United States foreign trade

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Material Information

Title:
United States foreign trade
Alternate title:
United States foreign trade. FT900, Summary of United States export and import merchandise trade
Portion of title:
Summary of U.S. export and import merchandise trade
Abbreviated Title:
U.S. foreign trade, FT900, Summ. U.S. export import merch. trade
Physical Description:
13 v. : ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of the Census
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census :
For sale by the Subscriber Services Section (Publications), Bureau of the Census
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Imports -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Exports -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Commerce -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
statistics   ( marcgt )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Issued also to depository libraries in microfiche.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Dec. 1976-
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Ceased in 1988.
General Note:
"FT 900."
General Note:
Description based on: Jan. 1979; title from caption.
General Note:
Beginning with July 1980 for sale by the Supt. of Docs., U.S.G.P.O.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Mar. 1988.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001320869
notis - AGH1745
oclc - 07222812
lccn - 81646118
issn - 0730-3270
sobekcm - AA00005268_00001
Classification:
ddc - 382/.0973/00212
System ID:
AA00005268:00001

Related Items

Preceded by:
Summary of U.S. export and import merchandise trade
Succeeded by:
U.S. merchandise trade. Seasonally adjusted imports and exports

Full Text

C3S.1(p4-: q00-% -1

UNITED STATES FOREIGN TRADE


ILL ,Summary of U.S. Export and


4 A h, V Import Merchandise Trade

n FEB ,. Niv. oF FL- Li.1


.... ...- DECEMBER 1976

FT 900-76-12 -,,/ For release January 28, 1977 10-00 A.M.
______________^ .^ f 1 -- _________Z__,-------


Seasonally


F.A. E.;FOFT'i -lii' F.s.:. iMPOc' :

,mnr-,ual 1( I.r iadju-t.Jd

The Bureau stated that -dujrir. calE.,dar vear Fi.r, exp rr: or, a
f.a.s. I(free alongside 'hip) U.S. port of e.xp..rtat.in a luE
basis, excluding Depart,-,ernt f Drefen -:, DOC M 1 ir ar, l ;;_ r. -
ance Program Crant-Aid :-h ip.ent. a, we Er .alid at illu .'.-.; I
million, an inrcreca : or at.our percent o.r thr. cat ndar -,ar
1975 total of C 107,1 '.- T millionn. Cenr. r a I mr-.port s or, a a .
foreign port of e/portar;r alue L i' f:.r c al n-dar .-ar I[
were valued at 120,67. illLon. ar, 1 n:r:ae .:f tf p: r -nr n
over the comparable i9 5 -otal c : ir,., l6.0 nil lon.

Based on the above export and import c alendar v. ar ig -are. the
1976 merchandise trade t.alanr:e .as ain L a C t tb 5,7,.3 m l-
lion. The comparable traie ba lance F .or i a : .rp lu c -f
$11,014.4 million.

MonrrhL kSeanonatl, A.1juitcdl

The Bureau stated that during 1-ecember I' ., exportE on a f.a..
(free alongside ship) U.S. port of exportation 'aloe asi3 ;,
excluding Department of Erefenre (LC';,) Militar, A':i'tar ce Pro-
gram Grant-Aid shipments, amounted to 110,51-. ,i_-lioor, .anf
that general imports on a f.a. .for nige port of export a iar,n
talu baris, amounted to ltl,'r6.2 -mill ,.' 2 3

Based on the above umonthr Is report andl import f igure_: the
December merchandise trade balance wa iLn C lEicit b, 05'-1..
million, ai compared to a deficit of 1i. 9 .2 million in
November.

For the --month period, September-DecerFnber 19 6, exporC: a 'er-
aged $9,934.7 rr ill;on per mornth. a level about 2 percent at.o'.e
the $9,743.2 million a erare reported for there precejirng -rinonrh
period, Ma-Augu-t 1-16. Importi on a f.a.-. ",alue ha, Li,
averaged S10,663.2 million per month for the current --i>nrt
period, about 5 percent higher than the 110,,I\)3.2 ,millic.n
average reported for the preceding -imonth period.

Mornthl lunadju ted)

For the month of December, exports excluding Military A::i Lt-
ance Program Crant-Aid 'hipmrenit increa.ead from $0,f62.3
million in November to $10,79-.5 million in December. With h
Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid shipmenct Included,
exports increased trom 0,,687.4 million in November to
$10,798.6 million in December. General imports increased from
$11,061.6 million in Notember to $11,450.2 million inDecember.

Note: Footnotes 1, 2, and 3 are ihrnow at the bottom of pace -.


adjusted Data


.;.".. E. 'F, ;. -, .* FI IMF.-,FTI

l r. r.,.j a l i.r, ..1j ,j ; r ,j ,*

Th: b-ire a. ar.ted rhat J.ur nir .:er ear I' export: on a
a. .-'. tfree al-:.rg .i-je ,: I .'. corr of p.p-:.rcat ion .alue
ra- -, e : I ud rL Np a r tpi r nt ft efr._-e -1" i'' M I itary v A. : t-
r,,e F'rccra..- Crant-A i ; hip.m.'r- t i- r_ .a .lud-i at ill-,8,"'.!
. 11.o a, i n r- a : at.r t pc r: -i : r t al ri Jar a r
,- r ,-r l -t ,:,'.I .- i1 '1 r,. *er,. r .! .porr mr, a :. .r.
':- i-Fr. n*-- ar.l 3 r.. ih 1.1.:. part. [ r r. a I ,
S-.r r, : .r,l dar ,-=r ., r- aLued r i ii. .r. ,, l ion, ar,
r.:r.e .:.f r. er-.ent a .. e t.e cor-p r rle _' ti a l of
Sl 3 ,, I T. I l. :,r,,

e.3 e or. tr ait..:,.e exp rt an-d Lm-.iport calendar r 5-ar f gJure Che
l r. ,,~.L rcharidi t rid- balac e n Ii I r dw -lc r_ b I ,? .5 il-
I :rn. Thr- -:.F-parabl. t rad- talar..- ftr.r 1 wa a surplu: :.f


l ntal, I --a,:r, all Adjusted)

The eur-au rare l tr.r l ur e.g r ,ece. "t,, r l"7r,, exp rt on a f.a. .
f r a riwn :ide hip Ul..': porch of exportat i--.n *a ue tr-a s,
SIxcl-iud. n Departm.ent r.f Det'- fer I lO*) Milit ar, A : i'r anrce Pro-
2ram hra t--i L hLpr* -tnt .T-C.0an-intc1 LO E. l million anl
that r,-_ ral i.Tp:.rt : r. a :. 'C it. in-iurance, ar-id f reigh
L,. I. porr of er -tr lu-a tia: i. -a'T"- uin-'d ta' ill 38 I mill ion.1 2

baned on the at---. m.O,: r.h pc-rt a-d iTr.pc.rc f i .,Jre.. tEr-
[e,-e,.t.-t r m.erchandise trade balance w.a r. n i., f rt t-. i. ,j23.J
i lli.rn, as cC.rr-.p red to = da.-f Cit of 1t.I .'' mill or. ,ri,
Nol.iemhe r

F-:-r 'he --r.orIt-. p r c-d i :pteniehEr-,'e'I-embe r 10o. export a'ver-
iagid i. -J l. 3 ,i ll i r n per r."--r h, a I-, i l abi cut 2 percent abo'.-
the i, I.' -. I ll,.n r a ':r ae ; r.p-.rted. i for t he. F.reeC ding -morn thF
peroLed, Lla y-A-jeut I ,ilportr. : n a r:. i.. ValJe c bai-',
aleragd i$11i,2 .i milt.Lon per month for the current -month
period, abtO t ., percent rhigher than the it1 ,90y8.2 million
average reported fcr the preceding '--moricr.c period.

Mcn ntl / (.inad iu.ted

For the .-oth of C-en-irmber, export- excliuding M ilitLary A iE.ist-
ance Frogran. Crant-Aid hipmennt= increased frrom $q,682.3 mIl-
lion in tNoe .T.hr r to. O1 ,t -a .5 million ir. Dec:-.mb r. WU th
Military A.si.tance Prograr. Crant-Aid shipments included.
exportL irncrea'-ed from 19,6E.- million in November to
$10,1798.6 millitor in December. General imports increased
from til,8.,0.5 million in Itoverrber to 12,2u6.n million in
DecetmbEr.


U.S. Department of Commerce
BUREAU OF THE CENSUS


Inquiries concerning these figures should be addressed to the Chief. Foreign Trade Division, Bureau of
the Census, Washington. D.C. 20233. Tel: Area Code 301, 763-5140.
For sale by the Subscriber Services Section (Publications). Bureau of the Census, Washington, D C.
20233. or any U S Department ol Commerce district office Postage stamp not acceptable. currency
submitted at sender's risk Remittances Irom foreign countries must be by international money order
or by a draft on a U.S. bank. Price 30 cents per copy. Annual subscription (FT 900, 975, 985, and 986
combined) $14.90.







EXPLANATION OF STATISTICS


Import Valuation


Coverage

The U.S. import statistics reflect both government and
nongovernment imports of merchandise from foreign coun-
tries into the U.S. Customs territory, which includes the 50
States, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. The U.S.
import statistics exclude imports into the Virgin Islands,
Guam, American Samoa, and other U.S. possessions; and
shipments between the United States and Puerto Rico,
between the United States and U.S. possessions, and
between any of these outlying areas. (Data on U.S. trade
with Puerto Rico and with U.S. possessions are published
separately in Report FT 800. Additional data on such trade
and on imports into the Virgin Islands from foreign coun-
tries are presented in reference tabulations.) Data on
imports of petroleum and selected petroleum products,
including shipments into the Virgin Islands from foreign
countries, (previously shown in Report FT 900-Supple-
ment) are included in this report effective with the January
1976 statistics.
The U.S. import statistics also exclude American goods
returned to the United States by its Armed Forces; intransit
shipments through the United States; temporary shipments;
transactions not considered to be of statistical significance,
such as shipments of personal and household effects; low-
valued nondutiable imports by mail; issued monetary coins
of all component metals; and gold in the form of ores,
concentrates, waste, scrap, and refined bullion. Imports of
silver in these forms are included in the statistics, unless
otherwise noted. (Information on gold movements, pre-
viously shown in Report FT 2402, appears in Report FT
990 effective January 1975.)

General Imports/Imports For Consumption

The statistics on U.S. imports are presented in terms of
both "General Imports" and "Imports for Consumption."
General imports are a combination of entries for immediate
consumption and entries into Customs bonded warehouses,
and thus generally reflect total arrivals of merchandise.
Imports for consumption are a combination of entries for
immediate consumption and withdrawals from warehouses
for consumption, and thus generally reflect the total of the
commodities entered into U.S. consumption channels.

Source Of Import Information

The official U.S. import statistics are compiled by the
Bureau of the Census from copies of the import entry and
warehouse withdrawal forms which importers are required
by law to file with Customs officials. The information as to
country of origin, net quantity, value, and commodity
classification is verified by Customs officials on entries filed
for transactions valued over $250, which are ordinarily sub-
ject to examination for Customs appraisement purposes.
The statistical copy of the entry is corrected if it does not
accurately reflect the information called for by the statis-
tical requirements.


F.a.s. Import Value.-The f.a.s. (free alongside ship) value
represents the transaction value of imports at the foreign
port of exportation. It is based on the purchase pnce. i.e.,
the actual transaction value and generally includes all
charges incurred in placing the merchandise alongside the
carrier at the port of exportation in the country of exporta-
tion.

C.i.f. Import Value.-The c.i.f. (cost, insurance, and freight)
value represents the value of imports at the first port of
entry in the United States. It is based on the purchase price
and includes all freight, insurance, and other charges
(excluding U.S. import duties) incurred in bringing the
merchandise from the country of exportation and generally
placing it alongside the carrier at the first port of entri in
the United States. If the merchandise was acquired in a
transaction between related parties, the purchase price used
in deriving the c.i.f. value is based on an arm's-length equiv-
alent transaction price, i.e., a price which would exist
between unrelated buyers and sellers.

Import Monthly Carryover

It is the objective of the compiling procedures to include
shipments, insofar as practicable, in the statistics for the
actual month of importation. However, for purposes of the
statistics the month of importation is based on the date of
official acceptance by Customs of the import entry or w.are-
house withdrawal document. This may not in all cases corre-
spond to the actual month of importation. (For example,
under the Customs "immediate-delivery" procedures,
importers may file the import entry up to 10 workdays
after the actual date of importation.) Also, because of
processing problems (e.g., late receipt of a document for an
end-of-month shipment, rejection of a shipment by the
computer because the data fail to meet certain edit criteria
established to protect the accuracy of the statistics, etc.),
there is an overall average carryover of about 7 percent (in
terms of value) of the shipments from the reported month
of importation (based on the date of the import entry or
warehouse withdrawal document) to a subsequent month,
usually the succeeding month. In addition, as a result of the
aforementioned Customs "immediate-delivery" procedures,
there is a further carryover of presently unknown magni-
tude from the actual month of importation to a subsequent
month. These limitations should be borne in mind when
making month-to-month comparisons.
Cumulations of data over at least 4-month periods are
desirable to identify underlying trends. Month-to-month
changes in imports, exports, and similar series often reflect
primarily irregular movements, differences in monthly
carryover, etc.

Estimated Data for Imports Valued Under S251

The overall import and Schedule A Section 9 totals
include sample estimates for shipments valued under $251.
Therefore, they are subject to sampling error, estimated at


IMPORT STATISTICS







less than one-tenth of one percent for the unadjusted overall
total and about one percent for the unadjusted Schedule A
Section 9 total. This means that we can have about 67
percent confidence that the published unadjusted overall
totals and the unadjusted Schedule A Section 9 totals differ
by less than one-tenth of a percent and one percent, respec-
tively, from the totals that would have resulted from a com-
plete tabulation. The statistics on imports of petroleum and
petroleum products included in this report reflect fully
compiled data and, therefore, are not subject to sampling
error.


EXPORT STATISTICS

Coverage

The export statistics reflect, in general, both government
and nongovernment exports of domestic and foreign mer-
chandise from the U.S. Customs territory (includes the 50
States, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico) to for-
eign countries, whether the exportation involves a com-
mercial transaction or not. The statistics, therefore, include
Department of Defense Military Assistance Program Grant-
Aid shipments, shipments for economic assistance under the
Foreign Assistance Act and shipments of agricultural com-
modities under P. L. 480 (The Agricultural Trade Develop-
ment and Assistance Act of 1954, as amended) and related
laws. The following are excluded from the statistics: Ship-
ments to U.S. Armed Forces and diplomatic missions
abroad for their own use; shipments between the United
States and Puerto Rico, between the United States and its
possessions (including the Virgin Islands), and between
these outlying areas: exports from U.S. possessions; intransit
shipments through the United States; transactions not con-
sidered to be of statistical importance, such as personal and
household effects: temporary exports; low-valued or non-
commerical exports by mail; issued monetary coins of all
component metals; and gold in the form of ores, concen-
trates, waste, scrap, and refined bullion. Exports of silver in
these forms are included in the statistics, unless otherwise
noted. (Information on gold movements, previously shown
in Report FT 2402, appears in Report FT 990 effective
January 1975.)



Definition of Exports of Domestic
and Foreign Merchandise

Exports of domestic merchandise include commodities
which are grown, produced, or manufactured in the United
States, and commodities of foreign origin which have been
changed in the United States from the form in which they
were imported, or which have been enhanced in value by
further manufacture in the United States. Exports of for-
eign merchandise consist of commodities of foreign origin
which have entered the United States as imports and which,
at the time of exportation, are in substantially the same
condition as when imported.


Source of Export Information

The official U.S. export statistics are compiled by the
Bureau of the Census primarily from copies of Shipper's
Export Declarations which are required to be filed with
Customs officials, except for Department of Defense Mili-
tary Assistance Program Grant-Aid shipments which are
reported directly to the Bureau of the Census by the
Department of Defense and shipments by qualified ex-
porters who have been authorized to submit data in the
form of magnetic tape, punched cards, or monthly Shipper's
Summary Export Declarations directly to the Bureau of the
Census.
Export Valuation

F.a.s. Export Value.-The value reported in the export sta-
tistics generally is equivalent to a f.a.s. (free alongside ship)
value at the U.S. port of export, based on the transaction
price, including inland freight, insurance and other charges
incurred in placing the merchandise alongside the carrier at
the U.S. port of exportation.

Export Monthly Carryover

It is the objective of the compiling procedures to include
shipments, insofar as practicable, in the statistics for the
actual month of exportation. For purposes of the statistics,
the month of exportation is generally based on the date
when the shipment leaves the United States. (For vessel or
air shipments it is the date when the carrier departs or is
cleared from the port of export.) However, as indicated
above for imports, because of processing problems (e.g., late
receipt of a document for an end-of-month shipment, re-
jection of a shipment by the computer because the data
fail to meet certain edit criteria established to protect the
accuracy of the statistics, etc.), there is an overall average
carryover of about 4 percent (in terms of value) of the
shipments from the actual month of exportation to a
subsequent month, usually the succeeding month. These
limitations should be borne in mind when making month-
to-month comparisons.
Cumulations of data over at least 4-month periods are
desirable to identify underlying trends. Month-to-month
changes in imports, exports, and similar series often reflect
primarily irregular movements, differences in monthly
carryover, etc.
Estimated Data for Export Shipments

The overall export and Schedule B section and division
totals include sample estimates for shipments valued
$251-$1,999 to Canada and for shipments valued
$251-$999 to countries other than Canada. Data for ship-
ments valued $250 and under to all countries are also esti-
mated, based on established percentages of individual
country totals, and included in the Schedule B Section 9
totals regardless of the commodity exported. It is estimated
that the unadjusted overall total is subject to a sampling
error of less than one-tenth of one percent, and the unad-
justed Schedule B section or division totals are subject to








sampling errors of about one percent. In addition, the
Schedule B Section 9 total is subject to possible error in the
estimated data for shipments valued $250 and under; and
the overall total, and the individual totals for sections other
than Section 9, to a more limited extent. Such $250 and
under shipments represent about 1 percent of the total
value of exports, and about 60 percent of the Schedule B
Section 9 total.

SOURCES OF ERROR IN THE STATISTICS

Monthly import and export figures are subject to the
possibility of errors which may arise from sources other
than sampling errors, discussed above. Among these are
errors in the reporting and/or processing of information as
to commodity classification, value and other statistical
factors, month of inclusion (see paragraphs on import and
export carryover, above), and the undercounting of exports
to Canada due to the non-receipt of Shipper's Export
Declarations. For 1974, the undercounting amounted to
about one and one-half billion dollars. In the case of im-
ports the information as to value and commodity classifica-
tion (as well as country of origin and net quantity) is
verified by Customs officials on entries filed for transactions
valued over $250 which are ordinarily subject to examina-
tion for Customs appraisement purposes, thus considerably
reducing the possibility of error. In addition, the procedures
used to compile both the import and export statistics
include clerical and computer processing checks designed to
protect the accuracy of the statistics to the fullest practi-
cable extent.


MERCHANDISE TRADE BALANCES


Two trade balances are presented in this report:
1) The balance between exports based on f.a.s. values
and imports based on f.a.s. values.
2) The balance between exports based on f.a.s. values
and imports based on c.i.f. values with adjustments for im-
ports from affiliated sellers abroad to reflect arms-length
equivalent prices.
Both balances are useful for certain purposes. The first
balance corresponds to a measurement of the international
payments or credit flows resulting from merchandise trade
between the U.S. and foreign countries. The second balance
is based on concepts similar to those used by most foreign
countries, and therefore provides a reference for comparison
with the trade balances published by those countries.


REVISIONS TO THE STATISTICS

Revisions are carried into the statistics on a periodic
basis. Data for 1975 and 1976 appearing in the 1976
monthly issues of this report are presented as follows:


1976 Statistics

a. January through November 1976 issues: figures are as
originally issued, except as noted below.
b. December 1976 issue: figures reflect revisions for
prior months of the year issued with December 1976
statistics or earlier, as noted below.

1975 Statistics

a. January through May 1976 issues: figures reflect re-
visions issued with December 1975 statistics or
earlier.
b. June through December 1976 issues: figures reflect
revisions to 1975 data issued with June 1976 statistics
or earlier.

In addition to the revisions which are made on a periodic
basis, instances may u, cur where a significant error in the
statistics for a month of the current year is discovered after
the statistics for that month are compiled. If the error is of
sufficient importance to require correction prior to the time
that the regular revisions are carried, the correction is made
and so noted in this report.



SOURCES OF FURTHER INFORMATION

Additional foreign trade statistics and information regard-
ing coverage, valuation, sampling, and qualifications which
should be considered by users of the statistics are contained
primarily in the following publications: Report FT 990,
Highlights of U.S. Export and Import Trade; FT 1 35. U.S.
General Imports, Schedule A Commodity by Country; FT
410, U.S. Exports, Schedule B Commodity by Country; and
the Guide to Foreign Trade Statistics. Information regarding
additional sources of statistics, the methodology used in
seasonally adjusting the data, and other matters relating to
foreign trade statistics may be obtained from the Bureau of
the Census, Washington, D.C. 20233.


SAdjusted for seasonal and working-day variation, but not for changes in price level. Factors used to adjust 1975 and 1976 data shown in this report represent seasonal adjustment factors derived from
monthly data through 1975 and introduced in January 1976 combined with the appropriate working-day adjustmentfactors.
'Cumulations of data over at least 4-month periods are desirable to identify underlying trends. Month-to-month changes in exports, imports, and similar series often reflect primarily irregularmoe-
ments, differences in monthly carryover, etc. Recent month-to-month percent changes in the overall seasonally adjusted export and import series are presented in the following table with average percent
month-to-month rise and decline over longer periods shown for comparison. The average rise and average decline figures exclude percentage changes for (1) the period July-December 1971 because of
abnormalities in the data due to effects of dock strikes and (2) periods when negligible changes (zero percent) in the level of exports/imports occurred. Percentage changes forf.as. import valuesare not
available for periods prior to January 1974:
Month-to-month Average monthly rates of change
Series Average Average 4 months 12 months
Nov.-Dec. Oct.-Nov. Sept.-Oct. Aug.-Sept. rise decline Aug.-Dec. Dec. 1975-
1976 1976 1976 1976 1970-1975 1970-1975 1976 Dec. 1976
(Percent) (Percent) (Percent) (Percent) (Percent) (Percent) (Percent) (Percent)
F.a.s. export value.. +9.2 -1.1 -1.5 +1.9 +3.2 -2.8 +2.1 +1.1
F.a.s. import value.. +5.1 +1.2 -2.3 +2.0 (NA) (NA) +1.7 +2.3
C.i.f. import value.. +4.9 +1.2 -2.6 +2.0 (NA) (NA) +1.4 +2.3
0See the "Explanation of Statistics" for definitions of the export and import values and trade balances.





Monthly figures for 1976 revised. See "Revisions to the Statistics" paragraph under the Explanation of Statistics
Etccion on page 4.
iRepresents exports of domestic and foreign merchandise excluding Department of Defense Military Assistance Program
Cranc-Aid shipments.
2Calendar year figures shown are unadjusted and do not represent the sum of individual monthly totals which have been
sdjuwted for seasonal and working-day variation.


F.a.s. Exports and f.a.s. Imports F.a.s. Exports and c.i.f. Imports
Period Trade Trade
Exports1 Imports balance Exports1 Imports balance


1975

January-December................. 2 107,130.4 2 96,116.0 2+11,014.4 2 107,130.4 2 103,389.1 2 +3,741.3

January........................... 9,373.9 9,632.5 258.6 9,373.9 10,374.8 -1,000.9
Fenruary.......................... 8,755.8 7,927.2 + 828.6 8,755.8 8,500.9 + 254.9
M rch............................. 8,681.1 7,466.5 +1,214.6 8,681.1 8,039.2 + 641.9
April............................. 8,648.6 7,959.1 + 689.5 8,648.6 8,547.1 + 101.5
May................................ 8,221.5 7,263.3 + 958.2 8,221.5 7,813.8 + 407.7
June.............................. 8,715.5 7,102.5 +1,613.0 8,715.5 7,651.2 +1,064.3

July ................... ......... 8,871.0 7,831.6 +1,039.4 8,871.0 8,412.6 + 458.4
August............................ 8,979.9 7,876.7 +1,103.2 8,979.9 8,478.2 + 501.7
September......................... 9,104.2 8,196.0 + 908.2 9,104.2 8,820.0 + 284.2
October........................... 9,225.7 8,169.3 +1,056.4 9,225.7 8,794.1 + 431.6
November.......................... 9,408.9 8,201.3 +1,207.6 9,408.9 8,827.5 + 581.4
December......................... 9,249.9 8,521.5 + 728.4 9,249.9 9,161.4 + 88.5

1976r

January-December................. 2114,807.1 2120,677.4 2_-5,870.3 2 114,807.1 2 129,564.6 2 -14,757.5

January........................... 9,097.2 9,176.0 78.8 9,097.2 9,879.7 776.3
fesruary.......................... 8,798.3 8,940.9 142.6 8,798.3 9,592.7 794.4
.March............................. 8,938.3 9,609.2 670.9 8,938.3 10,303.3 1,365.0
April............................. 9,386.3 9,595.6 209.3 9,386.3 10,301.5 915.2
May............................... 9,562.8 9,182.4 + 380.4 9,562.8 9,872.6 309.8
June............................. 9,712.6 10,095.2 382.6 9,712.6 10,890.6 1,178.0

July.............................. 10,010.7 10,849.2 838.5 10,010.7 11;650.2 1,639.5
August........................... 9,686.8 10,445.8 759.0 9,686.8 11,219.2 1,532.4
September......................... 9,871.7 10,649.9 778.2 9,871.7 11,447.5 1,575.8
October........................... 9,727.6 10,406.0 678.4 9,727.6 11,148.7 1,421.1
November.......................... 9,624.6 10,530.8 906.2 9,624.6 11,281.9 1,657.3
December.......................... 10,514.8 11,066.2 55L.4 10,514.8 11,838.1 1,323.3


Table 1. U.S. Exports (f.a.s. Value Basis), General Imports (f.a.s. and c.i.f. Value Basis), and Merchandise Trade

Balance, Adjusted for Seasonal and Working-Day Variation, by Month: January 1975 to December 1976

(In millions of dollars. See Explanation of Statistics for information on coverage, definitions of export and import values and
trade balances, and sources of error in the data. All data shown for 1975 and 1976 reflect seasonal adjustment factors intro-
duced in January 1976)










Table 2. U.S. Exports (f.a.s. Value Basis) of Merchandise Showing Department of Defense (DOD) Military Assistance
Program Grant-Aid Shipments, by Month: January 1975 to December 1976

(In millions of dollars. See Explanation of Statistics for information on coverage, definition of f.a.s. export value, and sources of error in
the data. Unadjusted totals represent sum of unrounded figures and hence may vary slightly from sum of rounded amounts)

Exports excluding DOD Exports includingOD Grant-A
Grant-Aid DOD Grant-Aid DOD Grant-Aid


Period Domestic Domestic Domestic
foreign, and Domestic, and Domestic, Western Other
foreign, foreign, unadjusted foreign, unadjusted Europe countries

adjusted' unadjusted unadjusted


1975

January-December....................... (3) 107,130.4 105,641.0 107,591.6 106,102.1 461.2 21.7 439.5

Monthly average....................... 8,936.3 8,927.5 8,803.4 8,966.0 8,841.9 38.4 1.8 36.6

January................................ 9,373.9 9,124.6 8,942.7 9,203.4 9,021.5 78.8 5.2 73.7
February............................... 8,755.8 8,499.3 8,368.1 8,545.0 8,413.8 45.7 3.3 42.4
March.................................. 8,681.1 9,408.6 9,265.6 9,437.5 9,294.5 28.9 2.2 26.7
April.................................. 8,648.6 9,017.9 8,889.0 9,079.7 8,950.8 61.7 3.6 58.1
May.................................... 8,221.5 8,900.6 8,784.8 8,951.5 8,835.7 51.0 2.2 48.8
June................................... 8,715.5 8,630.1 8,490.2 8,690.4 8,550.5 60.3 0.8 59.5

July.................................. 8,871.0 8,213.7 8,112.4 8,243.1 8,141.8 29.4 1.0 28.4
August................................. 8,979.9 8,446.5 8,352.1 8,456.4 8,362.0 9.9 1.6 8.3
September.............................. 9,104.2 8,353.1 8,233.1 8,378.7 8,258.7 25.6 0.7 24.9
October................................ 9,225.7 9,719.3 9,602.8 9,750.9 9,634.4 31.6 0.2 31.4
November............................... 9,408.9 9,513.3 9,406.4 9,526.4 9,419.5 13.0 0.8 12.2
December............................... 9,249.9 9,303.5 9,193.6 9,328.7 9,218.9 25.2 0.1 25.1

1976r
January-December....................... (3) 114,807.1 113,133.0 114,997.2 113,323.1 190.1 3.0 187.1
Monthly average....................... 9,577.7 9,562.3 9,427.8 9,583.1 9,443.6 15.9 0.3 15.6
January............................... 9,097.2 8,754.2 8,652.5 8,763.8 8,662.2 9.6 0.5 9.2
February.............................. 8,798.3 8,735.8 8,627.3 8,740,6 8,632.1 4.8 0.3 4.5
March.................................. 8,938.3 9,823.2 9,666.5 9,828.5 9,671.8 5.3 0.3 5.0
April.................................. 9,386.3 9,826.5 9,697.0 9,835.9 9,706.4 9.4 0.2 9.2
May.................................... 9,562.8 9,961.6 9,838.6 9,972.3 9,849.2 10.7 0.2 10.4
June................................... 9,712.6 9,846.6 9,714.0 9,859.6 9,727.0 13.0 0.4 12.6

July .................................. 10,010.7 9,315.0 9,174.0 9,319.5 9,178.6 4.6 0.3 4.2
August ................................ 9,686.8 8,827.6 8,693.8 8,897.2 8,763.3 69.6 0.3 69.2
September ............................. 9,871.7 9,159.0 9,008.3 9,208.7 9,058.0 49.7 (Z) 49.6
October... ........................... 9,727.6 10,080.7 9,925.3 10,085.1 9,929.7 4.4 (Z) 4.3
November .............................. 9,624.6 9,682.3 9,529.7 9,687.4 9,534.9 5.2 0.1 5.0
December............................... 10,514.8 10,794.5 10,606.0 10,798.6 10,610.1 4.1 0.2 3.9

'Adjusted for seasonal and working-day variation using seasonal adjustment factors introduced in January 1976. See footnote 1 on
page 4.
2Represents only export shipments from the United States and differs from DOD Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid shipment figures under
this program as follows: (a) Transfers of the material procured outside the United States and transfers from DOD overseas stocks from export
shipments. (b) Export value of f.a.s., whereas DODvalue, in most instances, is f.o.b., point of origin. (c) Data for shipments reported by
the DOD for a given month are included in Bureau of the Census reports in the second month subsequent to the month reported by the DOD.
3Annual total is not shown for seasonally adjusted data. Unadjusted data should be used for annual totals.


r Monthly figures for 1976 revised. See "Revisions to the Statistics" paragraph under the Explanation of Statistics section on page 4.










Table 3. U.S. Imports of Merchandise, by Month: January 1975 to December 1976
fin -illions of dollars. See Explanation of Statistics for information on coverage, definitions of f.a.s. and c.i.f. import values, and sources
of error in the data. Unadjusted totals represent sum of unrounded figures and hence may vary slightly from sum of rounded amounts)

U.S. imports of merchandise

F.a.s. value C.i.f. value
Period General imports Imports General imports Imports
for for
Seasonally Unadjusted consumption, Seasonally Unadjusted consumption,
adjusted' adjusted unadjusted adjusted' Unadjusted unadjusted

1975

J.nusry-December....................... (2) 96,116.0 95,704.3 (a) 103,389.1 102,954.9

M,r,,r.Ly average...................... 8,012.3 8,009.7 7,975.4 8,618.4 8,615.8 8,579.6

January ................................ 9,632.5 9,813.6 9,799.8 10,374.8 10,569.8 10,553.6
February............................... 7,927.2 7,169.4 7,137.7 8,500.9 7,688.2 7,655.4
March.................................... 7,466.5 7,404.5 7,373.9 8,039.2 7,972.5 7,941.6
4pr0l.................................. 7,959.1 8,190.7 8,143.0 8,547.1 8,795.8 8,745.4
May..................................... 7,263.3 7,365.0 7,321.1 7,813.8 7,923.2 7,878.3
June.................................... 7,102.5 7,277.9 7,254.0 7,651.2 7,840.2 7,812.5

Jul ................................... 7,831.6 7,920.1 7,890.9 8,412.6 8,507.7 8,475.9
AulL t ................................. 7,876.7 7,518.3 7,426.5 8,478.2 8,092.5 7,996.2
iiptember.............................. 8,196.0 8,152.6 8,131.8 8,820.0 8,773.3 8,753.2
October................................ 8,169.3 8,510.8 8,534.8 8,794.1 9,161.7 9,185.6
No,-mber............................... 8,201.3; 7,908.5 7,884.2 8,827.5 8,512.4 8,487.3
Dece..ber............................... 8,521.51 8,884.5 8,806.5 9,161.4 9,551.7 9,470.0

1976r
Jarnuary-December........................ (2) 120,677.4 120,014.4 (2) 129,564.6 128,874.6
Mantnly average........................ 10,044.8 10,056.5 10,001.2 10,785.5 10,797.1 10,739.6
Jlnuiry........................... 9,176.0 9,009.0 8,945.9 9,879.7 9,699.9 9,632.8
feDruary.................. .............8,940.9 8,111.2 7,986.8 9,592.7 8,702.5 8,574.8
March.................................. 9,609.2 10,202.1 10,049.6 16,303.3 10,939.0 10,782.2
April.................................. 9,595.6 9,895.0 9,844.6 10,301.5 10,622.9 10,569.7
May .................................... 9,182.4 8,943.7 9,029.4 9,872.6 9,615.9 9,705.4
Jur,.e................................... 10,095.2 10,579.8 10,397.6 10,890.6 11,413.4 11,225.6

July..................................... 10,849.2 10,563.9 10,649.2 11,650.2 11,343.8 11,432.0
Auut.............................................. 10,445.8 10,453.1 10,318.7 11,219.2 11,227.1 11,089.9
Seprember............................... 10,649.9 10,384.7 10,418.6 11,447.5 11,162.5 11,195.5
Oct.oner................................ 10,406.0 10,023.1 9,965.1 11,148.7 10,738.4 10,676.1
No,,ember............................... 10,530.8 11,061.6 10,966.2 11,281.9 11,850.5 11,749.6
December............................... 11,066.2 11,450.2 11,442.7 11,838.1 12,248.9 12,241.0

'Adjusted for seasonal and working-day variation using seasonal adjustment, factors introduced in January 1976.
'Annual total is not shown for seasonally adjusted data. Unadjusted data should be used for annual totals.


r Hor,rhly figures for 1976 revised. See "Revisions to the Statistics" paragraph under the Explanation of Statistics section on page 4.











Table 4. U.S. Exports (f.a.s. Value Basis) of Domestic Merchandise, Including Department of Defense (DOD) Military
Assistance Program Grant-Aid Shipments--Schedule B Sections and Selected Divisions, Seasonally Adjusted
and Unadjusted, by Month: January 1975 to December 1976
(In millions of dollars. See Explanation of Statistics for information on coverage, definition of f.a.s. export value, and sources of error
in the data. Unadjusted totals represent sum of unrounded figures and hence may vary slightly from sum of rounded amounts)

Schedule B sections and selected divisions'
Period
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 72 71 72 73 8 9

Seasonally adjusted3

1975

Monthly average.......... 1,287.6 109.3 819.4 374.3 478.7 725.7 912.5 3,825.1 1,741.6 631.5 1,440.0 473.4 '263.5

January................. 1,583.3 139.2 1,014.8 421.4 4140.9 863.1 931.0 3,487.2 1,655.1 608.6 1,216.8 468.2 '4238.6
February................ 1,418.9 111.5 805.9 399.8 4104.5 699.9 892.9 3,630.6 1,622.1 611.3 1,376.1 456.6 '226.6
March................... 1,250.3 125.1 787.6 415.9 '120.8 757.2 907.9 3,431.8 1,620.3 596.6 1,238.4 454.0 '237.0
April................... 1,250.6 113.6 731.9 381.8 '73.7 701.2 898.4 3,668.0 1,743.9 632.8 1,302.1 458.9 '274.9
May.................... 1,042.8 102.5 701.2 402.7 '88.9 667.9 882.0 3,577.9 1,702.2 622.2 1,333.1 457.9 '285.0
June................... 1,090.3 91.3 700.5 388.4 '57.9 712.3 886.9 3,965.7 1,809.7 621.1 1,469.4 473.0 '241.4
July.................... 1,210.3 84.6 867.1 324.6 '66.3 679.0 913.5 4,001.7 1,762.5 631.0 1,610.7 480.5 '237.9
August.................. 1,268.6 110.4 932.3 346.2 '43.9 687.4 880.9 3,963.3 1,749.1 652.1 1,577.4 468.3 '277.8
September.............. 1,259.1 99.0 847.9 307.5 '43.5 703.5 939.4 3,927.8 1,775.0 625.5 1,502.4 478.6 '245.7
October................ 1,402.6 107.4 852.9 288.3 '56.9 745.2 926.1 4,136.2 1,807.2 662.7 1,588.2 496.6 '278.2
November................ 1,381.8 110.8 801.7 450.7 '77.7 725.5 967.4 4,006.8 1,789.0 659.6 1,539.0 489.4 '353.3
December................ 1,292.8 116.1 788.3 364.4 '68.8 766.1 923.0 4,103.8 1,863.3 654.3 1,525.7 498.4 '265.5

1976

Monthly average.......... 1,311.9 128.2 909.5 350.8 '81.5 827.4 931.9 4,126.4 1,828.1 774.5 1,529.0 546.2 '229.1

January................. 1,298.2 211.6 822.7 321.0 478.9 782.1 930.1 3,759.5 1,722.4 655.3 1,368.2 493.2 '254.0
February................ 1,159.8 176.7 743.5 318.8 473.8 740.9 914.6 3,852.7 1,767.5 737.9 1,425-7 526.2 '201.6
March................... 1,182.8 122.5 773.2 310.2 477.9 810.1 952.3 3,749.8 1,786.9 737.2 1,210.6 562.8 '216.5
April................... 1,387.2 133.9 797.1 406.3 77.3 813.2 922.3 3,944.8 1,778.7 780.5 1,406.2 506.6 258.3
May..................... 1,330.5 96.8 930.5 350.3 96.7 870.6 918.8 4,072.2 1,867.7 735.4 1,518.2 565.6 248.5
June.................... 1,336.1 103.3 883.0 375.2 78.3 807.7 926.4 4,279.9 1,862.1 765.4 1,670.2 539.3 244.4
July.................... 1,469.6 92.9 907.1 376.8 86.4 820.3 932.0 4,353.2 1,896.1 861.6 1,619.0 555.8 4248.2
August.................. 1,508.8 106.3 911.0 278.8 60.3 825.8 936.8 4,271.4 1,746.3 788.4 1,728.2 532.0 191.3
September............... 1,313.7 122.9 1,049.1 360.4 491.5 828.5 942.1 4,172.0 1,870.9 800.2 1,468.2 564.5 '215.7
October................. 1,473.2 125.2 1,037.0 382.7 83.1 834.7 861.9 4,039.2 1,831.4 781.7 1,461.2 529.9 4212.2
November................ 1,164.1 93.3 1,037.3 384.4 79.0 886.4 935.7 4,197.8 1,862.4 727.3 1,538.8 557.6 4191.2
December................ 1,119.0 153.1 1,022.2 344.9 1 94.8 908.9 1,009.7 4,824.2 1,944.1 923.4 1,933.7 620.9 1267.5

Unadjusted


1975

January-December........ 15,484.3 1,308.4 9,783.6 4,469.5 943.8 8,691.2 10,919.2 15,667.6 ;0,895.1 7,582.0 17,190.5 5,672.7 3,162.0

Monthly average......... 1,290.4 109.0 815.3 372.5 78.7 724.3 909.9 3,805.6 1,741.3 631.8 1,432.5 472.7 263.5

January................. 1,637.1 122.9 1,026.0 357.4 140.9 820.8 910.5 3,312.8 1,612.1 616.5 1,084.2 454.6" 238.6
February................ 1,338.0 86.3 838.9 337.4 104.5 668.5 847.4 3,539.8 1,545.9 571.0 1,422.9 426.4 226.6
March................... 1,276.6 120.1 892.3 399.6 120.8 788.2 949.6 4,022.1 1,803.4 647.3 1,571.5 488.0 237.0
April................... 1,219.3 101.6 811.0 391.4 73.7 737.7 948.7 3,910.1 1,853.8 646.1 1,410.2 482.3 274.9
May..................... 1,028.2 98.0 765.7 436.5 88.9 702.6 954.3 3,993.0 1,829.9 652.7 1,510.4 483.5 285.0
June.................... 1,059.8 79.8 668.3 406.2 57.9 718.7 899.3 3,937.9 1,798.8 624.2 1,514.9 481.0 241.4
July.................... 1,114.7 71.5 757.0 310.3 66.3 696.7 863.3 3,569.5 1,692.0 596.9 1,280.5 454.6 237.9
August.................. 1,182.3 104.4 775.7 379.8 43.9 710.7 875.6 3,551.1 1,680.9 624.1 1,246.1 460.8 277.8
September............... 1,244.0 105.7 693.6 323.5 43.5 676.1 880.2 3,586.1 1,604.6 599.2 1,382.2 460.4 245.7
October................. 1,475.5 128.6 875.9 318.5 56.9 728.8 980.7 4,260.3 1,883.1 706.4 1,670.8 530.9 278.2
November................ 1,526.8 150.2 859.4 457.9 77.7 661.6 914.2 3,946.7 1,749.6 664.2 1,532.8 471.8 353.3
December................ 1,382.0 139.3 819.8 350.9 68.8 780.7 895.3 4,038.2 1,840.9 633.3 1,563.9 478.5 265.5

1976
January-December........ 15,709.7 1,523.3 10,891.4 4,226.1 978.1 9,958.2 11,204.8 49,509.9 [2,011.0 9,278.0 8,220.9 6,572.3 2 749.4
Monthly average......... 1,309.2 127.0 907.6 352.2 81.5 829.9 933.7 4,125.8 1,834.3 773.2 1,518.4 547.7 229.1
January................. 1,333.3 187.9 835.8 268.4 78.9 753.2 893.8 3,579.0 1,701.7 665.1 1,212.2 477.9 254.0
February................ 1,159.8 137.6 794.1 280.2 73.8 714.9 889.9 3,879.7 1,712.7 690.0 1,477.0 500.4 201.6
March................... 1,244.3 118.1 903.1 301.5 77.9 863.6 1,019.0 4,316.0 1,981.7 793.2 1,541.1 611.8 216.5
'April................... 1,355.3 120.6 888.0 412.0 77.3 853.0 973.9 4,224.9 1,908.6 796.2 1,520.1 543.1 258.3
May..................... 1,253.4 90.3 929.6 373.0 96.7 881.9 959.2 4,438.7 1,951.8 769.8 1,717.1 578.0 248.5
June.................... 1,281.3 89.7 875.1 403.8 78.3 840.8 959.8 4,395.5 1,899.3 769.2 1,727.0 558.2 244.4
July.................... 1,357.9 78.4 803.7 347.4 86.4 850.7 898.4 3,970.1 1,863.9 814.2 1,292.0 537.5 248.2
August.................. 1,367.0 101.5 768.9 304.8 60.3 839.8 892.8 3,728.9 1,610.1 755.3 1,363.6 508.0 191.3
September............... 1,321.6 131.1 823.5 387.8 91.5 785.4 910.0 3,846.6 1,725.0 766.6 1,355.1 544.8 215.7
October.................. 1,515.9 149.7 1,049.4 407.2 83.1 816.3 906.7 4,229.0 1,893.6 833.3 1,502.1 560.1 212.2
November................ 1,299.2 126.5 1,118.2 379.1 79.0 827.9 904.8 4,067.7 1,797.3 733.2 1,537.3 541.4 191.2
December................ 1,220.8 191.9 1,101.9 361.1 94.8 930.7 996.6 4,833.8 1,965.5 892.0 1,976.2 611.0 267.5

'Schedule B section and selected division descriptions are as follows:
0. Food and live animals 7. Machinery and transport equipment
1. Beverages and tobacco 71. Machinery, other than electric
2. Crude materials, inedible, except fuels 72. Electrical machinery, apparatus, and appliances
3. Mineral fuels, lubricants, and related materials 73. Transport equipment
4. Animal and vegetable oils and fats 8. Miscellaneous manufactured articles, n.e.c.
5. Chemicals 9. Commodities and transactions not classified according to kind
6. Manufactured goods classified chiefly by material
'Seasonally adjusted figures for section 7 may differ slightly from the sum of divisions 71, 72, and 73 since each is independently ad-
justed.
3Adjusted for seasonal and working-day variation using seasonal adjustment factors introduced in January 1976. See footnote 1 on
page 4. Annual totals are not shown for seasonally adjusted data. Unadjusted data should be used for annual totals. The adjusted section
totals in this table and similar overall monthly totals in tables 1, 2, and 3 were adjusted independently.
'In the absence of demonstrable seasonal patterns for this section, no seasonal adjustment factors have been applied to the data.








9

Table 5. U.S. General Imports (f.a.s. Value Basis) of Merchandise, Schedule A Sections, Seasonally Adjusted and
Unadjusted, by Month: January 1975 to December 1976
(In millions of dollars. See Explanation of Statistics for information on coverage, definition of f.a.s. import value, and sources of error
in the data. Unadjusted totals represent sum of unrounded figures and hence may vary slightly from sum of rounded amounts)

Schedule A sections'
Period
Priod 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Seasonally adjusted2

1975

M-nr,rI, average ...... 710.3 118.7 463.4 2,199.8 346.2 307.2 1,228.8 1,958.6 765.9 3 209.8

J inuary.............. 672.8 111.6 485.9 3,090.3 48.5 424.5 1,669.9 1,876.0 772.6 3214.5
Februarv............. 668.9 126.0 466.6 1,983.8 344.7 324.7 1,465.1 1,837.7 723.9 180.0
March ............... 675.1 150.9 466.7 1,364.7 3 55.1 329.9 1,356.7 1,986.2 722.4 185.4
April................ 664.1 120.5 472.0 2,438.9 340.7 314.5 1,305.8 1,814.0 726.3 3232.3
May .................. 625.3 114.3 442.5 1,994.9 3 51.9 281.3 1,101.8 1,835.4 675.6 3198.5
June................. 736.2 119.3 462.6 1,482.0 333.2 245.7 1,175.6 1,852.3 716.2 3219.7
Jul .................. 709.9 109.4 473.3 2,187.6 344.8 264.2 1,115.4 1,978.2 771.4 222.8
AuguIt ............... 664.4 112.7 439.5 2,243.4 332.7 282.7 1,053.1 2,101.5 740.6 188.6
September............ 904.1 116.1 459.8 2,503.7 341.6 286.3 1,099.5 1,889.7 776.9 216.5
October.............. 743.5 111.3 440.1 2,423.0 348.8 297.0 1,111.7 2,064.3 815.1 217.4
hosember............. 762.4 104.2 442.3 2,387.9 366.2 310.2 1,126.9 2,053.6 871.5 211.9
Decemner............. 696.8 127.9 509.1 2,297.1 346.0 324.7 1,164.5 2,214.1 878.7 3230.3

1976

M:.r.,r.l. average ...... 851.5 136.5 582.3 2,837.3 338.7 397.5 1,459.2 2,475.0 1,040.0 3 211.5

January .............. 731.9 140.4 527.0 2,668.0 337.8 353.1 1,166.0 2,293.9 901.0 3186.6
Febru ............. 701.0 187.8 512.2 2,349.3 351.5 330.1 1,275.7 2,256.1 919.9 '169.7
March ................ 876.1 176.5 508.0 2,342.9 334.4 382.3 1,426.6 2,410.6 966.3 3215.0
April................ 766.5 129.1 576.8 2,877.9 336.8 371.9 1,463.8 2,484.4 987.1 s189.9
May. ................. 826.4 105.6 528.5 2,201.0 329.4 367.3 1,376.5 2,427.5 1,024.8 3211.2
June ............... 936.2 125.5 564.2 2,816.1 330.1 374.6 1,547.4 2,381.5 1,034.6 '196.4
Jul ................. 938.1 130.0 637.1 3,210.2 334.2 428.8 1,568.2 2,602.4 1,122.9 '226.5
August............... 860.0 122.4 620.2 3,102.6 335.6 371.6 1,521.3 2,518.8 1,100.8 3218.9
eptemoer............ 859.8 134.0 660.8 3,020.0 343.2 369.5 1,602.9 2,590.1 1,061.8 3233.5
October.............. 821.7 121.6 615.3 3,126.4 318.6 498.0 1,517.1 2,457.6 1,055.6 '216.4
NuArmber............. 892.2 119.5 573.7 3,272.8 '62.2 473.4 1,472.7 2,557.4 1,183.9 3253.4
EDece.-.oer............. 1,008.3 145.1 664.1 3,060.5 350.0 448.7 1,572.4 2,719.3 1,120.9 3220.1

Unadjusted

1975

January-December..... 8,503.3 1,419.5 5,566.2 26,475.6 553.9 3,695.9 14,702.5 23,457.2 9,224.4 2,517.6

M,r.lr.l, average ...... 708.6 118.3 463.9 2,206.3 46.2 308.0 1,225.2 1,954.8 768.7 209.8

Jinu. r, .............. 713.8 112.3 466.0 3,421.0 48.5 437.2 1,750.0 1,894.7 755.6 214.5
February .............. 626.8 106.4 394.7 1,940.1 44.7 306.2 1,260.0 1,688.8 621.9 180.0
lMarch................ 657.5 143.7 460.6 1,480.7 55.1 340.8 1,313.3 2,079.5 687.8 185.4
April................ 684.0 119.1 475.3 2,441.3 40.7 351.9 1,243.2 1,899.2 703.8 232.3
miy .............. ... 608.4 116.9 453.6 1,945.0 51.9 285.3 1,144.8 1,934.5 626.3 198.5
June ... ........ 776.7 129.6 514.8 1,436.1 33.2 252.8 1,230.8 1,961.6 722.7 219.7
July................. 706.4 103.4 506.4 2,137.3 44.8 247.3 1,136.6 1,964.4 850.9 222.8
Augbt ............... 635.8 95.8 421.0 2,245.6 32.7 270.6 1,005.7 1,822.0 800.6 188.6
Zepterber............ 896.9 106.9 476.4 2,446.1 41.6 275.1 1,091.8 1,785.8 815.7 216.5
October .............. 759.9 128.0 457.7 2,345.5 48.8 302.4 1,194.0 2,138.6 918.7 217.4
tNo.ean-r............. 725.1 120.4 415.3 2,089.4 66.2 298.5 1,121.2 2,018.6 841.9 211.9
Decems er.. .......... 712.1 137.2 524.4 2,547.5 46.0 327.9 1,211.1 2,269.4 878.7 230.3

1976
J nr.-rt-December..... 10,267.4 1,623.7 7,013.8 33,996.2 463.9 4,771.8 17,615.2 29,823.9 12,563.9 2,537.7
MW ,r,l average ...... 855.6 135.3 584.5 2,833.0 38.7 397.7 1,467.9 2,485.3 1,047.0 211.5
Jannuar.............. 759.7 141.5 483.8 2,790.7 37.8 350.0 1,190.5 2,229.7 838.8 186.6
Freruar%............. 669.5 158.3 439.5 2,302.3 51.5 316.6 1,108.6 2,104.9 790.2 169.7
Marcr................ 890.1 167.8 539.5 2,748.2 34.4 410.2 1,473.7 2,724.0 999.2 215.0
April................ 818.6 127.6 563.0 2,797.3 36.8 414.3 1,409.6 2,606.2 931.8 189.9
May .................. 781.8 108.4 539.1 2,134.9 29.4 371.0 1,383.4 2,459.1 925.4 211.2
June................. 980.2 136.2 652.3 2,835.8 30.1 388.1 1,649.6 2,612.5 1,098.7 196.4
July................. 903.4 123.0 649.8 3,036.8 34.2 385.9 1,547.8 2,461.8 1,194.7 226.5
Audg. r ............... 880.7 104.9 619.5 3,164.6 35.6 368.3 1,538.0 2,307.2 1,215.3 ?18.0
Eeprember............ 851.2 123.5 678.6 2,959.6 43.2 368.4 1,558.1 2,445.0 1,123.4 23.5
Octoner.............. 776.5 139.1 602.4 2,823.1 18.6 471.6 1,520.1 2,354.4 1,101.0 216.4
Poierber............. 924.3 137.9 578.3 3,069.9 62.2 473.9 1,606.8 2,723.7 1,231.3 253.~
VDece.mer............. 1,031.4 155.4 668.1 3,332.8 50.0 453.6 1,629.0 2,795.4 1,114.2 C2U. I

'Schedule A section descriptions are as follows:
0. Food and live animals 5. Chemicals
1. Beverages and tobacco 6. Manufactured goods classified chiefly by material
2. Crude materials, inedible, except fuels 7. Machinery and transport equipment
3. Mineral fuels, lubricants, and related materials 8. Miscellaneous manufactured articles, n.e.s.
-. Animal and vegetable oils and fats 9. Commodities and transactions not classified according to hind
'Aniusted for seasonal and working-day variation using seasonal adjustment factors introduced in January 1976. See footnote 1 or.
Pa3: 4. Annual totals are not shown for seasonally adjusted data. Unadjusted data should be used for annual totals. Tne aaJustea section
[toalt in this table and similar overall monthly totals in tables 1 and 4 were adjusted independently.
'In the absence of demonstrable seasonal patterns for this section, no seasonal adjustment factors have been applied to the data.











Table 6. U.S. General Imports (c.i.f. Value Basis) of Merchandise, Schedule A Sections. Seasonally Adjusted and
Unadjusted, by Month: January 1975 to December 1976

(In millions of dollars. See Explanation of Statistics for information on coverage, definition of c.i.f. import value, and sources of error in
the data. Unadjusted totals represent sum of unrounded figures and hence may vary slightly from sum of rounded amounts)

Schedule A sections'
Period


Seasonally adjusted2

1975

Monthly average ...... 770.4 129.4 511.5 2,350.0 '48.9 326.5 1,326.2 2,111.2 825.4 '214.8

January.............. 732.9 122.1 549.6 3,306.3 350.5 454.0 1,811.1 2,018.0 825.3 3 220.8
February............. 726.2 135.8 512.9 2,108.1 346.8 346.6 1,582.0 1,971.4 776.3 3185.1
March................ 732.6 162.5 507.9 1,456.8 357.6 349.5 1,461.5 2,157.7 776.3 3190.9
April................ 720.3 131.3 520.8 2,594.3 342.5 333.9 1,407.2 1,962.0 777.6 3239.3
May.................. 678.0 124.0 485.8 2,131.1 354.6 297.7 1,187.9 1,986.4 728.0 '201.9
June............... 793.5 129.5 512.9 1,585.6 335.1 262.9 1,268.1 2,001.8 770.8 '224.3
July................. 770.9 120.2 525.9 2,329.3 347.7 282.1 1,200.5 2,123.5 831.7 3227.5
August............... 725.6 123.6 484.3 2,399.6 334.9 301.3 1,137.4 2,259.3 801.0 3192.9
September............ 974.4 127.6 505.7 2,690.1 344.4 304.1 | 1,179.6 2,035.6 841.8 3221.4
October.............. 804.3 122.0 485.2 2,597.0 351.9 313.1 1,198.9 2,226.9 881.6 3222.1
November............. 830.3 114.5 486.0 2,549.8 371.2 328.9 1,218.4 2,213.5 943.2 3216.1
December............. 755.7 139.1 561.2 2,452.3 349.6 344.0 1,261.5 2,377.7 951.3 3235.0

1976

Monthly average ...... 920.5 148.5 634.6 3,034.9 341.7 418.6 1,565.6 2,662.3 1,117.0 '216.0

January.............. 798.4 152.0 580.2 2,853.0 '40.7 372.6 1,264.0 2,473.1 972.8 3191.1
February............. 758.6 200.5 554.2 2,507.0 355.4 347.2 1,376.4 2,431.4 989.5 '173.6
March................ 951.9 190.6 550.0 2,505.9 '37.4 403.5 1,530.9 2,586.5 1,037.6 '219.9
April................ 829.4 140.5 623.9 3,076.3 '39.9 390.4 1,570.6 2,684.6 1,061.4 3193.7
May.................. 898.4 114.8 574.5 2,353.2 '31.8 384.7 1,487.2 2,620.9 1,101.2 '215.1
June................. 1,010.6 137.3 611.9 3,011.5 332.5 395.3 1,571.4 2,609.3 1,108.8 '201.0
July................. 1,008.7 141.3 700.0 3,443.7 337.1 453.4 1,697.2 2,785.4 1,203.7 '231.1
August............... 927.1 135.5 675.8 3,326.4 '38.4 391.3 1,644.2 2,702.3 1,182.9 3223.8
September............ 932.7 147.4 721.4 3,238.6 346.4 390.6 1,730.0 2,784.0 1,138.8 3238.2
October.............. 893.5 133.9 672.8 3,348.9 '20.0 522.9 1,632.1 2,619.0 1,133.6 '220.8
November............. 958.9 131.1 625.6 3,493.1 366.9 498.4 1,592.5 2,738.3 1,270.4 3258.1
December............. 1,077.4 156.4 725.1 3,261.4 '53.5 472.4 1,690.8 2,912.6 1,203.0 '225.3

Unadjusted

1975

January-December..... 9,222.4 1,547.2 6,144.8 28,284.1 586.6 3,928.7 15,867.7 25,287.9 9,942.2 2,577.4

Monthly average ...... 768.5 128.9 512.1 2,357.0 48.9 327.4 1,322.3 2,107.3 828.5 214.8

January.............. 777.6 122.8 527.0 3,660.0 50.5 467.6 1,898.1 2,038.2 807.1 220.8
February............. 680.4 114.6 433.7 2,061.7 46.8 326.8 1,360.5 1,811.7 666.9 185.1
March................ 713.5 154.7 501.3 1,580.6 57.6 361.0 1,414.7 2,259.1 739.0 190.9
April................ 742.0 129.7 524.5 2,596.9 42.5 373.7 1,339.6 2,054.2 753.5 239.3
May ................. 659.7 126.8 497.9 2,077.8 54.6 301.8 1,234.3 2,093.6 674.8 201.9
June................. 837.1 140.6 570.8 1,536.4 35.1 270.5 1,327.7 2,119.9 777.7 224.3
July................. 767.0 113.6 562.7 2,275.7 47.7 264.1 1,223.3 2,108.7 917.3 227.5
August............... 694.4 105.0 463.9 2,402.0 34.9 288.3 1,086.2 1,958.8 865.9 192.9
September............ 966.6 117.6 523.9 2,628.2 44.4 292.2 1,171.3 1,923.7 883.9 221.4
October.............. 822.0 140.3 504.6 2,513.9 51.9 318.7 1,287.6 2,307.0 993.6 222.1
November............. 789.6 132.4 456.4 2,231.0 71.2 316.4 1,212.3 2,175.9 911.1 216.1
December............. 772.3 149.1 578.0 2,719.6 49.6 347.5 1,312.0 2,437.2 951.3 235.0

1976
January-December..... 11,098.1 1,766.8 7,643.3 36,358.2 499.9 5,024.9 19,001.8 32,086.5 13,493.5 2,591.6
Monthly average ...... 924.9 147.2 637.0 3,029.9 41.7 418.8 1,583.5 2,673.9 1,124.5 216.0
January.............. 828.7 153.2 532.6 2,984.2 40.7 369.2 1,290.5 2,403.9 905.7 191.1
February............. 724.5 169.0 475.5 2,456.9 55.4 333.0 1,196.1 2,268.5 850.0 173.6
March................ 967.1 181.2 584.1 2,939.4 37.4 433.0 1,581.4 2,922.7 1,072.9 219.9
April................ 885.8 138.9 608.9 2,990.2 39.9 434.9 1,512.4 2,816.2 1,002.0 193.7
May.................. 849.9 117.8 586.0 2,282.6 31.8 388.5 1,494.7 2,655.0 994.4 215.1
June................. 1,058.1 148.9 707.4 3,032.6 32.5 409.5 1,783.4 2,862.4 1,177.6 201.0
July................. 971.4 133.7 714.0 3,257.7 37.1 408.0 1,675.1 2,635.0 1,280.7 231.1
August............... 949.3 116.2 675.1 3,392.9 38.4 387.8 1,662.3 2,475.3 1,305.9 223.8
September............ 923.4 135.9 740.9 3,173.8 46.4 389.4 1,681.5 2,628.1 1,204.8 238.2
October.............. 844.4 153.2 658.7 3,019.5 20.0 495.1 1,635.4 2,509.0 1,182.3 220.8
November............. 993.4 151.3 630.6 3,276.5 66.9 498.9 1,737.4 2,916.2 1,321.2 258.1
December............. 1,102.2 167.5 729.5 3,551.7 53.5 477.6 1,751.7 2,994.2 1,195.8 225.3

'Schedule A section descriptions are as follows:
0. Food and live animals 5. Chemicals
1. Beverages and tobacco 6. Manufactured goods classified chiefly by material
2. Crude materials, inedible, except fuels 7. Machinery and transport equipment
3. Mineral fuels, lubricants, and related materials 8. Miscellaneous manufactured articles, n.e.s.
4. Animal and vegetable oils and fats 9. Commodities and transactions not classified according to kind
2Adjusted for seasonal and working-day variation using seasonal adjustment factors introduced in January 1976. See footnote 1 on
page 4. Annual totals are not shown for seasonally adjusted data. Unadjusted data should be used for annual totals. The adjusted section
totals in this table and similar overall monthly totals in tables 2 and 4 were adjusted independently.
3In the absence of demonstrable seasonal patterns for this section, no seasonal adjustment factors have been applied to the data.








U.S. GENERAL IMPORTS OF PETROLEUM AND SELECTED PETROLEUM

PRODUCTS, UNADJUSTED

Tables 1-A, 1-B, 2-A and 2-B which follow, contain monthly and cumulative-to-date data on U.S. general imports
of petroleum and petroleum products into the U.S. Customs area and into the Virgin Islands for the period January
1975 through current month. Prior to January 1976, these data were presented separately in a Supplement to Report
FT 900. (It should be noted that imports into the Virgin Islands are excluded from the official U.S. import totals
presented in the preceding tables of this report.) The data in these tables are not adjusted for seasonal and working-
day variation.
Beginning with the issue for January 1976, the value figures presented in this report are in thousands of dollars
and the quantity figures in thousands of barrels.


Schedule A and TSUSA Commodity Numbers Used in Compiling the Petroleum
Information Presented in This Report


Energy products


Nonenergy products


Schedule A. No.


Crude and partly refined
petroleum
331.0120
331.0140
331.0210
331.0220
331.0230
331.0240

Crude petroleum
331.0120
331.0140

Gasoline
332.1000

Jet fuel
332.2020

Kerosene
332.2040

Distillate fuel oil
332.3020
332.3040

Residual fuel oil
332.4020
332.4040


TSUSA No.


475.0510
475.1010
475.0520, 475.0540
475.1020, 475.1040
475.3520
475.6520


475.0510
475.1010


475.2520, 475.2560


475.2540


475.3000


475.0530
475.1030


Schedule A. No.

Lubricating oils
332.5000 pt.

Lubricating greases
332.5000 pt.

Paraffin and other mineral
waxes
332.6220 pt.
332.6240

Asphalt
332.9800

Naphthas not for further
refinement
332.9920


TSUSA No.


475.4500


475.5500, 475.6000


494.2200
494.2400


521.1100



475.3540


All other petroleum products
(pitch of tar coke, non-
liquid hydrocarbon mix-
tures, and calcined petro-
leum and coal coke not for
fuel)


332.9700 pt.
332.9940 pt.
599.8040 pt.


401.6200
475.7000
517.5100


475.0550
475.1050


Propane and butane gas
341.0020

Liquid derivatives of
petroleum, n.e.s.
332.9940 pt.


475.1510, 475.1530


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U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
Bureau of the Census
Washington, D.C. 20233

OFFICIAL BUSINESS
FIRST CLASS MAIL


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

3 1262 0I8586 1887
POSTAGE A- ..
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE -IL |
COM -202 -
U.S.MAIL




Full Text







Date of Importation for Imports

Beginning with statistics for January, the import compiling pro-
cedures are being modified, in so far as is practicable, to include
shipments in the statistics for the month in which the mer-
chandise actually was brought into the country, or the month of
withdrawal, in the case of warehouse withdrawals for consump-
tion. Effective January 1978, the date of importation as re-
ported on the import entries is being used to determine the
statistical month in which the shipments are included. For
1977 and previous years, the date the import documents were
officially filed with Customs was used to determine the sta-
tistical month in which shipments were included.



The Bureau has recompiled the 1977 data on a date of importa-
tion, DOI, basis. Overall monthly totals for such data along with
comparable previously compiled date of entry (DOE) data for
1977 are presented in the table that follows. (Note: Both the
DOE and DOI monthly data shown in the table have been
further modified to reflect the inclusion of nonmonetary gold-
See footnote 1 on table.)


As can be derived from the figures in the table, the net increase
in calendar year 1977 DOI data over DOE data (on an f.a.s.
value basis) was about $205 million, with monthly differences
ranging from a minus $113.8 million to a plus $1,063.8
million-See footnote 2 on table.


In recompiling the 1977 data on a DOI basis, a review was made
of the import documents filed each month. This review enabled
the identification of documents by date of importation. Those
showing dates of importation for the prior month were sorted
out for inclusion in their proper statistical month. Thus, for
example, the DOI total shown for January 1977 represents
data from documents filed with Customs in February 1977 with
January 1977 dates of importation combined with data from
documents filed in January 1977 with January 1977 dates of
importation. This procedure was repeated for all months of
1977. (Note: Documents filed in January 1978 with December
1977 dates of importation were identified, sorted out, and in-
cluded in the DOI total for December 1977. This segment of
documents amounted to $2,171.5 million and has been pro-
cessed in all major import tabular formats (IM 145X, IM 145Y,
IM 136 etc.) for distribution to the regular recipients of these
tabulations, and to be made available at Commerce Depart-
ment Reference locations in New York and Washington. The
user should also note that documents filed in January 1977
with December 1976 dates of importation were sorted out and
are not included in the DOI total shown for January 1977.)

In 1978 issues of Reports which present prior years data (FT 900
and FT 990), 1977 data at the 1 digit SITC section level are re-
compiled on a DOI basis. Also in certain 1977 annual import
tabulations and publications the data are recompiled and will
be presented on a DOI basis. (E.g. FT 150, FT 155, FT 246,
etc.)


U.S. General Imports of Merchandise by Month January to December 1977

(In millions of dollars. F.a.s. (free alongaiae ship) and C.I.f. (cost, insurance, and freight) Import values. Date of importation, 001, is the
date the merchandise was actually brought into the Unirted States. Date oi entry, DOE, is the date of Customs' official acceptance of the import
documents)

F.a.s. salue C.L.t. value

Date ot Importation Date of Entry Date or Importation Date of Entry
1977 (DOI) (DOE) (DOI) (DOE)

Seasonally L Seaaonally Seasonally Seasonally n u
adjusted Unadjusted Unaajuted' asoally Unadjusted adjusted Unadjusted
adjusted adjusted adjusted adjusted

January-Dsce.ber .................... 17,685.7 1-7.695.8 1?7,281.0 147.490.8 157,568.3 157,574.0 157,149.8 157,368.9
January .............................. 10,9'l.- 10,6- .5 11,300.0 10,963.3 11,733.9 11,384.2 12,090.0 11,729.7
Fenruary............................. 12,881.8 11,592.3 11,699.6 10.528.5 13,749.4 12,373.1 12.488.9 11,238.B
March... .... ..................... 12,082.5 13,1.2.1 12,.82.9 13,577.7 12,878.5 1.,007.9 13,307.3 14,474.3
April................................ 12,086.9 11,93&.6 12,61?.3 12,.58.3 12,885.6 12,723.2 13,.u3.4 13,274.0
May.................................. 10,983.1 11.257.7 11,6..0 11,935.1 11,726.0 12,019.2 12,431.9 12,742.7
June.... ... ......................... 13,396.1 14,056.5 13,02'.0 13,069.2 14,297.7 15,002.6 13,904.7 14,590.2
July............. ................... 13,076.6 12,430.6 12,504.0 11,88b.3 13,973.0 13,282.7 13,357.8 12,697.9
August ............................... 11,650.7 12,059.6 12,2'" .2 12,73...0 12,415.8 12,851.6 13,091.7 13,551.2
September...... ... .... .......... 12,605.2 12,450.2 12,720.4 12,563.9 13,53.8 13,286.3 13,573.7 13,406.1
October ................ ............. 12,995.6 12,49.0 12,332.7 11,850.7 13,867.7 13,332.4 13,166.0 12,657.8
November ............................. 11,833.3 12.261.7 11,562.5 11,981.2 12,592.6 13,046.5 12,303.3 12,748.7
December............................. 13,122.5 13,371.8 13,117.3 13,366.5 13,99..3 14,260.2 13,991.1 14,256.9
'FLgureE include data on li.. imports of nonmonetary gold anlch totaled $674.0 million for the calendar bear with monthly amounts as follows:
January, 130.4 million: February, 123.3 million; March, t26.0 million; April, 123.7 million; May, $28.8 million; June, 199.6 million; July, $26.5
million; 4ugust, 32.5 million, September, 188.2 million; October, f*3.1 million; November, f182.7 million; and December, $59.3 million.
2Differences In the 1977 overall monthly 0OI and DOE totals are as follows: January, -4318.8 million; February, -+1,063.8 million; March, -$435.5
million; April, -$523.7 million: May, -J677.. million; June, +t387.3 million; July,*$54-.3 million: August, -$64-.3; September, -$113.8; October,
T6373.3 million; Notember, 4280.. million; and December, -*5.3 million. IThese differences are based on f.a.a. values.)


k -ms-




1





I3 /1'y-. Fo0 7e -/ 7 /

T: UNITED STATES FOREIGN TRADE


FT900-78-1 Supplement I


SUMMARY OF MAJOR C-


Summary of U.S. Export and

,,.... Import M rchandise Trade
AR i t-- UNIV. OF FL LIB.


S ...0 JANUARY 1978
I ." .. --- I For Release March 3, 1978 10:00 A.M.
U.S. Dt'r'u 1'{ '


Aeef' EXPORT AND IMPORT REPORTING AND COMPILING PROCEDURES
BEGINNING WITH STATISTICS FOR JANUARY 1978


This special release summarizes major changes in the export and
import ovirage, reporting, and compiling procedures which
became effective with and will be reflected in statistics released
for January 1978 and subsequent months. These changes are
(1) the introduction of the 1978 editions of Schedule B and
Schedule E; (2) the inclusion of the SITC Revision 2 Changes
in Schedule A, (3) the inclusion of nonmonetary gold in the ex-
port and import statistics; and (4) the presentation of the im-
port statistics on a date of importation (DOI) basis rather than
on a date of entry (DOE) or date of filing basis as was the case
during 1977 and earlier years.

The 1978 Editions of Export Classification Schedules B and E

Beginning with statistics for January 1978, two new export
classification systems are being introduced. They are Schedule
B. (Statistical Classification of Domestic and Foreign Com-
modities Exported from the United States) and Schedule E,
(SITC Based Classification of Domestic and Foreign Com-
modities Exported from the United States).

The new Sdhedule B, which is based on the framework of the
Tariff Schedules of the United States (TSUS), will be the
classification system used for collecting data on U.S. mer-
chandise exports. Computer outputs which will reflect export
data in terms of the new Schedule B commodity numbers
are data bank tapes; and all tabular outputs, whether hard
copy or microform, such as EM 522, EM 531, EM 563, etc.

The 1978 Schedule E a completely new schedule, is based on
the Standard International Trade Classification (SITC) Revision
2. The classifications in Schedule B are allocated to those in
Schedule E on a one for one basis. Foreign Trade tabulation
EM 450/455 and publications such as FT 900, FT 990, FT 410,


FT 450, and FT 455 will present data in terms of the classifi-
cations in Schedule E.
Prior to January 1978 the export statistics presented in all
Bureau of the Census foreign trade reports were in terms of the
classifications presented in the 1971 edition of Schedule B. The
commodity numbers in that schedule were based on and in the
framework of Standard International Trade Classification
(SITC). Revision 1.

Standard International Trade Classification (SITC)
Revision 2 Changes Reflected in Schedule A

Effective with the statistics for January 1978, Schedule A (Sta-
tistical Classification of Commodities Imported into the United
States), has been revised to reflect the Standard International
Trade Classification (SITC) Revision 2 changes. Schedule A,
like the newly developed export SITC classification system
(Schedule E, noted above), is also based on the SITC and is one
of the two classification systems used in compiling and pub-
lishing data on U.S. merchandise imports. Export and import
data for 1977 appearing in 1978 issues of Reports FT 900,
and FT 990 will be revised in so far as is practicable, to reflect
the Revision 2 changes.

Nonmonetary Gold Included in the Statistics

Exports and imports of nonmonetary gold in such forms as ore,
scrap and base bullion, and nonmonetary refined bullion, which
were previously excluded will be included in the statistics. In
earlier years imports of nonmonetary gold were published in a
special announcement titled, U.S. Exports and Imports of Gold,
which appeared monthly in Report FT 990. Imports of silver
in these forms have been included in the statistics on a regular
basis since January 1969.


U.S. Department of Commerce
BUREAU OF THE CENSUS


Inglids annuagni e sus figmaus leld be addlasd so t e Chief, Foign Trade Diviion, Bumsu of
the CusnS WMshinmgtn, D.C. 20233. Tel: Arm Code 301,763-5140.
For sale by the Subscriber Services Section (Publications), Bureau of the Census, Washington. D.C.
20233, or any U.S. Department of Commerce district office. Postage stamps not acceptable; currency
submitted at ender's risk. Remittances from foreign countries must be by international money order
or by a draft on a U.S. bank. Price 30 cent per copy. Annual subscription (FT 900,975, 985, and 986
combined) $14.90.






U.S. Department
of Commerce
BUREAU OF THE CENSUS
Washington. D.C. 20233
Official Business


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

IIIHIEIDIUIIIIIEIIil
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