United States foreign trade

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
United States foreign trade
Alternate title:
United States foreign trade. FT900, Summary of United States export and import merchandise trade
Portion of title:
Summary of U.S. export and import merchandise trade
Abbreviated Title:
U.S. foreign trade, FT900, Summ. U.S. export import merch. trade
Physical Description:
13 v. : ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of the Census
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census :
For sale by the Subscriber Services Section (Publications), Bureau of the Census
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Creation Date:
October 1977
Publication Date:
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Imports -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Exports -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Commerce -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
statistics   ( marcgt )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Issued also to depository libraries in microfiche.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Dec. 1976-
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Ceased in 1988.
General Note:
"FT 900."
General Note:
Description based on: Jan. 1979; title from caption.
General Note:
Beginning with July 1980 for sale by the Supt. of Docs., U.S.G.P.O.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Mar. 1988.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001320869
notis - AGH1745
oclc - 07222812
lccn - 81646118
issn - 0730-3270
sobekcm - AA00005268_00001
Classification:
ddc - 382/.0973/00212
System ID:
AA00005268:00011

Related Items

Preceded by:
Summary of U.S. export and import merchandise trade
Succeeded by:
U.S. merchandise trade. Seasonally adjusted imports and exports

Full Text

8 3. // / 77-( to

UNITED STATES FOREIGN TRADE


4! Summary of U.S. Export and


,,)ili :. ,;"cnport Merchandise Trade




___ j OCTOBER 1977
FT 900-77-10 For Release November 28. 1977 10.00 A.M.


Seasona1Atr cif$Ae and Unadjusted Data

(Including unadjusted data on imports of petroleum and petroleum products)


F.A.S. EXPORTS AND F.A.S. IMPORTS


Seasonally Adjusted

The Bureau of the Cen u-' [ aeFatcirien of C'rT..j r.ce .: an-
nounced toda\ chat during Ocitober '77;, exports on a
f.a.s. (free alongside shipi U.S. port of expert atLor
value basis, excluding Department of Def'en.e i[ODi Mliii-
tary A:sistance Prograrrm rani-Ai. -ihipriEnts, ani-unred C.:-
$9,190.0 million and that general imriporti on a f.t .a.
foreign port o exportation value tasi-. amrrLrintd to
$12,287.9 million.' "

Based or, the atove export aid import rr ure the 1Otberr
merchandise rrade balance was in detici. t by 13,:'-97.c, mil-
lion, a. compared r. a dJefiit of c 1,' :'. mill :,r. in
September.' 2 3

During the first 10 m.:-rtLr. ,f 1977 J ruar ,-O,'tr.b r .
exports on a seasonally adj'jted ba-., were at an arnual
rate of $119,729 million, a le&el about. a percent righenr
thar the calendar year 1976 total of i ll,a'"M2 million.
Imports for che January-October 197. period wre atE arn
annual rate cif $l6.1004 million, represencir.ng an in.-rease
of about 21 percent oc er the calendar -,ear 197t. total of,
$120.678 million.

For the --month period, JiLl-Octoter i197 e'.port~
averaged 09,954.6 m illionr per mronth. a decr-a'e :-f ab,:.ut
2 percent from the i10,137.2 171l[ lion average reported tor
the preceding --month period, tarch-June 1477. Import:
on a f.a.s. value basis averaged $12. r'- r.E million per
month for the current --month period, a le,.el I lightly ,
higher than the 12,400.1 million average reported for
the preceding 4-month period.' 3

Unadjusted

Exports excluding tlilitar,, Pssi tar'nce Progrim Grart-Aid
shipimientas decreased from $10,358.1 million in September
to f9,30'.5 million in October. With -litar., Asistance
Program Grant-Aid shipment-a included, export-- decreased
from $10,3tl.7 million in September to 19,312.1 rir llion
in October. General imports decreased from 112..-75.7
million in September to $11,813.6 million in October.

lote: Footnote_: i, 2, and 3 are .hown at the bottom of
page -.


F.A.S. EXPORTS AND C.I.F. IMPORTS


Seasonally Adjusted

The bureau .: f tEh n D- ep artm-nt o L Cf C oTu.e re anno-un:ed
rc.:da, chat d ir-; :,t obe r lut' e pcrc c n a f.a.i. i free
a lori-. :d itnp.1 UL.:. port c f esxportatiLc r value bas:.i ex-
L l.jd in r, a -p.art.ier.t o.f D'e i f n I (L,':l Mi l it ar% Ai:s i tance
F ro. ramn C'ranit-Aid i .pi r p er.t ar3.ounted to I 9 ', '.1 mi llon
and that p ne Era ipe.rc i- :-r, a i c.:o t in-urance. and
fre ifhr-: LiU. port cif entr'. value e ba i 3 mounted to
13, i 121.3 m i ll i.:.r, 3

E.a: -eJ -r. the ab.: t.a.. c:p.:rt and :.t. impip.rc figures,
th- 'ti: r t r.: rdi ; r. ade t a l ar e a it de f it b
1 3,'31 ..' Til tLi:r. a .- ..:.]7 ared .c: a defi,: in s ep t.mbe- r -t
i ; ':. ill r :

lur i n r h.. fir :r. r I i-i.-.Ith- At 1[ 7 J i an, a r,-Octobe r ,
expI.-rr: :, a ':ia :..nia adjuite.J t. L re -c in annual
rate ti' ll.f ,I ~ l i o a le'' l_ at,.:ut per.-i nt hie er
rhan the :ale-ndar ,.ear P1 76 total i:.f 1, 1 .8,02 m-' Ilion.
irip.'E f r theha Janual ,-O.:cr tob, r 1'97'7 period Were at an
ann-,al rate oft $I )6, i'5 mi liion. repre ent ri.g anr, increase
-f at :.t 21 peric n-t :. r th *a l r.dar :.ear 19-6 Et.ita of
1 12 '.,5 mill i n.:. .

For che i --a.cr.th per -iod. Jul r..:.- c ber L 77, export E
a- r r, ed 9-'. a. r. m il i, n per ..:. r, r dccrEas, o aL out
2 p -er' nt fro the ii l, 37.2 mill c.rn a.eragr ra:pc rted for
the (rc-:ed ng -mioricnt p-ri-.:.d, liar.:h-Jn c ''. Imports
on a *.i. .aluoe basic : averaged il3, -' .6 i li on per
monr.: h tf-r the -urrenr a-m-.:nrh per ,..d, a le-..el eight ly
higher than the. l3.229.1 r mi ltl on a"erag reported for
t.e prec:edirg -m-.iornth petr d.' 2 3

Unadjusted

Exporn I e .: eluding Ilil[itar. A: i:itan-ce Proigram Crarnt-Aid
-hipitenr c de, re aed From i lO,3,'8.. l mill ion in September
to I.'I,3.'-.5 mi l ion in .:to-be-r. ulth I l litar', A-s i-tance
Frc rait G'rant-r id :hipaner. iniclu-Jed, exports ae-creased
from i l'.3 1 [." mili on itn SeptemTber tu i.9,312.1 mill ion
irn 1:.t-:be r. General Tm mpc.rti- d:i: re 1 a d r fr.ocm .1 18 .5
mitl i n inin pcF.[e ber to. t l2 l-.8 mi ll ion in C, tober.


U.S. Department of Commerce
BUREAU OF THE CENSUS


Inquiries concerning the. figures should be addressed to the Chief. Foreign Trade Division, Bureau of
the Census, Washington, D.C. 20233. Tel: Area Code 301,763-5140.
For sale by the Subscriber Services Section (Publications), Bureau of the Census, Washington, D.C.
20233, or any U.S. Department of Commerce district office. Postage stamps not acceptable, currency
submitted at sender's risk. Remittances from foreign countries must be by international money order
or by a draft on a U.S. bank. Price 30 cents per copy. Annual subscription (FT 900,975,985, and 986
combined) $14.90.








EXPLANATION OF STATISTICS


IMPORT STATISTICS


Import Valuation


Coverage

The U.S. import statistics reflect both government and
nongovernment imports of merchandise from foreign countries
into the U.S. Customs territory, which includes the 50 States,
the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. The U.S. import
statistics exclude imports into the Virgin Islands, Guam,
American Samoa, and other U.S. possessions; and "'shipments
between the United States and Puerto Rico, between the United
States and U.S. possessions, and between any of these outlying
areas. (Data on U.S. trade with Puerto Rico and the Virgin
Islands of the United States are published separately in Report
FT 800. Additional data on such trade and on imports into the
Virgin Islands from foreign countries are presented in reference
tabulations.) Data on imports of petroleum and selected
petroleum products, including shipments into the Virgin Islands
from foreign countries, are included in this report effective with
the January 1976 statistics (previously shown in former Report
FT 900-Supplement).
The U.S import statistics also exclude American goods
returned to the United States by its Armed Forces; intransit
shipments through the United States; temporary -shipments;
transactions not considered to be of statistical significance, such
as shipments of personal and household effects; low-valued
nondutiable imports by mail; issued monetary coins of all
component metals; and gold in the form of ores, concentrates,
waste, scrap, and refined bullion. Imports of silver in these
forms are included in the statistics, unless otherwise noted.
(Information on gold movements appears in Report FT 990
effective January 1975, previously shown in former Report FT
2402.)


General Imports/Imports For Consumption

The statistics on U.S. imports are presented in terms of both
"General Imports" and "Imports for Consumption." General
imports are a combination of entries for immediate con-
sumption and entries into Customs bonded warehouses, and
thus generally reflect total arrivals of merchandise. Imports for
consumption are a combination of entries for immediate
consumption and withdrawals from warehouses for con-
sumption, and thus generally reflect the total of the com-
modities entered into U.S. consumption channels.


Source Of Import Information

The official U.S. import statistics are compiled by the Bureau
of the Census from copies of the import entry and warehouse
withdrawal forms which importers are required by law to file
with Customs officials. The information as to country of origin,
net quantity, value, and commodity classification is verified by
Customs officials on entries filed for transactions valued over
$250, which are ordinarily subject to examination for Customs
appraisement purposes. The statistical copy of the entry is
corrected if it does not accurately reflect the information
called for by the statistical requirements.


F.a.s. Import Value.-The f.a.s. (free alongside ship) value
represents the transaction value of imports at the foreign port of
exportation. It is based on the purchase price, i.e., the actual
transaction value and generally includes all charges incurred in
placing the merchandise- alongside the carrier at the port of
exportation in the country of exportation.

C.i.f. Import Value.-The c.i.f. (cost, insurance, and freight)
value represents the value of imports at the first port of entry in
the United States. It is based on the purchase price and includes
all freight, insurance, and other charges (excluding U.S. import
duties) incurred in bringing the merchandise from the country
of exportation and generally placing it alongside the carrier at
the first port of entry in the United States. If the merchandise
was acquired in a transaction between related parties, the
purchase price used in deriving the c.i.f. value is based on an
arm's-length equivalent transaction price, i.e.. a price which
would exist between unrelated buyers and sellers.

Import Monthly Carryover

It is the objective of the compiling procedures to include
shipments, insofar as practicable, in the statistics for the actual
month of importation. However, for purposes of the statistics
the month of importation is based on the date of official
acceptance by Customs of the import entry or warehouse
withdrawal document. This may not in all cases correspond to
the actual month of importation. (For example, under the
Customs "immediate-delivery" procedures, importers may file
the import entry up to 10 workdays after the actual date of
importation.) Also, because of processing problems (e.g.. late
receipt of a document for an end-of-month shipment, rejection
of a shipment by the computer because the data tail to meet
certain edit criteria established to protect the accuracy of the
statistics, etc.), there is an overall average carryover of about 5
to 6 percent (in terms of value) of the shipments from the
reported month of importation (based on the date of the import
entry or warehouse withdrawal document) to a subsequent
month, usually the succeeding month. In addition, as a result of
the aforementioned Customs "immediate-deliver procedures,
there is a further carryover of presently unknown magnitude
from the actual month of importation to a subsequent month.
These limitations should be borne in mind when making
month-to-month comparisons.
Cumulations of data over at least 4-month periods are
desirable to identify underlying trends. Month-to-month
changes in imports, exports, and similar series often reflect
primarily irregular movements, differences in monthly
carryover, etc.

Estimated Data for Imports Valued Under $251

The overall import and Schedule A Section 9 totals include
sample estimates for shipments valued under $251. Therefore,
they are subject to sampling error, estimated at less than
one-tenth of one percent for the unadjusted overall total and
about one percent for the unadjusted Schedule A Section 9
total. This means that we can have about 67 percent confidence








that the published unadjusted overall totals and the unadjusted
Scheduled A Section 9 totals differ by less than one-tenth of a
percent and one percent, respectively, from the totals that
would have resulted from a complete tabulation. The statistics
on imports of petroleum and petroleum products included in
this report reflect fully compiled data and, therefore, are not
subject to sampling error.

EXPORT STATISTICS


Coverage

The export statistics reflect, in general, both government and
nongovernment exports of domestic and foreign merchandise
from the U.S. Customs territory (includes the 50 States, the
District of Columbia. and Puerto Rico) to foreign countries,
whether the exportation involves a commercial transaction or
not. The statistics, therefore, include Department of Defense
Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid shipments, shipments for
economic assistance under the Foreign Assistance Act and
shipments of agricultural commodities under P.L. 480 (The
Agricultural Trade Development and Assistance Act of 1954, as
amended) and related laws. The following are excluded from the
statistics. Shipments to U.S. Armed Forces and diplomatic
missions abroad for their own use; shipments between the
United States and Puerto Rico, between the United States and
its possessions (including the Virgin Islands), and between these
outlying areas: exports from U.S. possessions; intransit ship-
ments through the United States; transactions not considered to
be of statistical importance, such as personal and household
effects. temporary exports; low-valued or non-commercial
exports by mail: issued monetary coins of all component metals;
and gold in the form of ores, concentrates, waste, scrap, and
refined bullion. Exports of silver in these forms are included in
the statistics, unless otherwise noted. (Information on gold
movement appears in Report FT 990 effective January 1975,
previously shown in former Report FT 2402.)

Definition of Exports of Domestic
and Foreign Merchandise

Exports of domestic merchandise include commodities which
are grown. produced, or manufactured in the UnitedStates, and
commodities of foreign origin which have been changed in the
United States from the form in which they were imported, or
which have been enhanced in value by further-manufacture in
the United States. Exports of foreign merchandise consist of
commodities of foreign origin which have entered the United
States as imports and which, at the time of exportation, are in
substantially the same condition as when imported.

Source of Export Information

The official U.S. export statistics are compiled by the Bureau
of the Census primarily from copies of Shipper's Export
Declarations which are required to be filed with Customs
officials, except for Department of Defense Military Assistance
Program Grant-Aid shipments which are reported directly to the
Bureau of the Census by the Department of Defense and
shipments by qualified exporters who have been authorized to
submit data in the form of magnetic tape, punched cards, or
monthly Shipper's Summary Export Declarations directly to
the Bureau of the Census.


Export Valuation

F.a.s. Export Value. -The value reported in the export statistics
generally is equivalent to a f.a.s. (free alongside ship) value at
the U.S. port of export, based on the transaction price,
including inland freight, insurance and other charges incurred in
placing the merchandise alongside the carrier at the U.S. port of
exportation.

Export Monthly Carryover

It is the objective of the compiling procedures to include
shipments, insofar as practicable, in the statistics for the actual
month of exportation. For purposes of the statistics, the month
of exportation is generally based on the date when the shipment
leaves the United States. (For vessel or air shipments it is the
date when the carrier departs or is cleared from the port of
export.) However, as indicated above for imports, because of
processing problems (e.g., late receipt of a document for an
end-of-month shipment, rejection of a shipment by the com-
puter because the data fail to meet certain edit criteria
established to protect the accuracy of the statistics, etc.), there
is an overall average carryover of about 2 to 3 percent (in terms
of value) of the shipments from the actual month of exporta-
tion to a subsequent month, usually the succeeding month.
These limitations should be borne in mind when making
month-to-month comparisons.
Cumulations of data over at least 4-month periods are
desirable to identify underlying trends. Month-to-month
changes in imports, exports, and similar series often reflect
primarily irregular movements, differences in monthly
carryover, etc.

Estimated Data for Export Shipments

The overall export and Schedule B section and division totals
include sample estimates for shipments valued $251-$1,999 to
Canada and for shipments valued $251-$999 to countries other
than Canada. Data for shipments valued $250 and under to all
countries are also estimated, based on established percentages of
individual country totals, and included in the Schedule B
Section 9 totals regardless of the commodity exported. It is
estimated that the unadjusted overall total is subject to a
sampling error of less than one-tenth of one percent, and the
unadjusted Schedule B section or division totals are subject to
sampling errors of about one percent. In addition, the Schedule
B Section 9 total is subject to possible error in the estimated
data for shipments valued $250 and under; and the overall total,
and the individual totals for sections other than Section 9, to a
more limited extent. Such $250 and under shipments represent
about 1 percent of the total value of exports, and about 60
percent of the Schedule B Section 9 total.


SOURCES OF ERROR IN THE STATISTICS

Monthly import and export figures are subject to the
possibility of errors which may arise from sources other than
sampling errors, discussed above. Among these are errors in the
reporting and/or processing of information as to commodity
classification, value and other statistical factors, month of
inclusion (see paragraphs on import and export carryover,
above), and the undercounting of exports to Canada due to the
non-receipt of Shipper's Export Declarations. For 1975, the









undercounting amounted to more than one billion dollars. In
the case of imports the information as to value and commodity
classification (as well as country of origin and net quantity) is
verified by Customs officials on entries filed for transactions
valued over $250 which are ordinarily subject to examination
for Customs appraisement purposes, thus considerably reducing
the possibility of error. In addition, the procedures used to
compile both the import and export statistics include clerical
and computer processing checks designed to protect the
accuracy of the statistics to the fullest practicable extent.


MERCHANDISE TRADE BALANCES

Two trade balances are presented in this report:
1) The balance between exports based on f.a.s. values and
imports based on f.a.s. values.
2) The balance between exports based on f.a.s. values and
imports based on c.i.f. values with adjustments for imports from
affiliated sellers abroad to reflect arms-length equivalent prices.
Both balances are useful for certain purposes. The first
balance corresponds to a measurement of the international
payments or credit flows resulting from merchandise trade
between the U.S. and foreign countries. The second balance is
based on concepts similar to those used by most foreign
countries, and therefore provides a reference for comparison
with the trade balances published by those countries.



REVISIONS TO THE STATISTICS

Revisions are carried into the statistics on a periodic basis.
Data for 1976 and 1977 appearing in the 1977 monthly issues
of this report are presented as follows:


1977 Statistics
a. January through November 1977 issues: figures are as
originally issued, except as noted below.
b. December 1977 issue: figures reflect revisions for prior
months of the year issued with December 1977 statistics
or earlier, as noted below.

1976 Statistics
a. January through May 1977 issues: figures reflect revisions
issued with December 1976 statistics or earlier.
b. June through December 1977 issues: figures reflect
revisions to 1976 data issued with June 1977 statistics or
earlier.
In addition to the revisions which are made on a periodic
basis, instances may occur where a significant error in the
statistics for a month of the current year is discovered after the
statistics for that month are compiled. If the error is of
sufficient importance to require correction prior to the time
that the regular revisions are carried, the correction is made and
so noted in this report.

SOURCES OF FURTHER INFORMATION
Additional foreign trade statistics and information regarding
coverage, valuation, sampling, and qualifications which should
be considered by users of the statistics are contained primarily
in the following publications: Report FT 990, Highlights of U.S.
Export and Import Trade; FT 135, U.S. General Imports,
Schedule A Commodity by Country; FT 410, U.S. Exports,
Schedule B Commodity by Country; and the Guide to Foreign
Trade Statistics. Information regarding additional sources of
statistics, the methodology used in seasonally adjusting the data,
and other matters relating to foreign trade statistics may be
obtained from the Foreign Trade Division, Bureau of the
Census, Washington, D.C. 20233.


'Adjusted for seasonal and working-day variation, but not for changes in price level. Factors used to adjust 1976 and 1977 data shown in this report represent seasonal adjustment factors derived from
monthly data through 1976 and introduced in January 1977 combined with the appropriate working-day adjustment factors.
2Cumulations of data over at least 4-month periods are desirable to identify underlying trends. Month-to-month changes in exports, imports, and similar series often reflect primarily irregular move-
ments, differences in monthly carryover, etc. Recent month-to-month percent changes in the overall seasonally adjusted export and import series are presented in the following table with average percent
month-to-month rise and decline over longer periods shown for comparison. The average rise and average decline figures exclude percentage changes for (1) the period July-December 1971 because of
abnormalities in the data due to effects of dock strikes and (2) periods when negligible changes (zero percent) in the level of exports/imports occurred. Percentage changes for f.a.s. and c.i.f. import values
are not available for periods prior to January 1974:


Month-to-month Average monthly rates of change

eries Sept.-Oct. Aug.-Sept. July-Aug. June-July Average Average 4 months 12 months
Series 1977 1977 1977 1977 rise decline June-Oct. Oct. 1976-
1971-1976 1971-1976 1977 Oct. 1977
(Percent) (Percent) (Percent) (Percernt) (percent) (Percent) (Percent) (Percent)


F.a.s. export value..
F.a.s. import value..
C.i.f. import value..


-15.8
-2.7
-2.7


+14.2
+3.3
+3.3


+0.4
-3.5
-3.4


'See the "Explanation of Statistics" for definitions of the export and import values and trade balances.


-2.4
(NA)
(NA)


-0.1
+1.4
+1.4









5

Table 1. U.S. Exports (f.a.s. Value Basis), General Imports (f.a.s. and c.i.f. Value Basis), and Merchandise

Trade Balance, Adjusted for Seasonal and Working-Day Variation, by Month: January 1976

to October 1977

In lI I r, 1 .c c F P rpl si. i rI : c j 1 1 1: r m : m a r i. 1r i 3 i t rt 3- 4 1 r .rr .a. L, r r. 3 r r L lJr.'
.r,, r err:r Ir, rr,, t ti r _r,*', :. I 3 L :L 1' r r.- .3r a. r 1 r ; 1 I, i" a I




F r ci,.,a
Tr ,_-3 ir 1-

LII



JEaru rv-C'c..r. r .a. .. ... .. .. -.'- -t. ,,)- ..-. rj.. *.. L 3>,

J a rn . .I .
earp drv .. r -

Apru l '4 E :,

ra t. -. L
. rn e. .. .. ... 1 ~ l I1- 1. ; l -,-,- o 1 t '4' 4 -4 ,' 4 l ,

id I v . . r : I


AD e UrI r... .. .. .... '" '- '".' 1 1 L -1 ,. r,
u.er. ....... ... '.. .. I .' l 1 I
ebruri LL 6 i 1' L "
, r. . 1 L'' L 1 -L 2L '



S .. .. . . .

Na, elld r F. . I L .-
Febuneraa ...... ... ... L l'2' L ,. '4 '.1 -3 K .L' :i
M&ly ... ... ... .. L' L-i 6 l-I -r ^ -lI l Y L J -o0:1 I -: l II



A eprl . '' :' '.' -: :. I '' 'I .'- : .

A o e.. . i .
e u -r L'3 l. -. '4- 6 I L. .% .
0C ioIel I . 63 L l
NovAui t-er. .
Dectter.. .

iRepre-encs p: r ci o r.e : .I 3. 3 r: re lr .| r cri .' .4l n- ar rI r.. r c' ia. r. ,r. I 3. Crair Cr .r-t. 3 ;ri F.111











Table 2. U.S. Exports (f.a.s. Value Basis) of Merchandise Showing Department of Defense (DOD)

Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid Shipments, by Month: January 1976 to October 1977

(In millions of dollars. See Explanation of Statistics for information on coverage, definition of f.a.s. export value, and sources of error in
the data. Unadjusted totals represent sum of unrounded figures and hence may vary slightly from sum of rounded amounts)

Exports excluding DOD Exports including DOD Grant-Aid
Grant-Aid DOD Grant-Aid


Period Domestic Domestic Domestic
and and Domestic, and Domestic, Western Other
foreign, foreign, unadjusted foreign, unadjusted Total Europe countries
seasonally unadjusted unadjusted
adjusted'


1976

January-December..................... (3) 114,802.3 113,128.4 114,992.4 113.318.5 190.1 3.0 187.1

January-October...................... 94,874.5 94,334.7 93,001.9 94,515.6 93,182.8 180.9 2.6 178.2

January .............................. 9,097.2 8,754.2 8,652.5 8,763.8 8,662.2 9.6 0.5 9.2
February ............................. 8,918.8 8,736.9 8,628.4 8,741.7 8,633.1 4.8 0.3 4.5
March ................................ 9,020.4 9,823.2 9,666.5 9,828.5 9,671.8 5.3 0.3 5.0
April ................................ 9,368.9 9,826.1 9,696.6 9,835.5 9,705.9 9.4 0.2 9.2
May.................................. 9,564.0 9,962.8 9,840.0 9,973.5 9,850.7 10.7 0.2 10.4
June................................. 9,722.0 9,846.4 9,713.8 9,859.3 9,726.8 13.0 0.4 12.6

July................................. 9,956.3 9,315.1 9,174.2 9,319.7 9,178.7 4.6 0.3 4.2
August ............................... 9,733.4 8,824.3 8,690.3 8,893.9 8,759.9 69.6 0.3 69.2
September............................ 9,795.8 9,165.9 9,015.2 9,215.5 9,064.8 49.7 (Z) 49.6
October.............................. 9,697.7 10,079.8 9,924.6 10,084.2 9,928.9 4.4 (Z) 4.3
November............................. 9,593.6 9,686.7 9,534.2 9,691.9 9,539.4 5.2 0.1 5.0
December............................. 10,397.1 10,780.8 10,592.3 10,784.9 10,596.3 4.1 0.2 3.9

1977

January-October...................... 99,773.8 99,129.6 97.297.3 99,185.2 97,153.0 55.7 2.0 53.6

January.............................. 9,598.9 8,975.9 8,817.6 8,992.7 8,834.3 16.8 0.1 16.6
February............................. 9,807.8 9,403.7 9,270.7 9,408.7 9,275.7 5.0 0.3 4.7
March................................ 10,071.6 11,044.5 10,849.3 11,052.3 10,857.2 7.8 0.3 7.5
April................................ 9,970.2 10,540.5 10,342.6 10,546.0 10,348.1 5.6 0.1 5.5
May.................................. 10,394.6 10,861.3 10,669.0 10,866.4 10,674.0 5.1 0.3 4.8
June................................. 10,112.3 10,251.9 10.037.1 10.254.9 10,040.1 3.1 0.1 3.0

July................................. 10,149.8 9,505.3 9,344.4 9,508.5 9,347.6 3.2 0.1 3.1
August............................... 9,562.7 8,879.0 8,705.7 8,881.9 8,708.6 2.9 0.4 2.6
September............................ 10,915.9 10,358.1 10,144.4 10,361.7 10,148.0 3.6 0.2 3.4
October.............................. 9,190.0 9,309.5 9,116.5 9,312.1 9,119.1 2.6 0.2 2.4
November .............................
December.............................

'Adjusted for seasonal and working-day variation using seasonal adjustment factors introduced in January 1977. See footnote 1 on front
page 4.
2Represents only export shipments from the United States and differs from DOD Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid shipment figures under this
program as follows: (a) Transfers of-the material procured outside the United States and transfers from DOD overseas stocks from export shipments.
(b) Export value is f.a.s., whereas DOD value, in most instances, is f.o.b., point of origin. (c) Data for shipments reported by the DOD for a
given month are included in Bureau of the Census reports in the second month subsequent to the month reported by the DOD.
3Annual total is not shown for seasonally adjusted data. Unadjusted data should be used for annual totals.











Table 3. U.S. Imports of Merchandise, by Month: January 1976 to October 1977

i in "ill3,,r, 1 f dollars. See Explanation of Statistics for information on coverage, definitions of f.a.s. and c.i.f. import values, and sources
of -rr- r in the data. Unadjusted totals represent sum of unrounded figures and hence may vary slightly from sum of rounded amounts)

U.S. imports of merchandise


F.a.s. value C.i.f. value

Period
General imports Imports General imports Imports
for for
Seasonally Unadjusted consumption, Seasonally consumption,
adjusted2 Unadjusted unadjusted adjusted Unadjusted unadjusted


1976

Jnr.uiry-Dejeac r ........................ (2) 120,677.6 120,013.6 (2) 129,564.9 128,873.5

Jmnuar,-Oc[ooer.......................... 98,882.4 98,165.8 97,604.7 106,232.6 105,465.6 104,883.0

January .. .. ......................... 9,001.2 9,009.3 8,946.2 9,691.6 9,700.3 9,633.2
February ................................. 9,032.5 8,111.2 7,986.8 9,691.0 8,702.5 8,574.8
M.rcn ... .. ..... .................... 9,469.2 10,202.1 10,049.6 10,153.1 10,939.0 10,782.2
Aonr l......... ....................... 9,643.1 9,894.8 9,844.3 10,352.4 10,622.6 10,569.4
Msy...................................... 9,182.4 8,943.7 9,029.4 9,872.6 9,615.9 9,705.4
JunE..................................... 10,153.5 10,579.9 10,397.7 10,953.5 11,413.5 11,225.8

July...................................... 10,717.2 10,563.9 10,649.6 11,508.4 11,343.8 11,432.4
August................................... 10,477.2 10,453.1 10,318.7 11,253.0 11,227.1 11,089.9
Septe.mber................................. 10,651.0 10,384.7 10,417.3 11,448.7 11,162.5 11,193.8
Octooer .................................. 10,555.1 10,023.1 9,965.1 11,308.3 10,738.4 10,676.2
November................................. 10,622.9 11,061.6 10,966.3 11,380.5 11,850.5 11,749.6
[evember................................. 11,020.4 11,450.2 11,442.7 11,789.1 12,248.9 12,241.0

1977

ia.uar,-O)coDrer.......................... 122,170.0 121,711.0 121,114.3 130,424.3 129,931.3 129,309.0

jar.uary.................................. 11,268.7 10,932.9 10,914.3 .12,058.6 11,699.3 11,682.4
Fecruary................................. 11,673.7 10,505.2 10,464.0 12,463.1 11,215.5 11,172.9
Marcn.................................... 12,459.0 13,551.7 13,450.4 13,283.4 14,448.3 14,342.7
April.................................... 12,593.3 12,434.6 12,363.2 13,419.4 13,250.3 13,177.0
May ................................... 11,615.9 11,906.3 11,731.7 12,403.7 12,713.8 12,532.6
June..................................... 12,932.1 13,569.7 13,535.2 13,809.8 14,490.6 14,453.3

J.ul ..................................... 12,476.1 11,859.8 11,779.5 13,330.0 12,671.5 12,587.8
Au.- t ................................... 12,232.2 12,661.5 12,663.5 13,050.6 13,508.7 13,507.2
aepteim.er................................ 12,631.1 12,475.7 12,338.2 13,484.4 13,318.5 13,175.2
Octoner.................................. 12,287.9 11,813.6 11,874.3 13,121.3 12,614.8 12,677.9
Nove-oer ....... ........................
December .................................

'Aojutca fir seasonal and working-day variation using seasonal adjustment factors introduced in January 1977.
AAnnu.A ro[al is not shown for seasonally adjusted data. Unadjusted data should be used for annual totals.








8

Table 4. U.S. Exports (f.a.s. Value Basis) of Domestic Merchandise, Including Department of Defense

(DOD) Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid Shipments-Schedule B Sections and Selected

Divisions, Seasonally Adjusted and Unadjusted, by Month: January 1976 to October 1977

(In millions of dollars. See Explanation of Statistics for information on coverage, definition of f.a.s. export value, and sources of error
in the data. Unadjusted totals represent sum of unrounded figures and hence may vary slightly from sum of rounded amounts)

Schedule B sections and selected divisions1
Period
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 72 71 72 73 8 9


Seasonally adjusted3

1976
January-October..... '13,190.1 1,262.8 8,844.5 3,480.1 4804.3 '8,200.5 9,249.9 40,549.9 18,171.2 7,601.8 14,876.6 5,362.7 '2,290.7
January............. '1,333.3 196.5 809.1 321.4 478.9 '753.2 932.1 3,791.4 1,729,4 647.0 1,403.1 499.9 4254.0
February............ .',159.8 156.4 762.6 321.7 473.8 *716.1 921.3 3,891.3 1,776.7 712.8 1,438.2 525.7 4201.6
March .............. 41,244.3 123.4 781.9 319.0 477.9 4863.5 945.3 3,819.5 1,803.2 744.8 1,268.4 553.6 4216.5
April............... '1.355.3 127.7 808.4 388.6 '77.3 '852.6 921.7 3,959.6 1,787.1 756.1 1,430.0 509.5 4258.3
May................. '1.253.4 100.4 905.0 351.6 '96.7 '883.3 925.1 4,087.3 1,858.8 755.5 1,504.9 553,7 4248.5
June............... '1.281.3 105.9 899.4 372.1 '78.3 '840.8 929.2 4,242.8 1,858.4 772.3 1,615.5 539.2 '244.4
July................ '1,358.1 100.9 900.9 375.1 486.4 '850.7 933.9 4,296.6 1,886.6 847.2 1,599.0 547.8 4248.2
August.............. '1,367.3 108.5 941.5 281.1 '60.3 '839.7 935.0 4,233.4 1,753.9 786.7 1,664.7 536.9 4191.3
September........... '1,321.6 120.3 1,025.6 373.2 '91.5 4785.1 937.0 4,165.5 1,864.2 797.7 1,480.1 559.9 4215.7
October............. '1,515.8 122.8 1,010.1 376.3 '83.1 4815.4 869.3 4,062.5 1,852.9 781.7 1,472.7 536.5 4212.2
November............ '1,299.2 98.7 1,024.9 378.3 '79.0 4829.3 932.8 4,138.0 1,860.5 741.3 1,505.6 561.8 '191.2
December............. '1,220.8 158.6 1,031.8 348.2 '94.8 '928.9 997.3 4,760.2 1,919.3 917.3 1,885.0 637.2 4267.5
1977
January-October..... 411,619.5 1,527.6 10,676.8 3,511.3 "1,106.6 49,047.9 9,396.0 42,147.9 18,401.8 8,419.7 15,342.4 6,026.0 42,598.9
January............. '1,077.0 172.9 1,065.3 266.3 '77.3 '809.3 934.5 4,157.1 1,838.5 757.5 1,518.3 557.6 4232.9
February ............ '1,114.1 150.5 1,160.4 318.5 '94.8 '910.0 983.0 3,993.0 1,890.5 820.5 1,287.6 597.4 '215.2
March............... '1,287.7 163.6 1,051.5 296.0 '134.5 '943.1 968.9 4,239.0 1,867.8 886.1 1,491.1 593.9 4292.5
April............... '1,232.6 117.6 1,195.8 382.4 '106.1 '903.3 940.8 4,073.9 1,756.9 847.2 1,533.5 561.0 '267.3
May................. 1,232.2 143.6 1,253.2 408.6 '127.3 '918.8 966.3 4,310.4 1,887.8 853.7 1,586.3 598.9 4265.8
June................ 1,145.9 169.1 1,095.9 356.7 '122.5 4918.9 960.5 4,195.8 1,862.9 848.2 1,465.3 624.9 '305.7
July................ .1.161.9 203.6 1,038.5 439.1 '129.3 '957.9 922.2 4,191.3 1,807.0 884.0 1,537.6 623.9 4269.0
August.............. '1,138.4 166.4 834.8 305.5 '106.6 '883.2 879.2 4,159.7 1,763.5 819.3 1,523.5 609.2 '278.2
September........... '1,244.3 185.3 969.5 399.4 '108.3 41,062.4 1,069.3 4,666.0 2,098.9 918.2 1,642.1 675.5 4242.5
October............. '985.3 55.0 1,011.9 338.8 199.8 "740.9 771.3 4,161.7 1,628.0 785.0 1,757.1 583.7 4230.0
November............
December............

Unadjusted

1976
January-December.... 15,710.1 1,523.5 10,890.7 4,225.8 978.1 9,958.7 11,206.1 49,501.2 22,012.3 9,278.5 18,210.4 6,574.9 2,749.4
January-October..... 13,190.1 1,205.1 8,670.6 3,485.6 804.3 8,200.5 9,304.9 40,611.5 18,249.7 7,652.8 14,709.0 5,419.5 2,290.7
January.............. 1,333.3 187.9 835.8 268.4 78.9 753.2 893.9 3,579.0 1,701.7 665.1 1,212.2 477.9 254.0
February............ 1,159.8 137.6 793.8 280.2 73.8 716.1 890.0 3,879.7 1,712.7 690.0 1,477.0 500.4 201.6
March............... 1,244.3 118.1 903.1 301.5 77.9 863.5 1,019.0 4,316.0 1,981.7 793.2 1,541.1 611.8 216.5
April............... 1,355.3 120.6 887.6 412.0 77.3 852.6 974.3 4.224.9 1,908.6 796.2 1,520.1 543.1 258.3
May................. 1,253.4 90.3 929.4 373.0 96.7 883.3 959.3 4,438.8 1,951.8 769.8 1,717.1 578.0 248.5
June............... 1.281.3 89.7 875.1 403.8 78.3 840.8 959.8 4,395.5 1,899.3 769.2 1,727.0 558.0 244.4
July................. 1,358.1 78.4 803.6 347.4 86.4 850.7 898.4 3,970.1 1,863.9 814.2 1,292.0 537.4 248.2
August............... 1,367.3 101.5 769.2 304.5 60.3 839.7 892.9 3,725.4 1,610.1 755.3 1,360.0 507.9 191.3
September........... 1,321.6 131.1 823.5 387.8 91.5 785.1 910.7 3,853.1 1,726.3 766.6 1,360.2 544.8 215.7
October............. 1,515.8 .149.8 1,049.5 407.2 83.1 815.4 906.7 4,229.0 1,893.6 833.3 1,502.1 560,1 212.2
November............ 1,299.2 126.5 1,118.2 379.1 79.0 829.3 904.8 4,067.7 1,797.3 733.2 1,537.3 544.5 191.2
December............ 1,220.8 191.9 1,101.9 361.1 94.8 928.9 996.4 4,822.0 1,965.4 892.5 1,964.2 611.0 267.5
1977
January-October.... 11,619.5 1,421.8 10,551.5 3,502.1 1,106.6 9,047.9 9,406.7 42,038.8 18,372.0 8,435.6 15,231.2 6,059.1 2,598.9
January............. 1,077.0 166.3 1,040.8 217.3 77.3 809.3 871.0 3,824.5 1,761.3 759.0 1,304.2 518.1 232.9
February............. 1,114.1 133.7 1,188.2 267.8 94.8 910.0 926.0 3,869.2 1,780,8 764.7 1,323.7 556.8 215.2
March............... 1,287.7 157.2 1,241.8 290.4 134.5 943.1 1,035.7 4,819.7 2,049.0 960.5 1,810.2 654.4 292.5
April............... 1,232.6 112.0 1,308.2 397.3 106.1 903.3 1,003.9 4,416.1 1,909.7 879.4 1,627.0 601.4 267.3
May................. 1,232.2 128.8 1,310.8 432.3 127.3 918.8 1,002.1 4.633.6 1,950.1 876.7 1,806.8 622.3 265.8
June................ 1,145.9 142.5 1,051.0 398.1 122.5 918.9 981.6 4,325.9 1,902.1 851.6 1.572.2 648.1 305.7
July................. 1,161.9 156.6 908.7 397.8 129.3 957.9 890.8 3.868.6 1,783.5 844.2 1,240.8 607.0 269.0
August.............. 1,138.4 155.6 686.2 333.6 106.6 883.2 862.4 3,677.2 1,654.1 778.4 1,244.7 587.3 278.2
September............ 1,244.3 201.8 798.9 401.4 108.3 1,062.4 1,054.3 4,367.4 1,958.3 901.7 1,507.5 666.8 242.5
October............. 085.3 67.3 1,017.0 366.2 99.6 740.9 779.0 4,236.6 1,623.1 819.5 1,794.0 597.1 230.0
November ....... .....
December............

'Schedule B section and selected division descriptions are as follows:
0. Food and live animals 7. Machinery and transport equipment
1. Beverages and tobacco 71. Machinery, other than electric
2. Crude materials, inedible, except fuels 72. Electrical machinery, apparatus, and appliances
3. Mineral fuels, lubricants, and related materials 73. Transport equipment
4. Animal and vegetable oils and fats 8. Miscellaneous manufactured articles, n.e.c.
5. Chemicals 9. Commodities and transactions not classified according to kind
6. Manufactured goods classified chiefly by material
2Seasonally adjusted figures for section 7 may differ slightly from the sum of divisions 71, 72, and 73 since each is independently adjusted.
3Adjusted for seasonal and working-day variation using seasonal adjustment factors introduced in January 1977. See footnote 1 on page 4. Annual
totals are not shown for seasonally adjusted data. Unadjusted data should be used for annual totals. The section totals in this table and similar
overall monthly totals in tables 1 and 2 were adjusted independently.
'In the absence of demonstrable seasonal patterns for this section, no seasonal adjustment factors have been applied to the data.











Table 5. U.S. General Imports (f.a.s. Value Basis) of Merchandise, Schedule A Sections, Seasonally

Adjusted and Unadjusted, by Month: January 1976 to October 1977

i i .-.-ll in:L Lla e F I a.., : ar i, t F lE : r ':r .i, r r--, .:n :c c ..r.a_ definition of f.a.s. import value, and sources of error
Ln Mr. 3ar, i r3a ju: tra3 :tc: r-~:r :.-,-,r .,T r .,_r: .j rn:re- uSi rr.: may vary slightly from sum of rounded amounts)

_:-.l-s= sections'
I-i r : i
0 C 5 6 7 8 9


--". adjusted2



janar.ry-0.coEer............ .. .:2.5 3l. .,.) 3.'- 5 3 ,i '3,844.3 14,432.8 24,418.8 10,191.1 '2,064.2
January.. .... "-".. '1 .1 '- 350.0 1,209.8 2,275.2 893.2 3186.6
Febru ry ........ .. 3-'.6 'l .: l. .) .-. 316.6 1,264.1 2.275.6 923.2 '169.7
Marcn ........... .. ... 5-i i .1. .' '3- 410.2 1,383.7 2,397.9 960.8 '215.0
April .. ............ ......... 3- .r .I 'j. '414.3 1.436.9 2,447.1 984.9 '189.9
MaF ........... .......... A1',. '0 '3" 0 2 .- 371.0 1,417.5 2,425.1 1,038.6 '211.2
June. .... ... ........ Q*, .0 'i,, :: '. r0 1 3388.1 1,519.0 2,407.9 1,039.5 '196.4
July............. ......... .. .I.6 '[: : 4: i60. 3 '385.9 1,552.5 2,564.4 1,114.5 '226.5
Aue~a ........... ......... .. .. 66 .' 6 10., 3:. 368.3 1,533.4 2,543.8 1,100.8 "218.9
.Dore oer ... ......... .. 8 --. :3 0 I -. 3 '368.4 1.588.2 2,631.9 1,076.0 '233.5
Octaber........... ........... .-0. 'Il* I .i I .- 471.6 1,527.7 2,449.9 1,059.6 '216.4
Noveib r ................. .... 0I w) 3 l : ; 1 ,3473.9 1,503.0 2,584.1 1,162.7 '253.5
Seceiber...................... 3 L1 .- .,, 453.6 1,567.9 2,685.3 1,125.4 '220.1


Ja. uar -i- er r .. ... ::- :L .- .. S34,586.9 17,744.8 29,332.4 12,183.0 '2,194.2
jar..ary........ ........ 1.- 'l .i L i l 2 402.1 1,568.6 2,744.9 1,145.6 '170.6
Febriarn ........ .. .. i- :1i 6 o- -1'. i 3407.1 1,605.7 2,740.1 1,166.7 '201.5
..arc .............. ....... .. I :* 1:..- 3. l I 517.1 1,673.5 2,730.8 1.147.8 '205.3
pril. .. .. ...... 3-.0 475.4 1,784.6 2,858.7 1.124.9 201.4
Ma. .................. ...... ill '1- : .-: 1 '481.0 1,826.7 2,763.1 1,242.0 '235.6
June'................... .. 1 r, .. 'i .3 .[ ; 01 r .- 505.5 1,839.8 3,019.8 1,264.0 3295.2
July ...... ....... .... ... i 414.3 1,833.4 3,135.7 1,247.5 3204.9
Aug ......... .. 08.1 ". -,-. *.3 '502.7 1,894.2 3,077.2 1,249.4 '233.2
Lepreacer ........... .... .. 9 6" l.-.. '-3 .-l. 3474.8 1,961.9 3,071.5 1,298.9 '218.7
Oct,b r ....... .. ...... -.. -, '406.8 1,756.4 3,190.6 1,296.2 '227.8
hui.e--tbEr ...... .
Deci--nDe r.....................

,..i .sted

1'',
Jandar.ry-er-er.e ..... .... 10 1 '. .t r-.i 4,771.8 17,615.5 29,823.9 12,563.9 2,537.7
Janarr-Octoneir. ............ 8 311." 1.330 3 :r.". 2 ,i3.i 3L.. 3,844.3 14,379.7 24,304.8 10,218.5 2,064.2
janusar...... ...... ........ .. L.1. -. 'J." 350.0 1,190.8 2,229.7 838.8 186.6
Fe rusr ....... ..... ........ L 6. -'. i 316.6 1,108.6 2,104.9 790.2 169.7
Marcn ......................... ... .6 5j -.- 410.2 1,473.7 2,724.0 999.2 215.0
Ur i ......................... .r I ., .S i. .c 414.3 1,409.6 2,606.2 931.8 189.9
Mi ........................... '. 1.6 106.- ..i 1 -.- i 371.0 1,383.4 2,459.1 925.4 211.2
June............. .... ....... I'i. 2 '36. i 1i 5. V 1 388.1 1,649.6 2,612.5 1,098.7 196.4
July.......................... '. 3.- I :. .' .1 ..:i 3i 385.9 1,547.8 2.461.8 1,194.7 226.5
%ugu r ........ .. .. .... 6i .'. 10-. '.15 J lo-.' j,.. 368.3 1,538.0 2,307.2 1,215.3 218.9
Sepie-.oer....... ....... ..... l -.. 368.4 1,558.0 2,445.0 1 123.t 233.5
Occooer .. ....... ......... 0 .- 1:1 i 6 l 1 471.6 1,520.1 2.354.4 1 1-11.0 216.4
Nover.Der .. .. ... i- .i i 'lT-.'i mi 473.9 1,606.8 2,723.7 1,231.3 253.5
Dece.er .... .... .. ..... 1 01.- 1;., o .i 13 0 453.6 1,629.0 2,795.4 1,114.2 220.1
19"-

nuur cob ... ,- .. .: 4,586.9 17,613.1 29,013.9 12,172.6 2,194.2
January ..... .. ........ 1 1 .1 .. 1 402.1 1,498.0 2,569.3 1,045.9 170.6
FCor.ary ....... .... 0 .. 1 -.6 v,-'.0 .' : :.9 '..* 407.1 1,397.0 2,504.5 1,002.2 201.5
Marcr .. ... ...... .. ........ l l-.l 1I,.- o. 1 r-"." -" 0 517.1 1,773.9 3,151.4 1,169.6 205.3
Apr .. ...... .. .. 1 .. :.6 475.4 1,673.9 2,864.5 1,047.3 201.4
M 7 ........................... 1 1- ." 1 481.0 1,856.0 2,951.0 1,125.2 235.6
June............... ........ 3 4 --. 505.5 1,999.9 3,294.6 1,328.5 295.2
July................ .. ... 6. .i .. 3 i .0 414.3 1,761.9 2,881.7 1,294.9 204.9
Au-u t .. 93- a 11-., 3]-. 3 "l.9 :.' 502.7 1,954.8 2,852.6 1,471.8 233.2
-eop.. b r .. r-*; 1.'.' 'O 0 -" '.... '1. 474.8 1,932.5 2,874.9 1,332.7 218.7
Octibe.r .. -.- r .i ., : .. 406.8 1,765.2 3,069.4 1,354.5 227.8
N-j..ejuner..
Pecn mii rr. I

'Scrineaal A :Ect ln a-.criprl:r r E -
0. Foe.d Ar L v- i L--.- l 5. Cr..- iI
1. Be.-rne i mna r.:Dns;c 6. .lainut :[red goods classified chiefly by material
,. Cru-a .T.aierini .rea6,le escprL i,.j. j,;-r...r and transport equipment
3. Plineral i-ueL lu. r iciarn in rleaI.3 .r.-u,risls 8 ,At,:,t 1Anious manufactured articles n.e.s.
.. Ari.Lral ana .egetar.le : .1: ra it 11 C,-.:- r ,-s and transactions not classified according to kind
A31ureu~r f,] r i:-,':,aL .no .-:rKt,n-dY ,Iar aci,:- us ,r-,1 :eziaL sj.:n. -i .c r.r irr.r-duced in January 1977. See footnote I on page 4. Annual
torl.: are nct in.T, ror t er:-.naii, adjju.te"a cs. .,nad,,nr-.:a ani CoiLsoa -1 n-.a for ar.r-,al totals. The section totals in this table and similar
overall *.orthLy total: in ca.Is; I &r, 1 ere r aj-Ca e epe. -,.onrxi l..
uin the C bS. nc d2 ler-[ rCrble .eac.r.nl pa e.rnr i.r tLi: ecrAn, n 5 .-:astaEl sauI. .Tent factors have been applied to the data.








10

Table 6. U.S. General Imports (c.i.f. Value Basis) of Merchandise, Schedule A Sections, Seasonally

Adjusted and Unadjusted, by Month: January 1976 to October 1977

(In millions of dollars. See Explanation of Statistics for information on coverage, definition of c.i.f. import value, and sources of error
in the data. Unadjusted totals represent sum of unrounded figures and hence may vary slightly from sum of rounded amounts)

Schedule A sections1
Period
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9


Seasonally adjusted2

1976
January-October............... 9,014.7 31,448.0 6,243.0 29,579.4 3379.5 34,048.4 15,570.7 26,292.6 10,948.2 32,108.2

January ....................... 814.1 '153.2 568.4 2,753.0 340.7 '369.2 1,311.5 2,452.9 964.5 '191.1
February...................... 783.2 3169.0 552.9 2,599.9 355.4 3333.0 1,363.9 2,452.4 993.0 3173.6
March......................... 914.1 3181.2 555.7 2,608.2 337.4 3433.0 1,484.9 2,572.8 1,031.7 '219.9
April......................... 839.6 '138.9 603.5 2,872.4 339.9 3434.9 1,541.7 2,644.3 1,059.2 3193.7
May........................... 901.2 '117.8 583.7 2,380.2 331.8 '388.5 1,531.4 2,618.4 1,116.1 '215.1
June.......................... 977.0 '148.9 613.5 3,032.6 332.5 3409.5 1,642.1 2,638.1 1,114.1 '201.0
July.......................... 981.3 '133.7 683.9 3,389.9 337.1 3408.0 1,680.1 2,744.8 1,194.7 '231.1
August........................ 934.4 '116.2 675.1 3,329.6 '38.4 '387.8 1,657.4 2,729.2 1,182.9 '223.8
September..................... 949.0 '135.9 715.1 3,258.6 '46.4 '389.4 1,714.1 2,828.9 1,154.1 '238.2
October....................... 920.8 '153.2 691.2 3,355.0 '20.0 '495.1- 1,643.6 2,610.8 1,137.9 '220.8
November...................... 958.9 '151.3 663.1 3,452.6 '66.9 '498.9 1,625.3 2,766.8 1,247.6 3258.1
December...................... 1,054.7 3167.5 698.8 3,322.4 353.5 '477.6 1,685.9 2,876.2 1,207.9 '225.1
1977
January-October............... 11,260.9 31,546.3 7,085.9 39,545.2 3493.7 '4,847.0 19,092.0 31,319.9 13,050.5 32,237.3
January....................... 1,091.0 3139.5 638.1 3,528.9 356.7 '423.9 1,692.9 2,934.9 1,228.8 '174.2
February...................... 1,217.5 3128.1 693.7 3,627.8 356.1 '429.6 1,724.5 2,939.2 1,249.9 3205.7
March......................... 1,204.6 3168.8 655.8 4,577.3 347.8 3544.3 1,790,5 2,931.4 1,227.0 3209.2
April......................... 1,431.7 3130.4 686.1 4,137.2 338.9 3501.0 1,908.5 3,062.0 1,204.4 3204.9
May........................... 1,289.7 3155.5 708.6 3,489.2 344.5 '506.0 1,965.0 2,952.8 1,329.6 '240.0
June.......................... 1,087.2 3166.3 737.3 4,338.8 373.6 '536.1 1,980.8 3,224.3 1,353.1 '300.4
July.......................... 1,067.5 '124.5 714.5 3,996.7 '44.2 3440.9 1,975.6 3,340.4 1,335.9 '208.9
August........................ 977.6 '178.0 774.7 3,673.6 356.4 '531.5 2,044.0 3,264.9 1,338.0 '238.1
September..................... 988.0 '204.0 744.2 4,177.1 344.2 3501.2 2,119.6 3,274.7 1,393.0 '223.1
October....................... 906.1 3151.2 732.9 3,998.6 '31.1 3432.6 1,890.6 3,395.3 1,390.8 3233.0
November......................
December......................

Unadjusted

1976
January-December.............. 11,098.1 1,766.8 7,643.3 36,357.9 499.9 5,024.9 19,002.2 32,086.5 13,493.5 2,591.6
January-October............... 9,002.6 1,448.0. 6,283.4 29,529.8 379.5 4,048.4 15,513.2 26,176.1 10,976.5 2,108.2
January....................... 828.7 153.2 532.6 2,984.2 40.7 369.2 1,290.9 2,403.9 905.7 191.1
February...................... 724.5 169.0 475.5 2,456.9 55.4 333.0 1,196.1 2,268.5 850.0 173.6
March......................... 967.1 181.2 584.1 2,939.4 37.4 433.0 1,581.4 2,922.7 1,072.9 219.9
April......................... 885.8 138.9 608.9 2,990.0 39.9 434.9 1,512.4 2,816.2 1,002.0 193.7
May........................... 849.9 117.8 586.0 2,282.6 31.8 388.5 1,494.7 2,655.0 994.4 215.1
June.......................... 1,058.1 148.9 707.5 3,032.6 32.5 409.5 1,783.4 2,862.4 1,177.6 201.0
July.......................... 971.4 133.7 714.0 3,257.7 37.1 408.0 1,675.1 2,635.0 1,280.7 231.1
August........................ 949.3 116.2 675.1 3,392.9 38.4 387.8 1,662.3 2,475.3 1,305.9 223.8
September..................... 923.4 135.9 740.9 3,173.8 46.4 389.4 1,681.5 2,628.1 1,204.8 238.2
October....................... 844.4 153.2 658.7 3,019.5 20.0 495.1 1,635.4 2,509.0 1,182.3 220.8
November...................... 993.4 151.3 630.5 3,276.5 66.9 498.9 1,737.4 2,916.2 1,321.3 258.1
December...................... 1,102.2 167.5 729.5 3,551.7 53.5 477.6 1,751.6 2,994.2 1,195.8 225.1
1977
January-October............... 11,182.0 1,546.3 7,109.4 39,542.1 493.7 4,847.0 18,950.5 30,983.6 13,039.3 2,237.3
January....................... 1,076.8 139.5 587.7 3,754.8 56.7 423.9 1,616.7 2,747.1 1,121.9 174.2
February...................... 1,110.3 128.1 586.2 3,439.1 56.1 429.6 1,500.4 2,686.4 1,073.6 205.7
March......................... 1,289.0 168.8 682.6 4,975.6 47.8 544.3 1,897.9 3,382.8 1,250.3 209.2
April......................... 1,407.4 130.4 673.0 4,315.1 38.9 501.0 1,790.1 3,068.1 1,121.3 204.9
May........................... 1,258.7 155.5 742.0 3,412.4 44.5 506.0 1,996.5 3,153.6 1,204.7 240.0
June.......................... 1,216.5 166.3 839.8 4,265.0 73.6 536.1 2,153.1 3,517.7 1,422.1 300.4
July.......................... 1,007.7 124.5 737.4 3,752.9 44.2 440.9 1,898.5 3,069.8 1.386.7 208.9
August........................ 1,005.9 178.0 797.1 3,989.5 56.4 531.5 2,109.4 3,026.6 1,576.1 238.1
September..................... 963.3 204.0 769.5 4,030.9 44.2 501.2 2,087.8 3,065.1 1,429.2 223.1
October...................... .. 846.3 151.2 694.0 3,606.7 31.1 432.6 1,900.0 3,266.3 1,453.4 233.0
November.....................
December .....................

'Schedule A section descriptions are as follows:
0. Food and live animals 5. Chemicals
1. Beverages and tobacco 6. Manufactured goods classified chiefly by material
2. Crude materials, inedible, except fuels 7. Machinery and transport equipment
3. Mineral fuels, lubricants, and related materials 8. Miscellaneous manufactured articles, n.e.s.
4. Animal and vegetable oils and fats 9. Commodities and transactions not classified according to kind
2Adjusted for seasonal and working-day variation using seasonal adjustment factors introduced in January 1977. See footnote 1 on page 4. Annual
totals are not shown for seasonally adjusted data. Unadjusted data should be used for annual totals. The adjusted section totals in this table and
similar overall monthly totals in tables 1 and 3 were adjusted independently.
'In the absence of demonstrable seasonal patterns for this section, no seasonal adjustment factors have been applied to the data.









U.S. GENERAL IMPORTS OF PETROLEUM AND SELECTED PETROLEUM
PRODUCTS, UNADJUSTED

Tables 1-A, 1-B, 2-A and 2-B which follow, contain monthly and cumulative-to-date data on U.S. general imports
of petroleum and petroleum products into the U.S. Customs area and into the Virgin Islands for the period January
1976 through current month. (It should be poted that imports into the Virgin Islands are excluded from the official
U.S. import totals presented in the preceding tables of this report.) The data in these tables are not adjusted for
seasonal and working-day variation.
Beginning with the statistics for January 1977, certain changes were made in the TSUSA and Schedule A com-
modity classifications covering petroleum products. These changes are reflected in the listing of commodities used in
compiling the Petroleum information presented in this report shown below. Data for 1976 presented in tables 1B and
2B which follow have been revised to reflect these changes.

Schedule A and TSUSA Commodity Numbers Used in Compiling the Petroleum
Information Presented in This Report


Energy products


Scnedule A. No.

Crude petroleum and deriv-
atives to be refined
331.0120
331.0140
33L.0240


TSUSA No.


475.0510
475.1010
475.6510


Nonenergy products

Schedule A. No.


Lubricating oils
332.5000 pt.

Lubricating greases
332.5000 pt.


TSUSA No.


475.4500


475.5500, 475.6000


Crude petroleum
331.0120
331.0140

Gasoline
332.LOOO

Jet fuel
332.2020

Kerosene
332.2040

Distillate fuel oil
332.3020

332.3040

Residual fuel oil
332.4020
332.4040

Propane and butane gas
341.0020


Liquid derivatives of
petroleum, n.e.s.
332.9940 pt.


475.0510
475.1010


475.2520, 475.2560


(475.2530
475.2550


475.3000


475.0525
475.0545
S475.1015
475.1025


475.0535
475.1035


Paraffin and other mineral
waxes
332.6220 pt.
332.6240


Asphalt
332.9800

Naphthas
332.9920


All other petroleum products
(pitch of tar coke, non-
liquid hydrocarbon mix-
tures, and calcined petro-
leum and coal coke not for
fuel)
332.9700 pt.
332.9940 pt.
599.8040 pt.


475.1525, 475.1535,
475.1545


475.6530


494.2200
494.2400


521.1100


475.3500


401.6200
475.7000
517.5100



























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