United States foreign trade

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Material Information

Title:
United States foreign trade
Alternate title:
United States foreign trade. FT900, Summary of United States export and import merchandise trade
Portion of title:
Summary of U.S. export and import merchandise trade
Abbreviated Title:
U.S. foreign trade, FT900, Summ. U.S. export import merch. trade
Physical Description:
13 v. : ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of the Census
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census :
For sale by the Subscriber Services Section (Publications), Bureau of the Census
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Creation Date:
January 1978
Publication Date:
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Imports -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Exports -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Commerce -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
statistics   ( marcgt )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Issued also to depository libraries in microfiche.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Dec. 1976-
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Ceased in 1988.
General Note:
"FT 900."
General Note:
Description based on: Jan. 1979; title from caption.
General Note:
Beginning with July 1980 for sale by the Supt. of Docs., U.S.G.P.O.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Mar. 1988.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001320869
notis - AGH1745
oclc - 07222812
lccn - 81646118
issn - 0730-3270
sobekcm - AA00005268_00001
Classification:
ddc - 382/.0973/00212
System ID:
AA00005268:00014

Related Items

Preceded by:
Summary of U.S. export and import merchandise trade
Succeeded by:
U.S. merchandise trade. Seasonally adjusted imports and exports

Full Text
:3.,/c l 0oo -78-/


UNITED STATES FOREIGN TRADE


UNV.OFFL L1S. ummary of U.S. Export and

ti Import Merchandise Trade



U.S. DEPOQTO_ JANUARY 1978

P7900-78-1 For Release March 3, 1978 10:00 A.M.


Seasonally Adjusted and Unadjusted Data


Seasonally Adjusted and Unadjusted Data

(Including unadjusted data on imports of petroleum and petroleum products)


FA.S. EXPORTS AND F.A.S. IMPORTS

Semonaly Adjustd

Thu.Bureau of the Census, Department of Conmerce an-
omunced today that during January 1978, exports on a
E.a.s. (free alongside ship) U.S. port of exportation
value basis, excluding Department of Defense (DCD) Mili-
ta*y Assistance Program Grant-Aid shipments, Emounted to
$10tO14.3 million and chat general imports on a f.a.s.
fqiaign port of exportation value basis, amounted to
$;2,393.0 million.3 2 3

Based on the above export and import figures, the January
merchandise trade balance was in deficit by $2,378.7
millon.1s

foP the 4-month period, October 1977-January 1978, ex-
ports averaged $9,967.8 million per month, a level about
3 percent below the $10,296.4 million average reported
for the preceding 4-month period, June-September 1977.
Imports on a f.a.s. value basis, averaged $12,586.1 mil-
Iea. per month for the current 4-month pericd, slightly
lower than the $12,682.2 million average reported for
tle preceding 4-month period.' 2 3
UnJdjunsed
Exlresl excluding Military Assistance Program Crant-Aid
sh Mausts decreased from $11,404.4 million in December
1977 to $9,364.4 million in January 1978. With Military
Assistance Program Grant-Aid shipments included, exports
decreased from $11,408.2 million in December 1977 to
$9,36 9 million in January 1978. General imports de-
creaS;e from $13,371.8 million in December 1977 to
$12,717.7 million in January 1978.


F.A.S. EXPORTS AND C.I.F. IMF


Seasonally Adjusted

The BLreau of the Census, Department of Commerce announced
coday that during January 1978, exports on a f.a.s. (free
alongside ship) U.S. port of exportation value basis, ex-
cluding Department of Defense (DCD) Military Assistance
Program Grant-Aid shipments, amounted to $10,01.3 million
and that general imports on a c.i.f. (cost, insurance, and
freight) U.S. port of entry value basis, amounted to
$13,169.8 million.' 2 3

Based cn the above export and import figures, the January
merchandise trade balance was in deficit by $3,155.5
million.' 2 3

For the --month period, Octcber 1977-January 1978, ex-
ports averaged $9,967.8 million per month, a decrease of
about 3 percent below the $10,296." million average reported
for the preceding 4-month period, June-September 1977.
Imports on a c.i.f. value basis averaged $13,406.1 million
per mcnth for the current L'-month period, slightly lower
than the $13,535.1 million average reported for the preced-
ing u-month period.' 2 3

Unadjusted
Exports excluding Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid
shipments decreased from $11,404.4 million in December
1977 to $9,364.4 million in January 1978. With Military
Assistance Program Grant-Aid shipments included, exports
decreased from $11,408.2 million in December 1977 to
$9,366.9 million in January 1978. General imports de-
creased from $14,260.2 million in December 1977 to
$13,514.9 million in January 1978.


oBate Footnotes 1, 2, and 3 are shown at the bottom of page 5.


US. Department of Commerce
BUREAU OF THE CENSUS


Inquiri con ning tase figures should be addraed to tue Chief. Foreign Trade Division, Bureau of
tde Caosm Washington, D.C. 20233. Tel: Ar Code 301,7635140.
For sale by the Subscriber Services Section (Publications), Bureau of the Census, Washington. D.C.
20233, or any U.S. Department of Commerce district office. Postage stamps not acceptable; currency
submitted at sender's risk. Remittances from foreign countries must be by international money order
or by a draft on a U.S. bank. Price 30 centsper copy. Annual subscription (FT 900.975,985, and 986
combined) $14.90.


SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT
Effective January 1978, major changes occurred in the export and import coverage,
reporting and compiling procedures. These impacted or. the data presented in this
report and include the following: The introduction of new export Schedules B, and
E, the adoption of SITC Revision 2 for exports and imports; the compilation of
import data on a date of importation (CO!) basis, except tables 2A and 2B; and the
inclusion of nonmonetary gold in the statistics. For more details, see the foot-
notes to the tables, the "Explanation of Statistics", and the special FT 900
supplement being issued simultaneously with this report.







EXPLANATION OF STATISTICS


IMPORT STATISTICS


Coverage


The U.S. import statistics reflect both government and
nongovernment imports of merchandise from foreign countries
into the U.S. Customs territory, which includes the 50 States.
the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. The U.S. import
statistics exclude imports into the Virgin Islands, Guam,
American Samoa, and other U.S. possessions; and shipments
between the United States and Puerto Rico, between the United
States and U.S. possessions, and between any of these outlying
areas. (Data on U.S. trade with Puerto Rico and the Virgin
Islands of the United States are published separately in Report
FT 800. Additional data on such trade and on imports into the
Virgin Islands from foreign countries are presented in reference
tabulations.) Data on imports of petroleum and selected
petroleum products, including shipments into the Virgin Islands
from foreign countries, are included in this report effective with
the January 1976 statistics (previously shown in former Report
FT 900-Supplement).
The U.S. import statistics also exclude American goods re-
turned to the United States by its Armed Forces: intransit ship-
ments through the United States when documented as such
with Customs; temporary shipments; transactions not con-
sidered to be of statistical significance, such as shipments of
personal and household effects; low-valued nondutiable im-
ports by mail, and issued monetary coins of all component
metals.

Inclusion of Gold in the Statistics

Effective with the statistics for January 1978, imports of
nonmonetary gold (in such forms as ore. scrap and base bullion.
nonmonetary refined bullion, etc.) which were previously
excluded, are now included in the statistics. Imports of silver in
these forms have been included since January 19o9. Additional
information regarding the inclusion of gold in the 1978 statistics
appears in the November and December 1977 issues of Report
FT 990.

General Imports/Imports For Consumption

The statistics on U.S. imports are presented in terms of both
"General Imports" and "Imports for Consumption." General
imports are a combination of entries for immediate con-
sumption and entries into Customs bonded warehouses, and
thus generally reflect total arrivals of merchandise. Imports for
consumption are a combination of entries for immediate
consumption and withdrawals from warehouses for con-
sumption, and thus generally reflect the total of the com-
modities entered into U.S. consumption channels.
Source Of Import Information

The official U.S. import statistics are compiled by the Bureau
of the Census from copies of the import entry and warehouse
withdrawal forms which importers are required by law to file
with Customs officials. The information as to country of origin.
net quantity, value, and commodity classification is verified by
Customs officials on entries filed for transactions valued over
$250, which are ordinarily subject to examination for Customs


appraisement purposes. The statistical copy of the entry is -
corrected if it does not accurately reflect the information
called for by the statistical requirements.

Import Valuation

F.a.s. Import Value.-The f.a.s. (free alongside ship) value
represents the transaction value of imports at the foreign port of i
exportation. It is based on the purchase price, i.e., the actual
transaction value and generally includes all charges incurred in
placing the merchandise alongside the carrier at the port of 1h
exportation in the country of exportation. 7

C.i.f. Import Value.-The c.i.f. (cost, insurance, and freight)
value represents the value of imports at the first port of entry in
the United States. It is based on the purchase price and includes !i
all freight, insurance, and other charges (excluding U.S. import.
duties) incurred in banging the merchandise from the country
of exportation and generally placing it alongside the carrier at
the first port of entry in the United States. If the merchandise
was acquired in a transaction between related parties, the!
purchase price used in deriving the c.i.f. value is based on anl
arm's-length equivalent transaction price, i.e.. a price which
would exist between unrelated buyers and sellers.


Import Commodity Information i

Import data are initially reported in terms of the commodity|.
classifications in the Tariff Schedules of the United States An-?
notated (TSUSA), which is an official publication of the U.S.,:
International Trade Commission, embracing the legal text of*
the Tariff Schedules of the United States together with statis-|
tical annotations. The TSUSA data are rearranged and presented.
in this report in terms of totals for the 1-digit commodity
sections in Schedule A, Statistical Classification of Commoditier
Imported Into the United States, which is based upon th4
Standard International Trade Classification (SITC), Revision 24
effective with the statistics for January 1978. Prior to Januarys:
1978, Schedule A was based upon the former SITC, Revised,!

Date of Importation and Import Monthly Carryover


It is the objective of the compiling procedures to includes:
shipments, insofar as practicable, in the statistics for the actulii
month of importation (or the month of withdrawal in the cane.,
of warehouse withdrawals for consumption). Effective with th.-
January 1978 statistics, the date of importation as reported omi
the import entries is being used to determine the statisticEal
month in which the shipments are included. However, since,"
under the Customs "immediate-delivery" procedures importer!:
may file the import entry up to 10 workdays after the date of
release of the merchandise, some documents for merchandise
imported during the last few days of a given month may not
be received in time for inclusion in the statistics for that month.
As a result, there is a carryover, estimated at about 15 percent,
from the actual month of importation to a subsequent month.
In addition, processing problems (e.g., late filing of documents,
rejection of a shipment by the computer because the data fail
to meet certain edit criteria established to protect the accuracy
of the statistics, etc.) contribute to an additional carryover of
about 5 percent (in terms of value) of shipments from the re-






ported month of importation (or withdrawal from warehouse)
to a subsequent month, usually the succeeding month. These
limitations should be borne in mind when making month-to-
month comparisons.
For 1977 and previous years, the date of Customs official
acceptance of the import documents was used to determine the
statistical month in which the shipments were included. How-
ever, in certain annual publications for 1977 and in 1978 re-
ports which also present 1977 data (e.g., FT 900, FT 990, etc.),
the 1977 data are recompiled on a date of importation basis.

Cumulations of data over at least 4-month periods are desir-
able to identify underlying trends. Month-to-month changes in
imports, exports, and similar series often reflect primarily
irregular movements, e.g., exogenous events such as strikes,
differences in monthly carryover, etc.

Estimated Data for Imports Valued Under S251

The overall import and Schedule A Section 9 totals include
sample estimates for shipments valued under $251. Therefore.
they are subject to sampling error, estimated at less than
one-tenth of one percent for the unadjusted overall total and
about one percent for the unadjusted Schedule A Section 9
total. This means that we can have about 67 percent confidence
that the published unadjusted overall totals and the unadjusted
Schedule A Section 9 totals differ by less than one-tenth of a
percent and one percent, respectively, from the totals that
would have resulted from a complete tabulation The statistics
on imports of petroleum and petroleum products included in
this report reflect fully compiled data and, therefore, are not
subject to sampling error.

EXPORT STATISTICS
Coverage
The export statistics reflect, in general, both government and
nongovernment exports of domestic and foreign merchandise
from the U.S. Customs territory (includes the 50 States, the
District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico) to foreign countries,
whether the exportation involves a commercial transaction or
not. The statistics, therefore, include Department of Defense
Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid shipments, shipments for
economic assistance under the Foreign Assistance Act and
shipments of agricultural commodities under P.L. 480 (The
Agricultural Trade Development and Assistance Act of 1954, as
amended) and related laws. The following are excluded from the
statistics: Shipments to U.S. Armed Forces and diplomatic
missions abroad for their own use, shipments between the
United States and Puerto Rico, between the United States and
its possessions (including the Virgin Islands), and between these
outlying areas; exports from U.S. possessions; intransit ship-
ments through the United States; transactions not considered to
be of statistical importance, such as personal and household
effects; temporary exports; low-valued or non-commercial
exports by mail; and issued monetary coins of all component
metals.

Inclusion of Gold in the Statistics.

As indicated above for imports, effective with the statistics
for January 1978, exports of nonmonetary gold (in such forms
as ore, scrap and base bullion, nonmonetary refined bullion,
etc.) which were previously excluded, are included in the


statistics. Exports of silver in these forms have been included
since January 1969. Additional information regarding the
inclusion of gold in the 1978 statistics appears in the November
and December 1977 issues of Report FT 990.

Definition of Exports of Domestic and Foreign Merchandise

Exports of domestic merchandise include commodities which
are grown, produced, or manufactured in the UnitedStates, and
commodities of foreign origin which have been changed in the
United States from the form in which they were imported, or
which have been enhanced in value by further manufacture in
the United States. Exports of foreign merchandise consist of
commodities of foreign origin which have entered the United
States as imports and which, at the time of exportation, are in
substantially the same condition as when imported.

Source of Export Information

The official U.S. export statistics are compiled by the Bureau
of the Census primarily from copies of Shipper's Export
Declarations which are required to be filed with Customs
officials, except for Department of Defense Military Assistance
Program Grant-Aid shipments which are reported directly to the
Bureau of the Census by the Department of Defense and
shipments by qualified exporters who have been authorized to
submit data in the form of magnetic tape, punched cards, or
monthly Shipper's Summary Export Declarations directly to
the Bureau of the Census.

Export Valuation
F.a.s. Export Value. --The value reported in the export statistics
generally is equivalent to a f.a.s. (free alongside ship) value at
the U.S. port of export, based on the transaction price,
including inland freight, insurance and other charges incurred in
placing the merchandise alongside the carrier at the U.S. port of
exportation.

Export Commodity Information
Beginning January 1978, export commodity information
is collected in terms of the commodity classifications in the
1978 edition of Schedule B, Statistical Classification of Do-
mestic and Foreign Commodities Exported from the United
States, which is based on the framework of the classification
system in the Tariff Schedules of the United States (TSUS).
In this report, the Schedule B data are rearranged and presented
in terms of totals for the I -digit commodity sections in Schedule
E, which is based upon the Standard International Trade Classi-
fication (SITC), Revision 2, effective with the statistics for
January 1978. Prior to January 1978, the export classifications
in Schedule B were based upon the organizational framework
of the former SITC, Revised.

Export Monthly Carryover

It is the objective of the compiling procedures to include
shipments, insofar as practicable, in the statistics for the actual
month of exportation. For purposes of the statistics, the month
of exportation is generally based on the date when the shipment
leaves the United States. (For vessel or air shipments it is the
date when the carrier departs or is cleared from the port of
export.) However, as indicated above for imports, because of







processing problems (e.g., late receipt of a document for an
end-of-month shipment, rejection of a shipment by the com-
puter because the data fail to meet certain edit criteria
established to protect the accuracy of the statistics, etc.). there
is an overall average carryover of about 2 to 3 percent (in terms
of value) of the shipments from the actual month of exporta-
tion to a subsequent month, usually the succeeding month.
These limitations should be borne in mind when making
month-to-month comparisons.
Cumulations of data over at least 4-month periods are
desirable to identify underlying trends. Month-to-month
changes in imports, exports, and similar series often reflect
primarily irregular movements, differences in monthly
carryover, etc.

Estimated Data for Export Shipments

The overall export and Schedule B section and division totals
include sample estimates for shipments valued $251-51.999 to
Canada and for shipments valued $251-$999 to countries other
than Canada. Data for shipments valued $250 and under to all
countries are also estimated, based on established percentages of
individual country totals, and included in the Schedule B
Section 9 totals regardless of the commodity exported. It is
estimated that the unadjusted overall total is subject to a
sampling error of less than one-tenth of one percent, and the
unadjusted Schedule B section or division totals are subject to
sampling errors of about one percent. In addition, the Schedule
B Section 9 total is subject to possible error in the estimated
data for shipments valued $250 and under; and the overall total,
and the individual totals for sections other than Section 9, to a
more limited extent. Such $250 and under shipments represent
about 1 percent of the total value of exports, and about 60
percent of the Schedule B Section 9 total.

SOURCES OF ERROR IN THE STATISTICS

Monthly import and export figures are subject to the
possibility of errors which may arise from sources other than
sampling errors, discussed above. Among these are errors in the
reporting and/or processing of information as to commodity
classification, value and other statistical factors, month of
inclusion (see paragraphs on import and export carryover,
above), and the undercounting of exports to Canada due to the
non-receipt of Shipper's Export Declarations. For 1976, the
undercounting amounted to about one and one-half billion
dollars. In the case of imports the information as to value and
commodity classification (as well as country of origin and net
quantity) is verified by Customs officials on entries filed for
transactions valued over $250 which are ordinarily subject to
examination for Customs appraisement purposes. thus con-
siderably reducing the possibility of error. In addition, the
procedures used to compile both the import and export sta-
tistics include clerical and computer processing checks designed


to protect the accuracy of the statistics to the fullest practicable
extent.

MERCHANDISE TRADE BALANCES

Two trade balances are presented in this report:
1) The balance between exports based on f.a.s. values and
imports based on f.a.s. values.
2) The balance between exports based on f.a.s. values and
imports based on c.i.f. values with adjustments for imports from
affiliated sellers abroad to reflect arms-length equivalent prices.
Both balances are useful for certain purposes. The first
balance corresponds to a measurement of the international
payments or credit flows resulting from merchandise trade
between the U.S. and foreign countries. The second balance is
based on concepts similar to those used by most foreign
countries, and therefore provides a reference for comparison
with the trade balances published by those countries.


REVISIONS TO THE STATISTICS

Under the revision policy adopted effective with the 1977
statistics, revisions to the monthly statistics for the current year
will be issued only once a year, i.e., with the reports for June
of the following year. Thus, revisions to 1977 statistics will be
issued only in June 1978. Under the policy previously in effect,
revisions were issued twice a year-the current year's June re-
ports contained revisions for the prior year while the December
reports usually contained revisions for the first three quarters
of the -urrent year.
In addition to the revisions which dre made on a unce a year
basis, instances may occur where a significant error in the
statistics for a month of the current year is discovered after the
statistics for that month are compiled. If the error is of
sufficient importance to require correction prior to the time
that the regular revisions are carried, the correction is made and
so noted in this report.


SOURCES OF FURTHER INFORMATION

Additional foreign trade statistics and information regarding
coverage, valuation, sampling, and qualifications which should
be considered by users of the statistics are contained primarily
in the following publications: Report FT 990, Highlights of U.S.
Export and Import Trade; FT 135, U.S. General Imports,
Schedule A Commodity by Country; FT 410, U.S. Exports,
Schedule E Commodity by Country; and the Guide to Foreign
Trade Statistics. Information regarding additional sources of
statistics, the methodology used in seasonally adjusting the data,
and other matters relating to foreign trade statistics may be
obtained from the Foreign Trade Division, Bureau of the
Census, Washington, D.C. 20233.









Table 1. U.S. Exports (f.a.s. Value Basis), General Imports (f.a.s. and c.i.f. Value Basis), and Merchandise

Trade Balance, Adjusted for Seasonal and Working-Day Variation, by Month: January 1977

to January 1978

(In millions of dollars. See Explanation of Statisticz for Inforination on coverage. ante of importation, definillonl of export and Import value- and
trade balances, and sources ot error in the Gala)

F.a.Z. E%-port- arid f.a.-. Ilsports F.a.s. Export' and C.I.f. [.sDort
Period

Erports iimpart; radc [Exports import; Trade
balance balance

1977

Januar,- ........... .. .................. 9.,664 .. 1 ,'l .. -1,307.0 9,664b .4 11,733.9 -2,069.c

January .................................. 9,t6,. 10,971 -I ,0i 7.0 9,66..- 11 .733.9 -2,069.5
February............................................. 9.896.5 12,861.6 -2,9m5.3 9,896.5 13.7, 9.. -3,852.9
March.............................. ...... 10,1 4. 1 12,082.5 -1,918.. 10,16..1 12,878.5 -2,714...
April?.................................... .,9 3.2 12.08., 9 -2,133., 9.953.2 12,885.6 -2,932..
May.................................... .. 10,.8B.9 10.983.1 --94..2 10,.88.9 1 1,726.0 -1,237.1
June................... ................. 10,090.3 13,396.1 -3,305.8 10,090.3 1.,297.7 -4.207..

July........................ ........... .. 10.. ,3 -.. 13,07c.t -2,692., 10.3J8u., 1 3,9'3.0 -3,,68..
August........................... .... ..... 9,67..0 11,630.7 -1,970.7 9,nb7 .0 12,.15.8 -2,141.8
September................................ 11,036.5 12,.05.2 -1,,68 ? 11,03b.5 13,.53.8 -2,417.3
ODetober.................................. Q.3' 8 12,99' .r -3, 20 L 9,37-.8 13,867. -,.92.
November ................................. 9,.. 75.0 11.833.3 n,3 8.3 9,.5.0 i2,592.o -3,117.o
December ................................. 11,007.0 13,122.5 -2,115.5 11,007.0 13.994.3 -2,987.3

1978

January .............. .......... ....... .,,. l .1, .,i .-. .. 6-. ll .e -), 1 .,.

January.................................. L)ui.ul. 2. 3.i. I, j.. ] l ,lo9.r. .
February................... ,............
March...................................
April ....................................
liay......................................
June.........................,,,,,,............

July.....................................
August...................................
September ................................
October..................................
ovember.......................................
December................................

tExport data represent domestic and foreign r...rclhanai e excluding LfsDcar enr ol Otfen-e I DOD Milttar- -ilztance Progran, Grant-Aid shipments.
Import data represent general Imports of merchandise.
'Beginning uith the January 1978 u of r.i report, export anr, ipor. c c t l ,-,d cr.de talane- ,r. .,la a, :.r. .hipnernt CT o.,,, -eta, r euold
in the form of oreE, concentrate', uste ,crap, and r.iin, tull..I.. [D ring 14" '.4. exc.rts i no r a.-r. t.r gold totaled I ,-..'. mil a r,..
Henthly balue, uere reportedly in millions a. frilcws: January .1.2.5; February $65.3: Marcr, 15.9, April $i.", Ma, e l'.1: June $2 .1, July 2-,.9.
August $96.5; September 1$ .5; Octobr $263.1: Note,.r er I-I : anr,d DOa t.e.r '98.s. l,,perr... tortal'd ''..I mllirnm B rnth, alu.e' r, m1 i llon,
were as followsi : January 130.C-; F.'r ruary i3.: Marcrh 12b..*: Apr tl $23.'; MN.5 S .B: Ju,. t"- .t., Jls $2,. augu c i- .5; sept,,ter i8.2, O .:totb r
$i3.1; November $182.8, and Decerrnber S'4.3.
'Adjusted for seasonal and workirng-d.y varinton using .a,.c :err iartor a. de'crlted in footnote I a oc.tcom of orts rage.





Exports and imports are adjusted for seasonal and working-day variation but not for price level Fartors used to adjust 1977 and 1978 export dala Shown in Ihis rpton represent seasonal adjustment
fcitors derived from monthly data through 1977 and introduced in January 1978 combined wilh the appropriate worting-day adjustment lactorn 1978 import data are beingadjusied by interim lactorl
derived from monthly data through 1977 1977 import data are being adjusted by factors introduced in Januar, 1977
'Cumulations of data over al Iast 4 month periods are desirable To identify underlying trends Monri 10 monnth changes in exports, imports and similar series ofter reflect primarily irregular move
milsen, differences in monthly carryover ell Recent month lo-month percent changes in Ihb overall seasonally adjusted export and mport series are presented in the following table witr average percent
month-lo-monttI rise and decline over longer periods shown for comparison. The average rise and average decline ti.ures do nor reflect data on nonmonelary gold The averages also ecrlude percentage
changes for 11 the period Ociobe December 19771 because of abnormalities in the data due to effects ol dock Strikes and 121 periods when negligible changes itero percent) in the level ol eApornsiimporls
occurred. Percentage changes for fa s. and c i.t. import values are not available for periods prior to January 1974

Month-to-mont r Average monthly rates of change


Series Dec. 1977- Nov.-Dec. Oct.-Nov. Sept.-Oct. Average Average monthS 12 months
Jan. 1978 1977 1977 1977 rise decline Sept. 1977- Jan. 1977-
J 19 2-197 1972-1977 Jan. 1978 Jan. 1978
(Percent) (Percentl (Percentl (Percent; (Percent) (Percent (Percent) (Percenti


F.a.s. export value.. -9.0 t16 .1 +1.1 -i1.0 +3.6 -3.-* -1. *)0.7
F.a.s. import value.. -5.5 +10.8 -8.9 +3 .1 (NA) (NAI -0.1 +1.6
C.i.f. import value.. -_.8 +11.1 -9.1 +3.1 (NA) (NAI -0.I +1.5


'See the 'Explanation of Statistis lor definlions of the export and import values and trade balances









Table 2. U.S. Exports (f.a.s. Value Basis) of Merchandise Showing Department of Defense (DOD) 7
Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid Shipments, by Month: January 1977 to January 1978

fin millions of dollars. See Explanation of Statistics for information on coverage, definition of f.a.s. export value, and sources of error in
the data. Unadjusted totals represent surm of unrounded figures and hence may vary slightly from sum of rounded amounts)


Exports excluding DOD Exports including DOD Grfnt-AidI
Grant-Aid' DOD Grant-Aid'


Period Domestic Domestic Domestic
and and Domestic, ana Domestic. Western Other
fore gn, foreign, unadjusted foreign, unadjusted Europe countries
a onjtely unadju.tea unadjusted


1977

January-December...................... (A) 121 14.0 118,9.3.5 121,205.8 119,005.4 61.9 3.1 58.7

January.......... .. .... ............... 9,b6-.4- 9,118.4 8,960.1 9,135.2 8,976.8 16.8 0.1 16.6

January............................... 9,66... 9,118.4 8,960.1 9,135.2 8,97o.8 16.8 0.1 16.6
February................... ......... 9,896.5 9,-69.0 9,336.0 9,.73.9 9,341.0 5.0 0.3 4.7
tarch................................ 10,16 .1I 11,050.4 10,855.2 11,058.2 10,863.1 7.8 0.3 7.5
April................................. 9,953.2 10,542.4 10.344.5 10,548.0 10,350.1 5.6 0.1 5.5
May......................... ........ 10,-88.9 10,928.. 10.736.1 10,933.5 10,741.1. 5.1 0.3 4.8
June............................ .... 10,090.3 10,279.0 10,Ob6.2 10,282.1 10,067.3 3.1 0.1 3.0

July.................................. 10,384.6 9,751.1 9,590.3 9,754.4 9,593.5 3.2 0.1 3.1
August................................ 9,67,.0 8,975.5 8,802.2 8,978.5 8,805.1 2.9 0.4 2.6
September............................. 11,030.5 10,363 ., 10,151.9 10,369.2 10,155.5 3.6 0.2 3.4
October............................... 9,37,.8 9,572 6 9,379.7 9,575.2 9,382.1 2.6 0.2 2.4
Novemb r .............................. 9.-75.0 9,667.2 9,517.- 9,689.6 9,519.6 2.5 0.3 2.2
::ecember .............................. 11,007.0 11 ,404.4 11,206.0 11i ,08.2 11,209.5 3.8 0.8 2.9

1978

January.............................. I0,01i -. ) I, )irt.-. 9.2'1-. I lQ,or,. ',2 6.t :2.5 0.5 2.1

January.............................. 10.. .O ,-I ,t,- .b 9,21,l-. ,, ])ob.l ',21b.6 2.5 0.5 2.1
February.............................
March................................
April ................................
May..................................
June.................................

Jul y......................... ........
Augu t ...................... ........
September ............................
Octo e r ..............................
N.-.vember.............................
December.............................
'Be Ln a r.g -ith Januar) 1978 sta.tLis Ct -, total_. include Cdta on .hLpmentE f r-orm.cn et rv gold. See tatle 1, footnote 2.

'Represents only export shipments from the Uniteo States and differs from DOD Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid shipment figures under this
program as follows: (a) Transfers of the .material procured outssae the United States and transfers from DOD overseas stocks from export shipments.
(b) Export value is f.a.s., whereass DOD value, in most instances, is f.o.b.. point of origin. (c) Data for shipments reported by the DOD for a gfIve
month are included In Bureau of the Cenrus report' in the second month subsequent to the month reported by the DOD.
'AdusEted for seasonal and *orking-day variation. See footnote I on the bottom of page 5.
"Annual tot3l is not shoan for seasonally adjusted data. Unadjustea data should be usea for annual totals.


I








7


Table 3. U.S. Imports of Merchandise, by Month: January 1977 to January 1978

(In millions of dollars. See Eiplanation of Statistics for information o0r coverage, oiat- of isportat ictr. deinitrionr of i.A._-. and c.i.f. import
values, and sources of error in the aata. Unadjusted totals represent -,um of unroundea figure_ ana hence m3y vary lightly iror, sum oi rounded
amount:)


F.a.-. value' C.t.I. value'


period General ipor import General import; IportB
for for
ae3sonal v ndy jSt cons up t i or., E a .or.i l1 y dju d con_ ump t ion,
adju- ted ulrsdjust.d d lud.- ted 3ad)u- ted l nadjustCa




January-December......................... .I 1..7?.', 8 1. ,'93 .- 'i 15?,i'.0 ib6,*'u .

January......................... ........ .1.0,971. lO. 10,0L 7.0 11 '33 9 11,36-..2 ll, ,. 9.

January.............................. ..... 10,971 .- 10,0o-.. 5 10i n'o .0 11.733.9 11,36-.2 11 ,-09.
February ................................. 1 2. 81.6l il 592. 11 13, .9.. 12,3'3.1 12,303 1
Marcb.................................... 12,082.' 13.1 2.1 13'.0b 12'.876.5 1.,0)37 9 13,930.1
April.................................... 12.08' .9 11,9I a 11.8652. 2,885.6 12, 23.2 12,638.
May ....................................... 10, 9i l 11 7 11 .07q.. 11 726.0 12,019.2 11 ,631 .0
June..................................... 13.39n. I l-,05h. 1-.u.-.. 1 ,29'.? 15 002. 1l-,969.1

July...................................... 13,0'o t 1'.,') 22,3- 3 13,9-3.0 13.262.7 13,1 W 9
August................................... 11 .,0.' 02, n .,0 .4'2 1 2,-1 .6 12,8 :l .r. 12,8.- .2
September................................ 12 *2 12,.-,0..' r2.' ,. i 1 ,-.i .8 13,288.3 13, 159.9
October.................................. 12,99,.o 1 .-9-.0 12, -..'. 1 13,o0'.7 13,3:;2.. 1 ,3 3. 5
November................................. 11,633.3 12,2 12,;'-.9 12, ,9.' 6 13,0-8 5 13,063.5
December................................. 13.12- : 13.3 1.a 1.1,1..'.9 13 ,99.. I l ., 0 2 1 ,0. .1

1978

January-........................ ..... ... .l.. .12,3 .' I "3. '.' .1.. II, .

January .................................. I ,l- ., i' ',, .... l. .1r '3 -... .-
February.................................
March ....................................
Apr I ....................................
May ......................................
June .....................................

July .................................. ...
August...................................
September................................
October r ..................................
November r.................................
Decora e r .................................

'Beginning -ith January 178 =tatiL.IC=, total; ir.:lude aa t on -hipm nt- of r.:or,ronetary gla- S e the Expikanaion of Si3ti-tic foIr additional
information. Sec il:i, tibl 1, loo1 r.,L 2.
'Adjusteo for EEasornil and .orklng-avy ..ara .t,on. Se. rootr'ote L on the boittc oi page 5.
3Annual total is not 'ho.n icr seasonalls aaiuj.t-a dat=. inauauted data shouldd oe usea for innur,a totals.










Table 4. U.S. Exports (f.a.s. Value Basis) of Domestic Merchandise, Including Department of Defense

(DOD) Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid Shipments-Schedule E Sections Seasonally

Adjusted and Unadjusted, by Month: January 1977 to January 1978 "

(In mr.Illors of dollar-'. See Eoplanarion of 3tatiott c. for information on coverage, det.n.tion, oi I.a.s. e-port -alue, and sources of error
In the oa[a. Unad luted totals represent ,ur. of nrounrded f irarea and hence may vary slightly from s-ur of rounoea amounts)

Scneaule secti onst


0 1 4 6 1 8 9


Seaoan.lly raijusted

1977

January-......................... i.'.'n.j 3i3.4 i.5.'.7 .. ?I.-, -.. 0 .. b.l 378.6

January ............ .......... ,'.. j). .') I ,. ;1. .1) '1. ] '-.b 907.1 093.6 6b.5.1 37b.8
February...................... ,i't l I. 1- L. i7. 4'). 7.2 9..2.1 3 '6.8 bti61.8 315.
March. ............. I. T.0 i6..6 I '.9.9 -1.9 1 .s 50,.. )719. -, '19.8 .2. 3u. 1
April......................... 22.5 22 '6.7 '5 .0 L11.3 o1q.l ')6.3 -.t031.9 616 2 242.3
May.................+........ ,132.1 is'. 1. .-.. 193.6 H, 87" ?8.1 52-. ] .l23A.5 hW..4 133.1
June....... ....ud.'. -t,'.6 b 1. l.t 3. LII.9 9i1. I 3l. 096.9 092'.0 299.9
July ......................... I 231., 1d... 1.2.. -6.B 'i2. 91.2 8'0.? 10s.9 699.] 508.1
August........................ L,'".0 -198.8 9. .eu9..J l.'. 8i.b 6 1b3.9 '..Ub-.6 ti..9 328.9
September..................... .2 1.9 143. 9 1.Y,-' I J 1.7 10.; I .1 I .0 I, .2 -. 1.' "6.0 265.5
October...................... .I. 39.; 1.i ). jl .'. 10=i.. ) '8.5 .1I.3 ..1 .' t ol.. 5 19.
November..................... I : .. -. ,i .6038 336.1 23.l d.9 83.0 3 .".8.1 lI.' 31 7..
December..................... .2 '.o 221. i063. 2 30'. 9 tul.6 89. 962.2 29. .6 69., 00..

1978

January ....................... L.- i. I. *. ,'.' 1.2 .r.. ... -. .3 ) .) .5"...

January....................... .i .. I'*. i. I.- ? J *.- lI.- 3 u .r -. -.;'. 'Ir -10.
February ..............
March.......................
April.........................
May..........................
June........................
July........................
August.......................
September...................
October.......................
November ..................
December.....................

.ina i U tec


1977

January-December.............. I-. i 3 .3 1,6-b.8 i 1 J. :' b. i). L. li)8. 10 i 1 .'.6 0. ,l.') i0,.25.. 6 -1..h3.2 0,212.2

January-....................... 1. IJ' Il6',. 3 1.0 7. 1 .0 .. L In.O 639.- ,. '62.2 I 90. I 3J.'

January....................... I ,.'. A j.c. .,, .3j. l .' ". i 616.0 3J9.- j. j '.1 2 990. 3 376.1
February...................... i lib.o 7. l lu. 2to. 90i. C'. 6992. i ,61 t'. i t201.8 260.9
March ......................... i. 3.. I. .J : ,i.u 32.1 9-j3. 1 1,003.1 -.l 53 I 33.'0 299.6
April......................... 1. .-. l.r. 1 i 2 3 ''.v 102.5 u2. ] 9r 1 -. .9 I 602. 2 .'1 0.2
May........................... ] .3-. 'B. 1. .- 7 .. 2 .' <":'. > -,566. 56 .- 33j.6
June....... ...... i.......... i, t..1 3-b.5 l,':". 3'h. I I '. 91 7.t 9-'.0 '.,2 .. 8 ..j 333.8
July.......... ............. ... fi,. i r 93-.j i3 2 .) ic. 5, b. 3 9c.9 685 ) 515.7
August....................... i .1 1 7.6 1. I j ]." l'.i.. 5'1*. ] 531. 3 6 i .., ,il.3 375.5
September ..................... .7. A, i :2.' -:..'. 100 1 .rb63. 1..J13.9 '.301.0 h -.- 250.9
October ....................... .) I .'j j i .E 6. 3".' .2. -..I' .. l t7. 71 3 3. 7
November ...................... 1 ,1-;. .- l. 10 .6 '6.i .1 11.;.5 b.0 1 'l.- ..,':'. m92.9 112.
December ...................... I .I Jo .o L.7''i.o 3:..i 1. 1.03 .'. ', .1 :'b. i .1.8 .3'-.8

1978

January-................ ...l."--.' 3, ir.. r' ; ". .r* =-'J*'
January....................... I L.. .' -- "I i ; t '.. ''r > J.'.b

February......................
March...... ....... .........
April.......................
May...........................
June..................... ...
July.........................
August......................
September....................
October.....................
November...................
December......................

1Schedule E section descripti-r. ar, i. i-.-
0. Food and live animals L. lr.e-,:a.i
1. Beverages and tobacco c '.nVeal. tjrka good Cla- II.c chii l. O1 -.aterlal
2. Crude materials, inedit- l .- ui= t':Ir. ner0 3rn trar.%c. rt -. -upmnt
3. Mineral fuels, lubricepr:, anJ rci.trl cdt-,ral- -. t 'jcciino' u. manul a,.ure'p articlee'-. -.c.
4. Animal and vegetable c' l a,- '.ra: Corn.,aJi tI '.na tran: tl3na r'. t las',lea according to Iind
'Beginning with January 1978 -t1 .1=t i:, IA. Inciua- 1.t. r, .. -, r.'r ... ne.r,mn.nar., g a "-e IMe t 0.Ian,.tin of St-citicz i 3r aua_[lrnal
information. See Ii. i i.- rti 1. I.
w Adjusted for -ne. nd-i annt -.ork .-.i .r -rirn. l: I ot. or7 1n betl'' :i page trr.ua onita r.r -i h:-r. ior soeson.lv najusoia
data. Unadjusted data should be --a !.:.r .rieal 'o = Tr' t -in t ej. .-; n til- an -I.o.r ... r-.3z corrthls to[a]; 'tn T05is 7 -d 2
were adjusted independently.








Table 5. U.S. General Imports (f.a.s. Value Basis) of Merchandise, Schedule A Sections, Seasonally

Adjusted and Unadjusted, by Month: January 1977 to January 1978

(In millions of dollars. See Explanation of Statistics for inior.mat lo, or. coverage, date of importation. d l iritl-in of I.a.E. Import ,alue,
sources of error Ln Lhe data. Unadjusted totals represent sum of unrounded figures and nience may nary slignt'l from sum of rounded amoujntsi


Schedule A sections'
Period

0 1 2' an. ad 6- 9'


Seasonally adjusted1


1977

January .......................

January.......................
February......................
March.........................
April .........................
May...........................
June ..........................
July ..........................
Augus t........................
September .....................
October .......................
November ......................
December ......................

1978

January .....................

January.......................
February......................
March.........................
April .........................
May...........................
June..........................
July..........................
August ........................
September .....................
October.......................
November......................
December......................





1977

January-December..............

January- .......................

January.......................
February ......................
March.........................
April .........................
May ..........................
June ..........................
July ..........................
August ........................
September .....................
October.......................
November ......................
December ......................

1978

January-.......................

January.......................
February......................
March.........................
April .........................
May...........................
June..........................
July ..........................
August........................
September.....................
Oct ober .......................
November......................
December r......................


98-.2
98-. 2
1,203.5
1,022.1
1,337.0
. 150.3
I U33. n
Lu38.
859.9
89t. 1
670.3
890.0
I, 2'6.u




S1. I I -


'12'3.5

"120. 5
"122."


'121. -


1 11.2

'182.-a
1i 7.8
105.U
-"1 .8
- I iq. 8



131 i

I 1t I


3.309.6

3, 30"9.6
-.1:168.0
-. 392.c,
3. 3r7. I
2.85. o
-.,630.3
-.165.'.
3, 362.2
3.855.-
..'029.6
1.677.-
3. 085. 1





I, Ia.


'352. "

'3:2.

".'9.99

"-12.
'4-9. 2
"399."
"*.21 a

-3..9. I
':ill.6
549.0



.I s.4


I 'n. I


1. 9 .. l
I.;t8.3
Siii,.-


1. 67.. n
.856.5
I 805. -


1.6| ?.6
. lc bd. ,
Ifc-..






-, IOl..


2, bbi3.

2, 6a3.

2.90.5

2. 59.3
3,133.9
3. 25 .
-, );8.
3.200.?

3. '9.o8
3.al'.8


Srr.aj .. u;tea


12,557.8

971.-

971.-.
1,097.%
I 1-'. L
1, l 3
1, 122. 7
1, 15 .8
980.3
88-. 8
873. 7
812.9
901.6
1, 29..6





1. 1 2 '


L, 69.-

120. 5

120.4
122.,
155.4
121.]
1-..9
1-s.

111.2
i62. 3
182.9
13-.6
105.0
I S9.8


. 85.-.
5,9. 5

398.-




71-. "

-.6

.15. 2
'61.2


--.53-1.2

3. "21 -

3,52 1.-

i-. .

, -92.8
-, 3j ..
3.911. ,
3, 65 .-
", '"20.
3,63 .

3, 151.,-


-,9'0. -

352.

382..
-69..

.61.5


o9I.-
-21.is
-3n.-.
34-9.
311.6
.-- U.


21, 3 0 .0

1,-26.
1,-28.8








. 888.
1,-9. i

I -1 .,.,



2, M-. o

.888.
.1o9. .
1, 6 1 -. "






I 809. .


6, 28.. 2

2.-93.3
2,-9 .3
?, ; ., .

2. 88 .2
2. 9-0.9
3.-19. i
2. 995.2
2.?ol.3
2, 99..9
3. aul.5
3, 190. I
3, 6.3. 1


1.035.9
1, 1 1.5
1.012.5

1. 10.2
i. Inb. .i

t.21 5.b

1.25.5
L.283.3
L, 1. 8
L.379.y


1.3?'..
I .


13,809.-



-.5. 8
919. 1
.031.
L 'r)91. 2

1,.25 .0
1. 261 .

1,2I '.-
1.3 1.l


1 -'5. -.



I ." I


'Schedule A section de-criptions are as t1uiloo -
0. Food ana live animal- i. L.ne.cal-
1. Beverages and tobacco b. Manufacturea gods cLa-n itea cniefl D)I material
2. Crude materials, inedible except fuels 7. Machinery anoa ranEp.rt fquioment
3. Mineral fuels, lubricants and related material- 8. MisceLlslnepus manufactured articles n.e.s.
A. Animal and vegetable oill ana ft-= 9. Comr-od,t.'i and transacti.ins not cla.'iflea accord.er. to kird
'Beginning with January 1978 ElaEistics. totals include (ata 3n -hipenits of noprmonetary gold. See tht EKxlanaiELi of s ttl.tics for anaotional
Information. See also tootrCt- 2, taDi I.
tAdjusted for seasonal and working-day variation. See footnote L on bottom of page 5. Annual totils ire not shown for setaonally adjusted
data. Unadjusted data should be used for annual totals. The section totals in this tbile ana simillir overall montnl% totals in tables I nna 3
were adjusted Independently.
'In the absence of demonstrable seasonal patterns for this seclion, no seasonal adjustment zactora have necn applied to the data.


* .'








Table 6. U.S. General Imports (c.i.f. Value Basis) of Merchandise, Schedule A Sections, Seasonally

Adjusted and Unadjusted, by Month: January 1977 to January 1978

1in million. of dollars Fee Explanat on of Statli icsm for information on coverage, date of importat on, definition of c. i.f. Lmport value, and
sources of error in ine aata. Unaajusted totals represent sum of unrounded figures and hence may vary slightly from sum of rounded amounts


Schedule A sections'

Period
u 12' 3 5 ., 7 8 9'


Sea .onally ad justedj


1977

January-......................

January......................
February........... ... ....
March............ ....
April... ........... .. .. ..
May.................. .. .
June................
July............. .
August ........... ...... .
September........ .
October.......... .. ....
November.......... .. .
December........... ..... ....

1978

January-.......................

January............ ...
February............
March .............. .......
April ............. .. ..
May................ ....
June.............
July............. .......
August ............. ... ......
September........ ..
October........... .. ... ....
November.........
December......... ..





1977

January-December. ..... ..

January-.......... ............
January......... .
February.........
March............
April............ .
May..............
June.............
July.............
August...........
September ........ ...
October ..........
November....... .. .. ..
December......... .. .

1978
January-.. ....................

January... ....... ...
February .........
March............
April............ .
May..............
June............... ..
July.......... ......
August............
September......... .
October..........
November..........
December.........


I. UJ52.9

1,052.9
1,282.0
1,136.8
1..20.9
,225.n
l, i4.3
1,,12.1
965. l

q3j ..
952.2
1,3 1.:



I i t .

1 .1 *: .-


13,-;2-.8.



I. 1b9.2
.I J9.2
1.03 16. ?
- 19 b.
1. 35.

S52.-.





vI .


"131.2

'131.2
133. 1)
161.5
"33.2
'1 5'.




199...
"1-B.9
"IL.8s





1, 1 .1
4


1,8L. L 2.





163.

13J. .

15 9.-
123t.
i L *
199.'
SI 1. 6







I L 1


634.3

b39. 3
759.9
b699.5
716.-
'2-. 3
197.5

nlu. t,
-82.0
8 1.2
68'.0
- 3.,


*' -


** IB '


0, 60.


368.8
566.8





,80. 1
91.18.4.
"''9.1
6j-. I
80 6
at' I,


3.536.1

3,536. 1
-,324.7
-,67. b
3, )"-.O
3,030. 5
.,602.1
,.27.9
3,5 t2.0
-.080.3
,276.1
4,100.1
3,263.'




3. .A )


- :,292.8

3, '62.-

. 0'2.-
.,099.8

3. 2'. -
2,9o3.8
4.,582.6
-. 157.8
J. Sim. i
3,937.i
3.6,;.0U
3,915.6
3, 35.3


'60.6

'"B0.6
'43.3
'40.3
'38.8


t...\..


'31 .b
'41.6




31

* 11 .


'371.0

*371.0
409.7
'461.
'485.3
4.35. I
'475.2
'42,.2
'--6.8
''49.8
4371.1
'328. 3
'577.5


5.2-5.5

3; 1.0
371 .u
'09.7
-61.5
.85. 3
-35.1
e. 5.2
42'.. 2
.-6.6
.59.
371. 1
328. 3
i-\'.


1,613.2

, 613.2
1,846.4
1,665.4.
1,953..
1,887. -
I,990.9
2.001.4
1, 9.6. 2
2,072.1
2,000.-
1,880. 3
2,223.8



2, 21 f..

2,2 l1,. C


22,997.2

1,5-0.
1. 5.0.6
l. bo06.4
1.006.5. I
I. lvi. 1
1. 832. 3
1.91 1.l
2,o 1-.
1.923.
2,008.5
2,0-l.u
2,010.-
1. 8 5. 7
2,292.0


-. 1 .r

*,131.8


2,848.2

3.255.8
2,784.6
3.086.3
2. 9 '. 5
3.343. 3
3,-;3. 3
3, 15-.6
3,-10.1
3,650.3
3, 250.0
3. &,l.


38.8 0.3

2,665.9
2,.665.9
2.975.8
3,213.4
3.392. 5
3.1-7.9
3. o-.5
3,192.0
2,92-. 3
3.191.9
3, 511. 6
3. 39. 5
.1 b6. 3



1.4


1, 113.0

1,113.6
1,234.8
1,086.1
1,163.9
1,254.5
1,281.6
1,305.0
1, 120.7
1,311.6
1, 382.6
1,119.0
1,-83.5



1,-5b.5

1.456.5


14,828.0

1.010.o
1,016..7
S1,00. 7
1,106.7
1,083. 6
1,136.6
, 3,.7.D
L. 35-. b
1,320.2
1,351.9
1,..4,.8
,. 201.8
I,403.-



I Ir..


3


ISchedule A se- I ... rj i ,r, .- ir. I L


0. Food and I i, ,,,, i i
1. Beverage- .1..1 5.... r-. fr.'l', cru '.-Ii l.,i .f ._.f cr.ci ll, b, mrc ralJ
2. Crude mi.ier ,. r .. i thl|. .:enr I un. pi' r r. ri s ,r. r I.. p.r k'lu Iim rEr.,r
3. Mineral Iu.- : I i ,,r -r ,,'-, i nJ re lal- ,- -ri l a Mi i,: li r,- ,,,-, ..a : t r j rr r l,: .:I r. t
4. Animal irl e ll .1 r.n far. i t.- .a .i e in tr ans at i.-n rot Cl 3 -l ea Eic ,oraing t l I kind
Beginning wit.. Tr,-,,nr 14 -L -. -le i. *i I .lid, 1..'. .. .-,oi m..,,. -, ....I .... r CO ',, tle EL' D 3ina lion f Statistics itor adaltion
information. See 1. L L.- I .
'Adjusted for :.--orn. 1 ,nd ..-,ritr. -dAy viri'ron,. i.:;e i,..--tn..te I on pagc 7.. A.nrul Cr.t.1E are not ihowr, for seasonally adjusted datn.
Unadjusted data sh:.ui. o, us-d tor an.Jal rotids. Th- id,.iusted section totals in tEns taoln and similar overall monthly totals in tables I and 3
were adjusted independlnr i.
4In the absence ot d..ons-'tr blie e-on:,l patterns fnr thii 'ectirn, no .e sonal 3ajuSLment factors have been applied to the data.


,413.2

207.8
207.8
233.1
223.9
230.4
261.8
408.1
236.8
263.8
313.0
285.8
4.18.2
332.5


333.3

33)1.3


al


I' i 1. 2'' 1 ed








GENERAL IMPORTS OF PETROLEUM AND SELECTED PETROLEUM PRODUCTS INTO
THE U.S..CUSTOMS AREA AND U.S. VIRGIN ISLANDS, UNADJUSTED

Monthly and cumulative-to-date data on general imports of petroleum and selected petroleum products into the U.S. Customs area
and into the U.S. Virgin Islands for the period January 1977 through the current month are presented in the tables that follow. Tables
I-A and 1-B present imports into the U.S. Customs area and tables 2-A and 2-B present imports into the U.S. Virgin Islands. (It should
be noted that imports into the Virgin Islands are excluded from the regularly compiled foreign trade statistics and, therefore, are ex-
cluded from the data presented in tables 1 A and 1-B as well as the other tables shown in the front of this report.-See "Explanation of
Statistics".

E effective with January 1978 statistics, certain changes were made in the commodity classifications (Schedule A and TSUSA) covering
petroleum products. These changes are reflected in the listing of classifications shown below. Data presented in tables 1-B and 2-B which
follow have been revised to reflect all changes in classifications, effective January 1978.


Schedule A and TSUSA Commodity Numbers Used in Compiling the Petroleum
Information Presented in This Report


Energy products

Schedule A. No.


Nonenergy products

Schedule A. No.


TSUSA No.


Crude petroleum and deriv-
atives to be refined
333.0020
333.0040
334.4040


475.0510
475.1010
475.6510


Lubricating oils
334.5410 pt.

Lubricating greases
334.5410 pt.


475.4500



475.5500, 475.6000


Crude petroleum
333,0020
333.0040

Gasoline
334.1500

Jet fuel
334.1205

Kerosene
334.2000


Distillate fuel oil
334.3021

334.3041

Residual fuel oil
334.4050
334.4060

Propane and butane gas
341.0025

Liquid derivatives of
petroleum, n.e.s.
334.5430 pt.


475.0510
475.1010


475.2520, 475.2560


475.2530
475.2550

475.3000


475.0525
475.0545
475.1015
475.1025

475.0535
475.1035


Paraffin and other mineral
waxes
335.1225 pt.
335.1245


Asphalt
335.4500

Naphthas
334.5420


All other petroleum products
(pitch of tar coke, non-
liquid hydrocarbon mix-
tures, and calcined petro-
leum and coal coke not for
fuel)
335.3000 pt.
334.5430 pt.
598.5020 pt.


475.1525, 475.1535,
475.1545


475.6530


TSUSA No.


494.2200
494.2400



521.1100



475.3500


401.6200
475.7000
{517.5120
517.5140












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U.S. Department
of Commerce
BUREAU OF THE CENSUS
Washington, D.C. 20233
Official Business


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
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