"A Survey and History of Rotary Educational Loan Fund, Inc.": paper prepared by Edward B. Sharpe and John W. Wincey, 1935

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"A Survey and History of Rotary Educational Loan Fund, Inc.": paper prepared by Edward B. Sharpe and John W. Wincey, 1935
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Spatial Coverage:
North America -- United States of America -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville

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University of Florida
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Full Text
















A SURVEY AND HISTORY


of

ROTARY EDUCATIONAL LOAN FUND, INC


Prepared in partial fulfillment of requirements
for credit in Business English 356




by

Edward B Sharpe and
John W Wincey











University of Florida
Language Hall, 1-C
May 29, 1935





Professor W. A. Clark
Language Hall
Campus

Dear Sirs

Ve transmit herewith a report on the Rotary Educational Loan
Fund, Incorporated, for the period beginning January 1, 1923,
to March 31, 1935.

In the preparation of the report, emphasis has been placed
on aoouraoy and completeness. Everywhere that it was pos-
sible, original sources of information were examined. In
addition to such data available in the office of the Rotary
Educational Loan Fund, which include student registers, were
obtained from the Office of the Registrar. Each student's
rank together with his correct home address, was checked with
these records. This made possible their classification ac-
cording to towns and counties, as set forth in Schedules 3
and 4 of this report. Seminoles for each year, beginning in
1921 and ending with the one published in 1933-34, were ob-
tained from the Business Manager's office and information
found on the Seniors who had received aid from this Fund, was
recorded.
9
Each of three ledters was examined and the name of each stu-
dent was placed on 3 x 5 cards. All information concerning
a particular student was recorded on his card. These cards
served as recapitulations for making this report.

Respectfully yours,




Edward B. Sharpe


John Winoey











TABLE OF CONTENTS



Page

I. Letter of Transmittal i

II. Table of Charts and Graphs iii

III. Introduction 1

IV. History, Operation and Status 3

V. Appendix 28












TABLE OF. CHARTS AD. GRAPHS



Page

Schedule No. 1
"Participating Clubs" 7

Exhibit No. 1
"Interest Received per Year" 9

Schedule No. 2
"Distribution of Students by Colleges" 12

Exhibit No. 2
"Subscriptions Received per Year" 14

Exhibit No. 3
"Amount Loaned to Students per Year" 16

Exhibit No. 4
"Loans Repaid by Students per Year" 17

Exhibit No. 5
"Number of Students Receiving
Loans per Year" 18

Exhibit No. 6
"Average Amount Loaned per Stu-
dent per Year" 19

Schedule No. 3
"Summary of Borrowers by Towns" 21

Schedule No. 4
"Summary of Borrowers by Counties" 24













INTRODUCTION



The necessity for increasing economy of operation sinoe-the Year

Book of March, 1930, was issued has prevented publication of another

until now. This, the twelfth year, closes with so many features of en-

oouragement that it seems well to pass them on to the Rotarians of the

State and others interested who have made the Rotary Educational Loan

Fund a reality.

First, a new plan of increasing capital stock was adopted at the

District meeting at Eustis in April, 1934, and is now swinging into opera-

tion. This plan calls for a pro rata budget of one dollar per member in

each Rotary Club for stook subscriptions, thus relieving individuals of

the heavy personal subscription, and, at the same time, making it easier

for the Rotary Loan Fund to be participated in by all the clubs of Florida.

Second, collections on interest and principal due from student borrow-

ers have been most satisfactory during this year, especially during last

summer and fall. The Honor Roll*, composed of men who have repaid their

loans in full with interest, is growing steadily, while new applications

and letters of appreciation from young men assisted by the Fund show that

the Fund is not decreasing in popularity among the students.

Third, two criteria of the success of a loan fund for assisting stu-

dents are: (a) how well students meet their obligations in repayment of loans,

and (b) number of students continuing on to graduation and even beyond to

postgraduate work. In this latter respect, also, results of the Rotary

Educational Loan Fund compare favorably with similar loan funds in other

states.

Fourth, additional help is now available to Florida young men from

See Appendix











the Fund through a new system of short-term loans, which will be explained

later on in the report.

For those not already familiar with the operation of the Loan Fund

and others interested in watching its progress a complete history and ex-

position of the institution to date is given in the following pages.

While it has been hard during the last few years to "keep on keep-

ing on", we are inclined to agree with Lowell that



"Endurance is the crowning quality,

And patience all the passion of great hearts."












HISTORY, OPERATION, AND STATUS


The Rotary Educational Loan Fund, Inc., is the outgrowth of an

effort of the Rotarians of Florida to serve their State University,

and later, when sufficient funds are available, the State College for

Women.

The University of Florida has practically no student loan funds.

A few alumni and friends of the institution have made small donations

int he way of endowments, with stipulations that the income should be

available for scholarships or loans to worthy students. All of these

- are handled through the office of the Dean of Students, who checks the

merits of applications received for these scholarships or loans and makes

awards strictly on a basis of need and merit.

It was found that these funds were not sufficient to meet the oon-

stantly increasing demand on the part of worthy students for help in

paying their college expenses. Also, there were not enough student

assistant jobs to take care of all the students who desired to work their

way through the University.

Therefore, in the fall of 1922, realizing that an opportunity for

real service had presented itself to the citizens of the State, a few

enthusiastic alumni and friends of the University and all active members

of the Gainesville Rotary Club conceived the idea of organizing a State-

wide Loan Fund,, and that year the Florida Educational Loan Corporation

came into existence.

Of course, it is realized that at times charity in the way of

scholarships may be more of a detriment than a help, as in sane indi-

viduals character is weakened rather than strengthened by this kind of













assistance; and strong, capable men are not developed by having all ob-

staoles removed from their paths. However, properly administered help
J
means a great deal, and often proves the turning point in a person's life.

This seems especially true in education; for it is, of course, an

indisputable fact that very often the worthiest boys do not come from

families financially able to give them the training which our present

civilization demands. Florida has many boys who without sane assistance

cannot hope to make the most of their lives. It is realized that any

help given them should be of a discriminating nature, and here it should

be pointed out that the Loan Fund duly serves that very purpose. It is /

not to be considered a charity organization, but simply a business ser-

vice devised for removing a temporary embarrassment, and one which has

been organized for the sole purpose of assisting students of promise and

purpose to develop themselves into useful and oonstruotive citizens. In

this way the student must realize his obligation both from a moral or

ethical standpoint and-from a business standpoint. By this method we feel

that his ambition and sense of responsibility are awakened; that there is

value to the individual in undertaking a voluntary business obligation

early in life and thus receiving a training in personal finance and se-

curing a credit rating at the beginning of his career.

It is thought that help of this nature should prove of even much

greater value than is at first apparent. To be eligible for a loan, an
J
applicant must be a good student, must bear a good reputation, and must

have the confidence and respect of his associates. His character must be

such that he will be able to secure two good endorsers on his note. He

must have the recommendation of the Dean of Students as to the merits of






5







his case, as well as the approval of his hometown or near-by Rotary

Club.

The original aim of the Fund was to secure a subscription from

every Rotarian in the State for one share of stook (par value, $100.00)

each, making available a working capital of about one hundred thousand

dollars. Up to this time we have raised $31,131.39*. In recent years

raising money has been difficult$ of course, and for that reason the new

pro-rata budget plan is viewed with considerable hope, as a relief from

general conditions.

*By the original plan the stock was to be paid for by four annual

payments of $25.00 each. Later, subscriptions on a $10.00 a year basis

were accepted. In 1929, District Governor F. Irving Holmes made the

suggestion that each club in the State set aside in its yearly budget an

assessment of $1.00 per capital for their membership annual for the pur-

chase of stock in the Fund. This plan while it would be no great buti

den on any one individual would insure an ample working capital for the

Fund if taken up by each of the clubs of the State; would provide a yearly

income; would eliminate much uncertainty and "begging"; and would make the

undertaking a State-wide ROTARY PROJECT. The plan was adopted by resolu-

at the district meeting in Eustis in April, 1934, and all clubs so

notified by letter. A number of clubs not before participating in subscrip-

tions have adopted the pro rata plan and other clubs have notified this

office of their intention to adopt it. As is the case with all paid-in

capital, pro rata subscriptions are to be used for loans to students only.

The purpose of the organization is to pranote, assist, and encourage

higher education for needy Florida boys who can prove their eligibility

See Recapitulation Sheet in Appendix.













for suoh help, by making loans at a low rate of interest; such loans to

be repaid in easy installments beginning six months after the borrower

is no longer inoollege, and is in position to repay. It is strictly

a ROTARIAN SERVICE, being supported entirely by Rotarians in the Dis-

triot, and now has a nation-wide recognition as a worthy and imitable

ROTARY PROJECT and entitled to the hearty support of every Rotarian in

Florida. Numbers of letters of inquiry from institutions in other states,

which have heard of the Rotary Loan Fund of Florida and of its success-

ful achievements, ask us for detailed information so that they may

organize similar student-help funds.

The officers of the Fund consist of a President; and active Vice-

President, who shallbe the President of the University of Florida as

well; four Vice-Presidents; a Secretary-Treasurer; an Advisory Committee;

And a Loan Committee. These officers are elected at the annual meeting

of the stockholders each year. The Active Vice-President is President

of the University of Florida, and the Secretary-Treasurer is the Business

Manager of the University. The Loan Committee consists of the latter two \

officers, the President of the Gainesville Rotary Club, and one member at tj
v
large. The Advisory Committee, or Board of Directors, is composed of the l

Presidents of all the Rotary Clubs in this District. All officers serve

without pay.

At the present time, we have 219 stockholders, including sixteen Rotary

Clubs* of the State, representing our paid-up capital, together with 45

subscribers, of $31,131.39.

The Rotary Educational Loan Fund, formerly the Florida Educational Loan

Corporation, is at the close of its twelfth year of operation. During this


* See Schedule No. 1.













SCHEDULE NO. 1.



PARTICIPATING CLUBS


Club Subscription STOCKHOLDER

Apopka 100.00
Bartow 100.00
Bradenton 50.00
Daytona Beaoh 200.00
Eustis 50.00
Fernandina 200.00
Fort Myers 100.00
Gainesville 18.00 200.00
Haines City 25.00
High Springe 38.00
Homestead 35.00
Jaoksonville 500.00
Lake City 100.00
Lake Worth 30.CO
Marianna 20.00
Ocala 85.00
Orlando 86.35 300.00
Pensacola 50.00 200.00
Pompano 50.00
Quinoy 100.00
Sanford 68.00 100.00
Sebring 20.00
Saint Augustine 500.00
Tallahassee 200.00
Tampa 200.00
Winter Haven 20.00 100.00


35200.00


Total













time loans have been granted to 378 students in amounts ranging from

$12.00 to $800.00, the latter amount being the largest loan to a single

individual, and it was repaid before it was all due. The above number

'of students does not enolude eight who were granted short-term loans,

Which have all been repaid. The total amount loaned to these 386 stu-l

dents is $54,020.94. Of the amount loaned $22,471.93 has been repaid A

by borrowers* and re-loaned, with the exception of $1,579.61, cash balance

on hand as of Maroh 31, 1935. On these loans we have received interest

amounting to $9,303.39, out of which all operating expenses, such as post-

age, stationery, telegrams, printing, mimeographing, stenographic and

clerical services, have been paid, leaving a surplus of $2,629.53.

Two of the factors that guage the successful operation of a loan fund

such as this are: status of repayment of loans and number of graduates.

During the twelve years of operation, the Loan Fund has assisted 210

young men to graduation, and 127 have either resigned or did not.return

to school, leaving 49 registered in the University at the present time.

A number of these graduate students have secured their Master's degree,

and one has a Doctor's degree from Cornell. It is hoped that a "7ho's

Who" of Rotary Loan graduates will be possible of publication within the

next year or two. With very few exceptions, Rotary Loan graduates have

.gone back into the life of the State and made enviable places for them-

selves.

The scholastic standing and maintenance of high grades by the stu-

dent borrowers is shown by the fact that fifteen made Phi Kappa Phi,

national honorary fraternity. Their leadership and popularity are evi-

denced by a representation of seventeen in Blue Key, national honorary


*See Honor Roll in Appendix.






EXHIBIT NO. 1
Interest Received Per Year


... ..


7-7-- -


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i I- j


24.----


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-- I--

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1600

1500


1400


1300


1200


1100


1000


900
goo


800.


700


6oo
600


500


400
2oo


300


200


100


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fraternity, which requires at least two major campus offices to be eli-

gible for consideration. The records show also that 127 of these men

were members of social fraternities. It is a peculiar coincidence that

the number who wither resigned or dropped out of school is equil to the

number who were members of social fraternities. This has no particular

significance since all those who resigned were not fraternity men. Twen-

ty-six men engaged in one or more of the majcr sports of football, bas-

ketball, or baseball, while nineteen participated in the minor sports.

Ten engaged in debating; thirteen worked on the staff of the Alligator,

weekly campus newspaper; and the Seminole staff attracted nineteen of

the men receiving aid from this Fund. Three were elected by their fellac

students to publish the yearly "F" Book, which sets forth information

concerning the operation of the University of value to the beginning stu-

dent. The students also elected eighteen of the borrowers to carry on

the excellent work of the Honor Court. Further activities of students

receiving loans are indicated by the fact that ten participated in the

University Bank, Glee Club, or Orchestra, while ten were elected to the

Executive Council of the Student Body. The tabulations show two of these

men held the high ranking office of President of the Student Body.

A tabulation of the students registered according to colleges of

the University, indicates that the largest number of borrowers is repre-

sented by the College of Law with 72, followed by the College of Engineer-

ing with 69. The fact that students taking law are required to remain at

the University for a longer period of time possibly accounts for their tak-

ing the lead. It is interesting to note that even though the College of

Arts and Sciences has a larger enrollment that the College of Agricvlture,

the former carries the same number receiving financial aid, 56.











SCHEDULE NO. 2

DISTRIBUTION OF STUDENTS BY COLLEGES


College of

College of

College of

College of

College of

College of

College of

College of

Total


Law

Engineering

Education

Arts and Soiences

Agriculture

Business Administration

Architecture

Fharmaoy


72

69

60

56

56

46

10

9

378





CHART NO. 1 I1
Distribution of Students by Colleges







: I : -

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70 -- .




60




50
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20




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In the course of operation we have had to depend largely on our

own experience for guidance, and no doubt many mistakes have been made;

however, we believe that we shall learn through them, and be able to

do more worth-while work hereafter because of them.

Several causes are probably responsible for the difficulties we have

encountered in collecting past due accounts from students and subscribers.

Students had became used to the idea of gifts, scholarships and helps of

various kinds, accepted with no thought of responsibility. During late

years it has been difficult if not impossible for the young men to se-

cure paying employment upon leaving school, and business reverses have

forced a number of subscribers to cancel their subscriptions (See Exhibit

No. 2).

Second, one of the Articles of Incorporation provides that the ex-

pense of'operation shill not exceed interest earned, as no part of the

principal shall be used or expended for expenses of any character. The

interest earned was small during the early years of the corporation, and

economy of operation was necessary and at times so close as to be at the

expense of efficiency of operation, so that at times the follow-up system

could not be as rigid as is necessary for best results.

Third, experience has shown that loans to freshmen are not adviaable,

except in very unusual cases. The mortality is too great among them, and

they are too much an unknown, untried quantity, both as to character and

mental cblibre. While same finished their courses, borrowing in subse-

quent years, the money was tied up for a considerable time. More often

the freshman did not complete his courses and later proved to be our





EXHIBIT NO. 2
Subscriptions Received Per Year


I --i K


I :


!i.


1


900 -.-l -1- -.,.-i... -
: .. .. ... ...... L : i .. i. .: i : : '._



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-:




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2000





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most obstinate oases for collection (88 failing to finish, and 12 be-

ing dropped for failure). Except in cases of unusual merit and abili-

ty, it is better to confine loans to juniors and seniors only. When

a student has spent two years' time and energy on his college work, he

is more likely to struggle through to the end, even through difficulties.

Besides this, in two years' time ample opportunity is given to place a

true estimate on a boy's character.

More recently, economic conditions in general have had a strong

bearing on the situation.. The greatly improved repayment of this year

(Exhibit Do. 4) has allowed a greater number of students to be aided

by the funds coming in (Exhibit No. 3), and causes the belief that the

unemployment situation, etc., through which we have all struggled for the

past four or five years, is largely responsible for slowness in repaying

.oans. Many borrowers would have been glad to pay but have been unable

to do so because of loss of job, drastic reduction in salary, or b&ing

compelled to assume the burden of supporting unemployed relatives. We

have many earnest letters along this line. As times have grown a little

better, we have begun to receive payments this year from emn who have

not been able to pay before, no matter how willing, and through no fault

of their own. Te believe, as the Earmon Foundation holds, that 99% of

our borrowers are honest and appreciative of the help they have received

from this source, as we have many expressions of gratitude from them.

There is yet another side to be considered in accounting for slow-

ness of repayment among some of the borrowers A number of borrowers,

especially in the case where the corporation was unable to _ve further

assistance, -;ave been forced to leave school to secure work whereby they
















80C





70C





60o





50C


3o0


20C


100


EXHIBIT NO. 3 16
Amount Loaned to Students Per Year



7 T I I T:
711 -::'~;-
1:2:2. .

~~.: 77;



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EXHIBIT NO. 4 17
Loans Repaid by Students Per Year

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+ :; :. h; i; ; i. .; ..............................


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R 43
I" I






EXHIBIT NO. 5 18
Number of Students Receiving Loans Per Year

....................----....-----







wt 7-
-i --. ..,











77 .. ....................... .
LL I'


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EXHIBIT NO. 6 19
Average Amount Loaned Per Student Per Year




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1. ... .. .... ....
A:




........ ... ... .

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................ .... .:-



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might earn enough to enable them to return to school. Some of these

have been unable even to secure employment. Others, more successful,

to whom we write regarding payment, reply that they are saving every

cent to come back to school. Finally, when they do get back, the ace

count which may have been classed as "past due" is not due at all while

they are in school. And so the situation is complicated and the money

often tied up for a considerable time.

At the request of a number of stockholding individuals and clubs,

a schedule of the number of borrowers from each town is appended, to-

gether with a summary of borrowers by counties. The 378 borrowers, ex-

clusive of short time loans, represent 140 towns, two of which are not

in Florida (Schedule iTo. 3P. And the 140 towns represent 53 counties

in the State (Schedule Ko. 4), not including the two not in Florida.

The borrowers of the Corporation have come from all parts of the State,

as the appended schedules indicate, and are not barred by any religious

affiliations or restrictions, as the organization is strictly non-sec-

tarian and undenominational.

From actual experience the administrator's of the Rotary Educa-

tional Loan Fund have gleaned certain fundamental principles which should

be observed:

1. There should be a certain standard of selection among stu-

dents as to character, ability, purpose, etc.

2. Greater care should be exercised in securing responsible
endorsers or to have the borrower take out insurance to
cover the indebtedness.

3. No loans should be made to freshmen, except in very unusual
cases.

4. A rigid and comprehensive follow-up system should be main-
taired. VPhile some phases of the work are unpleasant and






21



SCHEDULE NC. 3

SU3ILARY OF BORROWERS BY TOWNS


Alachua 1
Anna i'aria 1
Apalaohioola 2
Archer 1
Arlington 1
Auburndale 2
Avon Park 1
Barberville 1
Bartow 2
Bell 2
Blountstown 1
Bradenton 4
Bristol 1
Brookeville 1
Bushnell 2
Cedar Key 1
Center Hill 2
Clearwater 2.
Crescent City 1
Crystal River- 1
Dade City 2
Daytona Beafh 6
Deerfield 1
DeFuniak Springs 3
DeLand 2
DeSoto City 1
Dukes 1
Eau Gallie 1
Eustis 1
Felda 1
Fernandina 1
Florahame 3
Frink 2
Ft. Barranca 1
Ft. Green 2
Ft. Lauderdale 1
Ft. Eeade 1
Ft. Myers 4
Ft. Pierce 1
Ft. White 1
Gainesville 23
Graham 1
Green Cove Springs 1
Gonzalez 1
Greensboro 1
Groveland 2
Hastings 3
High Springs 1
Hollywood 2
Homestead 3
Hudson 1
Inverness 1











Jacksonville 38
Jay 2
Jennings 1
Jupiter 2
Key West 2
Kissimmee 2
Knights 1
LaBelle 1
Lake Butler 2
Lake City 4
Lade Hamilton 1
Lake Helen 1
Lake Jovita 1
Lake Wales 1
Lake Worth 1
Lakeland 8
Largo 5
Larkirs 1
Laurel Hill 1
Leoanto 1
Lithia 1
Little River 1
Live Oak
Lochloosa 1
Lynn Haven 1
Madison 1
Malabar 1
Manatee 1
Marianna 1
Melbourne 1
Miami 15
Micanopy 1
Miooo 1
Milligan 1
Milton 1
Mims 1
Monticello 5
lontverde 1
Mulberry 1
Newberry 1
New Fort Richey 1
New Smyraa 2
Oakland 1
Ccala 7
Cna 1
Oneco 1
Orlando 1 8
Dviedo 1
Palatka 1
Palmetto 2
Penney Far.::s 1
Pensacola 8
Perry 3













Pine Mount 1
Plant City 3
Pompano 1
Quinoy 1
Reddiok 1
Ritta 1
Rookledge 1
Safety Harbor 1
Sanford 3
Seffner 1
Sneads 1
St. Augustine 2
St. Petersburg 9
Stuart 2
Sulphur Springs 2
Summerfield 4
Tallahassee 15
Tampa 27
Titusville 1
Trenton 3
bmatilla 2
Venus 1
Vero Beaoh 1
Wabasso 1
Warrington 1
i'auchula 3
West Palm Beach 11
Williston 1
Wiauma 1
7tinter Garden 1
Tinter Haven
.inter Park 1
Zephyrhills 2



Camilla, Georgia 1
Washington, D. C. 1

Total 8

Kunber of Towns 140











SUMMARY OF BORROWERS BY COUNTIES


llaohua 28
Bay 1
Bradford 1
Breward 9
Broward 5
Calhoun 3
Cgrus 3
Clay 2
Columbia 5
Dade 20
Duval 38
Esoambia 11
Franklin 2
Gadsden 2
Gilehrist 5
Hamilton 1
Hardee 6
Hendry 2
Hernando 1
Highlands 3
Hillsborough 35
Indian River 2
Jaokson 2
Jefferson 3
Lake 6
Lee
Leon 15
Levy 2
Liberty 1
Madison 1
Manatee 9
Marion 12
Martin 2
Montoe 2
Nassau 1
Okaloosa 2
Orange 21
Osoeola 2
Palm Beach 16
Pasoo 7
Pinellas 15
Polk 20
Putnam 5
St. Johns 5
St. Lucie 1
Santa Rosa
Seminole
Sumter 4
Suwannee 5
Taylor 3












Union
Volusia
Walton



Camilla, Georgia.
Washington, D. C.

Total

Number of Countios


1
1

1i7

53












discouraging, and require considerable time and tact,
such a system is imperative to the work.

5. Another important part of the work is the maintenance
of contact between borrower and endorser. This is es-
peoially difficult under present economic conditions,
when curtailment is the order of the day and many young
men are traveling in search of employment.

Heretofore the work of the Corporation has been handled fro the

most part by a part-time secretary. There is much work attached to the

various operations of a student loan fund, as is evidenced by the office

detail noted in this report and as the years pass and the number helped

and capital invested grow larger, the office work also increases, so

that laok of sufficient clerical force will prove a serious handicap

to efficient operation.

In oonolusion, we set forth questions often asked oonoerning oer-

tain details of operation. We append the following data to afford de-

sider informations

1. Eligibility for loans To be eligible for a boan, applicant
must be a Florida boy who has successfully completed the feesh-
man years preferably the junior year, of college and whose
character and soholasted standing are such that he can secure
the approval of the University Dean of Students, the signature
of two legally responsible endorsers to his note, the recom-
mendation of the Rotary Club of the ocamunity from which the
applicant registers, and the approval of the Rotary Educational
Loan Fund Committee.

2. A student eligible for a loan should apply to the secretary
of the Loan Fund, University of Florida, secure two endorsers
for his note, and get a letter of recommendation from his
local Rotary Club.

3. The maximum loan for any one year is $150.00.

.- It is not the policy of the Loan Coamittee to make loans to
first-year men. However, in exceptional oases the Rotary
Club of the community from which a boy is registering may
make a subscription for the amount the boy needs, specifying
it is for the assistance of this particular applicant. This
arrangement for assisting freshmen has worked well in a num-
ber of oases.











5. Should a Rotary Club desire to make a subscription to be
used exclusively for two students, the Loan Committee will
apply a particular loan to students named by the Club mak-
ing subscription for that purpose.

6. It is possible for an individual to help a boy with a pri-
vate loan inoognitp by having the loan handled through this
organisation. The money will be represented by a blook of
stook in the Fund, for whioh a certificate will be issued
and amount used as lender directs.

7. Funds are not yet available for making loans to young
Florida women to attend the Florida State College.

8. Sinoe loans are not restricted to Rotary sons or looali-
ties, a boy can borrow even though he oomed from a town
that has no Rotary Club and has made no contribution to
the Fund.


































APPENDIX















ROTARY EDUCATIONAL LOAN FUND, INC
RECAPITULATION SHEET
MARCH 31, 1935


No. of
Year Students


1923-24
194-25
1925-26
1926-27
1927-28
1928-29
1929-30
1930-31
1931-32
1932-33
1933-35
1934-35


53
13
29
22
40
35
24
38
29
35
27
43


Totals 5388


Average Amount
Loaned per Stu-
dent per Year

133.02
275.77
188.19
231.82
120.80
166.71
144.o04
111.29
172.35
102.84
86.15
82.61


139.23
8S!.a&


Interest
Received

90.30
S307.91
417.32
513.18
538.44
1,290.81
779.48
1,103.16
892.55
1,185.77
676.18
1,508.29

9, 33.39
'I ^ l t7


Subsoriptions
Paid

8,570.00
2,950.00
5,300.00
2,100.00
2,900.00
2,672.50
1,501.oo00
1,835.00
1,379.59
982.95
310.00
630o35


31,131.39
Li 4 4* -


Loan
Repaid


Amount
Loaned


568.50 7,050.00
660.00 3,585.00
577.25 5,457.50
1,309.55 5,100oo.oo
1,687.25 4,832.05
1,981.63 5,834.88
2,467.90 3,456.95
2.368.33 4.228.85
3,302.78 4,998.25
2,400.73 3,599.25
1,910.44 2,325.92
3,237.57 3.552.29

22,471.93 54,020.94
-A -7 .7i. AL t


Postage
and Misoel-
Station- laneous
Services ery Bxpnsee

140.40 209.99 675.00
81.33 29*33 16.56
48.10 20.46 .50
16.40 58.73 -o-
500.00 235077 165.00
701.14 94.11 60.35
54o.oo 172.56 92.90
625.00 132.86 2.90
610.00 166.97 69.oo00
761.67 172.72 136.97
157.45 102.84 123.68
180.00 118.87 91.60

4361.49 1510.21 1,434.46 /
L- // l- // 4 f -


f 1 -7__Sr


'9906COV IL7 V 7(1 rb )


%










ROTARY EDUCATIONAL LOAN FUND, INC.
HONOR ROLL
Mareh 31, 1935


Abbott, C. E.




Airth, Alfred





Allen, Chester R.





Atkinson, Clyde




Baber, W. E.


Baggott, Charles E.





Baker, H. Kent



Bannerman, R. C.



Bass, Clayton C.




Bauer, A. F.


Registered frma Fort Green Springs, Fla. Borrowed $100.
Received BS and BSAE degrees in 1923. Graduate student
at University of Florida during 1927-29. Now Professor
of Pomology and Vegetable Growing, University of Florida.

Registered from Live Oak, Fla. Borrowed $50. Graduated
with degree of Baohelor of Law, 1930. Now practicing law
in Live Oak. "I am glad that I can take care of this bal-
ance at this time and hope that it will help in raising
funds to loan the boys that must be in need of money."

Registered from Auburndale, Fla. Borrowed $235. Now in
the U.S. Marine Corps. "I am pleased to have the note
paid, but feel very much indebted to the Loan Corporation
for the opportunity the loan afforded me and hope some other
boy may get the help I had and appreciate it as I have."

Registered from Tallahassee, Borrowed $800. Graduated with
LLB degree in 1927. Practicing law in Talahassee. "This
help came at a time when it was invaluable. I shall always
be grateful for it."


Registered from Green Cove Springs. Borrowed $50.00
dent in College of Pharmacy. Resigned in 1931.


Stu-


Registered frcm Lithia, Fla. Borrowed $50. Received BSA
dgree in 1927. Graduate student, University of Florida,
in 1928-29-31-32. Now agriculture director for Hardee
County and member Wauohula High School faculty. "This
money served a purpose when it was sorely needed."

Registered from Gainesville. Borrowed $40. Received degree
of BS in Journalism June, 1933. "This certainly helped me
out."

Registered from Tallahaseee. Borrowed $100. Received BSCE
degree in 1931. "I wish to express my appreciation for this
loan."

Registered from Live Oak, Fla. Borrowed $40. Received
BAE dgree in 1931. Entered College of Lar in 1933. "I
wish to thank each of you for making it possible for me to
get the loan."

Registered from Groveland, Fla. Borrowed $75. Left school
in 1929.









Benton, Felix R.






Blanton, C.H.D.


Blooker, W.M., Jr.


Booth, David E.


Boyd, Randolph We



Brinkleyp Harry J.


Registered from Tampa, Borrowed $150.00. Received
BA in Arohitecture in June, 1931. "May I express my
appreciation for the loan to you and to the others
who made the fund possible. You may be assured I will
only be too glad if in any measure I can sometime repay
the favor."

Registered from Bartow, Fla. Borrowed $75. Resigned
in September, 1923.

Registered frooJaoksonville, Borrowed $50. Received
BSAroh degree in 1931. Now located in Jaoksonville.

Registered from St. Petersburg, Fla. Borrowed $100.
Graduated with BSCE degree in 1924.

Registered from Jacksonville. Borrowed $58.00. Re-
oeived AB degree in Education in 1930. Now located in
Jacksonville.

Registered from Jacksonville. Received BSAg degree in
1932. Graduate student throughout school year 1933-34-
Received MS degree in Fegruary, 1935. Borrowed $50.00
Now located in Augusta, Ga.


Brooker, Layton


Registered from Lakeland, Fla. Bowrowed $150.
in 1929. Now engaged in insurance business in
Beach. "I am certainly grateful for the loan,
this cheok will chip some other boy in .


Resigned
West Palm
and hope
a # school."


Brooker, Marvin A.



Browning, Louis P.


Buohan, W. Hortaon


Buohanan, W.L.


Burton, W. G., Jr.


Burnett, B. J.


Cannon, Frank T.


Registered from Gainesville. Borrowed $150.00. Received
degrees of BSA and MSA in 1927, and PhD degree from Cor-
nell in 1931.

Registered from gainesville. Borrowed $250.00. Received
BSEE degree in June, 1933-

Registeres from Tallahassee, Borrowed $150.00. Resigned
in 1927.

Registered from Melbourne, Fla. Borrowed $250.00. Left
school in 1924.

Registered front Jacksonville. Borrowed $130.00. Resigned
February 6, 1927.

Registered from Jacksonville, Received BSE degree in
1932. Borrowed $150.00

Registered from Live Oak. Borrowed $559*75. Graduated with
LLB degree in 1929. Now practicing law in Jacksonville.
"This has meant much to me. I shall never forget nor cease
to be grateful for it. I am always at your service; if
there is anything I can do for you in the future, I shall
be glad to render any assistance possible."












Carlton, Doyle


Carnes, C. C.


Registered from Plant City. Borrowed $150. Resigned
from College of Law in January, 19335

Registered from Crystal River. Borrowed $100. Received
ABE degree in 1926 and MAB in 1932. "I thank you for
this favor and hope the other boy gets the same benefit
from this money."


Cassels, W. L.


Registered from Plant
BSCE degree in 1931.
wish to thank you for


City. Borrowed $150.
Engaged in engineering
this loan and for your


Received
work. "I
patience."


Cody, J. A.






Coe, A. B.

Cox, George 0.


Creeoh, Silas M.




Crown, Raymond


Dansby, B. L.


Davis, L. R.


Dinning, W. L.


Doub, Thurmon


Driggers, A. G.


Registered from Penny Farms. Graduated in 1953 with
BS degree. Borrowed $31*50. Now located in St. Louis,
Missouri. He writes "Please accept my thanks for your
kind patience in the matter. I hope in the near future
to be able to become a regular contributor to the Loan
Fund."

Registered from Miami. Resigned 1925.

Registered from Boiling Green, Fla. Borrowed 475.
Received BSA degree in 1925.

Registered from Camilla, Ga. Borrowed $90. Received de-
gree of BS in Business Administration in 1926. Now with
telephone company in Baltimore, Md. "This money was a
God-send."

Registered from Gainesville. Borrowed $50. Received
BSA degree in 1926. Graduate student 1927.

Registered from Larkin, Fla. Borrowed $100. Graduated
in 1927.

Registered from Pierson, Fla. Borrowed #88.00 Graduated
in 1931 with BAE degree. Graduate student College of
Education during summer quarter, 1934.

Registered from Tampa. Borrowed $125.00. Received BS
degree in Business Administration in 1930. Editor of
University of Florida Alligator in 1929-30.

Registered from Dade City. Borrowed $200. Received BSEE
degree in 1929.

Registered from Wauchula, Fla. Borrowed, Received BSA de-
gree in 1928. Graduate student in 1929-31. "I hope the
next boy who gets this money gets as much benefit from it
as I did."












Driggers, V. W.





Dubler, Sheldon


Edwards, H. L.



Ellsworth, Lloyd


Gaylord, Herbert




Gilroy, Robert





Glover, M. M.



Gratigny, Jerome



Greene, E. W.





Gunn, James R.


Head, William Pitt

Henley, L. D.

Menley, W. W.



Houk, Dean C.


Registered from Wauchula. Borrowed $85.00. Received
BSAE degree in 1925. Graduate student in 1927, through
summer session, 1932. "The Florida Educational Loan
Corporation'was very kind to me when I was in school
and I shall do what I can to keep it in an active state."

Registered from Miami. Borrowed $50. Received LLB de-
gree in 1930. Practicing law in Miami.

Registered from Daytona Beach. Borrowed $225. Graduated
from University in 1924. Graduate student 1926-31.
Principal of school of Daytona Beach.

Registered from Dade City. Received BSA degree from Uni-
versity in 1927. Now in Tampa.

Registered from Tampa. Borrowed $100.00. Received BSE
degree in 1932. "I wish to express my appreciation of
the Association's kindness in advancing me this loan, as
I could not have finished this past year (1930) without it."

Registered from Miami. Borrowed $200. Received LLB de-
gree from the University in 1925. Now practicing law in
Miami. "A much-needed help. I appreciate more than I
can state the fact that I was able to obtain this loan and
the way you have helped me through .."

Registered from Lakeland. Borrowed $500. Received LLB
degree in 1925. Now practicing in the Criminal Court of
Bartow, Florida.

Registered from Zephyrhills. Borrowed $170. Received AB
degree in 1928. "I wish to express my appreciation for the
opportunity this loan afforded me."

Registered from Stuart, Fla. Borrowed $50. Received ABE
degree in August, 1930. "I would like jo express to you,
Mr. Graham, and to the other members of this Loan Committee,
my sincere thanks---and trust that this money will be of as
much help to some other student as it was to me."

Registered from Jacksonville. Borrowed $50. Entered West
Point Military Academy in 1930.

Registered from Jacksonville. Borrowed $100. Resigned, 1924.

Registered from Tampa. Borrowed $250. AB degree in 1923.

Registered from DeFuniak Springs, Fla. Borrowed $103.10.
Received degree of BSA in 1932. Registered as graduate stu-
dent majoring in agriculture in 1932-33.

Registered from St. Petersburg. Borrowed $100. Received
LLB degree in 1930. "I wish to thank you for making this
loan to me at a time when it was so urgently needed to enable













House, Ona L.


Hudson, H. E.


me to finish my studies at the University."

Registered from Gainesville. Borrowed $75.
BAE degree in 1927. Engaged in school work.


Registered from Jay, Fla.
degree in 1927. Graduate
County Agrioultural Agent


Received


Borrowed $50. Redeived BAE
student in 1927 and 1929.
at Crawfordville, Florida.


Hubbard, Richard J.






Hull, H. S.



Hurt, James L.



Ivey, Fred M.



Jackson, J. M.

Jamison, James



Jibb, W. F.





Johnson, Timothy A.


Josey, Metzer E.


Keller, Frank M.


Langbehn, Franklin


Lansdell, F. D.


Registered from Orlando. Borrowed $125. Graduated from
A&S in 1925. Engaged in newspaper work in Orlando. "I
wish to express my hearty appreciation of this kindness.
The Corporation is very kind to us who have borrowed money
and we students will always remember it in our future
prosperity."

Registered from Oakland, Fla. Borrowed $200. Received BSA
degree from the University in 1925. Located at Winter
Haven.

Registered from Gainesville. Borrowed $80. Returned for
graduate study in summer, 1933. Now prinoiapl at Nice-
ville, Fla. Received BS degree in August, 1932.

Registered from Deland, Fla. Borrowed $300.00. Received
LLB degree in 1926. Now practicing law in Deland. "Per-
mit me to express my appreciation for this loan."

Registered from Palmetto. Borrowed $250. Resigned in 1921.

Registered from Wabasso, Fla. Borrowed $95. Received in
June, 1932, a BSA degree. "This was a great help to me in
a tight place."

Registered from Jacksonville. Borrowed $80. Resigned from
College of Law in 1932. "I regret that I could not pay the
amount sooner, so that it could be used in helping some other
boy through school, but I hope that it will be used in keep-
ing a few of the students in school."

Registered from Largo. Borrowed $125. Received BSE degree
in 1926.


Registered from West Palm Beach. Borrowed $50.75.
BSBA degree in 1928. Located in West Palm Beach.


Received


Registered from Ft. Meade. Borrowed $50. Graduated with
BSCE degree in 1925.

Registered from Gainesville. Borrowed $100. Received BS
in Architecture in June, 1932.

Registered from Miami. Borrowed $150. Received BSAg degree
in June, 1931. Registered for graduate study the following
summer. "I fully realize the fact that if it had not been
for the kindness of the loan I would not have been able to
finish my college education."












Lloyd, John U.


Logan, J. H.




Louoks, I. H.



Malpas, H. S.

Marshall, C. A.



Marshall, L. S.





Marshall, W. D.

Mathis, C. G.


Matthews, J. C.


Miller, A. H.


Miller, R. W.


Mitchell, D. G.


Iize, Arthur G.




Mizell, 0. L.


Registered from Pompano, Florida. Borrowed $105.00.
Registered in Law School at present time.

Registered from Sarasota. Borrowed $225. Graduated from
the University in 1925. Now County Agricultural Agent
located at Bradenton. "I thank you very kindly for this
assistance."

Registered from Gainesville. Borrowed $100. Received
BSEE degree, June, 1931. Located with the Federal Radio
Commission in Grand Island, Nebraska.

Registered from Stark. Borrowed $90. Resigned in 1924.

Registered from St. Augustine. Borrowed $300. Resigned in
1920. Obligations paid by his endorsers, Messrs. Middleton
Parker, Weinberger, and H. W. Davis, of St. Sugustine.

Registered from Tallahassee. Borrowed $100. Graduated in
1926. Located in Tallahassee.. "I wish to express my sin-
coere thanks for the use of this money when I needed it
most. This loan has helped me very much. In fact without
it I would have been in serious difficulty."

Registered from Tampa. Borrowed $75. Resigned in 1923.

Registered from Hastings, Fla. Borrowed $61.50. Received
LLB degree in 1930.

Registered from Gainesville, Borrowed $150. Left school
in 1925.


Registered from Dukes, Fla. Borrowed $100.
1925. "The loan was the only means by which
stay in school."

Registered for Orlando, Fla. Borrowed $100.
degree in Business Administration in 1930.


Resigned in
I managed to


Received


Registered from Eustis, Fla. Borrowed $100. Resigned from
the University in 1926.

Registered from West Palm Beach. Borrowed $25. Resigned in
1931. "This does not termintate my indebtedness personally,
as I shall always feel grateful to the Corporation for aid
recieved duking my first year in Florida."

Registered from Lake Butler. Borrowed $300. Resigned in
1925. "The loan enabled me to stay in school at a time when
it would have been impossible without it. I wish to thank
the ones who made it possible for me to secure le loan."












Moore, Ellis




Moore, M. L.




Moss, D. R.


Mounts, Marvin U.





MoCall, Hugh





MoCcesney, Wm.


McClellan, Ammon


McClellan, Broward





MoClellan, J. A.



MoDonald, H. H.


MqMullen, J. Tweed



Newton, Virgil M.


Registered from Umatilla, Fla. Borrowed $125. Re-
ceived BSE degree in 1923 and MSE in 1928. "Again '
with to thank the Corporation for their help at a time
when I needed it."

Registered from Laurel Hill, Fla. Borrowed $73.10. Re-
ceived BS degree in August, 1930, and MS in August, 1931.
Entered Northwestern University in 1931. "I wish to ex-
press my appreciation to you for this loan."

Registered from Jacksonville, Borrowed $125.00. Re-
signed in 1923.

Registered from West Palm Beach. Borrowed $125.00 Re-
signed in 1924. Located as assistant count agricultural
agent, Palm Beach County. "I deeply appreciate the bene-
fits derived from the use of this money, and hope that
other fellows will get the good from it that I did."

Registered from Brooksville. Borrowed $175. Received
BS degree in Business Administration in 1928. Located in
Tampa. "May I express my sincere thanks, first for the
loan and for your kindness during these many lean years
while I have struggled to repay it."

Registered from Pensacola. Borrowed $100. Resigned in
1925.

Registered from Frink, Fla. Borrowed $150. Resigned
February, 1928. Located in Washington, D. C.

Registered from Frink, Fla. Borrowed $68. Received de-
gree of BS in Health and Phys. Ed. in June, 1932. "I
deem it is unnecessary for me to state at length my sin-
cere appreciation for the favor extended to me in secur-
ing this loan for me."

Registered from Monticello, Fla. Borrowed $100. Re-
ceived degree of BS in Agriculture in June, 19335 "This
surely did help me out."

Registered from Gainesville. Borrowed $50. Received
LLB degree in 1925.

Registered from Clearwater, Fla. Borrowed $56.60.
Enrolled in University for year 1933-34, in College of
Law.

Registered from Tampa. Borrowed $50. Graduated in 1925.
"I wish to express my appreciation for this loan."












Norton, Clyde



Nunez, Geo. T.


Registered from Winter Haven. Borrowed $150. Received
BSA degree in 1925. Located in Ooala as agricultural
agent for Marion County. "This loan was a great help."

Registered from Panama City, Fla. Borrowed $100. Re-
ceived BSBA degree in June, 1931. Registered for grad-
uate study in 1931-32. Employed by the State Auditing
Department of Florida.


O'Connell, P. C.


Registered from West Palm Beach.
oeived LLB degree in June, 1931.
judge in West Palm Beach, Florida


Borrowed $100. Re-
Elected municipal
in 1932.


Potter, Eugene N.


Proctor, Fletoher



Proctor, R. E.


Rambo, David A.


Rawls, Vernon





Reynolds, Rot. B.

Richards, Bennett


Rippey, Andrew D.


Robertson, G. C.2



Russell, C. L.


Registered from Ooala. Borrowed $125. Resigned in
1928.

Registered from Orlando. Borrowed $100. Resigned in
1927. "I want to thank you again for the kindness ex-
tanded to me."

Registered from Tallahassee. Borrowed $200. Resigned
in 1926.


Registered from Orlando. Borrowed $100.
BSCE degree from the University in 1931.


Received


Registered from Lakeland. Was graduated with LLB degree
in 1930. Borrowed $25.00. "I appreciate all of the fa-
vors the Corporation has shown me. Possibly I will be
in a position to reciprocate should the necessity ever
arise."

Registered from Ocala. Borrowed $100. Resigned in 1923.

Registered from Orlando. Borrowed $21.50. Resigned in
1928.

Registered from Bradenton. Borrowed $75.10. Received
a BS degree in June, 1932.

Registered from Jacksonville. Borrowed $150. Received
BSME degree in 1928. "I wish to thank you for your kind-
ness and patience."

Registered from Miami. Borrowed $125. Received degree of
BSBA in 1932. "It affords me considerable satisfaction to
repay this loan. Because of the oiroumstknoes under which
it was obtained, its value to me is hardly expressed in the
figures representing its actual amount. I trust that those
who made the loan possible will fully appreciate the depth
of my gratitude for their most timely assistance."












Shipp, H. W.


Registered from Tallahassee. Borrowed $300.
1924. "I am grateful to you for this loan."


Resigned in


Siedenburg, Paul E.





Slavin, Sam


Stephens, Carl W.





Sweeting, Banjamin







Swindell, Jas. B.


Thomas, D. D.


Vann, C. E.




Walker, W.P.


Walsh, Tracy


Wesson, L. A.


Wheeler, Jos. A.


Registered from Oneoo, Fla. Borrowed $87.50. Resigned
in 1926. "I can frankly state that if I had been unable
to secure the loan I should have been obliged to resign
from the University. Its aid was almost invaluable and
I am deeply grateful for your securing this loan for me."

Registered from Miami Beach. Borrowed $40.00. Received
degree of ABE in 1951.

Registered from Ona, Fla. Borrowed $150. Received BS
degree in Agriculture in 1929. "This loan has meant much
to me and I appreciate very much your kindness and interest
in me. Let me say THANKS again to you and to the Corpor-
ation."

Registered from West Palm Beaoh. Borrowed $321. Resigned
in 1929. Employed at the Everglades Experiment Station,
Belle Glade. "I wish to express my thanks to the Florida
Educational Loan Corporation and to you for the loan which
was made me and the interest you have shown in my educa-
tional struggles. Perhaps, at some future time I will
have shown myself worthy of having received this loan."

Registered from Pensacola. Borrowed $35. Resigned in
1928. "I wish to thank you for your courtesy and patience."

Registered from Melbourne. Borrowed $150. Resigned in
1924.

Registered from Miami. Borrowed $25. Resigned in 1928.
"I wish to say that I greatly appreciate the help given
me by the RELC and hope some day to ba able to show my ap-
preciation in some other way than just expressing it."

Registered from Alva, Fla. Borrowed $57. Registered in
College of Engineering school year, 1934-355

Registered from Pensacola. Borrowed $140. Received BSEE
degree in 1930.

Registered from Ooala. Borrowed $250. Received BSCE de-
gree in 1924.

Registered from Miooo, Fla. Borrowed $50. Received LI
degree in 1929 and ABE degree in 1930.












Wilder, W. L.





Williams, A. D..




Williams, E. L.





Yarnall, W. D.


Yates, Chester


Registered from Plant City, Fla. Borrowed $200. Re-
ceived BSBA degree in 1929. "Thank you again for your
kindness to me and I extend to you the heartiest con-
gratulations for the good work you have done and are
doing."

Registered from Mioanopy, Fla. Borrowed $200. Received
ABE degree in 1928. Returned for graduate study in 1929-
30-31. "I have not forgotten your kindness to me I
Never shall."

Registered from Williston, Fla. Borrowed $75. Reoieved
LI degree in June, 1929. In residence for summer sessions
1929 and 1932. "I want to express my appreciation to the RELC
for their kindness in aiding me in school. I think they
do a wonderful work."

Registered from Tampa, Fla. Borrowed $150. Received an
LLB degree in 1933.


Registered from Plant City.
ABE degree in 1932.


Borrowed $100.


Received an






40






STOCKHOLDERS
April 1, 1935



APOPKA

Apopka Rotary Club $100.00

ATLANTA, GA.

Edwards & Sayward 100.00
Roper, Claude 100.00

BARTOW

Bartow Rotary Club 100.00

BRADENTON

White, G. E. 100,00

CHARLOTTE, N. C.

Godwin, J. L. 100.00

DAVENPORT

Crisp, Frank W. 100.00

DAYTONA BEACH

Archibald, Stanley 100.00
Daytona Beach Rotary Club 200.00
Deohman, A. T. Co., Inc. 100.00
Green, A. A. 100.00
Green, R. C. 100.00
Hdmes, R. S. 100.00
Niver, F. J. 100.00
Wood, Franklin N. 100.00

EUSTIS

Childs, C. A. 100.00
Ferran, H. A. 100.00
Ferran, H. R. 100.00
Hannah, H. C. 100.00
Igou, Wm. 100.00
Isted, Chas. 100.00
Moore, Rev. S. H. 100.00
Taylor, L. J. 100.00












FERNANDINA

Fernandina Rotary Club $200.00

FROSTPROOF

Corbett, W. P. 100.00

FT. MYERS

Chapin, 0. E. 100.00
Dean, Richard 100.00
Ft. Myers Rotary Club 100.00
MoClure, C. C. 100.00

FT. LAUDERDALE

Hortt, M. A. 100.00

Gainesville

Allen, Frank G. 100.00
Batey, Hal C. 100.00
Burnett, J. F. 100.00
Colson, B. R. 100.00
DePase, M. H. 100.00
Fowler, J. R. 100.00
Gainesville Rotary Club 100.00
Glass, A. M. 100.00
Greene, T. L. 100.00
Hamptin, E. B. 100.P0
Hampton, F. J. 100.00
MoCollum, J. W. 100.00
Miller, Philip 100.00
Newell, Wilmon 100.00
Parrish, Moorman 100.00
Pepper, W. M. 100.00
Phifer, W. B. 100.00
Pound, C. A. 100.00
Soott, J. M. 100.00
Shaw, D. A. 100.00
Stook, 0. F. 100.00
7ison, G. B. 100.00
Weloh, G. W. 100.00
Wilson Co. 100.00
Woo~bridge, C. G. 100.00













JACKSONVILLE

Avery, H. C. $100.00
Baker, J. D. 100.00
Baldwin, G. H. 100.00
Buokner, T. G. 100.00
Call, Judge R. M. 100.00
Cheek, L. T. 100.00
Covington, R. V. 100.00
Cummer, A. G. 100.00
Cummer, W. G. 100.00
Cunningham, Dr. L. W. 100.00
Doig, D. H. 100.00
Dunk, T. W. 100.00
Fant, Frank D. 100.00
Fish, C. D. 100.00
Fla. Metal ProduotsCo. 100.00
Fogarty, F. A. 100.00
Gay, J. H. 100.00
Giddings, G. G. 100.00
Green, L. H. 100.00
Gress, M. V. 100.00
Groover, F. C. 100.00
Hall, J. A. 100.00
Hardaore, Ben 100.00
Howard, M. L. 100.00
Hoyt, E. R. 100.00
Hoyt, H. B. 100.00
Jacksonville Rotary Club 500L00
Kay, W. E. 100.00
Loftin, S. M. 100.00
Miller, F. O. 100.00
Moulton, H. S. 100.00
Ogden, M. G. 100.00
Potter, A. B. 100.00
Shepard, H. E. 100.00
So. Bell Tel. Co. 100.00
Thames, G. W., Jr. 100.00
Walsh, J. H. 100.00
Weaver, R. G. 100.00
Whitehead, W. L. 100.00
Williams, H. E. 100.00
Wilson & Toamer Fert. Co. 100.00
Zachry, W. W. 100.00

KISSIMMEE


Johnson & Gerrett


100.00












KEY WEST

Warren, Dr. W. R. $100.00

LAKE CITY

Harkness, R. B. 100.00
Lake City Rotary Club 100.00
Young, F. H. 100.00

LAKELAND

Gillian, J. J. 100.00

LIVE OAK

Hinely, S. A. 100.00

MIAMI

Chase, F. A. 100.00
German, M. H. 100.00
Nay, D. 0. 100.00
Pentland, R., Jr. 100.00
Philpitt, S. E. 100.00
Railey, Pat 100.00
Whitten, G. E. 100.00

OCALA

Camp, Clarence 100.00
Chace, J. E. 100.00
Edwards, J. L. 100.00
Gary, W. T. 100.00
Gerig, J. J. 100.00
Harris, Frank, Jr. 100.00
Leavengood, P. V. 100.00
Mackay, Geo. 100.00
Martin, E. H. 100.00
Munroe, T. T. 100.00
Palmer, W. M. 100.00
Ray, W. C. 100.00
Rhenauer, Ben. 100.00
Rose, C. G. 100.00
Taylor, J. H. 200.00
Waterman, H. A. 100.00

ORLANDO

Branch, WmT. S. 100.00
Brumby, A. W. 100.00
Burkhard, Jacob 100.00
Floyd, Bruce 100.00
Guernsey, S. K. 100.00






Uh






Kinoaid, James $100.00
Leu, H. P. 100.00
Mouser, Wn. H. 100.00
Orlando Rotary Club 300.00
Robinson, B. M. 100.00
Way, S. Y. 100.00
Yowell, N. P. 100.00

PENSACOLA

Pensacola Rotary Club 100.00

QUINCY

Quinoy Rotary Club 100.00

SANFORD

Chase, Randall 100.00
Chase, S. 0. 100.00
Sanford Rotary Club 100.00

St. Augustine

St. Augustine Rotary Club 100.00

ST. PETERSBURG

Barnez, L. J. 100.00
Beaoh, D. E. 100.00
Black, Mrs. E. B. 100.00
Carr, C. C. 100.00
Carter, Chas. R. 100.00
Dann, H. A. 100.00
Davis, W. M. 100.00
Dent, H. C. 100.00
Esau, Ralph 100.00
Gandy, Geo. 100.00
Harris, John 100.00
Harris, S. D. 100.00
Jonsberg, F. F. 100.00
Muir, Wm 100.00
Murphy, T. R. 100.00
Poynter, Paul 100.00
Strab, W. L. 100.00
Tillinghast, W. L. 100.00
Watson, W. L. 100.00













TALLAHASSEE

Moor, F. C. $100.00
Tallahassee Rotary Club 200.00
Van Brunt, Dr. W. E. 100.00
Winthrop, F. B. 100.00
Yates, L. A. 100.00

TAMPA

Addison, Ive 100.00
Allen, W. G. 100.00
Berry, Dr. & Mrs. A. E. 100.00
Brorein, W. G. 100.00
Cralle, R. B. 100.00
Davis, R. L. 100.00
Dorchester, W. E. 200.00
Gray, W. B. 100.00
Kirkland, J. G. 100.00
Leiman, Henry 100.00
Maas, Isaao 100.00
Melvin, C. T. 100.00
Morris Plan Co. 100.00
Ritter, R. J. 200.00
Root, H. H. 100.00
Stewart, A. B. 100.00
Sutton, J. B. 100.00
Swarm, J. T. 100.00
Tampa Rotary Club 200.00
Tarr, R. H. 100.00
Traynor, F. M. 100.00
Yeats, J. G. 100.00

WEST PALM BEACH

Beach, John 100.00
Brower, J. K. 100.00
Burguieres, J. M. 100.00
Carr, G. W. 100.00
Castlen, R. C. 100.00
Chillingworth, C. C. 100.00
Cochrane, J. P. 100.00
Comstock, J. W. 100.00
Conkling, D. H. 200.00
DaCamara, W. H. 100.00
Fowler, R. W. 100.00
Hall, S. C. 100.00
HAlsey, W. L. 100.00
Krumpe, W. F. 100.00
Lainhart, S. T. 100.00
Nielson, A. R. 100.00
Ohmer, C. J. 100.00













Peek, L. A. $100.00
Pettibone, C. H. 100.00
Pettibone, F. A. 100.00
Sayad, Dr. Wm. Y. 100.00
Wideman, J. E. 200.00

WINTER HAVEN

Winter Haven Rotary Club 200.00

WINTER PARK

Chase, J. C. 600.00
Williams, R. A. 100.00

ZELLWOOD


Edwards, Wm.


100.00












SUBSCRIBERS
AS OF
MARCH 31, 1935



ALTAMONTE SPRINGS


AMOUNT PAID

$ 30.00


Maltbie, B. L.


AMOUNT DUE

$ 70.00


FT. BENNING, GA.


Van Fleet, Maj. J. A.



Cox, O'Meal
Shands, W. A.


GAINESVILLE


GREEN COVE SPRINGS


Bourne, J. D., Jr.
Hall, J. 0.


JACKSONVILLE


Arnold Printing Co.
Baker, J. D.
Benjamin, R. A.
Wooten, L. B.


Minear, L. B.


Hackney, Wmn. H.


JUPITER



IARE CITY


MIAMI


Milam, M. A.
Tatum, S. M.


NEW SMYRNA


Bristley, F. D.


75.00


25.00


65.00
50.oo


35.00
50.00


75.00
25.00


25.00
75.00


50.00
75.00
50.00
7500oo


50.00
25.00
50.oo
25*00


30.00


35.00


70.00



65.oo00


75.00
$5.oo


25.00
25.00


50.00


50.00












ORLANDO

Hand, Carey $ 50.00 $ 50.00
Miller, C. D. 50.00 50.00
Tilden, W. L. 25.00 75.00

ST. PETERSBURG

Pulver, Frank 75.00 25.00

TAMPA

Alexander, T. F. 75.00 25.00
Anderson, H. P. 75.00 25.00
Baughman, G. N. 50.00 50.00
Dantzler, L. N., Jr. 75.00 25.00
Earley, J. F. 50.00 50.00
Owen, S. E. 50.00 50.00
Pinm, A. B. 75.00 25.00
Skinner, L. B. 75.00 25.00

WEST PALM BEACH

Ahrens, F. F. 20.00 80.00
Alford, Lore 20.00 80.00
Anthony, E. P. 10.00 90.00
Bensel, G. F. 30.00 70.00
Boyd, J. M. 20.00 80.00
Brombaoher, Max 20.00 80.00
Cater, J. J., Jr. 20.00 80.00
Cole, B. D. 40.00 60.00
Ellis, C. H. 65.00 35.00
Herpel, F. K., Dr. 80.00 20.00
Jessup, J. C., Jr. 90.00 10.00
Kay, Clarence 25.00 75.00
Niohols, L. S. 10.00 90.00
Payne, W. A. 50.00 50.00
Peeples, E. E. 10.00 90.00
Selby, Howard 75.00 25.00
Smith, G. W. 20.00 80.00
Vannah, H. P. 40.00 60.00