1 1,910.0 3,000.9 1,213.0 262.6
June ........ ... ...... .6 1 7.61. '9n.. -.,o b.8 '5' -o ;. ,l 99b.- 3,-B).9 1, 12.9 r389. 1
July........ .... 1,0519. 132. ;'-6. 3 -,u08-. -5 3 6 1,Q2Q. 1 1,2'0.o 1,233.' 232.2
August ... .. ... 9..6.2 20-.- o l.- 3, 2.60 -.2 1 ,9 3.3 3,196.0 1,202.- 'r 51.1
Septermner. .. 51,05., 210. 91.2 -,0-c. --... -9i. ',039.0 3,-28.5 1,531.9 105.-
October ..... 9-'.0 135. '1|. -., 13.-. 31.1 369. t 1,9- .2 3,-63.l 1,292.3 27-.i
November ... 95A.8 107.1 629.t .,21-.9 .. 12 6. 7 1,B65.6 3,362. 1, 1-8.4 39 .3j
December .... .. ... .. 1,353.8 160.6 12.0' 3.2'0. I -.2 2.4 L2,2 l. 7 3,737.2 1,-51.3 311.0

19'8

January-April ........... .. ... 3.1 .B L-, 't1. 16 ." "..l' I ., A .. It ., .. c 1. 1. .1 .

January. .. .. ... 1,203.8 1-7. 1 '2 3.11. 3. i.0 -35.8 2,2'..6 3, "'0 .6 l ,-l1.8 356.9
February .. .. .. ... I,26'.0 14 .' 851. 3" .- 7.-.. 5.1 2,6G,3.& .,21...o 1,63..0 28i.9
March ..... .. ..... 1,2k 3.3 187.0 821.0 3,312.2 '6.1 's8.- 2,502.1 3,87 2. ,636.9 380.9
Apr l. . 1. .. .4 .2 .6 1,.10.2 .52.1.
May.....................
June.... ... ....
Ju ly.... ...... ... ....
August .. ......
September ........ .
October. ....
November .. .......
DecembEr .....

.r.',a in 1 ed




January-December.. ... ... 11 ,-2-.8 1.81'. 4.1,0.5 -'.:9..6 : -. l 5,:-q.5 2'.9.3'.2 8,630.3 1-.B28.0 3, )A8 .

January- prl I ................. 21. 5 5t.-.9 2,tcl .I I A-. 1, .) l, '2 .5 '--.6 lt ,4 '. -,2. ; 195.2
January.. .. .. .. .. .09.2 131.2 588.6 i. ",:.- r,.* 3'1.0 1.5-0.6 2.6b5.9 1,016. 207.8
February...... ... 1 9.2 133.'30 c 2.1 ..0-'.1 -..'i. 00..' 1. b06.- 2,.9 5.8 1.060.7 233.1
March .. .. .. .21 167.5 728.2 S..08-. -0..' 1.5 1 6 5.3 3 213.4 1.106.? 223.9
April ... 1.06. 133.2 02.8 ".9 7. 8.8 -85.3 1.652.3 3.042.5 1.083.6 210..
May.... ... 1,196.2 157., 'i6.i 2.it.3.8 -.. 5..1 1.91'. 3. 1.7.4 1.1,6.6 261.8
June .. 1 .235.' 154.3. qob.'. -.. 8:-. "... -75.2 2 16tL.1 3.b-'.5 1.3 ;7.0 '397.9
July.... .. ... .0. 9.8 121.0 7;Q.1 -. i.'.8 --.1 '.2 ,.2 1.92 i.3 3.192.0 1,54.6 23L.8
August .. ... .. 952.4 177.6 834.1 3.8668.] .5 6.8 2,008.5 2.926.3 1.120.2 r248.6
September .... ....... .. 9-1.0 194.1. 608.n 3.437.5 -'.2 .54.8 2,041.0 3.191.4 1.351.4 313.0
October ...... .6 148.4 791b.n 3.85,.0 I1. 371.1 2,010.4 3.511.6 1 .44.8 285.8
November....... ..... 9bh-.6 111.8 '71.5 1.915. -1..) 325.3 1.695.7 3.399.5 1 .01.8 418.2
December........ .. 1 ,389.0 175.0 8-2.0 3.3i 5., -5.1 577.5 2.242.0 3,868.0 1.03... 332.5

197B
January-April................ .. sr..- -N-.. I. 1 6 r.i .- ...t.- '5 .o 1.03-..p ,itc.9 1, 3c0.

January .. ..... 1,19-.1 151.1 692.9 1.,6.2 31. ....4.5 2.131.8 3 545... Il3 b.7 333.3
February .... .. l, 183.1 1 6..' '21.- 3,'13.2 53.1 500.8 2, 3 '.5 3,'93.1 1,388.9 258.0
March ... .... ........ 1,3-0.3 190.- o23. 3,'2r,.49 -9.3 b3nr. l 2;, 0'. l ..,30'.9 ,61i.6 3'-..

May......................
June ........ .. .

July ... ... .....
Aurast .. .... .....
September .......... .
October ....... ... .. ..
November.. ...... ....
December ......

"Revised.
'Schedule A section description- are as ioliuws
0. Food anra live animals 3. heritcil and re-lated prauctz, N.c.P.F.
1. Beverages and tobacco b. M.iiulatuctred _g.'ud classified chiefly by miLeriail
2. Crude materiai3, ineatblE, except fuels 7. Machinery ai.d tranipr-rt equipment
3. Mineral fuels, lubricants, ana related material MHacellare-.us ma,.uisetured articles, N.0.P.F.
4. 0115 and tats--animai anrd vegetable Cormodities anG transactisons not clasmifled elsesnere
iBeginning nith January 19"8 srttsctics, totals include d ata or. shilpmnents .f ioro.r rry eold. See the Explanation of Statistics for adti.onai
Information. See also tanic 1, footnote 2.
'Adjusted for seasonal iroa -',rking-oiy variation. See foLtraote I on bottom of pace P-. Annual totals are not sho.n for .easonall, Saju;tec duta.
Unadjusted data should be u'eo Ior annual totals. Troe adjusted s-ctiin total" ,n rhii 'ble arca siimilr overall monthly totals in tables I and j
were adjusted Independently.









GENERAL IMPORTS OF PETROLEUM AND SELECTED PETROLEUM PRODUCTS INTO
THE U.S. CUSTOMS AREA AND U.S. VIRGIN ISLANDSj UNADJUSTED

Monthly and cumulative-to-date data on general importss of petroleum and selected petroleum products into the U.S. Customs area
and into the U S. Virgin Islands for the period January 1977 through the current month are presented in the tables that follow. Tables
I A and 1-B present imports into the U.S. Customs area and tables 2-A and 2-B present imports into the U.S. Virgin Islands. (It should
be noted that imports into the Virgin Islands are excluded from the regularly compiled foreign trade statistics and. therefore, are ex-
cluded from the data presented in tables 1 A and 1 B as well as the other tables shown in the front of this report.-See "Explanation of
Statistics".

Effective with January 1978 statistics, certain changes were made in the commodity classifications (Schedule A and TSUSA) covering
petroleum products. These changes are reflected in the listing of classifications shown below. Data presented in tables 1-B and 2-B which
follow have been revised to reflect all changes in classifications. effective January 1978.


Schedule A and TSUSA Commodity Numbers Used in Compiling the Petroleum
Information Presented in This Report


Energy products


Schedule A. No.

Crude petroleum and deriv-
atives to be refined
331.0120
331.0140
331.0240


TSUSA No.


475.0510
475.1010
475.6510


Nonenergy products

Schedule A. No.


Lubricating oils
332.5000 pt.

Lubricating greases
332.5000 pt.


TSUSA No.


475.4500


475.5500, 475.6000


Crude petroleum
331.0120
331.0140

Gasoline
332.1000

Jet fuel
332.2020

Kerosene
332.2040


Distillate fuel oil
332.3020

332.3040

Residual fuel oil
332.4020
332.4040

Propane and butane gas
341.0020

Liquid derivatives of
petroleum, n.e.s.
332.9940 pt.


475.0510
475.1010


475.2520, 475.2560


{475.2530
475.2550

475.3000


475.0525
475.0545
475.1015
475.1025

475.0535
475.1035


Paraffin and other mineral
waxes
332.6220 pt.
332.6240


Asphalt
332.9800

Naphthas
332.9920


All other petroleum products
pitch of tar coke, non-
liquid hydrocarbon mix-
tures. and calcined petro-
leum and coal coke not for


332.9700 pt.
332.9940 pt.
599.8040 pt.


475.1525. 475.1535,
475.1545


475.6530


494.2200
494.2400



521.1100



475.3500


401.6200
475.7000
517.5100









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